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Are you a recent art graduate? Have you graduated in the last 4 years? 

To celebrate our partnership with Central St. Martins at our upcoming July London fair, we’re thrilled to present London Futures! We’re offering 8 recent graduates the chance to exhibit at The Other Art Fair London Summer 2019 as part of a special feature space curated by Fair Founder Ryan Stanier.

The Other Art Fair was born from a realisation of the disparity between a London audience eager to discover the next big thing and talented artists struggling to gain recognition. Now in partnership with world renowned online art gallery Saatchi Art, The Other Art Fair has grown to be presented in 7 cities across the world. We understand that participating in the fair is a large financial commitment that not all artists can afford, which is why we want to provide this unique opportunity for recent graduates. The fair is an invaluable platform enabling independent emerging artists to personally showcase their work to an entirely new network of collectors, gallerists, critics and first-time buyers.

“Exhibiting at The Other Art Fair changed my life! It was the first time I’d exhibited my work and within 2 years I was making a living from my art and exhibiting with galleries around the world!”
Benjamin Thomas Taylor, The Other Art Fair London 2016, 2017, 2018

What will you get?
  • 5m stand (1m x 3m x 1m) at the fair in The Crossing, King’s Cross for the discounted price of £825 + VAT (40% off standard price of £1375 + VAT)
  • Exclusive welcome talk with Ryan Stanier and advice during set up
  • One-on-One session with a Saatchi Art curator onsite at the fair
Apply now

Send your CV, artist statement, 4 images of your work, the idea for your stand, your university degree and graduation year to jessica@theotherartfair.com by Sunday 2 June 2019

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We are happy to introduce our esteemed Selection Committee for the upcoming London edition of The Other Art Fair (4-7 July 2019).

These members of a globally significant art community set the high standard of the fair, ensuring you can buy from our artists with the confidence that you are investing in the very best of emerging talent.

Alex Schady

Alex Schady is Programme Director at Central St Martins. He has a broad interdisciplinary practice that includes drawing, video, sculpture and performance.  He is also co-founder of Five Years Gallery an artist-run space that establishes a direct relationship between programming, curation and practice.Recent projects include an exhibition at Camden Arts Centre (Rulers 2011), a series of performances within the Oil Tanks at Tate Modern (Misguided 2012) and a solo show at Five Years Gallery (Besame Mucho 2013).

(Credit: Dave Benett) Juliette Loughran

Founded by Juliette Loughran in 2013, Loughran Gallery was launched through an ambitious series of pop-up shows that harnessed the eclectic energy of London at various cultural landmarks in the city; from a converted shipping container in Shoreditch to an award-winning complex on the South Bank. This fresh approach to exhibiting contemporary art caught the attention of collectors and press alike.

A collector herself, Juliette is known for her discriminate eye for high quality art with a cutting edge, and central to her vision is to show work of innovation which is beautifully executed and that will have a voice in the art world in years to come.  With a now defined and established rostrum of artists including Charlie Barton, Chris Levine, Dave White, Jessica Zoob, Maddie Rose Hills and Piers Bourke.

Gary Cochran

Gary Cochran is the Art Director for The Economist Magazine. He studied at Central St Martins and over the past 30 years he has been art directing award winning magazines including Telegraph Magazine, Nova, it Magazine, and The Independent Magazine.

The Other Art Fair will make its London summertime debut in King’s Cross from 4-7 July 2019
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Chicago Fair Director Sophie Lucas sits down with The Creative Muscle to discuss the ins and outs of the wild world of art.

The Other Art Fair was born from a realization of the gap between an audience eager to discover meaningful pieces for their walls and talented artists hoping to share their work.  Fair Director Sophie Lucas discusses the art world and how The Other Art Fair stands out with the team at The Creative Muscle.

As a bonus, you’ll get to hear from three emerging talents featured at the fair; architect and painter Nathan Casteel, printmaker Emily Shopp, and craftiest Shannon Downey (Badass Cross Stitch).

Take a listen and be sure to stop by The Creative Muscle booth at The Other Art Fair at Mana Contemporary, May 16-19

The Creative muscle

Creativity is a muscle. The more you use it, the more it grows. The Creative Muscle podcast is here to debunk the myth that creativity is just for artists. It’s not, it’s for everyone. Each week through various interviews and discussions, hosts Nathan Michael, Jon Guerra, Valerie Guerra and Jonny Mendez help guide listeners from being merely creative to generous, world-changing creators. Brought to you by LOW RES, the podcast’s extensive library of content includes interviews with marketer Seth Godin, Grammy Award-winning musician Amy Grant, Apartment Therapy founder Maxwell Ryan, Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, and Tony-winner Heather Headley, to name a few.

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In celebration of Museum Week, we asked our team of expert curators at Saatchi Art to name their favorite artworks at five of the world’s most renowned museums including the Louvre in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the British Museum in London and more. Read on to learn more about our curators’ picks!

The Louvre “The Nike of Samothrace (Winged Victory),” via Wikipedia

Described as one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world, this marble Hellenistic sculpture of Nike (the Greek goddess of victory) is one of a small number of original Hellenistic statues surviving (rather than a Roman copy). Believed to be created around the 2nd century BC, the sculpture has been proudly displayed at the Louvre since 1884. Sitting atop the The Daru staircase, The Nike of Samothrace is Associate Curator Victoria Kennedy’s favorite artwork at the Louvre. For more works inspired by the classics found in the Parisian museum visit our Museum Week: The Louvre collection.

MOMA “Dance (1),” by Henri Matisse via WikiArt

In 1909 Matisse received an important commission from the Russian industrialist Sergei Shchukin. Shchukin asked Matisse for three large scale canvases to decorate the spiral staircase of his mansion, the Trubetskoy Palace, in Moscow. Matisse reused the dancers motif from the back of his earlier painting Bonheur de Vivre, but removed one dancer. Assistant Curator Monty Preston never misses a chance to see it when visiting the MOMA. To see more modern and abstract art, check out our Museum of Modern Art collection.

The Getty “Girl in Fulton Street, New York,” by Walker Evans via The Getty

In this photograph by Walker Evans we see an unidentified young woman standing as still as stone and absorbed in thought as she looks out on the city’s bustling street. Focused on some point in the distance, the subject seems unaware of the crowded street before her and of the photographer’s presence. This photograph is my favorite piece in the photography collection at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Browse our Museum Week: The Getty collection for more photography works inspired by the likes of Walker Evans’.

The MET “Madame X,” by John Singer Sargent via Wikipedia

This portrait of a young socialite, Virginie Amélie Avegno Gautreau by John Singer Sargent was not a commission but completed at the request of the artist. The initial reception of the painting at the Paris Salon in 1884 caused a scandal and a temporary set-back to Sargent’s career while in France. People were shocked and scandalized by the amount of skin displayed by the subject, and forced the artist to withdraw the painting from the exhibition. Victoria Kennedy picked this work as her must-see artwork from the Met and created the Museum Week: The Met collection.

 The British Museum “The Gayer-Anderson Cat,” via The British Museum

Acquired by the British Museum in 1939 and created over 2,300 years ago, this life-size sculpture of a cat remains a highlight of the museum’s Egyptian collection. Dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Bastet (who was often represented as a cat) the statue is made from copper and adorned with gold ear and nose rings. Assistant Curator Megan Wright has chosen it as her favorite artwork at the British Museum. You can find similar works inspired by antiquity in our collection, Museum Week: The British Museum.

Love reading about all things art? You can have articles from Canvas, curated collections, and stories about emerging artists delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for the Saatchi Art Newsletter.

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In recent years Dallas, Texas has grown to be a large piece of the art market puzzle. With a growing collector base, strengthening museums, and events such as TWO X TWO and The Dallas Art Fair, the Dallas art world has garnered global attention.

What are experts saying about the direction of the Dallas art market? We’ve curated the following to highlight the unique qualities and significance of this burgeoning arts hub.

Artsy: The Collecting Couple Promoting Emerging, Diverse Art in Dallas

“[The Coles] are of a new generation of Texas art patrons and buy work by living artists who don’t necessarily have overwhelming market heat in New York and London. The artists they collect are often young women whose work might never end up on the walls of the more staid older guard of the city’s collecting class.”

“Moving to a city with a well-established collecting culture allowed [Kristin and Joe Cole] to present their formidable collection of work by young artists, which serves as a funkier, hipper counterpoint to the city’s brawnier collections with public-facing exhibition apparatuses such as Deedie Rose’s Pump House, the Rachofskys’ Warehouse, and the Karpidas Collection.”

artnet News: In Dallas, the Elusive Middle Market Collector is Alive and Well. But Are Dealers Willing to Woo Them? Visitors to the second floor of the 2019 Dallas Art Fair were greeted by J.B. Blunk’s Wishbone, 1977, presented by Los Angeles’s the Landing. Photography by Silvia Ros. Courtesy of the Dallas Art Fair.

“[The] latest iteration [of the Dallas Art Fair] reinforced the reasons that more and more dealers at all levels of the commercial hierarchy find themselves rocketing toward the Lone Star State each spring—or perhaps should.”

“[The] combination of youth, expendable cash, and cultural interest makes Dallas an oasis for precisely the type of fresh-faced middle-market collectors evaporating from traditional art capitals (and polarizing the trade in the process).”

ArtTactic: Artsy’s Nate Freeman talks Dallas Art Fair and the Dallas art scene

In this edition of the ArtTactic Podcast, Nate Freeman, art market report for Artsy, discusses the several facets of the Dallas art community. He and Adam Green, Dallas native, discuss the Dallas Art Fair’s position in the saturated art fair landscape, how this year’s edition of the fair performed, why the Dallas collecting community is so respected by the art world and how the Dallas art scene has changed over the past decade.

Looking for an opportunity to join the art movement in Dallas? Saatchi Art will launch the leading independent artist showcase, The Other Art Fair, in the heart of Dallas this September 19-22, 2019.

The Other Art Fair will give visitors the opportunity to meet a curated selection of over 120 independent artists and browse thousands of pieces to suit every budget under one roof. 

For a chance to exhibit at The Other Art Fair Dallas, complete a free application at dallas.theotherartfair.com/applications. Deadline to apply is June 14.

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To celebrate Mental Health Month, we have curated a number of collections highlighting the power of art in transforming ourselves and our lives through mindfulness, focus, and meditation. Mindfulness is the art of focusing on the present moment and being conscious of your thoughts and feelings. Art appreciation is ideal in practicing mindfulness, properly engaging with the present moment, and unplugging from your everyday routine to focus wholly on the object in front of you.

“Phantom Limb 1” by Aleksandar Bezinovic via Saatchi Art

Whether you’re strolling through your local art museum, gallery, or simply rediscovering an artwork at home, begin by settling your body and mind, letting go of all tensions, worries, and distractions. Next, hone in on your breathing, allowing your eyes to open softly and rest on the painting before you. Start your exploration of an artwork by noting some of the major features. In “Phantom Limb 1” by Aleksandar Bezinovic, the twisting form and negative and positive areas dominate the canvas. Drawing closer to the painting, more details emerge such as the thin strip of green within the central form and the textured background.

“Conquer,” by Marek Emczek Olszewski via Saatchi Art

Much like with a painting, you take in all characteristics that make up a particular photograph, from the sections of light and dark to the areas of movement and stillness — each polarity bringing the artwork to life. After viewing all details that make up “Conquer” by Marek Emczek Olszewski and fitting them together as a whole, you can almost hear the wind and roar of the ocean.

“Versatile Movement,” by Marijus Balcius via Saatchi Art

While the image of an artwork will eventually fade from view, your experience with the work will stay with you. Using mindfulness to fully embrace a work of art can lead to an awakening of the image before you, within yourself, and inevitably everything around you.

 “The health of the eye seems to demand a horizon. We are never tired, so long as we can see far enough.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Love reading about all things art? You can have articles from Canvas, curated collections, and stories about emerging artists delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for the Saatchi Art Newsletter.

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Ever wondered what other people are buying for their personal art collections? Though your tastes may differ, seeing what others are purchasing can help you discover new artists whose works you might not otherwise have considered. Below, meet 5 artists who have proven to be popular favorites with our collectors.

For more ideas, browse our recently sold works and contact our curators who can help you find similar works in your budget.

Dane Shue

With a heavy pop art aesthetic, Texan visual artist Dane Shue paints portraits of iconic figures ranging from Audrey Hepburn to Queen Elizabeth II. Vibrant and eye-catching, Dane’s paintings give new energy to familiar faces. Dane’s works can be found in private collections around the world. See more of Dane’s works here.

Ruth Lantz

Ruth Lantz‘s abstract artworks integrate the language of painting and digital media, commenting on the influence technology has on the way we understand our visual environment. Her work has exhibited nationally at institutions including The University of Illinois at Chicago, and Washington State University. After receiving her MFA in Visual Studies from Pacific Northwest College of Art, Edith became a recipient for the Regional Arts and Culture Council and Community Arts Assistance Program Grant. See more of Ruth’s works here.

Félix Hemme

French artist Félix Hemme depicts patterned forms and minimal color schemes in his abstract paintings. Félix received his diploma in Product Design at the European Institute of Design in Toulon. He has exhibited his works in numerous galleries throughout France including Salon des Réalités Nouvelles and Centre d’art La Passerelle. See more of Félix’s works here.

Gleb Kriukov

Russian artist Gleb Kriukov studied Technology of Artistic Materials Processing at State Marine Technical University of Saint Petersburg. With a focus on body language and emotion, Gleb examines human and animal forms through an ethereal lens that often places his characters in unconventional postures. Gleb has most recently exhibited in an individual showcase at Konstantin Palace in Saint Petersburg. He received 2nd and 3rd place prizes at Art Expo in Saint Petersburg, and a 3rd place prize at Art Week in Rome. See more of Gleb’s works here.

Laina Hadengue


French artist Laina Hadengue paints the strange and absurd in a hyperrealistic style. The surrealistic subject matter of her works allows her to creatively explore themes of humanity and our relationship with time. Laina’s works have been featured in prominent collections such as the Museum of Borneim and the Biennale de Venezia 2017, Palazzo Mora. She received the 2006 Prize of Contemporary Art Space for Dialogos. See more of Laina’s works here.

Love reading about all things art? You can have articles from Canvas, curated collections, and stories about emerging artists delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for the Saatchi Art Newsletter.

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The Other Art Fair team is excited to announce a unique seminar at the second edition of The Other Art Fair Chicago (May 16-19, Mana Contemporary). Susan Blackman—Art Advisory, Ltd. will be leading tours on Friday, May 17 for artists on the subject of “The Art of Selling at an Art Fair.” Areas to be covered include booth design, sales techniques, and building client marketing lists.

Susan Blackman is an expert in the business of art:

  • Advanced degrees in business management
  • Over 30 years of experience in the art world
  • Managed 5 art galleries and owned her own gallery before establishing Art Advisory, Ltd. over 15 years ago.
  • Certified as a Women Business Enterprise (WBE)
  • Strong presence in the local arts community through board service and other activities

Reserve your spot for one of the tours here!

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From May 2nd to the 5th, Frieze will showcase its 2019 New York program highlighting distinguished galleries from around the world, emerging artists and influential figures from the 20th century.

Below we highlight two artists from the upcoming Frieze New York 2019 Fair, and recommend similar Saatchi Art artists that we be featured at The Other Art Fair, Brooklyn this May. For more artists showing at The Other Art Fair, Brooklyn, browse our Anti-Frieze: New York Edition collection.

Discover your next favorite artist at The Other Art Fair, Brooklyn on May 2nd to May 5th at the Brooklyn Expo Center. Tickets are available to purchase hereBrowse the full exhibitor list here on the Saatchi Art website.

Lisa Alvarado
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Based in Chicago, musician and artist Lisa Alvarado will be presenting her new installation work entitled “Moving Space and Frozen Time” at Frieze New York in Booth C02 with LC Queisser, Tbilisi. The refreshing combination of paint and textiles adds an antique aesthetic to a modern design. If you enjoyed this innovative combination of textile and paint featured in Lisa’s work, check out “Empathy” by Frances Sousa.

Frances Sousa

“Empathy” by Frances Sousa via Saatchi Art

Frances Sousa is a Canadian artist who uses her experimentation with paint, photography, collage and textiles to explore the relationship between medium and form. Elegant yet chaotic, Frances’ works have been showcased in cities around the world including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Brooklyn and Toronto. A few notable clients of Frances are Crybaby Zine, The Debrief, Getty and Minted.

Marta Chilindron
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Currently residing in New York, Argentinian artist Marta Chilindron created two manipulable sculptures titled “Star” and “Tall” for the upcoming Frieze show and will be showing them in Booth DLG09. Vibrant and eye-catching – Marta’s sculptures are composed of fluorescent colors that play wonderfully with its highly geometric form. Check out Maggie Tookmanian’s sculpture “Gus” if Marta’s sculptural work caught your eye.

Maggie Tookmanian

“Gus” by Maggie Tookmanian via Saatchi Art

American artist Maggie Tookmanian received her BFA in Fashion from the Parsons School of Art and Design. Combining her fashion background with her infatuation with piñatas, Maggie creates timeless piñata sculptures often adorned with Louis Vuitton, Fendi, and Gucci elements. She has exhibited her works in The Other Art Fair Brooklyn 2018, Irwin Garden, Rosie Assoulin, and Saks 5th Avenue Window.

Love reading about all things art? You can have articles from Canvas, curated collections, and stories about emerging artists delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for the Saatchi Art Newsletter.

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The Polish artist Artur Wiernicki captures the eerie and the strange within seemingly mundane subject matters and landscapes. Influenced by his deep appreciation for cinematography, his neo-noir inspired paintings intuitively portray the elements of the aesthetic, exploitation movies, “low culture” and the dark side of human nature.

Artur received his degree from Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Fine Arts in Poland. He has featured in a number of joint and solo exhibitions, including his solo exhibition “Neuromans” at Socato Gallery and his joint exhibition with Michal Sikorski, “2016 Lincz” at md_s Gallery. 

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?

I have always been into movies and the variety of worlds it creates. Ever since I started my artistic career I have referred to cinematographic works of arts. It wasn’t that I wanted to paint over some of my favorite shots or movie characters. What I’m trying to achieve in my works is to grasp the unique atmosphere of the scene, mysterious aura that leads the viewer for a further investigation. Major themes of my neo-noir paintings (what I like to call them) are hotel rooms and corridors, areas on the side of the road, woods, unreal places, nocturnal landscapes and strange characters, which create in the imagination of the viewer a coherent story, or, on the contrary, leave them confused. These are seemingly ordinary places but they might be hiding a secret under the surface, a secret that we want to know. To create this kind of feeling is the goal I’m pursuing in my work.

How did you first get interested in your medium, and what draws you to it specifically?

I believe it’s the same story for any painter. I have always had this urge to draw and paint and the decision to keep on working with this medium was just natural. The thing I love the most about this particular medium is that right now, in the digital era where everyone can create stunning images rapidly with a smart phone and an app, a painting remains a painting. With it’s full majesty and once again mysterious, almost metaphysical aura a painting remains unique object, a work of art. And though I work with variety of medium (including digital media) I always keep coming back to easel painting.

How has your style and practice changed over the years?

I don’t think my practice changed a lot. But my style did for sure. I started with very subtle abstract paintings driven with my liking to expressionism in cinema, romantic poetry and James Whistler paintings, what led to a semi-realistic figurative compositions and landscapes inspired by neo-noir aesthetics, exploitation movies, low culture and the dark side of human nature.

Can you walk us through your process? Do you begin with a sketch, or do you just jump in? How long do you spend on one work? How do you know when it is finished?

It all depends. I’m not working with any scenario but I sketch a lot, so if the sketch is intriguing enough I’ll probably paint it. Mostly I prefer free-hand painting. Of course I use photo references or work with a model sometimes but I’m not afraid letting my imagination do it’s work. I like to paint the canvas grey at the beginning and observe it, it helps the composition define itself. I’m not sure how long it takes me to finish a painting. I’m loosing track of time while working. Also it happens that I’m coming back to a certain painting and change it a little. Some say that a painting is never finished, but I know when it is. It’s the moment I’m afraid to give it another touch. Then I wait until it’s completely dry and varnish it.

If you could only have piece of art in your life, what would it be?

It would definitely be Edward Hopper’s painting “Summer evening”. Just imagine it hanging on your wall, waiting for you to step closer and immerse into the night.

If you couldn’t be an artist, what would you do?

I guess I would be working night shift as a taxi driver just to wander around the city when it sleeps and observe those who don’t. Or maybe a mortician. A gloomy profession for sure.

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