Loading...

Follow Italian Language Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

In last week’s blog, we looked at some vocabulary that’s useful for finding your way around in Italy. Here’s a quiz based on interpreting the replies that you may get to your inquiries.

In this scenario, you’ve just arrived by rental car in the little country town of Pontremoli, Lunigiana. You need to find accommodation and something to eat, so you follow signs to the ufficio turistico (tourist office) where you hope to garner some useful information.

Translate the Italian replies below.

All’ufficio turistico:
At the tourist office:

Question: Scusi, c’è un Bed and Breakfast vicino al centro?
Translation: Excuse me, is there a bed and breakfast near the town centre?

Reply: Sì, ecco, c’è il B&B ‘Azzurro’ in via Cairoli, proprio all’entrata di Pontremoli. Ecco una piantina della città.
Your translation: ________________________________

Question: Mi può consigliare un buon bar?
Translation: Can you recommend me a good bar?

Reply: Ce ne sono tanti in centro, ma se vuole assaggiare gli Amor, dolci tipici di Pontremoli, deve andare al Caffè degli Svizzeri, in Piazza della Repubblica, nel centro di Pontremoli.
Your translation: ________________________________

Question: Domani vorrei andare a visitare le Cinque Terre … come ci arrivo?
Translation: I’d like to go and visit le Cinque Terre tomorrow … how do I get there?

Reply: Il modo più semplice per andare alle Cinque Terre è col treno. C’è un treno che parte da Pontremoli alle 9.05 e arriva a Monterosso alle 10.17
Your translation: ________________________________

Question: Dove si trova la stazione?
Translation: Where is the railway station?

Reply: Dal B&B vada a sinistra, attraversi il ponte con le statue e poi giri a destra. Continui sempre dritto lungo questa strada, Via dei Mille, e dopo 500 metri sulla sinistra in alto c’è la stazione.
Your translation: ________________________________

Al bar:
At the bar:

Question: Scusi, posso usare il bagno, per favore?
Translation: Excuse me, can I use the bathroom/toilet please?

Reply: Certamente, è lì dietro, a sinistra.
Your translation: ________________________________

Poi, dopo aver bevuto un ottimo cappuccino ed assaggiato i famosi Amor:
Then, after having drunk a good cappuccino and tasted the famous Amor:

Question: C’è un buon ristorante qui vicino?
Translation: Is there a nice restaurant near here?

Reply: C’è la Trattoria da Mariano, in Piazza del Duomo, accanto alla chiesa.
Your translation: ________________________________

Per la strada:
In the street:

Question: Scusi, è lontano il Castello?
Translation: Excuse me, is the Castle far from here?

Reply: No, è vicino … se vuole può prendere l’ascensore: vada sempre dritto per via Garibaldi, appena esce da Porta Parma a sinistra c’è il tunnel che conduce all’ascensore del Castello.
Your translation: ________________________________

You: Grazie mille!
Translation: Thank you very much!

Reply: Prego! Buona visita al Castello!
Your translation: ________________________________

You spend a few days exploring Pontremoli and its surroundings. Le Cinque Terre is beautiful, but too full of tourists. Now that you’re feeling more confident about asking for information you go back to the friendly bar that has become your ‘regular’, and ask Jessica, la barista, for some advice. This time, translate you question into Italian:

Your question: Jessica, can you recommend me any nice places to visit near the sea where there won’t be many tourists?
Your translation: ________________________________

Il piccolo porto di Le Grazie in Liguria. Qui vicino ci sono i resti di una favolosa villa Romana detta La Villa Romana del Varignano. Merita una visita!

Dear readers, don’t be shy about asking for information in Italian. People are very helpful, and will sometimes even take you where you want to go!

Su, coraggio!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

On the second Sunday of May, like many other countries around the world, we celebrate la Festa della Mamma (Mothering Sunday).

In Italy this festival was first introduced as a business enterprise in 1956 at Bordighera, a town situated on the Ligurian coast, famous for the commerce of ornamental flowers. La Festa della Mamma was so successful that in 1958 it was made an official national festival.

At this latitude, May is the month when many plants are in full blossom, and so it’s natural that flowers, particularly roses, play an important role in la Festa della Mamma.

Here in Lunigiana however, the flower of choice is la giunchiglia (the wild daffodil) which grows profusely amongst the foothills of the Appennino Tosco-Emiliano mountains. In fact at this time of year these beautifully scented white flowers are in full blossom in the nearby Prati di Logarghena (Meadows of Logarghena), which lie at around 1000 meters (3,280 ft.) altitude. It’s an amazing sight: vast expanses of pasture land spangled by these gentle white flowers.

Wild daffodils on i Prati di Logarghena, Lunigiana. Photo by Geoff.

Happily, le giunchiglie are now a protected species, and cannot be picked. So instead of giving mia mamma a bunch of wild daffodils I’m going to dedicate to her a nice little poem called La Parola Più Bella (The Most Beautiful Word), written by the poet Marino Moretti (1885-1979), who was one the main members of the Italian literary movement known as il Crepuscolarismo (lit. the Twilight).

Here’s the poem followed by my English translation:

La Parola Più Bella, di Marino Moretti

Mamma. Nessuna parola è più bella.
La prima che si impara,
la prima che si capisce e che s’ama.
La prima di una lunga serie di parole
con cui s’è risposto alle infinite,
alle amorose, timorose domande
della maternità.

E anche se diventassimo vecchi,
come chiameremmo la mamma
più vecchia di noi?
Mamma.
Non c’è un altro nome.

The Most Beautiful Word, by Marino Moretti

Mother. No other word is more beautiful.
The first that we learn,
the first that we understand and love.
The first of a long series of words,
with which we have answered the infinite,
loving, apprehensive questions
of maternity.

And even if we should become old,
what would we call our mother
who is older than us?
Mother.
There is no other name.

You may also enjoy this post: Wild Daffodils

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

At this time of year many people are starting to dream of a summer vacation in Italy. Time to brush up on that rusty Italian vocabulary?

These days, of course, English is spoken in all the big tourist hotspots, so those places don’t present much of a challenge. But if, like us, you prefer to get off the beaten track, to discover Italy’s hidden gems and interact with the ‘natives’, then you’re going to need to know at least some basic phrases that will help you find your way around.

Summer’s coming, although the late snow that fell last night would seem to belie that notion. Taken from my terrazza this morning: patches of snow amongst the emerald green foliage.

Getting there:

Noleggiare una macchina (hiring a car) can be fun … if you’re prepared to run the gauntlet of Italian roads! But un pullman (a coach), un autobus (a bus), or un treno (a train) is more relaxing, and provides way more opportunities for interacting with the locals! Let’s find that train or bus, shall we?

When referring to the railway station we tend to use the generic term stazione rather than the full title stazione ferroviaria (that’s a relief, isn’t it!). Here are a few ways of asking how to find it:
scusi, dov’è la stazione per favore? = excuse me, where is the railway station please?
or … scusi, dove si trova la stazione per favore? = excuse me, where is the railway station please? (literally: where can the station be found)
or … scusi, mi può dire come arrivare alla stazione per favore? = excuse me, can you tell me how to get to the railway station please?
If you are looking for the bus station then you’ll need to ask for la stazione degli autobus
and the bus stop is la fermata dell’autobus:
scusi, dov’è la fermata dell’autobus per favore? = excuse me, where is the bus stop please?
or … scusi, c’è una fermata dell’autobus qui vicino? = excuse me, is there a bus stop nearby?

Staying there:

Unless you’ve brought a tent with you, or you’re going to sleep on a park bench, you’ll probably want to find un hotel (a hotel … with a silent ‘h’), un albergo (another word for a hotel), una pensione (a boarding house), un bed and breakfast (no translation needed!), un ostello (a hostel), or another form of lodgings.

In order to avoid that park bench, head to the local Ufficio Turistico, or Pro Loco. To find your way there you can ask:
scusi, mi sa dire dove resta l’ufficio turistico/la Pro Loco per piacere? = excuse me, are you able to tell me where the tourist office/Pro Loco is please?
In out of the way places you may not find a tourist office, in which case you’ll have to ask around. Bars are traditionally a good place to start:
scusi, c’è una pensione/un bed and breakfast, ecc. qui vicino? = excuse me, is there a boarding house/B&B, etc. nearby?
Or perhaps you’ve played it safe and booked in advance, so you can ask:
scusi, mi può dire dove si trova l’Hotel Tramonto per piacere? = excuse me, can you tell me where I can find the Hotel Tramonto (Sunset Hotel) please?
scusi, come arrivo all’Albergo dell’Anfiteatro per favore? = excuse me, how do I get to the Albergo Anfiteatro  (Amphitheatre Hotel) please?
scusi, dove’è l’ostello della gioventù per piacere? = excuse me, where is the youth hostel please?

Eating there:

Well done, you’ve successfully avoided sleeping with i barboni (the tramps) in the park … but in the process you’ve worked up quite an appetite!

Why don’t you ask that friendly ragazzo or ragazza who just served you un buon cappuccino al bar (a nice cappuccino at the bar) for some advice? Go on, be courageous!
you could ask: mi può consigliare un ristorante/una pizzeria/una trattoria? = can you recommend me a restaurant/pizzeria/trattoria? (una trattoria is usually more basic and cheaper than un ristorante)

Sight seeing:

Good, we have a place to sleep and a nice full stomach, now it’s time to feed the mind and soul with beautiful things!:

scusi, come si arriva all’anfiteatro per favore? = excuse me, how do you get to the amphitheatre please? (literally: how does one arrive at …?)
scusi, quanto dista il Museo Etrusco? = excuse me, how far is it to the Etruscan Museum?
scusi, dove si trova La Pinacoteca Nazionale per favore? = excuse me, where is the National Art Gallery please?

And last, but certainly not least … finding a toilet!:

Public toilets are often few and far between in Italy, but let’s give it a go:
scusi, c’è un bagno/una toilette/un gabinetto qui vicino?
= excuse me, is there a toilet nearby?
If you don’t have any luck, you may find that your only option is going to a bar and using theirs, in which case you’ll need to ask: scusi, posso usare il bagno/la toilette/il gabinetto per favore? = excuse me, can I use the toilet please? Of course, it’s more polite if you also buy something while you’re there, so treat yourself to another buonissimo caffè!

Summary and Notes

scusi = excuse me (when addressing strangers use the third person singular subjunctive scusi. In less formal situations you can use scusa. If you’re addressing more than one person use scusate)

c’è …? = is there …?

ci sono …? = are there …?

mi può dire …? = can you tell me …? (use mi potete dire …? if speaking to more than one person)

dov’è …? = where is …? (dove = where, è = it is)

dove sono …? = where are …? (dove = where, sono = they are)

dove si trova …? = where is …? (literally: where does one find)

come si arriva a …? = how do you get to …? (literally: how does one arrive at)

come arrivo a …? = how do you I get to …? (literally: how do I arrive at)

quanto dista …? = how far is it …?

mi può consigliare …? = can you recommend me? (if there’s more than one of you then use ci può consigliare …? = can you recommend us?)

Please let us know if there’s anything else in this category that you’d find useful.

Alla Prossima!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Italian is sooo complicated!” you say? So does that mean that English is easy for Italians? ASSOLUTAMENTE NO!

Let’s find out why …

The Italian language is very phonetic, and we learn from an early age how these simple rules of spelling work. Once you’ve learned them you have a pretty good idea how to pronounce any word, although accents may vary. English rules of pronunciation, on the other hand, are very abstract for us, and we pretty much have to learn the language word by word!!!

Take the word ‘awkward‘, for example. This is a word that didn’t make any sense to me when I first read it. I remember encountering it in a novel and asking Geoff: “What does owquard mean?”
A puzzled Geoff took a look at the word and pronounced it for me: “awkward”.
Cosa?!?
In order to pronounce ‘awkward‘ correctly following Italian spelling rules it should be written something like ‘ouqud‘, although there isn’t an exact equivalent for that initial ‘aw‘.

But nothing can beat that horrible group of words containing ‘-ough‘. Can someone please explain why ‘tough‘ is pronounced ‘tuf‘, and ‘though‘ is pronounced ‘tho‘ when there’s only one letter difference between the two words? How can the sound change completely? Ed ecco un’altra di quelle maledette parole: ‘plough‘. Geoff fondly remembers the day he took me out for an autumn drive. As we passed through the countryside I pointed at a field and said: “Look, that field has been pluffed“. Of course, I’d read the word ‘ploughed‘ and interpreted it as ‘pluffed‘, as in ‘enough‘ or ‘rough‘. Geoff loved the image of a huge pair of hands reaching down and pluffing up the field as one might do to a pillow!

Then there are all those words which are spelt exactly the same as each other but pronounced differently (homographs), such as tear (lacrima), which sounds like ‘tia‘, and tear (strappare) which sounds like ‘tair‘, or wind (vento) and wind (serpeggiare, avvolgere). If you asked me to write ‘wind‘ (as in wind up a clock) following Italian rules, I’d spell it ‘uaind‘.

And just to make things really complicated for our poor Italian brains there are those words which are written differently, but pronounced the same (homophones), e.g. ‘brake‘ (frenare) and ‘break‘ (rompere), or ‘bare‘ (nudo) and ‘bear‘ (orso).

This brings us to our next big problem: Pronunciation

In English there are several sounds which don’t exist in Italian and our tongue refuses to get around them. The English sound most hated by us Italians has to be ‘th‘. It just doesn’t want to come out. What we tend to do is make all kinds of contorted lip/tooth configurations, ending up with a mishmash of something between a ‘t‘ and an ‘f‘. Personally, the word I hate most is ‘throat‘ (gola). The combination of ‘th‘ followed by the letter ‘r‘ is horrendous, and for some reason I usually end up with something resembling ‘troath‘. Oddio!

Another confusion is the letter ‘h‘. In Italian l’acca è muta (the h is silent), which is why you often hear Italians saying ‘ome‘ instead of ‘home‘, or ‘oliday‘ instead of ‘holiday‘, and so on.

Italian vowel sounds have less variation than English vowel sounds, and if we combine them with the Italian silent ‘h’ then things get really complicated. How does one distinguish ‘angry‘ from ‘hungry‘? This is a big riddle for Italians, and they often seem to tell you that they’re ‘very angry‘ when in fact they’re just ‘very hungry‘ (quite normal for us … now, where’s the nearest pizzeria?).
And what is the difference between ‘warm‘ (caldo) and ‘worm‘ (verme)? In Italian, we pronounce ‘o‘ as in ‘octet‘, so ‘worm‘ should really be ‘warm‘ …  or is the worm warm? … aiuto!!!

Due to the lack of differentiation between long and short vowels, we can easily end up in deep ‘sheet‘. That double ‘e‘ can seem like an ‘i‘ (as in Italy) to us. So if, for example, we’re at an ‘otel‘ and we find that our bed has a dirty ‘sheet‘ on it … well, this video explains all: WARNING: don’t watch if you’re offended by parolacce (swear words)

The Italian Man Who Went To Malta [FULL VERSION] - YouTube

Another big problem concerns all those letters which you are NOT meant to pronounce, something which is unthinkable for us Italians as we pronounce everything! An Italian friend of mine struggled to find ‘Lester‘ Square on the London Underground map. The nearest she could find, she told me, was ‘Leicester‘ Square, which to her Italian brain was obviously some place called ‘Laychester‘ Square.

Last but not least: the abundance of words ending in consonants! The majority of Italian words, as you know, end with a vowel, hence the famous ‘musicality’ of ‘la bella lingua‘. Italian words simply flow one into another. English words seem too brief and punctuated for us, and it’s so hard to suddenly end on a consonant. That’s why the stereotypical Italian accent “soundsa sometinga lika theesa” … we just don’t feel that words are complete without a little ‘e‘ or ‘a‘ at the end, especially those that have become part of our vocabulary, such as ‘il filme‘ (the film), ‘il busse‘ (the bus), ‘il weekenda‘ (the weekend) and so on. There’s even a satirical Italian version of facebook called ‘facciabuco‘ (face hole).

So, the next time you feel sorry for yourself because “Italian is sooo complicated!” remember: l’inglese non è esattamente facile per noi Italiani.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Here’s my translation of Serena’s tale about her parents romantic encounter.

Come abbiamo detto, intorno al 1957 zio Bill si trovava a Bengasi come soldato dell’esercito britannico di stanza in Libia, che era diventata dominio britannico. Con lui c’erano la moglie Vicky, sorella di mia mamma, e i due figli, nati subito dopo il matrimonio. I figli, ormai grandicelli, andavano a scuola, per cui zia Vicky, che non lavorava, decise di imparare a scrivere a macchina per poi trovare un lavoro come segretaria.
As we said, in around 1957 uncle Bill was in Benghazi as a soldier in the British Army based in Libya, which had become British dominion. With him were his wife Vicky (my mother’s sister) and their two children, born soon after they were married. The children were now older and went to school, so aunt Vicky, who wasn’t working, decided to learn how to type so that she could find work as a secretary.

Papà aveva l’unico negozio di macchine da scrivere in tutta Bengasi, perciò si rivolse a lui per prendere in affitto una macchina da scrivere. Mio padre si rese subito conto che Vicky poteva essergli utile: era madrelingua italiana, ma parlava e scriveva correntemente l’inglese, così le fece una controfferta: vieni in ufficio ad imparare a scrivere a macchina, e nello stesso tempo mi fai da segretaria. Papà infatti aveva ottenuto il contratto per la manutenzione delle macchine da scrivere dell’armata britannica a Bengasi. E così mio padre divenne amico di zio Bill ed era spessissimo a casa loro a pranzo e a cena.
Father had the only typewriter shop in the whole of Benghazi, so she went to him to rent a typewriter. My father immediately realised that Vicky could be useful: she was mother-tongue Italian, but spoke and wrote English fluently, so he made her a counteroffer: come to my office to learn how to type and at the same time you can be my secretary. Father had, in fact, obtained the contract to service the typewriters of the British army in Benghazi. So my father became uncle Bill’s friend and was often at their house for lunch and dinner.

Nel frattempo, in Italia …
Meanwhile in Italy …

la mamma si era diplomata infermiera e poi dietologa a Roma, e dopo aver fatto vari lavori in giro per l’Italia, aveva ottenuto un posto a La Spezia dove si trovava il resto della sua famiglia. Nel 1958 decise di andare a trovare la sorella Vicky in Libia per le vacanze di Pasqua.
Mother had got both her nursing and dietician certificates in Rome, and after having had various jobs around Italy she obtained a place in La Spezia, where the rest of her family were. In 1958 she decided to go and visit her sister Vicky in Libya for her Easter holidays.

Alla fine di marzo a La Spezia si imbarcò su una nave mercantile, che però aveva anche dei posti disponibili per passeggeri civili. Fece prima scalo in Sicilia, poi a Malta, ed infine approdò a Bengasi il 30 marzo del 1958.
At the end of March she boarded a merchant ship with places available for civilian passengers in La Spezia. It made its first stop in Sicily, then in Malta, and finally docked in Benghazi on the 30th March 1958.

Mamma e Papà da fidanzati.

Proprio quella mattina lo zio Bill era fuori Bengasi per delle manovre militari, per cui zia Vicky chiese a mio papà di andare al porto a prendere sua sorella Rosanna, mentre lei finiva di preparare il pranzo e mettere a posto la casa.
That exact morning uncle Bill was out of Benghazi on military exercises, so Vicky asked my father to go to the port and pick up her sister Rosanna, whilst she finished preparing lunch and tidying up the house.

Fu così che la prima persona che mia mamma vide mentre scendeva la passerella della nave era papà e … fu un colpo di fulmine! “Ho sentito dentro di me una voce che diceva: E’ lui!” raccontava mia madre ogni volta che le chiedevano come si fossero conosciuti.
And so it was that the first person my mother saw whilst she descended the ship’s gang plank was father and … it was love at first sight! (lit. a lightening strike!) “I heard a voice inside me that said: It’s him!” my mother recounted every time someone asked her how they met.

Papà dal canto suo non ha mai voluto dire cosa provò quando vide la mamma, ma fatto sta che la sera di due giorni dopo, il primo aprile, durante una romantica passeggiata al Blue Lagune, le chiese di sposarlo! “Ecco, non hai nessun senso dell’umorismo, non sai neanche riconoscere un pesce d’aprile!” è sempre stata la battuta di papà al romantico ricordo della mamma.
Dad, for his part, never wanted to say what he felt when he saw mother, but the fact is that two days later, on the evening of the 1st of April, during a romantic stroll at the Blue Lagoon, he asked her to marry him! “You have no sense of humour, you can’t even recognise an April fool’s prank!” my father always joked about my mother’s romantic memory.

Da lì in poi le cose sono andate sempre più rapidamente: quattro settimane dopo la mamma doveva tornare a lavorare a La Spezia, mentre papà aveva un corso di aggiornamento ad Ivrea (in Piemonte), alla sede dell’Olivetti. Così presero l’aereo insieme e il 25 aprile arrivarono a Roma, dove abitavano le due sorelle di mio papà.
From that moment on, thing sped up: four weeks later mother had to return to work in La Spezia, whilst father had an update course in Ivrea (Piedmonte) at the Olivetti headquarters. So they caught the plane together, and on the 25th of April they arrived in Rome where two of my father’s sisters lived.

Dopo un paio di giorni andarono a La Spezia, dove la mamma presentò il fidanzato all’esterrefatto padre (la madre si trovava in Brasile, in quel momento), il quale aveva ricevuto un telegramma che diceva: “Prepara tutti i documenti che mi sposo!” Quindi andarono dal parroco, che, dopo un lungo colloquio privato con mio padre, dette il benestare al matrimonio e disse: “Domenica prossima ho un matrimonio. Se venite subito dopo coi testimoni, vi sposo.”
A couple of days later they went to La Spezia, where mother presented her fiance to her flabbergasted father (her mother was in Brazil at the time), who had received a telegram saying: “Get all the documents ready because I’m getting married!” So they went to the priest who, after a long private interview with my father, gave his blessing to the marriage and said: “Next Sunday I’ve got a wedding. If you come straight afterwards with the witnesses I’ll marry you.”

Mamma e Papà coi testimoni il giorno del matrimonio.

E così il 3 maggio 1958, dopo 33 giorni di fidanzamento, i miei genitori si sposarono!
And so on the 3rd of May 1958, after 33 days of engagement, my parents got married!

Sono stati sposati per 57 anni, mio papà è morto nel 2015 all’età di 94 anni, e la mamma, che ha ora 90 anni, vive in una casa famiglia nelle vicinanze di Pontremoli.
They were married for 57 years, my dad died in 2015 at the age of 94, and mum, who is now 90, lives in a family run care home near Pontremoli.

If you have any questions about the translation please leave a comment.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In part 1, I described the events which set the stage for my parents’ romantic meeting in Benghazi, Libya. Here’s how it happened …

Come abbiamo detto, intorno al 1957 zio Bill si trovava a Bengasi come soldato dell’esercito britannico di stanza in Libia, che era diventata dominio britannico. Con lui c’erano la moglie Vicky, sorella di mia mamma, e i due figli, nati subito dopo il matrimonio. I figli, ormai grandicelli, andavano a scuola, per cui zia Vicky, che non lavorava, decise di imparare a scrivere a macchina per poi trovare un lavoro come segretaria.

Papà aveva l’unico negozio di macchine da scrivere in tutta Bengasi, perciò si rivolse a lui per prendere in affitto una macchina da scrivere. Mio padre si rese subito conto che Vicky poteva essergli utile: era madrelingua italiana, ma parlava e scriveva correntemente l’inglese, così le fece una controfferta: vieni in ufficio ad imparare a scrivere a macchina, e nello stesso tempo mi fai da segretaria. Papà infatti aveva ottenuto il contratto per la manutenzione delle macchine da scrivere dell’armata britannica a Bengasi. E così mio padre divenne amico di zio Bill ed era spessissimo a casa loro a pranzo e a cena.

Nel frattempo, in Italia …

la mamma si era diplomata infermiera e poi dietologa a Roma, e dopo aver fatto vari lavori in giro per l’Italia, aveva ottenuto un posto a La Spezia dove si trovava il resto della sua famiglia. Nel 1958 decise di andare a trovare la sorella Vicky in Libia per le vacanze di Pasqua.

Alla fine di marzo a La Spezia si imbarcò su una nave mercantile, che però aveva anche dei posti disponibili per passeggeri civili. Fece prima scalo in Sicilia, poi a Malta, ed infine approdò a Bengasi il 30 marzo del 1958.

Mamma e Papà da fidanzati.

Proprio quella mattina lo zio Bill era fuori Bengasi per delle manovre militari, per cui zia Vicky chiese a mio papà di andare al porto a prendere sua sorella Rosanna, mentre lei finiva di preparare il pranzo e mettere a posto la casa.

Fu così che la prima persona che mia mamma vide mentre scendeva la passerella della nave era papà e … fu un colpo di fulmine! “Ho sentito dentro di me una voce che diceva: E’ lui!” raccontava mia madre ogni volta che le chiedevano come si fossero conosciuti.

Papà dal canto suo non ha mai voluto dire cosa provò quando vide la mamma, ma fatto sta che la sera di due giorni dopo, il primo aprile, durante una romantica passeggiata al Blue Lagune, le chiese di sposarlo! “Ecco, non hai nessun senso dell’umorismo, non sai neanche riconoscere un pesce d’aprile!” è sempre stata la battuta di papà al romantico ricordo della mamma.

Da lì in poi le cose sono andate sempre più rapidamente: quattro settimane dopo la mamma doveva tornare a lavorare a La Spezia, mentre papà aveva un corso di aggiornamento ad Ivrea (in Piemonte), alla sede dell’Olivetti. Così presero l’aereo insieme e il 25 aprile arrivarono a Roma, dove abitavano le due sorelle di mio papà.

Dopo un paio di giorni andarono a La Spezia, dove la mamma presentò il fidanzato all’esterrefatto padre (la madre si trovava in Brasile, in quel momento), il quale aveva ricevuto un telegramma che diceva: “Prepara tutti i documenti che mi sposo!” Quindi andarono dal parroco, che, dopo un lungo colloquio privato con mio padre, dette il benestare al matrimonio e disse: “Domenica prossima ho un matrimonio. Se venite subito dopo coi testimoni, vi sposo.”

Mamma e Papà coi testimoni il giorno del matrimonio.

E così il 3 maggio 1958, dopo 33 giorni di fidanzamento, i miei genitori si sposarono!

Sono stati sposati per 57 anni, mio papà è morto nel 2015 all’età di 94 anni, e la mamma, che ha ora 90 anni, vive in una casa famiglia nelle vicinanze di Pontremoli.

We’ll publish the English translation at the beginning of the next week. Buona Pasqua!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How did you manage with your translation of Serena’s post, L’Incontro – Part 1? Let’s find out!

Cominciamo dalle origini:
Let’s begin from the beginning:

Papà

Nonno Karekin con sua mamma e sua moglie, nonna Vartanush. In piedi ci sono mio papà Nicola e la sorella maggiore Maria. Bengasi, 1923 circa. Grandfather Karekin with his mother and his wife Vartanush. My father Nicola and his elder sister Maria are standing. Bengazi, circa 1923.

Papà, cioè Nicola Cricorian, era nato a Bengasi, in Libia, nel 1921 da genitori armeni. Agli inizi del Novecento i suoi genitori, ancora bambini, erano fuggiti dall’Armenia insieme alle loro famiglie per salvarsi dai genocidi armeni perpetrati dall’Impero Ottomano in Turchia fra il 1896 e il 1915, ed erano arrivati a Bengasi, che a quei tempi faceva anch’essa parte dell’Impero Ottomano, ma essendo lontana dalla Turchia era tranquilla.
Father, that is Nicola Cricorian, was born in 1921 to Armenian parents in Benghazi, Libya. At the beginning of the 1900’s his parents, who were babies at the time, had fled from Armenia with their families to save themselves from the Armenian Genocide perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire in Turkey between 1896 and 1915. They had arrived in Benghazi, which at the time was also part of the Ottoman Empire but, being far from Turkey, was peaceful.

Nel 1911 la Libia fu conquistata dall’Italia, che la tolse ai turchi, e quelle poche famiglie armene che si trovavano lì vennero riconosciute italiane a tutti gli effetti. Così mio padre e i suoi fratelli andarono alle scuole italiane, parteciparono alle colonie estive per i figli dei coloni italiani in Libia, e infine papà combatté con l’esercito italiano nella campagna d’Africa durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale.
In 1911, Libya was conquered by Italy, who took it from the Turks, and the few Armenian families that were there were effectively recognised as Italians. So my father and his siblings went to Italian schools, participated in the summer camps for children of Italian settlers in Libya, and my father eventually fought with the Italian army in the African campaign during the Second World War.

Alla fine della guerra mio padre e suo fratello decisero di restare in Libia, che nel frattempo era diventata dominio inglese, avendo l’Italia perso la guerra. Quindi dovettero rinunciare alla cittadinanza italiana e presero quella libica. Papà, che durante i tre anni di prigionia nei campi francesi aveva imparato ad aggiustare le macchine da scrivere, aprì un ufficio di macchine da scrivere Olivetti a Bengasi.
At the end of the war my father and his brother decided to stay in Libya which, in the meantime, had become British domain because Italy had lost the war. They therefore had to give up their Italian citizenship and take up Libyan citizenship. Father, who during his three years as a prisoner in the French POW camps had learnt to fix typewriters, opened an Olivetti typewriter office in Benghazi.

Qui ci fermiamo, per il momento, e vediamo la storia della mamma.
We’ll stop here for the moment, and take a look at my mother’s story.

Mamma

Mia mamma Rosanna, a destra, con le sorelle. A sinistra Maria Luigia detta Lola, al centro Vittorina detta Vicky, che sostiene Carmen, detta Cicci. Pesaro, agosto 1933. To the right, my mother Rosanna with her sisters. To the left is Maria Luigia, known as Lola, in the centre is Vittorina, known as Vicky, holding Carmen, known as Cicci. Pesaro, August 1933.

La mamma, cioè Rosanna Marcacci, è nata a Porretta Terme, vicino a Bologna, nel 1929. Agli inizi della Seconda Guerra Mondiale si trovava con le sue tre sorelle in collegio a Pesaro, sulla costa adriatica, perché i loro genitori erano andati coloni in Abissinia (Africa Orientale, oggi Etiopia). Nel settembre 1943, durante l’avanzata degli Alleati, la sua famiglia fu sfollata a Mombaroccio, una cittadina nell’entroterra, dove viveva uno zio, che faceva il prete, e per questo era sempre chiamato lo Zio Prete. Credo che il suo vero nome fosse Olindo!
Mother, that is Rosanna Marcacci, was born at Porretta Terme near Bologna in 1929. At the beginning of the Second World War she was at boarding school in Pesaro, on the Adriatic coast with her three sisters, their parents having gone to Abyssinia (in East Africa, today called Ethiopia) as colonists. During the allied advance in September 1943 her family was evacuated to the inland town of Mombaroccio, where an uncle lived. This uncle was a priest, and for that reasons he was always referred to as ‘Uncle Priest’. I believe his real name was Olindo!

Per Mombaroccio però passava la Linea Gotica e per un lungo periodo furono proprio sul fronte fra i tedeschi in ritirata e gli alleati che avanzavano. La famiglia della mamma viveva nella canonica con lo Zio Prete, ma essendo questa l’edificio più importante di Mombaroccio, fu presto requisito dal comando tedesco per i suoi ufficiali, mentre alla famiglia di mia madre vennero concesse solo un paio di stanze.
The Gothic Line* passed by Monbarrocio however, and for a long time they were right on the front line between the retreating Germans and the advancing Allies. Mother’s family lived in the rectory with Uncle Priest, but as this was the most important building in Mombaroccio it was soon requisitioned by the German high command for its officers, and my mother’s family were given just a couple of rooms.

Nell’agosto 1944 ci fu l’offensiva alleata, e il 28 agosto entrarono i canadesi a Mombaroccio. A settembre la mamma con tutta la famiglia fece finalmente ritorno a Pesaro. Fu qui che la sorella maggiore di mia mamma, Vittorina detta Vicky, incontrò Bill, un soldato inglese, e nel luglio del 1946 si sposarono.
In August 1944 the Allied offensive took place, and on the 28th of October the Canadians entered Mombaroccio. In September, mother, with all her family, finally returned to Pesaro. It was here that my mother’s elder sister, Vittorina, known as Vicky, met Bill, an English soldier, and in July 1946 they were married.

Alla fine della guerra, Bill decise di rimanere nell’esercito, e qualche anno dopo, nel 1957 circa, fu postato a Bengasi, che era ora dominio britannico.
At the end of the war, Bill decided to stay in the army, and a few years later, in about 1957, he was posted to Benghazi, which was now under British rule.

Notes:
la Linea Gotica* (the Gothic Line) was a German defensive line which spanned from just below La Spezia on the west coast to Pesaro (and then Rimini) on the east coast.

Nella prossima puntata vi racconterò l’incontro fra mamma e papà.
In the next episode I’ll tell you how my mother and father met.

Potete leggere la storia di mio padre durante la guerra in questo link:
You can read the story of my father during the war at this link:
My Father’s War

Potete leggere il diario di mia nonna durante la guerra in questo link:
You can read the diary of my grandmother during the war at this link:
My Grandmother’s War Diary

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Every now and then, people ask me why I was born and grew up in Benghazi, Libya. So I’ve decided to write a brief story explaining all.

N.B. Today I’m going to write in Italian, my mother tongue. By the end of the week Geoff will publish an English version which should answer any queries you may have about a translation.

Cominciamo dalle origini:

Papà

Nonno Karekin con sua mamma e sua moglie, nonna Vartanush. In piedi ci sono mio papà Nicola e la sorella maggiore Maria. Bengasi, 1923 circa.

Papà, cioè Nicola Cricorian, era nato a Bengasi, in Libia, nel 1921 da genitori armeni. Agli inizi del Novecento i suoi genitori, ancora bambini, erano fuggiti dall’Armenia insieme alle loro famiglie per salvarsi dai genocidi armeni perpetrati dall’Impero Ottomano in Turchia fra il 1896 e il 1915, ed erano arrivati a Bengasi, che a quei tempi faceva anch’essa parte dell’Impero Ottomano, ma essendo lontana dalla Turchia era tranquilla.

Nel 1911 la Libia fu conquistata dall’Italia, che la tolse ai turchi, e quelle poche famiglie armene che si trovavano lì vennero riconosciute italiane a tutti gli effetti. Così mio padre e i suoi fratelli andarono alle scuole italiane, parteciparono alle colonie estive per i figli dei coloni italiani in Libia, e infine papà combatté con l’esercito italiano nella campagna d’Africa durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale.

Alla fine della guerra mio padre e suo fratello decisero di restare in Libia, che nel frattempo era diventata dominio inglese, avendo l’Italia perso la guerra. Quindi dovettero rinunciare alla cittadinanza italiana e presero quella libica. Papà, che durante i tre anni di prigionia nei campi francesi aveva imparato ad aggiustare le macchine da scrivere, aprì un ufficio di macchine da scrivere Olivetti a Bengasi.

Qui ci fermiamo, per il momento, e vediamo la storia della mamma.

Mamma

Mia mamma Rosanna, a destra, con le sorelle. A sinistra Maria Luigia detta Lola, al centro Vittorina detta Vicky, che sostiene Carmen, detta Cicci. Pesaro, agosto 1933.

La mamma, cioè Rosanna Marcacci, è nata a Porretta Terme, vicino a Bologna, nel 1929. Agli inizi della Seconda Guerra Mondiale si trovava con le sue tre sorelle in collegio a Pesaro, sulla costa adriatica, perché i loro genitori erano andati coloni in Abissinia (Africa Orientale, oggi Etiopia). Nel settembre 1943, durante l’avanzata degli Alleati, la sua famiglia fu sfollata a Mombaroccio, una cittadina nell’entroterra, dove viveva uno zio, che faceva il prete, e per questo era sempre chiamato lo Zio Prete. Credo che il suo vero nome fosse Olindo!

Per Mombaroccio però passava la Linea Gotica e per un lungo periodo furono proprio sul fronte fra i tedeschi in ritirata e gli alleati che avanzavano. La famiglia della mamma viveva nella canonica con lo Zio Prete, ma essendo questa l’edificio più importante di Mombaroccio, fu presto requisito dal comando tedesco per i suoi ufficiali, mentre alla famiglia di mia madre vennero concesse solo un paio di stanze.

Nell’agosto 1944 ci fu l’offensiva alleata, e il 28 agosto entrarono i canadesi a Mombaroccio. A settembre la mamma con tutta la famiglia fece finalmente ritorno a Pesaro. Fu qui che la sorella maggiore di mia mamma, Vittorina detta Vicky, incontrò Bill, un soldato inglese, e nel luglio del 1946 si sposarono.

Alla fine della guerra, Bill decise di rimanere nell’esercito, e qualche anno dopo, nel 1957 circa, fu postato a Bengasi, che era ora dominio britannico.

Nella prossima puntata vi racconterò l’incontro fra mamma e papà.

A presto!

Potete leggere la storia di mio padre durante la guerra in questo link:
My Father’s War

Potete leggere il diario di mia nonna durante la guerra in questo link:
My Grandmother’s War Diary

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Today, I’m dedicating a poem by Alda Merini (1931-2009) to my dear husband Geoff, who sometimes complains that the verb sentire (to feel) is used for too many different actions: to hear, to smell, to taste, and to feel.

In reality, we do actually have specific nouns and verbs to describe i cinque sensi (the five senses).
Eccoli (here they are):

la vista = sight
verb: vedere = to see

l’udito = hearing
verb: udire = to hear. This is irregular in the present tense: io odo, tu odi, lui ode, noi udiamo, voi udite, loro odono

l’olfatto = smell
verb: odorare = to smell

il gusto = taste
verb: gustare = to taste

il tatto = touch
verb: toccare = to touch

However, apart from la vista, which always uses the verb vedere, all the other senses commonly use the verb sentire, e.g.:
ho sentito un rumore strano = I heard a strange noise
si sente il sapore del cloro nell’acqua = you can taste chlorine in the water; il sapore del cloro = the taste of chlorine
sento un odore delizioso = I smell a delicious smell
senti com’è morbido! = feel how soft it is!

We also use sentire for feelings, e.g.:
sento pena per lui = I feel sorry for him
quando vedo il mare sento una grande felicità = when I see the sea I feel great happiness

The verb sentire is used in this way for a reason: the word senso (sense) comes from the Latin verb sentire, which means ‘to perceive an external stimulus, either physically through the five senses or emotionally’. In fact English words such as sentiment (sentimento) and sentimental (sentimentale) come from the same root.

Geoff by the sea.

So, here’s Alda Merini’s beautiful poem which pays homage to this very important Italian verb. English translation by Serena.

Mi Piace Il Verbo Sentire…, di Alda Merini:

Mi piace il verbo sentire…
Sentire il rumore del mare,
sentirne l’odore.
Sentire il suono della pioggia
che ti bagna le labbra,
sentire una penna che traccia
sentimenti su un foglio bianco.
Sentire l’odore di chi ami,
sentirne la voce
e sentirlo col cuore.
Sentire è il verbo delle emozioni,
ci si sdraia sulla schiena del mondo
e si sente…

I Like The Verb To Feel…, by Alda Merini:

I like the verb to feel…
To feel the noise of the sea,
to feel its smell.
To feel the sound of the rain
that wets your lips,
to feel a pen portraying
feelings on a white sheet.
To feel the smell of the one you love,
to feel his voice,
and to feel him with your heart.
To feel is the verb of emotions,
you lay down on the back of the world
and you feel…

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview