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Tomorrow marks the first step in a process that will hopefully restore some of the vision I've lost over the past four or five years due to having macular degeneration and cataracts in both eyes.   There's absolutely nothing that can be done for the type of macular degeneration I have other than to continue taking the vitamin/mineral supplement that I have already been taking twice a day for
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Despite myself having come of age a long time ago, I still enjoy a good coming-of age novel and usually read several of them a year.  And that is precisely what drew me to Glen Sobey’s No Fences in Alaska. This one in particular, though, appealed to me because one of its two central characters, Cooper, is a man in his sixties who is facing a steadily worsening case of early-onset Alzheimer’s.
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I know that you can’t always tell from my short story reviews that I love short stories the way that I love novels, but I swear it’s true.  It’s just that short stories have more of a tendency to frustrate me than novels do.  If I see early on that a novel is not working for me, I don’t hesitate to toss it into the discard pile. That’s not something, though, that I’m likely to do with a story
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Book Chase by Sam Sattler - 3d ago

Fredrik Backman is a Swedish columnist and writer whose books seem finally to be getting their due in the United States.  Backman first came to my attention just a few months ago when I first heard about (probably because of the movie of the same title) his 2012 debut novel A Man Called Ove. I enjoyed that one so much that I started looking for more of Backman’s work and quickly came upon the
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2019 is already half over so it's time for me to review my reading to this point in order to determine which of the 60 books I've read so far (not all sixty meet the year-published requirement) belong on my first pass of a Best of 2019 Fiction list.  As in years past, I'm limiting the candidates to books published between October 1 of the preceding year and December 31 of the current year.  That
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I most enjoy the kind of fiction that both entertains me and allows me to immerse myself in a world that I would never otherwise experience.  A good novel or short story can take me around the world to some remote location, some major metropolis, or just to the heart of the city I live in.  A good novel or short story is the only time machine I’ve ever been able to get my hands on.  A good
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Graphic nonfiction is a genre that I was completely unaware of until late 2016 when I discovered Sarah Glidden's Rolling Blackouts, her account of the trip that she and two friends took to Turkey, Syria, and Iraq in order to document the effect of the Iraq War on the civilian population in those countries.  Glidden's book, told in the graphic style most familiar to comic strip fans, is a
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Naomi Wolf Naomi Wolf is no stranger to being challenged on the supposed "facts" around which she has based some of her bestselling books. But this time, it looks like she may have really stepped in it because her publisher (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) is delaying the release of her latest, Outrages, and recalling the copies it has already delivered to retailers around the country. Last month
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This has been one of those weeks that thankfully come around only once in a great while. Precisely seven days ago (I am writing this at 9:00 p.m. local time) my wife had just been delivered to a hospital emergency room by ambulance to deal with back pain so severe that she literally almost could not move.  Nine hours later she was transferred to a local rehabilitation hospital for treatment
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It is all relative, of course, but in many families there is a “good” sibling, and by comparison, there is a “bad” sibling.  And more often than not, that idea becomes so normalized within the family circle that even the “bad” sibling comes to believe it to be true.  This is the family dynamic explored by Gillian McAlister in her novel The Good Sister, the story of one family being destroyed
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