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“Now Look What You’ve Done…”

That was the subject of an email I received from a BGU member in Virginia… I was intrigued…

Inside the email was the following:

“After spending 30-ish years piddling my way to being a bad-at-best guitar player, I ran into your 4-note solo on YouTube. It began what’s changed everything about my ability.

Cut to today. Looking for a place/way to play live with other people, I met some entrepreneurs about to open a music park here in Richmond, VA. It’s called, Orbital Music Park. It’s sort of like a recording studio without the recording part. Two soundproof rooms rented by the hour with drums and PA in place. There’s a lounge/stage area, coffee bar and space for the local music community to hang out. Don’t know if you have spaces like this in LA, but here, in Richmond, with practice spaces rapidly disappearing, it’s a godsend.

I took them my offer to host weekly Blues sessions. Kind of a jam, but more of a weekly, invitational chance to play with other musicians for 3 hours. I’ve learned a lot. Some of it comical, like why jams typically have a house band and what to do when you have three bass players, a sax and no drummer show up!

Anyway, NONE of this could have happened without you. THANK YOU!!! I often share links to Blues Guitar Unleashed when I see players struggling or reaching in certain areas. Hopefully the love trickles your way.

We’ve done it now for 12 weeks. Am sending you a few photos. Please enjoy.”

And, needless to say, I am beyond thrilled that they are doing this and I hope that if you are in or around the Richmond, Virginia area you will look them up and say “Hello” to Dave if he is there.

Most importantly, of course, to me, is the fact that they are sharing music and playing with others.

I always say it’s the most fun you can have… and that many of the greatest people I’ve ever met in my life I’ve met through music.

Just a fun story and I hope it brightens your day a little. Thanks to Dave Clemans for sharing.

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Being able to play in different beat subdivisions is a HUGE part of playing and soloing effectively…

After all, you only have two things to work with, the order of the notes, and the rhythms!

Wanna see how you can improve quickly? Grab your metronome and get ready to count along with me…

Guitar Lesson (Blues and more) - Practicing In Eighths, Triplets, and Sixteenths For Better Solos - YouTube
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Mixing up the Major and Minor Blues sounds can be essential to really nailing the blues sound…

… but it can also be a big pain in the neck!

When do you change? How do you change? How do you practice it?

All of that and more in today’s video…

Mixing Up The Major And Minor Blues Sounds And How To Practice It - YouTube

If you want more info on Major Minor Blues Shapes (that I refer to in the video) it can be found HERE

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This riff came from a Rory Gallagher recording, but I’ve heard it (or variations of it) in many songs over the years (CCR comes to mind, even though I can’t think of which song.)

It’s in E, and like many blues things in E, it’s based around the open position E minor box 1/box 2 scales.

Then, when it goes to the IV chord, the A, it just moves the whole thing up – which is an easy move to make.

Also cool is the turnaround, which goes up by 1/2 step to the C instead of down to the A7 so it’s kind of a nice variation to have in your hip pocket (think of songs like “Little Sister” which make the same move.)

Hope you dig it and feel free to share with any guitar playing friends.

Rory Gallagher Style Blues/Rock Riff - Blues/Rock Guitar Lesson - YouTube

Here Is The TAB (PDF)

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Since it happens to be Mother’s Day, I thought it might be a good time to celebrate some of the female blues guitar players out there…

Generally speaking, there aren’t nearly as many female blues guitar players out there as the men, but I think that’s changing – especially over the last few years.

So here are some great female blues artists you might want to check out, and if you have some others you dig, please let us know in the comments section below.

These are in no particular order, just the ones I know off the top of my head:

  1. Bonnie Raitt
  2. Samantha Fish
  3. Ana Popovic
  4. Joanne Shaw Taylor
  5. Joanna Connor
  6. Elizabeth Cotton
  7. Sue Foley
  8. Susan Tedeschi
  9. Debbie Davies
  10. Sister Rosetta Tharpe

But like I said, I’m pretty sure y’all will have some more I’m missing here.

When you have a few minutes, search for some of these artists on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music, or whatever service you use – and check them out.

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For whatever reason, we all have to spend some time away from our guitars…

It’s never fun, but it happens. Maybe it’s an injury, maybe it’s work travel…

Maybe it’s just that the kids have been sick and your time hasn’t been your own. It doesn’t matter, you want to get back to where you were as quickly, and safely, as possible.

So I’ll give you some suggestions on ways to build back up to the sort of practicing you were doing before you had to be away.

How To Get Your Hands Back After A Break From The Guitar - YouTube

By the way, the course, Blues Speed Building Blocks, can be found at https://bluesguitarunleashed.com/get-blues-speed-building-blocks/

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These last few days we’ve been talking a lot about “acoustic” blues, in the sense that it’s blues you play by yourself – and not with a band…

But I really want to emphasize that these skills are just as useful on an electric guitar – with a band – as they are without!

In fact, in some ways, this might help your band playing (soloing instead of solo…) as much or more than just about anything else you can do.

So check out this video, it’s not real long, and see what I mean:

Playing "Acoustic" On Electric For Blues Soloing - YouTube
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In today’s lesson we’ll talk about how to get that Texas-style “chunk” out of your blues rhythms.

Also, we’ll talk about where a lot of those different classic riffs in the style of SRV and Kenny Wayne Shepherd (and that Griff Hamlin guy) come from.

Grab your guitar and let’s get going:

Blues Rhythm Guitar Lesson - Those Texas-Style Heavy-Handed Riffs - How And What (Live) - YouTube
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