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Lourdes Gurriel Jr. made his return to the Blue Jays lineup in the opener of their three-game series against the Padres. But unlike before, the 25-year-old will now be positioned in left-field with the opportunity of earning everyday playing-time.

The Blue Jays are currently lacking in depth of quality outfielders that are ready to be called-up to have a major impact on the Blue Jays. Other than Teoscar Hernandez and Anthony Alford, who both have had their struggles this season, the Blue Jays just don’t have any other outfielders who are viable options for this season or the next.

Which has now paved the way for Gurriel Jr. to transition into an everyday left-fielder for the Blue Jays. But, the Cuban-native will have to earn that role. Gurriel Jr.’s time earlier this season was anything but successful. Through the 14 games played with the Blue Jays this season, Gurriel Jr. hit just four doubles and a lonely home run, along with slashing a line of .186/.255/.349/.604 and striking-out 13 different times.

LOURDES HAVE MERCY, #PińaPower is back!@yunitogurriel | #LetsGoBlueJays pic.twitter.com/sPrbDqVvAr

— Toronto Blue Jays (@BlueJays) May 25, 2019

Along with Gurriel Jr.’s laughable defensive miscues, his inability to reduce his strikeouts were a big reason for his demotion last month. Gurriel Jr. has so far struggled to reduce his strikeout rate and improve his walk rate throughout his professional career.

The man with the best-hair throughout the entire Blue Jays organization has failed to improve those numbers particularly over the past few seasons. In 65 games last season with the Blue Jays, Gurriel Jr. recorded a walk rate of 3.4% and a strikeout rate of 22.4%. What’s troubling is that those numbers are basically the same through his 30 games played at triple-A this season.

In those 30 games, Gurriel Jr. recorded 13 doubles, four home runs and 26 RBI. However, he also struck-out 23 times and walked to first-base just three times for a strikeout-rate of 18% and a walk-rate of 2.3%. So while Gurriel Jr. hit an impressive .207 ISO, he also recorded a wRC+ of just 94. Which means while he was hitting for extra-bases, he was proving to be a liability at the plate because of all the strikeouts.

So along with Gurriel Jr. needing to show improvements at the plate during his call-up, the talented young-player will also need to display that he’s a changed player defensively as well. Most of us wish that those terrible throws to first-base by Gurriel Jr. were just a bad nightmare, but unfortunately they’re all too real.

Just like the throws to first were a nightmare, so are Gurriel Jr.’s defensive numbers over the last two seasons. Let’s just pretend that those three games at first-base for Gurriel Jr. never happened and just focus on his middle-infield and outfield statistics.

Gurriel Jr. split 65 games between shortstop and second-base last season with the Blue Jays. What was thought to just be a learning curve, turned into a cause for concern for Gurriel Jr. He committed a combined seven errors in his time paroling the middle of the infield last season.

To make matters worse, Gurriel Jr. also recorded a -9 DRS, and a -6.8 UZR in his 351.1 innings at shortstop last season. While he only played in 14 games before being demoted this season, Gurriel Jr. clearly showed that a change in position was needed in hopes to turn his career around.

Despite advanced metrics not being recorded in the minor-leagues(which is very annoying BTW!), there are still ways to depict how Gurriel Jr. performed in his seven starts in the outfield at triple-A this season. I will admit that seven games is too small of a sample size to completely judge how effective a player performs, but we’re going to attempt to do it anyways with Gurriel Jr. here.

In those seven games, Gurriel Jr. recorded eight putouts in nine opportunities. So while that’s a positive note, he did also commit an error as well. However, Gurriel Jr. will likely receive the benefit of the doubt for the majority of his time back up at the major-league level. As long as he’s able to contribute offensively, and not turn into a liability like he was at triple-A earlier this season.

This seems to be Gurriel Jr.’s last opportunity at becoming a everyday-player in the MLB. So with the lack of quality depth in the outfield at the lower-levels, left-field is Gurriel Jr.’s to win, if he can prove he deserves it.

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Tonight’s Blue Jays lineup will somewhat resemble that of an All-Star team from the early 2000s. I mean, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but it’ll be funny to see a Guerrero and Biggio take the field for the Blue Jays tonight.

Cavan Biggio, of course, is the second Hall of Fame son to join the Blue Jays this season. First, it was Vlad Jr., baseball’s best prospect and next big thing. Now it’s Biggio, the son of Houston Astros legend Craig Biggio. There obviously isn’t as much hype around baseball about Biggio Jr.’s debut as there was for Vlad, but still, within hardcore Toronto baseball circles, there’s a lot of interest.

Biggio was selected in the fifth round of the 2016 draft out of Notre Dame as a four-year college senior. He put up some whatever results in his first two professional seasons but then burst onto the scene as a key prospect in the Blue Jays’ system after a breakout year in New Hampshire.

Biggio made a slight adjustment to his swing, as he explained in an interview with Shi Davidi last season…

“I knew that I needed to get a more starting point besides my hands,” Biggio explains. “I knew that getting something to go back at a consistent time would always get me on time for when I wanted to get ready to hit.”

That worked well with the drop in his hands, which used to start up near the top of his head and then drop down as he started to swing. In turn, that left him with a bat path that swooped in and out of the zone, which is counterproductive to both hitting the ball consistently and hitting it consistently hard.

The lower starting point has allowed him to create the checkmark shaped bat path currently preached by launch-angle aficionados, although that wasn’t Biggio’s intention.

“I was just trying to keep the bat path in the zone more,” he says. “I kept my natural finish, which is a high finish, higher than most people. So, with the lower starting point and higher finish, it created more of a launch angle.”

The results were pretty staggering. Biggio smashed 26 homers, drove in 99 runs, and slashed an impressive .252/.388/.499 line, en route to winning the Eastern League MVP and Championship with the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. He came into the season ranked No. 9 on Toronto’s top prospects list, but didn’t receive any consideration in Baseball America’s Top-100.

There was still some skepticism about Biggio’s breakout year given the fact New Hampshire is notoriously a hitter’s paradise. But a month-and-a-half into his first go-around at Triple-A Buffalo, Biggio is posting even better numbers at the plate than he did last season. Biggio is slashing a .252/.388/.499 line that looks even better when you compare it to the rest of his teammates.

So, what can we expect from Biggio? Given his numbers this year in last in Double- and Triple-A, you’d expect a lot more fanfare and hype around Biggio. But that isn’t the case. As I said earlier, there’s a lot of excitement for him within Blue Jays circles, but that doesn’t extend outside of Toronto. For example, Keith Law has expressed major skepticism that Biggio can even be a regular Major League player.

Part of that his to do with his glove. As a second baseman, Biggio’s level of production at the plate would likely play well from what you’d expect out of the position. But if he doesn’t have the glove to stick at second, which seems to be a legitimate concern given the effort the Jays have made to play him in the outfield, his bat doesn’t profile as nicely to a corner outfield spot.

Here’s what FanGraphs had to say about Biggio heading into the season…

There’s skepticism surrounding Biggio’s ability to play second base, so the Blue Jays began expanding his defensive horizons last year with time at first and third base, as well as both outfield corners, which is where Biggio saw the most action in the Arizona Fall League. The uppercut nature of Biggio’s swing is going to lead to some strikeouts and his aggregate offensive profile looks much less promising in an outfield corner than it would at second base. If he could indeed play all of those positions, he’d be a very interesting Swiss Army knife with power, but realistically he profiles as a second-division regular or platoon outfielder.

Personally, I find these projections wildly pessimistic and have a hard time grasping them given how good Biggio has been at the plate since his adjustment. Biggio, albeit in a small sample size, has a 150 wRC+ in Buffalo this season and he’s walking more than he’s striking out, which is generally one of the most important signs of success at higher levels. In the world of fielding independent baseball, in which fielding is becoming less and less important and hitting the ball into the seats is all the rage, Biggio profiles quite well.

Who knows! Maybe the skeptical projections are accurate! Maybe they aren’t! That’s the thing with baseball — you can’t predict it. When I look at Biggio, I see somebody who’s mashed at the upper minors and I get excited. Then again, I’m a fan of the Blue Jays, and I want things to work out. I’m not worried about the perfect world in which he needs to play above average defence at second base in order to hit a threshold that matches his value at the plate. I just see a young player who hits and hits and hits and I want to see him join a team full of guys who, well, don’t. We can sort out the details later.

Projections weren’t kind to Devon Travis heading into the 2015 season when he was acquired in a one-for-one swap for Anthony Gose. Keith Law said that Travis wasn’t a real prospect and he didn’t have a shot at being anything worthwhile because his glove was bad and his bat was good, but not good enough. That sounds just like what many are saying about Biggio.

Unfortunately for Travis, things didn’t work out. But that isn’t because of his bat or glove. It was because of health. When Travis was healthy, he was excellent. Travis proved doubters wrong and played a key role in Toronto’s 2015 and 2016 seasons. Let’s hope Biggio can also prove his doubters wrong and continue to hit at the Major League level.

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After what was a forgettable series against the big-bad Red Sox, the Blue Jays are welcoming in a couple of new kids who grew up die-hard fans of the boys in blue. Canadians Cal Quantrill and Josh Naylor will make their homecoming debuts during this three-game series in “The Six.”

The Blue Jays will also be calling-up one of their top-prospects as well for this series. No. 9 of the top-30 prospects within the Blue Jays minor-league system, Cavan Biggio will be added to the active roster ahead of this series. Now while I believe this just to be a move made out of necessity, the Blue Jays clearly need additional offensive-support and Biggio will likely provide that positioned in either the outfield or infield.

Friday at 7:07 ET

Trent Thornton has really found his stride this month with the Blue Jays. After struggling for the majority of April, Thornton has now been able to put together quality starts in three out of his four starts this month. Thornton will now be looking to earn his 2nd-win at the major-league level against the new-look Padres.

Despite their reputation, Thornton actually matches-up very well against the Padres. This lineup from the city that never experiences bad weather, currently ranks 2nd in the NL in strikeouts and 2nd-worst in walks as well. Which means Thornton should be able to create a lot of swing and misses with his wipe-out curveball. The 25-year-old has recorded four or more strikeouts and two or fewer walks in three of his four starts this month. So this should provide Thornton with a great opportunity to record three quality starts in a row for the first-time in his career.

Joey Lucchesi will be taking the ball for the Padres in game one of this series. The 25-year-old’s season so far is best described as a roller coaster. Lucchesi didn’t allow a single run through his first two starts to the season. But he was then pounded for 17 runs over his next four starts to end the month of April.

However, his roller coaster season has now started to ascend upwards ever since the start of May. Through his three starts this month, Lucchesi is pitching with a 3.12 ERA, 0.923 WHIP along with 12 strikeouts in 17.1 innings pitched. Opposing batters are also hitting just .203 against Lucchesi this month as well. So this could be a very tough match-up for this Blue Jays lineup, given the fact that they rank last in the AL in hits for this month.

Saturday at 3:07 ET

Edwin Jackson will make his 3rd-start with the Blue Jays in game two of this series. The man who was nearly drafted during the same year I was born, got smacked around by the defending-champions in his last outing. Jackson pitched five innings for the second-straight time, but gave up seven hits and six runs(five earned) and a lone walk.

A rough outing was expected in Jackson’s latest outing against the Red Sox. They’re still one of the best-offenses in the entire league. So it was actually quite respectable that Jackson was able pitch through five innings before being chased out of the game. While the Padres do have a power-hitting offense like the Red Sox, they’re basically a boom or bust lineup. Which means Jackson should be able to give his team a better opportunity to win this game compared to his latest start.

Cal Quantrill will make his debut in his home-country in game two of this series. Quantrill grew up approximately two hours east from Toronto in his home-town of Port Hope. The son of former MLB-player Paul Quantrill, will finally be able to pitch at the same park that his dad played six-straight seasons at.

Quantrill made his MLB-debut at the start of this month, but it hasn’t gone as smoothly as the 24-year-old would have liked. Through his three starts this month, Quantrill has surrendered 21 hits, nine runs and five walks in just 15 innings pitched. Accuracy is something that the home-town pitcher struggles a lot with, as he threw 102 pitches in just five innings in his last start. So the Blue Jays will need to force a lot of deep counts in this game, in order to be successful against the son of the former fan-favorite who called the Blue Jays home for so many seasons.

Sunday at 1:07 ET

The latest episode of the Stro-Show was very impressive against the Red Sox. Stroman was able to earn his 2nd-win of the season, and he FINALLY got support from his offense. After averaging just 2.2 runs of support/game, the Blue Jays supplied the heart and soul of this team with a total of ten runs of support. Thankfully, he’s no longer at the bottom of the rankings in the league for average runs support per game. With those ten runs of support, Stroman is now averaging 2.9 runs of support/game.

In Stroman’s last start against the Red Sox, he did surrender a season-high in walks with six. However, this start against the Padres should provide him with a fantastic opportunity to improve off of that number. Especially, with the way this Padres lineup has shown that they’re unable to stay patient at the plate. As they currently rank 4th-worst in the NL for the amount of total pitches during at-bats this season.

Chris Paddack is a name most-people probably haven’t ever heard of. Which is understandable given he pitches for a team that plays on the west coast. But Paddack is a name to remember, as he’s currently pitching as one of the best-young pitchers in the entire league.

The 23-year-old currently ranks 2nd in the NL in ERA, as well as ranking 1st throughout the NL in opponents BA. Paddack hasn’t surrendered more than three runs in a single game in any of his nine starts this season. He has also recorded five or more strikeouts in seven of those nine starts. So for a team like the Blue Jays who have scored the 2nd-fewest amount of runs this month, they will likely find it tough sledding against one of the best young pitchers in the league.

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Though they got off to a rough start this season, the Boston Red Sox (27-23) are still an undoubtedly good baseball team. In this week’s four-game series against the Blue Jays at Rogers Centre, they demonstrated just that, disengaging Blue Jays hitters and handling the onslaught of pitchers with ease.

Here’s a look at the good, the bad, and the weird from this week’s set against the rival Sox:

The Good

The stupidly productive Rowdy Tellez (5-for-13, 3 HR, 6 RBI, 2B, BB) was the driving force in this series, while Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (4-for-15, HR, 3 R) and Brandon Drury (6-for-17, 3 RBI, 4 2B) also put together some solid at-bats throughout the series, as did Justin Smoak (4-for-16, 2 HR, BB, 2B).

On the mound, Clayton Richard (4.0 IP, 2 SO, ER) was rather efficient in his season debut, while relievers Derek Law (2.0 IP, ER, H, 2 SO), Tim Mayza (0.2 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 2 SO), and Ken Giles (1.0 IP, SO, H, 0 ER) were all dependable.

As per usual, Marcus Stroman (6.0 IP, 5 H, 4 SO, ER, W) was outstanding, while fellow starter Aaron Sanchez (6.0 IP, 4 H, 2 ER, 5 SO) managed to piece together yet another solid start.

The Bad

Knuckleballer Ryan Feierabend (1.2 IP, 4 H, 3 ER) struggled once again, while Elvis Luciano (2.2 IP, 9 H, 6 ER, 2 BB) was also majorly roughed up. Elsewhere in the bullpen, Joe Biagini (2.1 IP, 2 H, 2 ER, BB) also had a subpar series, increasing his ERA in the month of May to 4.00.

In his second start with the club, veteran Edwin Jackson (5.0 IP, 7 H, 5 ER, BB, 4 SO) faltered, as did Ryan Tepera (1.0 IP, 3 H, 2 ER, BB), who has yet to find his rhythm after returning from an early-season IL stint.

At the dish, Eric Sogard (0-for-10, 2 SO), Jonathan Davis (2-for-14, 4 SO), and Danny Jansen (2-for-12, 2 RBI, 3 SO) also had their fair share of struggles against Red Sox pitching.

The Weird

Aside from Thursday’s bizarre “Baby Shark” inspired video on the big screen, Blue Jays fans were puzzled by Charlie Montoyo’s decision to rest Vladimir Guerrero Jr. on Victoria Day Monday, one of Canada’s biggest spring/summer festivals. Though the skipper didn’t comment, Blue Jays general manager Ross Atkins was apologetic, saying that he forgot to “communicate the importance of Victoria Day” to his manager.

Looking Ahead

The Blue Jays (now 20-30 on the season) will send Trent Thornton (1-4, 4.41 ERA, 50 SO), Jackson (0-1, 6.30 ERA, 6 SO), and Marcus Stroman (2-6, 2.81 ERA, 55 SO) to the mound to face the San Diego Padres’ (26-24) trio of Joey Lucchesi (3-3, 4.28 ERA, 46 SO), Cal Quantrill (0-2, 5.40 ERA, 10 SO), and Chris Paddack (4-2, 1.93 ERA, 56 SO).

With Cavan Biggio soon joining the major-league roster, and Lourdes Gurriel Jr. rejoining the team in Toronto, this weekend’s series figures to be one of the more exciting the team has played this season.

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Another one of the Blue Jays top prospects will be getting called-up this Friday. Cavan Biggio is getting promoted to the majors and will make his big-league debut with the club soon.

#BlueJays are bringing up Lourdes Gurriel Jr., and Cavan Biggio tomorrow.

— Shi Davidi (@ShiDavidi) May 24, 2019

Biggio has raked at every level and is just getting better and better through his journey in the minors. The son of Craig Biggio joins the son of Vladimir Guerrero in Toronto.

In his first year with the Triple-A Bisons this year, he is slashing .306/.440/.507 with a total of six home runs in 168 plate appearances. Projected to spend the full year down in the minors with a chance to make the 2020 team, Biggio broke through that assumption and forced management’s hand.

At age 24, there is no manipulation needed for a player like Biggio. He will be hitting free agency at the age of 31, which is fine by any modern-day general manager.

Acknowledging their weakness in outfield, the natural second-baseman was put in the corner outfield spots in Buffalo, where he appeared comfortable. Joining him in those outfield rotations was Lourdes Gurriel Jr.

Already familiar with Toronto, Gurriel Jr. started on the 25-man roster but through defensive lapses and a cold bat, found his way to Buffalo. With the Bisons he has been hitting for a .274 average with a .779 OPS and four homers — surely good enough for the 25-year-old to get his confidence back.

The players going the other way will be outfielder Billy McKinney and infielder Richard Urena. McKinney has a .663 OPS in 150 plate appearances with the Jays this season, while Urena was off to a hot start but cooled down to a .608 OPS in Toronto.

Both players could use some time in Buffalo to get their groove back or just get lost in the sea of mediocre batters the Jays currently have.

For Gurriel Jr. and especially Biggio, their youth and ability to rake in Triple-A might show their potential to grow and be full-time big-league players like everyone hopes they will be.

Another exciting prospect debut, another month for the 2019 Blue Jays.

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Growing more and more desperate for pitching, the Toronto Blue Jays have claimed lefty reliever Zac Rosscup from the Seattle Mariners.

OFFICIAL: We've claimed LHP Zac Rosscup off waivers from the @Mariners and designated RHP Jimmy Cordero for assignment.

In 19 games this season, Rosscup has a 3.21 ERA with 20 strikeouts. pic.twitter.com/42CY5fN4wZ

— Toronto Blue Jays (@BlueJays) May 23, 2019

The 31-year-old has been in and out of the minors since 2013, making his debut with the Chicago Cubs. A total of 79.2 innings pitched in his career, with a 4.86 ERA and a 1.556 WHIP.

This season with the Mariners, Rosscup has a total of 14 innings under his belt, pitching a career-high 3.21 ERA but a 1.929 WHIP. His current strikeout rate sits at a 12.9 K/9, but with a 9 BB/9 to contrast that.

Another left-handed option out of the bullpen could excite some of the handedness-lovers, but Rosscup might not be a Jay for long — depending on his performance.

The resulting move is Jimmy Cordero being DFA’d to the Bisons, after he was called-up just this week and pitched 1.1 innings.

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The sky is uninspiring, much like the baseball being played in the south side of Chicago these days. Toronto is at Guaranteed Rate Field getting ready to take on the White Sox for the third day in a row. The stadium should be called Comiskey Park, but we’re living in different times.

Both of these clubs are on similar paths, as fans wait for a promised future. It’s a promised future that guarantees both teams won’t be playing meaningful baseball this September. It’s hardly meaningful now. And it’s only Spring. FanGraphs projects that the Blue Jays will lose 90 games this year; the White Sox 93.

The southern side of the Windy City is ready to take in a matinee game and cheer on Lucas Giolito, who was the No. 16 overall pick in the 2012 draft. He is slowly turning into the ace of the staff. He is one of the three pitching prospects that Washington sent to Chicago for outfielder Adam Eaton.

White Sox fans are still waiting for Rick Hahn’s ‘rebuild’ to turn into flags that fly forever. Hahn is probably still disappointed that Manny Machado decided to play in San Diego, but at least he tried. I’m sure he is just as ready as the fans for his organization to write different headlines, but it won’t be this year. I sometimes wonder if Bill Murray and Eddie Vedder have a soft spot for the Southside Sox.

On the jumbotron behind the center field wall, Sox fans read Ryan Feierabend’s name, which is lit up in neon lights. It’s not a high-profile name like Giolito. He was not a first-round pick. He was not a part of a blockbuster trade. He spent the past four seasons in South Korea. He walked down the Soju soaked streets in Seoul. And probably ate Bulgogi – some Bibimbap, too.

On this overcast day, Feierabend stands on the mound in Chicago – an ocean away from Suwon Baseball Stadium where he pitched for the KT Wiz. It’s the first time he has set foot on MLB dirt since July 27, 2014. He is about to make history and not too many fans in the stadium know this; not too many fans know he is about to join an exclusive lefty knuckleball club. It’s obscure history – baseball’s best kind.

Rich Sauveur was the last member to join this lefty club, even though it has been reported differently. Sauveur pitched 10.1 innings for Oakland back in 2000 with a knuckleball grip – no knuckles actually involved. He gave up thirteen hits, 5 earned runs, struck out 7, and walked 1. And that would be the last time the MLB saw such an oddity.

On September 23, 2008, Feierabend started for the Mariners and faced Vladimir Guerrero Sr. because that’s how the baseball universe works, of course. That was the last MLB game he would start in. He had no knuckleball back then, too.

After that he travelled to High Desert (Mariners A) to West Tenn (Mariners AA) to Tacoma (Mariners AAA) to Lehigh Valley (Phillies AAA) to Louisville (Reds AAA) to Frisco (Rangers AA) to Round Rock (Rangers AAA) and then to Texas where he would pitch 7.1 innings for the Rangers in 2014.

From there, he travelled to South Korea. He pitched for the Nexen Heroes in 2015, who recently changed their club name to the Kiwoom Heroes. And then from 2016 – ’18 he pitched for the KT Wiz. And it was with the Wiz where he redefined himself and added a knuckleball to his repertoire. In 682 2/3 innings pitched in the KBO, Feierabend had 554 strikeouts, gave up 178 walks, and was hit 772 times.

It was his knuckleball that intrigued the Blue Jays front office, as they signed him to a minor-league deal this past offseason. Nick Ashbourne of Yahoo Sports even wrote an article in the winter: Ryan Feierabend might be the Blue Jays most interesting add of the offseason.

On May 18th, he finally stood on an MLB mound again – this time in Chicago.

Leury GarcÍa set foot in the batter’s box at 1:10 pm. The fans sat back and watched the first pitch of the game. Feierabend threw a four-seam fastball that travelled at the speed of 84.8 mph – it was fouled off. However, his next pitch was a knuckleball – a knuckleball that would put him in the lefty knuckleball club with pitchers like Gene Bearden, Danny Boone, Mickey Haefner, and Wilbur Wood.

The second pitch of the game – the pitch that reinvented him and the one that led him back to the MLB – was crushed by the White Sox leadoff hitter, as fans watched it sail over the left-center wall. Feierabend finished the rain-shortened game throwing 74 pitches – 51 of those for strikes: 28.4% of them were fastballs, 9.5% changeups, 2.7% curveballs, and 59.5% knuckleballs. That’s 44 knucklers in 4 innings pitched.

Once MLB officials declared the White Sox the winners after a lengthy rain delay, Feierabend found himself in his first post-game MLB scrum since 2014. He told reporters that his ultimate goal is being a regular in the big-leagues. He added that he hadn’t had that great of success in the big-leagues and that’s why he sort of reinvented himself as a knuckleballer. And, of course, the first knuckleball he throws in the MLB was sent beyond the wall, as is the case when a floater floats into dangerous territory.

When he was asked about his perseverance, he explained to beat reporters that while he was growing up, his mom was really sick. He said that when he saw her push through everything she went through that it challenged him to push himself in what he was doing. And that he did.

Who knows how many innings Ryan Feierabend will pitch for the Blue Jays, or where his baseball journey will lead to next. As long as he wants to pitch, he will pitch – it doesn’t matter if it’s in Buffalo, or Toronto, or overseas.

What I find interesting about baseball is the story behind its players. Whenever I go to a game or watch from home, I often wonder about how these people ended up in the MLB. I wonder about what road or roads they took – how many struggles were had along the way.

22,908 fans walked through the gates at Guaranteed Rate Field this past Saturday. Many of those fans watched the Blue Jays lefty struggle through 4 innings of work. However, not too many knew about what it took for the 33-year-old to get there. I know that I didn’t.

Most of the headlines in Canada were ‘Jays make Feierabend 1st lefty knuckleballer to start game in 20 years’. And most of us read that and thought ‘cool’. And it is cool. The Blue Jays current pitching situation; however, isn’t very cool at all.

But because of all the bad that has happened to Toronto’s rotation, a couple of interesting arms with a journey have landed in Toronto with their journeyman stories. Ryan Feierabend is one and Edwin Jackson is the other. There might not be too much to cheer for these days for Jays fans, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t going to be stories to tell.

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Signed as a minor-league option in the outfield, familiar friend Ben Revere was released by the Blue Jays on Wednesday morning.

According to Baseball America’s Kegan Lowe, Revere will be heading back to the free agent market after a mediocre stint in Buffalo with the Triple-A Bisons. Beginning his comeback with the Jays in extended spring, Revere appeared in a total of eight games for the Bisons, going 10-for-35 in this stint.

Posting a slash line of .286/.286/.371 is miserable at best but Revere was brought on just to possibly make a resurgence with the Jays through their desperate need for a capable big-league outfield.

Revere is not that, but why not reconnect with an old friend?

The 31-year-old most likely went straight to the bottom of the outfield depth chart as soon as Bobby Meacham and the Bisons staff started using Cavan Biggio and Lourdes Gurriel Jr. for some outfield rotation and possible appearances with the Blue Jays later on.

In Toronto, they have one of the worst outfields in baseball right now — ranked bottom-five for every offensive category you could think of — they need some help and it might be coming. If either Biggio or Gurriel Jr. turn out to be capable outfielders for the near future, it would surely look much better than having McKinney, Davis, and Grichuk out there in their current form.

With the optioning of Teoscar Hernandez as well, Revere was given the push out of the organization.

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The Toronto Blue Jays got Rowdy on a Tuesday night and crushed the Boston Red Sox 10-3 at home, tying up a four-game series.

Getting the win was Marcus Stroman, going a total of six innings and only allowing one earned run and five hits. Even though the Jays starter allowed six walks, he was able to punch out four batters.

On the other not so empathetic side, Eduardo Rodriguez suffered the rare offensive onslaught by the Jays. Allowing only six hits through five innings, but they produced a total of six earned runs for the pitcher.

Finally the Jays offence was able to kick in for Stroman to notch just his second win on the season, even though he has a 2.95 ERA and 1.29 WHIP through 58 innings pitched. Run support is a hell of a drug.

Worth Mentioning
  • Clearly the highlight(s) of the night, Rowdy Tellez had his first multi-home run game of his career and destroyed some of the video board in the process. Batting in five runs in his two hits, Tellez now has 24 RBI on the season after his eighth home run.

WE GOT SO ROWDY HE BROKE THE VIDEO BOARD pic.twitter.com/mS8srvg4FZ

— Toronto Blue Jays (@BlueJays) May 22, 2019

Rowdy Two-llez

First career multi-homer game! pic.twitter.com/qDjFVzTgZr

— Toronto Blue Jays (@BlueJays) May 22, 2019

  • Vladimir Guerrero Jr. recovered from his absent Victoria Day game with a 2-for-5 performance with two runs as well, both runs scored off Rowdy home runs is the best-case scenario for feeling good about the large sons of the Blue Jays.
  • The Jays as a whole enjoyed a rare high-exit velocity game, Rodriguez must have just loved allowing all of those hard-hit balls. Drury led the way with a two-run double that clocked in at 111.2 mph — the Jays all together had nine batted balls travel over 100 mph.
  • To close-out the game, lefty Tim Mayza came in relief of Stroman and struck-out two batters and allowed a walk in 0.2 innings. Joe Biagini pitched 0.2 innings as well, but allowed one earned run on a home run to Rafael Devers, a blast that went 432 feet into the Rogers Centre stands. Sam “best relief pitcher in baseball” Gaviglio closed out the game with 1.2 innings pitched, allowing one home run but that was the only hit as he was able to strikeout three.
  • This win feels so good after getting absolutely murdered at home to open this series against the disgusting Red Sox. Vlad doing well, Rowdy hitting bombs, Handsome Randy hitting an absolute dinger, Stroman suffocating the Boston offence — for a fleeting moment, baseball was fun again.
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Claimed off waivers by the Blue Jays on Wednesday and assigned to Triple-A Buffalo, pitcher Jimmy Cordero has been promoted up to Toronto.

Ryan Tepera is leaving to see a specialist as he continues to struggle with the elbow troubles that bothered him in the spring. He says he hasn’t been able to get extension he needs on release, pain comes and goes.

— Shi Davidi (@ShiDavidi) May 21, 2019

As mentioned by Shi Davidi, the pitcher going the other way on the roster is reliever Ryan Tepera. He suffered injuries earlier this season from spring training and made his return a few weeks after the season began and has pitched 11 innings since. He might be heading to a lengthy stint on the IL if his problems have re-emerged.

The 27-year-old made his big-league debut last season for the Nationals, pitching 19 innings in 22 relief appearances and sporting a 5.68 ERA. Along with a 1.842 WHIP, Cordero had an even strikeout-to-walk ratio — a 5.7 per nine innings rate for both.

In 2019, Cordero was on the roster of Washington’s Triple-A Fresno and made 12 total appearances, pitching 15 innings with a 6.00 ERA. While in Buffalo this week, he only made one appearance and one inning pitched, allowing no runs and striking-out two batters.

In the minors last season, the Dominican pitcher spent time with Triple-A Syracuse, affiliate of the Mets, making 41 appearances and pitching 46 innings for an impressive 1.96 ERA and a 1.41 WHIP.

The pitcher was originally a Jays international free agent signing back in 2012, but was then later traded in exchange for outfielder Ben Revere in 2015. With both now in their possession, looks like the Jays have clearly won the transaction.

Whether the Jays see the Cordero last year in Syracuse or see the pitcher that has been in the majors so far, they could use any healthy arms with big-league experience as of late. Injuries have had a major impact on the pitching staff this season.

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