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Invoicing reminder

Please note that invoices are to be submitted after you have seen your patient and not before. This will avoid the need to process a reversal if the patient does not attend their appointment. Invoicing prior to appointment completion may result in delayed payment and challenges with reconciliation.


Lock feature coming soon!

Information privacy and security remain a top priority for ICBC. ICBC is pleased to inform you that we are responding to your request to add a “lock” feature to reports. Report templates will soon have the option to permanently lock editing on completed reports. We will notify you once this function is available.


HCPIR enhancements coming soon!

To improve your user experience, we are introducing updates to the HCPIR application. Along with the application changes, an updated HCPIR application checklist will be also be available with helpful tips and key steps. We will notify you once these changes are in effect.


How ICBC is supporting you

For more information, visit ICBC’s Health Services Business Partners site at www.icbc.com/partners/health-services. If you have any further questions, the Health Care Inquiry Unit (HCIU) is available to assist you Monday-Friday, 8:30am-4:00pm.


Lower Mainland: 604-587-7150 
Toll free: 1-888-717-7150


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This webinar has been designed for managers and leaders. It will introduce a systematic approach for managing workloads and providing mentorship to staff. 

Date: Thursday September 19, 2019
Time: 12 -1pm PST
Presenter: Lydia Phillips
Cost: $50

For more information or to register for this workshop, please contact Aaryn at aaryn.cleland@meridianrehab.ca

Workshop will run with a minimum of 5 participants.

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Photo on Foter.com
Article: Finn, C. (2019). AnOccupation-Based Approach to Management of Concussion: Guidelines for Practice. The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy, 7(2).

Purpose: To provide OTs with a theoretical framework, an occupation-based model and a guideline to support clinical practice in concussion rehabilitation.

The Framework: Aims to integrate the foundations of the CMOP-E while also incorporating the current best evidence and guidelines on the management of concussion.           

The Model:
                                                                       
Recommendations for Practice:
  • A client interview should be conducted to identify the factors that are impacting the client’s engagement.
  • Numerous assessments (ie: COPM, RPQ, APMS, ect) are recommended to evaluate the client’s perceived occupational performance, the severity of their symptoms, their QOL, and possible sleep disturbances.
  • Current best practice is a balanced and gradual return to activity.
  • Intervention should be facilitated through environmental modifications, assistive technology, activity modifications, and strategies for pacing and energy conservation.             

Bottom line for OT:
  • OTs have the skills and knowledge to provide a client-centered, occupation-based, and engagement-focused assessment and intervention.
  • The framework, model, and guideline presented provides OTs with the tools to support their clients’ gradual re-engagement in meaningful activities.


Post by Brandy Virgin, fieldwork student with CAOT-BC
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In case you did not receive the email last week from the MoCA Copyright Owner, Ziad Nasreddine, here is some information to be aware of: 

Dr. Nasreddine has announced that as of September 1, 2019, MoCA’s Training and Certification program will become mandatory for test use. Dr. Nasreddine states that the Certification will support clinicians to minimize errors, enhance standardization, and improve the clinician's confidence in administering, scoring and interpreting the test which will result in more consistency among members of the healthcare team. Certification is stated to take 1 hour, and is offered on their website. The cost for training and certification is $125, and is valid for two years.

For more information, head to the link: https://www.mocatest.org/training-certification/?access 

Post by Jenna Zedel, CAOT-BC fieldwork student. 

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UPCOMING EVENTS

UBC Capstone Conference
When: July 23, 2019
Where: AMS Student Nest @ UBC
The Capstone Conference showcases research by graduating Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) students of the University of British Columbia’s Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy.


WWDPI webinar: Improving work outcomes in patients with musculoskeletal pain
When: July 30, 2019 | 8:30am PST
Where: Webinar
This webinar will provide a discussion of the impact of musculoskeletal pain on the working-age population, while providing an overview of findings from a study comparing a brief, early intervention to support people working with pain through best current care practices.

OPPORTUNITIES

BC Government Worker's Compensation System Review
British Columbians are invited to share their views on what an improved workers’ compensation system should look like. The independent reviewer would like to hear from people from all over B.C., including injured workers and their families, employers, medical practitioners, and more.
Participate by September 30, 2019 


The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is seeking feedback from the public regarding their next Strategic Plan. Take a survey or join a discussion forum and share your priorities for health research.

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An exciting opportunity to travel to India and make a genuine, sustainable difference in the lives of people with disability in rural India. 

When: January - December 2020 
Where: Amar Seva Sangam (www.amarseva.org), located in the rural town of Ayikudy, Tamil Nadu, is an organization for people with disabilities run by people with disabilities.

Placement at Amar Seva Sangam (ASSA) facilitated by registered Canadian charity –
Handi-Care intl. (www.handicareintl.org)

Job Description:
  • ASSA regularly hosts OT, PT, SLP students from North American universities (UBC, Toronto, Ottawa, McGill, Western, Queens, Manitoba, McMaster, Sherbrooke, Dalhousie and Colarado) for clinical fieldwork placements  (www.handicareintl.org/Clinical/).  
  • Interested OT / PT / SLP applicants will be accompanied by and supervise 1-4 OT / PT / SLP students from North America.
  • Provide bedside mentorship and teaching to the 12 PTs, 3 OTs and 1 speech therapists working at ASSA with the goal of exchanging knowledge. Conduct seminars/ workshops for the PTs, OTs and speech therapists.
  • Direct client care will occur alongside mentorship and teaching.
  • Area of focus can be tailored towards applicant’s experience / interest.
For requirements, accommodation details and more information read the full recruitment flyer

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What did CAOT-BC do for you this month? 



  • Represented BC at the CAOT Conference, including delivering a chapter update and collaborating with other professional associations at an in person ACOTPA meeting.
  • Connected with over 70 occupational therapists across BC in our Regional Forums
  • Spoke to the Select Standing Committee on Finance and Government Services about considerations for the 2020 BC Budget
  • Represented occupational therapists at the HSA Professional Associations meeting and WorkSafeBC Health Professionals Conference
  • Participated in phone meetings with various stakeholders including the Ministry of Health (Allied Health Workforce Development), Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions and ICBC

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Interview with Denise Kendrick, winner of the CAOT Fieldwork Educator Award of Excellence

Why did you choose OT as a career?
After completing an undergrad in psychology and post baccalaureate diploma in gerontology, I was looking at career options. I loved the idea of pursuing gerontology but also wanted a career with job security and a professional qualification. I came across OT and just felt that it fit well with my educational background, passion for health promotion and desire for job security.

What is your favourite thing about CAOT-BC?
CAOT-BC provides excellent opportunities for professional development at a local level and through broader advocacy for the profession. Now that I’m in an OT position that is somewhat isolated, it helps to keep me connected with what is going on in the profession at a local and national level.

Where have you worked over your career? Where do you work now?
My first job was as a casual at Vancouver General Hospital, with my first assignment on acute medicine, where I had one of my favourite clinical placements. It felt familiar which was nice. From there I stayed in medicine for about 8 years before being seconded into a practice support role as a Clinical Resource Therapist. This stretched me outside of my comfort zone and gave me an opportunity to take on a new challenge in education and practice support. It also helped me gain momentum and increased my confidence in taking on new challenges, which led to coming into the Multiple Sclerosis Clinic to develop a student enhanced clinic. It has been a challenging 4 years in this position but the opportunity to work as a researcher, educator and clinician in a specialized area is really unique and special.

What has been your most interesting job?
They have all be interesting in such different ways. I’d say acute care was interesting as there was never a dull moment, a lot of outrageous stories and good laughs among colleagues over coffee. I still get nostalgic for those days. My current job is interesting in a whole other way. I get to slow down in the MS Clinic, learn a lot about an interesting and specialized area of practice and be creative in how I deliver OT services. It’s a different kind of interesting.

What do you find most challenging about working as an OT?
This is a tough one. I think there is an expectation of front line clinicians to be more than clinicians. We are often asked to take on roles as educators, researchers and leaders, which can be hard as it’s often off the side of our desks. Having said that, this expectation also presents tremendous opportunity and leads to front line clinicians doing some pretty amazing work. I’ve seen OTs build or re-vamp programs from the ground up, which can results in very clinically relevant changes.  So it’s a blessing and a curse I guess!

Tell me about someone who has influenced your OT practice?
I would have to say Patti Erlendson, who has influenced many OTs in her time with Providence Health Authority and Vancouver Coastal Health and is a CAOT-BC Outstanding OT of the Year Award recipient. The most important lesson I learned from Patti was to be courageous and stand by your professional principles, even when faced with challenge. Patti had a wonderful way of managing the political minefield of public health care while upholding the profession to the highest standards. And she never seemed tired!

What do you think will change/shape practice over the next five years?
I would like to think that the general interest in self-management in health care will lead to more opportunities for OTs to work outside of settings that focus on putting out fires. It would be great to see the creation of more positions like the one I am in, where I’m able to work with people who are still functioning at a relatively high level to assist them in maintaining their independence. I guess this really speaks to the role of OT in primary care. I think what we need to be cautious of in this area is resisting the cookie cutter approach. I’ve seen a move towards a group based self-management approach, which doesn’t work for all clients. I’d hate to see OTs lose the ability to employ creativity when working with clients one-to-one to apply concepts unique to their situations. I guess I hope to see expansion of the OT role, but not at the expense of loss in other areas.

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Practice Resources 


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CAOT-BC is seeking your input on how we can best recognize and improve recruitment/retention of our long-term volunteers, such as Advisory Committee members and Practice Network chairs/co-chairs.

Please complete this 3-minute survey by noon on Friday, June 21st

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