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Hello Spring, We finally meet again! I’ve waited months for Spring…but now I’m remembering how much it rains in March & April. We’ve had rain on 7 days out of the past 9 days. Oh dear. Rain makes me want to curl up and ignore the world. Springtime and rain are great for reading though, so I am predicting a great few months, book-wise atleast! #1. Well, I recently started my new semester. I’ll be taking American Govt, World Civilizations 1, Human Anatomy 1 & 2 and Abnormal Psychology. While these classes sound awesome and fun…there’s a bunch of reading that goes with each: 4 textbooks and about 25 nonfiction books/research papers. So unfortunately, the blog will probably be a bit lonely since I wont have as much time to be here. #2. Unfortunately, I’ve been doing quite bad on my reading challenges. I find that constricting myself to only books with a certain theme really dampens my mood for reading in general. Or I’ll find a book I like and then I start feeling guilty because it doesn’t fit any objectives on the reading challenge lists. It’s making reading less enjoyable overall. So I am highly considering just scaping them… or maybe simplifying them to a few overall yearly goals. Like reading more books from other countries or reading more diverse books. My spreadsheet does an amazing job at keeping track of everything, so maybe I should just focus on analyzing what I’ve read instead of pre-planning & restricting my books for the whole year. My Spring reading list will include all the books I plan to finish, read completely through or atleast start during the next 3 months. Books Left Over from Winter Books I’m Reading For The Classics Club Books I’m Reading for Challenges & Review Requests Books I’m Reading Because I Just Want To Newer Releases I’m Still Hoping To Pick Up
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To try to keep myself on track, I’ve decided to do monthly challenges in 2019. In 2018, I did monthly TBR’s and I found myself straying from them a lot or not wanting to read those specific books, so hopefully this will help alleviate some of that. Each month I will set forth some a few challenges as well as go over the progress for the previous month. At the end of the year, I will rate myself on how on point my reading was. You can also check last month’s post to see how much progress I made in the last 30 days. Favorite Books Read In February Stats Books Read: 2.5 Pages Read: 1316 Posts Published: 8 Reviews Posted: 3 Reading Challenge Progress: 11% New Twitter Followers: -7 (3121 total) New Instagram Followers: +202 (879 total) Favorite Posts from February Madame Bovary Discussion Historical Science Reading List Reviews from February The Concealed by Sarah Kleck Shadow in the Sea by Sheila A. Nielson The Fading Dusk by Melissa Giorgio March’s Blogging Goals Add 5 New Blogs to Blogroll Participate in 3 meme posts each week Post 6 Reviews Post 1 Discussion Post Post 1 Original Post March’s Reading Goals Read 1250 Pages Read 1 Arc/Newer Release Read 1 Mystery Read 1 Classic Read 1 Non-Fiction Books I Want to Finish or Start in March
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Hey everyone, welcome this week’s post about books I cant wait to read. While there are literally 100 books on my tbr and interesting new releases every week, I decided to focus on only 3 for today. These are mostly books the were recommended to me at work from some of my patrons and coworkers. A Constellation of Roses by Miranda Asebedo YA Contemporary | 332 Pages | Pub. 2019 Ever since her mother walked out, Trix McCabe has been determined to make it on her own. And with her near-magical gift for pulling valuables off unsuspecting strangers, Trix is confident she has what it takes to survive. Until she’s caught and given a choice: jail time, or go live with her long-lost family in the tiny town of Rocksaw, Kansas. Trix doesn’t plan to stick around Rocksaw long, but there’s something special about her McCabe relatives that she is drawn to. Her aunt, Mia, bakes pies that seem to cure all ills. Her cousin, Ember, can tell a person’s deepest secret with the touch of a hand. And Trix’s great-aunt takes one look at Trix’s palm and tells her that if she doesn’t put down roots somewhere, she won’t have a future anywhere. Before long, Trix feels like she might finally belong with this special group of women in this tiny town in Kansas. But when her past comes back to haunt her, she’ll have to decide whether to take a chance on this new life . . . or keep running from the one she’s always known. With lovable and flawed characters, an evocative setting, and friendships to treasure, A Constellation of Roses is the perfect companion to Miranda Asebedo’s debut novel The Deepest Roots. The Road to Paradise by Karen Barnett Historical Fiction | Pages 344 | Pub. 2017 In 1927, Margie Lane, an avid naturalist, convinces her Senator father to procure her a position at the fledgling Mount Rainier National Park. Since Ranger Ford Brannon lost his father in a climbing accident, he doubts his ability to protect the park and its many visitors. He certainly doesn’t relish the job of watching over an idealistic and privileged young woman with no practical survival skills. When Margie’s former fiance sets his mind on developing the Paradise Inn and its surroundings into a tourist playground, Margie and Ford will have to work together to preserve the beauty and simplicity of this mountain hideaway, but the developer’s plans might put more than just the park in danger.” Song of the Dead by Sarah Glenn Marsh YA Fantasy | 416 Pages | Pub. 2019 Karthia is nothing like it used to be. The kingdom’s borders are open for the first time in nearly three hundred years, and raising the dead has been outlawed. Odessa is determined to explore the world beyond Karthia’s waters, hoping to heal a heart broken in more ways than she can count. But with Meredy joining the ocean voyage, vanquishing her sorrow will be a difficult task. Despite the daily reminder of the history they share, Odessa and Meredy are fascinated when their journey takes them to a land where the Dead rule the night and dragons roam the streets. Odessa can’t help being mesmerized by the new magic–and by the girl at her side. But just as she and Meredy are beginning to explore the new world, a terrifying development in Karthia summons them home at once. Growing political unrest on top of threats from foreign invaders means Odessa and Meredy are thrust back into the lives they tried to leave behind while specters from their past haunt their tenuous relationship. Gathering a force big enough to ward off enemies seems impossible, until one of Queen Valoria’s mages creates a weapon that could make them invincible. As danger continues to mount inside the palace, Odessa fears that without the Dead, even the greatest invention won’t be enough to save their fates. In this enthralling, heartrending sequel to Reign of the Fallen, Odessa faces the fight of her life as the boundaries between the Dead and the living are challenged in a way more gruesome than ever before.
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While working checkout, I came across this very interesting book called The Story of Western Science by Susan Wise Bauer. I’ve heard of this author before because she is very popular with a lot of the parents I talk with, but I haven’t heard of this particular book before. After flipping through it, I quickly realized that I wanted to read all of the works the author listed as reference material. The books start with the first science texts and early scientific methods and go through space exploration and advanced scientific theories. This list is definitly geared towards lovers of science and math and probably less so for casual readers. Here’s the list: TOTAL BOOKS: 38 TOTAL READ: 0 COMPLETE: 0% TOTAL TBR: 38 LEFT: 100% Last Updated: January 17 PART I: The Beginnings The Hippocratic Corpus (c. 420 BC) The Aphorisms of Hippocrates (c. 420 BC) Plato, Timaeus (c. 360 BC) Aristotle, Physics (c. 330 BC) Aristotle, History of Animals (c. 330 BC) Archimedes, “The Sand-Reckoner” (c. 250 BC) Lucretius, On the Nature of Things (c. 60 BC) Ptolemy, Almagest (c. 150 AD) Nicolaus Copernicus, Commentariolus (1514) Nicolaus Copernicus, On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543) PART II: The Birth of the Method Francis Bacon, Novum Organum (1620) William Harvey, De Motu Cordis (1628) Galileo Galilei, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632) Robert Boyle, The Sceptical Chymist (1661) Robert Hooke, Micrographia (1665) Isaac Newton, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687/1713/1726) PART III: Reading the Earth George-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, Natural History: General and Particular (1749-1788) James Hutton, Theory of the Earth (1785) Georges Cuvier, “Preliminary Discourse” (1812) Charles Lyell, Principles of Geology (1830) Arthur Holmes, The Age of the Earth (1913) Alfred Wegener, The Origin of Continents and Oceans (1915) Walter Alvarez, T. rex and the Crater of Doom (1997) PART IV: Reading Life Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, Zoological Philosophy (1809) Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species (1859) Gregor Mendel, Experiments in Plant Hybridization (1865) Julian Huxley, Evolution: The Modern Synthesis (1942) James D. Watson, The Double Helix (1968) Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene (1976) E. O. Wilson, On Human Nature (1978) Stephen Jay Gould, The Mismeasure of Man (1981) PART V: Reading the Cosmos Albert Einstein, Relativity: The Special and General Theory (1916) Max Planck, “The Origin and Development of the Quantum Theory” (1922) Erwin Schrödinger, What is Life? (1944) Edwin Hubble, The Realms of the Nebulae (1937) Fred Hoyle, The Nature of the Universe (1950) Steven Weinberg, The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977) James Gleick, Chaos (1987)
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I randomly picked up Madame Bovary a couple weeks back and just read though it in a weekend. I had no idea what it was about or anything other than that it was only my classics club list. I was very surprise that I was able to get thourgh it soo fast considering its a “classic” and they have a notorious reputation for be hard and convoluted to read. Soo happy I read this book though. Possibly one of the best books of the year…and it’s still early February…. :O If you have not read this book yet, you might want to skip this post…it will def be spoilery! About the Author Gustave Flaubert was a French novelist. Highly influential, he has been considered the leading exponent of literary realism in his country. He is known especially for his debut novel Madame Bovary, his Correspondence, and his scrupulous devotion to his style and aesthetics. The celebrated short story writer Guy de Maupassant was a protégé of Flaubert. As a devoted Spinozist, Flaubert was significantly influenced by Spinoza’s thought. He was also a pantheist, like some other prominent Spinozists such as Goethe and Einstein. About the Book Madame Bovary is the debut novel of French writer Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856. The character lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. When the novel was first serialized in La Revue de Paris between 1 October 1856 and 15 December 1856, public prosecutors attacked the novel for obscenity. The resulting trial in January 1857 made the story notorious. After Flaubert’s acquittal on 7 February 1857, Madame Bovary became a bestseller in April 1857 when it was published in two volumes. A seminal work of literary realism, the novel is now considered Flaubert’s masterpiece, and one of the most influential literary works in history. Discussion Questions #1 Flaubert was deeply hurt when his book was met with outrage, later resulting in a court trial. Why do you think this books was banned? Do you think it would have “spoiled the minds” of the readers of that time? #2 In what ways is Emma Bovary the quintessential “desperate housewife”? How did she use escapism to deal with her emotions? #3 Is Emma believable as a real woman, rather than only as a literary character? How well does Flaubert portray the emotions of a woman? #4 Who’s to blame for what happened to Emma & what point could she have turned back or changed her course? #5 Did it surprise you that a book entitled Madame Bovary actually begins and ends with others? Why do you think Flaubert makes those choices? #6 The time between the onset of the French Revolution (1789) and WWI is often described as the era of the middle class. How is this central to the commentary of Madame Bovary? #7 “A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.” (Italo Calvino) What does Madame Bovary have to say?
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Overall, i liked the book. The ending was satisfying and appropriate. There were a few things left open...but i imagine those are for book 2. I'd def recommend this book and will certainly read book 2.
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Overall, i would give this book a 4.5/5 stars. It's a great story told by a great storyteller. I have already gotten the first book, like i said, and would certainly recommend this author.
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Overall, this was a beautifully written book. I look forward to reading the second book and other books by this author & would def recommend this book to my friends.
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Hey everyone, welcome this week’s post about books I cant wait to read. While there are literally 100 books on my tbr and interesting new releases every week, I decided to focus on only 3 for today. These are mostly books the were recommended to me at work from some of my patrons and coworkers. Circle of Shadows by Evelyn Skye YA Fantasy | 400 Pages | Pub. 2019 Sora can move as silently as a ghost and hurl throwing stars with lethal accuracy. Her gemina, Daemon, can win any physical fight blindfolded and with an arm tied behind his back. They are apprentice warriors of the Society of Taigas—marked by the gods to be trained in magic and the fighting arts to protect the kingdom of Kichona. As their graduation approaches, Sora and Daemon look forward to proving themselves worthy of belonging to the elite group—but in a kingdom free of violence since the Blood Rift Rebellion many years ago, it’s been difficult to make their mark. So when Sora and Daemon encounter a strange camp of mysterious soldiers while on a standard scouting mission, they decide the only thing to do to help their kingdom is to infiltrate the group.Taking this risk will change Sora’s life forever—and lead her on a mission of deception that may fool everyone she’s ever loved. White Stag by Kara Barbieri YA Fantasy | Pages 368 | Pub. 2019 As the last child in a family of daughters, seventeen-year-old Janneke was raised to be the male heir. While her sisters were becoming wives and mothers, she was taught to hunt, track, and fight. On the day her village was burned to the ground, Janneke—as the only survivor—was taken captive by the malicious Lydian and eventually sent to work for his nephew Soren. Janneke’s survival in the court of merciless monsters has come at the cost of her connection to the human world. And when the Goblin King’s death ignites an ancient hunt for the next king, Soren senses an opportunity for her to finally fully accept the ways of the brutal Permafrost. But every action he takes to bring her deeper into his world only shows him that a little humanity isn’t bad—especially when it comes to those you care about. Through every battle they survive, Janneke’s loyalty to Soren deepens. After dangerous truths are revealed, Janneke must choose between holding on or letting go of her last connections to a world she no longer belongs to. She must make the right choice to save the only thing keeping both worlds from crumbling. Enchantee by Gita Trelease YA Historical Fantasy | 459 Pages | Pub. 2019 Paris in 1789 is a labyrinth of twisted streets, filled with beggars, thieves, revolutionaries—and magicians… When smallpox kills her parents, Camille Durbonne must find a way to provide for her frail, naive sister while managing her volatile brother. Relying on petty magic—la magie ordinaire—Camille painstakingly transforms scraps of metal into money to buy the food and medicine they need. But when the coins won’t hold their shape and her brother disappears with the family’s savings, Camille must pursue a richer, more dangerous mark: the glittering court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. With dark magic forbidden by her mother, Camille transforms herself into the ‘Baroness de la Fontaine’ and is swept up into life at the Palace of Versailles, where aristocrats both fear and hunger for la magie. There, she gambles at cards, desperate to have enough to keep herself and her sister safe. Yet the longer she stays at court, the more difficult it becomes to reconcile her resentment of the nobles with the enchantments of Versailles. And when she returns to Paris, Camille meets a handsome young balloonist—who dares her to hope that love and liberty may both be possible. But la magie has its costs. And when Camille loses control of her secrets, the game she’s playing turns deadly. Then revolution erupts, and she must choose—love or loyalty, democracy or aristocracy, freedom or magic—before Paris burns…
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