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Canadian Musician Editorial Assistant Shanine Cook (pictured above with The Maine) was out for the last-ever Toronto stop on the infamous Vans Warped Tour. The iconic tour, lovingly dubbed “punk rock summer camp,” announced that the 2018 edition would be its last full cross-country run. Here are Shanine’s thoughts from the day, including some summer festival prep tips.

July 17th marked Toronto’s last-ever Warped Tour and I was extremely lucky to get the chance to attend. With the majority of the bands being ones I listened to and loved when I was in middle school and high school, and my ALL-TIME favourite band attending, it was a no-brainer; I just HAD to be there.

Warped Tour has been a dream experience for many concertgoers over the years, allowing fans and bands to connect on all kinds of levels. The music, the merch, the signings, the photo opportunities… It makes Warped Tour a fun and exhilarating place to connect.

With this one being my first (and unfortunately last), I had no idea how to prepare. Spending an entire day in the July heat can be tasking and it’s so important to be prepared. I unfortunately wasn’t as prepared as I should have been, but live and learn. I put together a list of things that will benefit you for your next summer festival experience:

1. SUNSCREEN!
Please, please, PLEASE, bring sunscreen. I cannot stress enough how important it is to protect your skin during a long day in the sun. I applied before I went in but forgot to reapply through the day and I ended up paying for it with burnt shoulders, face, and calves. Make sure you reapply every few hours at least.

2. Water
It’s so important to keep hydrated. If you’re of age, you’ll probably be drinking alcohol, and with the hot sun, it’s so easy to get dehydrated and sick. Hydration is literally vital. Most festivals will let you bring in a sealed water bottle and the majority have refill stations throughout the festival grounds. You don’t need to spend money on purchasing water at the venue, so don’t let that stop you from staying hydrated.

3. Hat
Protect yourself. A hat will at least protect your face and keep you semi-covered.

4. Snacks
Most festivals want you to purchase their food at the venue but will allow you to bring sealed snacks. Bring granola bars, nuts, fruit – whatever will keep you full and provide a boost of energy throughout the day. Food can be pricey on festival grounds, so bringing snacks will prevent you from burning a hole in your wallet.

5. GOOD SHOES!
Ditch the flip flops, folks – especially if you’re planning on spending any time in the pit. My friend was wearing flip flops (the cheap ones) and I can tell you, her feet were killing her and her sandal actually broke near the end of the day. Running shoes or at least closed-toe shoes are important. They’ll be comfortable and protect your feet and ankles through the day. The sites tend to be big and you’re on your feet walking around for nearly 12 hours. There are thousands of people as well, so you probably will get stepped on.

6. Money
I can guarantee you will want to buy something, and it’s better to have enough and be able to grab some cool merch that catches your eye, and you’ll probably need to purchase dinner or lunch. Though you will have to keep it secure, bringing cash beats the huge lines and fees at the onsite ATMs, and it’s better to have it and not need it than the other way around.

Despite some lessons learned the hard way, I don’t regret doing Warped and ended up having a blast. I got to meet The Maine, I got to watch Sum 41, Simple Plan, and Mayday Parade. I was able to enjoy new bands I didn’t know well but now love and listen to on a daily basis. The way everyone comes together to enjoy the music and the passion shared between the fans and artists is truly inspiring and amazing.

Even though Warped Tour is now finished, there are plenty of great festivals across Canada for fans of pretty much any style of music. If Warped Tour was your scene, another festival to check out would be Rockfest in Montebello, QC. Many of the same artists attend and it can make for a fun road trip or mini vacation. I have gone twice and it’s an experience to remember.

The point of a music festival is to bring everyone together to enjoy and express themselves through music. Take the tips, be prepared, and you’re primed for a great summer festival experience.

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The are only six days left to submit artist showcase applications for the 2019 Folk Alliance International conference and festival, which will be held in Montreal from Feb. 13-17, 2019. The showcase application deadline is Aug. 15, 2018. This will be the first time that FAI, the world’s largest roots music conference and showcase, has returned to Canada in five years.

Information on artists applications is available at www.folkconference.org/osaapp.

Founded in 1989, FAI is the largest organization and conference for the folk music industry. In 2018, 2,850 delegates (agents, managers, labels, journalists, festivals, venues, artists) from 35 countries attended. The conference program features professional development workshops, industry panels, master classes, business networking sessions, and keynote presentations.The economic impact for the conference host city has been assessed (by VisitKC) at $5 million (USD). Previous Canadian editions have included Calgary (1992), Vancouver (2001), Montréal (2005), and Toronto (1997, 2013).

FAI presents 180 jury-selected Official Showcase performances featuring established artists and tour-ready emerging talent from around the world who are diverse in sound, culture, geography, and language. Showcases are 30-minute sets on full production stages.

From Aug. 1 to the deadline on Aug. 15, 2018, the cost is $25 USD for FAI members and $50 USD for non-members. Those selected to showcase will be notified by Sept. 15, 2018.

For more information on applying, including details on eligibility and the radius clause, go to www.folkconference.org/osaapp.

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Artist applications are being accepted for Canadian Music Week’s 2019 showcase festival. The current application fee is $40, which rises to $62 on Nov. 5, 2018.

Each year Canadian Music Week attracts thousands of artists and industry from around the world to gather in Toronto for a week of live music, learning, and networking. Showcasing artists will receive a pass to the CMW conference, which offers panels, one-on-one meetings, and more.

CMW offers a chance to perform in front of top industry insiders from Canada and around the world. Talent buyers, booking agents, festival programmers, music publishers, A&R reps, managers, music supervisors, and more attend the conference and festival.

Application deadline for CMW 2019 is Jan. 7, 2019.

To apply, click here.

For more information, go to www.cmw.net.

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Or need some advice for your next career move? #AskAndrew is a new video series from Canadian Musician in which Editor-in-Chief Andrew King answers your questions on the music business, no matter how simple or complex.

A new edition of #AskAndrew will go up every Monday on our Instagram channel. From the basics like finding people to play with or how to book shows to the more advanced, like sync licensing, mechanical royalties, or record deal red flags, we’ve got you covered.

 If Andrew doesn’t have the answer, he knows where to look – or who to look to, including the industry’s best, brightest, and busiest artists and insiders.
If you’ve got a question that needs an answer, simply send us a question (or two) and Andrew will make sure you get the answers you need. Submit your questions via Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram by tagging Canadian Musician and using hashtag #AskAndrew, or via email at askandrew@nor.com.
For more information, go to www.canadianmusician.com/askandrew.
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GOATLIFE - John Orpheus (Official Lyric Video) - YouTube

The buzz is building for GOATLIFE, the new mixtape from Toronto-based trio John Orpheus that blends fresh afropop with bouncy hip-hop, soca, and dancehall. The group dropped three much-hyped mixtapes in 2017 to set the stage for the Mike Schlosser-produced GOATLIFE, and in this exclusive #CMPremiere, we’re bringing you the electric new video for the title track two days ahead of its wide release.


“‘GOATLIFE’ is the title track from our fourth mixtape,” Orpheus begins on behalf of the group. “It is a stream of consciousness poem on the power of always living our best selves – creativity, flyness, and success. It is also a dark hip-hop epic about a lifestyle inspired by our totem animal, the goat, and paints the frantic fun of the ‘GOATLIFE’ in colours, movement, and words.”

John Orpheus is a Trini troubadour and Pan-African poet whose musical journey has taken him from the Trinidad bush, to blues and folk festivals across Canada, to some of the biggest rock and roll stages in the world.

Born and raised in the town of New Grant, South-Central Trinidad, J.O. grew up singing in Pentecostal and Shango Baptist churches. After attending the famed Presentation College in the same year as legendary soca singer Machel Montano, he immigrated to Canada, where he fully immersed himself in the music life.

His current musical iteration with his creative soulmate, DJ/drummer Sarah Jane Riegler, and singer/dancer Chaenel Mattise combines hip-hop swagger, afrobeats energy, and dancehall charisma to create a sound built on big catchy hooks, African rhythms, and Caribbean twang. The group is known for rabble-rousing live shows filled with audience participation, chanting, and impromptu dance offs that feel more like Caribana road parties than concerts.

As J.O. likes to declare: “AH SO WE DO IT!”

JohnOrpheus.com
Twitter.com/John_Orpheus
Instagram.com/JohnOrpheus
YouTube.com/JohnOrpheus

Artist photo by R. Kelly Clipperton

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On Thursday, June 28, Canadian Musician will be offering another free, career-building webinar. This month, CM Editor-in-Chief Andrew King will be joined by producer/engineer Kevin Dietz, who will teach musicians how make the most of their studio and, in turn, save money, save time, and get the best recordings possible.

Regardless of whether you’re recording at home or in a major studio, knowing what to expect and being fully prepared will maximize your efficiency and the quality of your music. Dietz has recorded Randy Bachman, Tom Cochrane, Stone Sour, Alexisonfire, SonReal, Protest the Hero, The Glorious Sons, and many others. Needless to say, he knows his way around the studio and is here to share his expertise. In this free webinar, Kevin will help you make the most of any studio experience, get the best return on your investment, and come out with top-notch tracks.

You’ll learn:

-How to get comfortable, confident, and ready to record

-The process and importance of pre-production

-What you need in the studio (and what you don’t)

-How to get what you want from your engineer

…and lots more!

About the presenters

Kevin Dietz is a recording/mixing engineer and music producer based in Toronto. His main goal when working with an artist is to help bring out their musicality and their best performance. He has plenty of experience recording both analog and digital and everything in between, from full-band, live-off-the-floor recordings to programmed and production/synth-based music. www.kevindietzmusic.com.

Andrew King is the Editor-in-Chief of Canadian Musician, as well as Canadian Music Trade, Professional Sound, and Professional Lighting & Production magazines. He also co-hosts the popular Canadian Musician Radio podcast. He has been a guest speaker, panelist, and moderator at events including CMW, ECMA, BreakOut West, the Halifax Pop Explosion, and many others.

For more information, go to www.nwcwebinars.com.

To register, go to CLICK HERE.

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The Toronto chapter of the Audio Engineering Society (AES) has released the details of this month’s meeting, which will be held on Tuesday, June 26 at Long & McQuade Pro in Toronto (2 Eastern Ave.). It will John “Beetle” Bailey and Jeff Johns. The presentation will begin at 7 p.m.

About the Event
Explore High-End converters in a discussion and listening session at Long & Macqude Pro’s listening studio. John Bailey and Jeff Johns step through the evolution of digital conversion and take a glimpse into the future of networked high-resolution audio.

Take a walk through how their legacy recording setups were traditionally built and learn how workflows have evolved to today. Contrast that to how the current equipment decisions work in real-world applications. Learn of the challenges of high sample rate sessions with large ensembles, headphone monitoring, and latency concerns.

Discussions will center around observations of hardware DSP versus Native DSP. Listening sessions and Studio session explanations will be featured.

AES Toronto thanks Long & McQuade Pro, HHB Canada, Merging Technologies for sharing their passion for the craft and support of the Audio Engineering Society.

About the Presenters

John “Beetle” Bailey is the owner-operator of The Drive Shed Recording Studios. In April of 2007, John earned the “Recording Engineer Of The Year” Juno award, for “Rain” performed by Molly Johnson, and “The Sisters Of Mercy” performed by Serena Ryder. John received Juno nominations in 2008, 2009 and 2010 and again in 2015.

Since graduating from Fanshawe College in 1990, John’s been fuelled by coffee and the love of music. In 2005 he took over the former Arnyard Studios, renaming it The Drive Shed (a farm building used to store tractors and implements), in tribute to his small town rural background. In 2015, he finally moved the studio to a quiet semi-rural street in his hometown of New Hamburg.

With a diverse career spanning work in almost every genre, John’s been busy at The Drive Shed working on recent and upcoming releases from Sultans of String, Marc Jordan, Olivia-Newton John / Amy Sky / Beth Neilson-Chapman, Hilario Duran, Eliana Cuevas, Ellen Doty, Heather Rankin, Brenda Navarrete, Micah Barnes, Matt Dusk and many more!!!

John also hosts a panel event each year for MusiCounts on Juno weekend presenting the nominees for Recording Engineer of the Year and Jack Richardson Producer of the Year categories and serves as co-chair for the P&E categories for CARAS & The JUNO Awards.

Jeff Johns is committed to the design and installation of Recording, Broadcast, Post facilities in Southern Ontario.
Clients include: Jukasa Media Group, Revolution Recording, Greyson Matthews Audio Design, Rita Marley (Studio One Ghana),Merriam Music, Grip Limited, Vice-Media (through Amplohubs), CityTV (through Majortech), Evasion and Zeste TV Montreal (through Majortech), JAZZ FM, Grande Prairie Regional College, Post Producers Digital. (Al Mitchell).

For more information, go to www.torontoaes.org.

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There are only three days left to you get your submissions in for the 2018 Juno Master Class. Three winners will be put on the fast track to being “JUNO ready.” Music industry members have to give their endorsement for artists to qualify. Winners will head out to Toronto to take part in a weeklong workshop with artists and industry experts. The deadline is June 25, 2018.

More information, can be found at www.junomasterclass.ca.

Submission materials needed:

Mandatory:

  • Two original tracks in mp3 format (released between January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018)

  • Lyrics for each track

  • A link to where each song is available online: for sale, streaming, or viewed online

  • A link to a performance video – The video should highlight a compelling and current performance of one original song (NO COVER SONGS). Please do not include full concert performances or music videos.

  • A biography (200-word maximum)

  • A publicity photo (must be in .JPEG or .PNG formats ONLY)

  • An Academy Delegate Endorsement – Please provide contact information for the CARAS Academy Delegate who is endorsing you for the program

  • Your Skype Username – if you do not have a Skype account, please create one here (finalists will be contacted through Skype only)

    Optional:

  • Links to your Social Media Pages (including Twitter, Instagram, Facebook & YouTube)

  • A list of notable accomplishments (500-word maximum)

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