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As a social media junkie enthusiast, “taking a break from social media” is not an expression I ever imagined using for myself! No, I’m not fired (phew) nor am I taking a social media free month ! I will just be on maternity leave the next few months, so our journal’s blog, twitter and facebook will not be regularly updated (but there might be the occasional surprise!). However, as we love social media, we will be back! Stay tuned! Till then, have a look at the table of contents of our latest issue . If you get inspired and would like to submit a paper in our journal, have a look at our website where our aims and scope is indicated, as well as the instructions to authors. For tweets related to IJPH and other public health related papers, have a look at the Springer Public Health twitter account!

In the meantime I wish you all the best and see you soon!

Thomy Tonia

Social Media Editor

International Journal of Public Health

The post IJPH is taking a short break from social media- but we’ll be back! appeared first on International Journal of Public Health.

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Growing urbanization and social inequality increases the risk of violence and is preventing urban areas reaching their full potential. So, what can be done to build trust and common ground between historically adversarial civil society and law enforcement sectors in the Global South?

Rob Worrall (right) and Finn Kjaerulf (left)

*This is a guest blog post by Rob Worrall, PhD and Finn Kjaerulf. Rob is the lead author of a recently published IJPH paper on how a leadership development programme has enabled trust building between civil society and law enforcement leaders as part of an Intersectoral Urban Violence Prevention (IUVP) programme in Kenya. Rob has just taken up a new role as a Leadership and Management Specialist for the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) in Dublin, Ireland.

The co-author of this article Finn Kjaerulf is a social scientist with more than twenty years’ experience of working with local partner organizations on urban violence, security, protection and prevention  especially in Central America and East Africa.

Much has been written about the causes and complexity of urban violence and there is an increasing acceptance that reducing it requires effective collaboration between opposing sectors. However, much less has been written about how to work with local partner organizations to build this collaborative capability.

After completing my PhD in Place-Based Leadership Development (P-BLD), I was keen to ensure that the product of my research would have a real-world impact. A chance meeting in a swimming pool with Finn Kjaerulf, Urban Violence Prevention Manager of DIGNITY (The Danish Institute Against Torture) has enabled me to fulfil this goal. Working with DIGNITY’s local Kenyan partner the MidRift Human Rights Network, and following successful pilot workshops in Nakuru (Oct 2016) and Naivasha (Dec 2016), our fruitful and ongoing collaboration has led to the development of a three-year (2017-2019) P-BLD programme for IUVP in both places. We are developing the capability of two cohorts of 25 leaders working together in intersectoral urban violence prevention and building trust between them. This shared journey of self-development, mutual learning and discovery is enabling these leader collaboratives to enact place-based violence reduction

The impact of our work has been recognised by the awarding of the Ruskin Medal for real world impact. Today we are very proud to present some of our key findings from the lived experience of the intersectoral leaders from the initial P-BLD programme sessions which took place in March 2017.

This paper provides an analysis of how a unique Place-Based Leadership Development programme has enabled leaders to surface and explicitly address the emotional, relational and structural tensions they face in working together.  This has built trust, mutual respect and common understanding as a firm foundation for combating urban violence in an evidence-based approach which is replicable within urban areas across the world.

Indeed, in 2018 we have been working with local partners delivering further pilot workshops within different cultural, social and geographical settings in municipalities in Uganda and Guatemala further building the evidence base. We are currently presenting the findings of this embedded implementation research at academic conferences, to be followed by submissions to appropriate academic journals.

The post Building Local Leadership Collaboratives to Reduce Urban Violence appeared first on International Journal of Public Health.

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A while ago we opened a call for papers called “Environmental and health equity” with the occasion of the EcoHealth Conference (which will be held on 15-18 August 2018 in Cali, Colombia).

We received a lot of submissions and some papers were finally accepted for publication, after peer review. Out of those, 3 were pre-selected for taking part in the voting process by experts in the field. This process is now completed and we are happy to announce the winner! Collecting 42% of the 71 anonymous votes, the winner is….

Kai Liu, from the Department of Social Security, School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China in Beijing, with the paper called “Health inequality and community-based health insurance: a case study of rural Rwanda with repeated cross-sectional data”. This paper is available to download (pdf here). You can also see the abstracts of the other award candidates by clicking here.

On behalf of our Editors in Chief, we would like to congratulate Kai Liou and co-authors (Benjamin Cook and Chunling Lu) for their contribution and their success! And of course thank you to everyone who submitted their work and the experts who voted!

Tell us what you think and don’t forget to follow the EcoHealth Conference on Facebook and Twitter!

The post We have a winner! Best paper on environmental and health equity appeared first on International Journal of Public Health.

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Are you an early-stage researcher, holding a Master’s degree and interested in conducting research in Public Health Sciences? The Swiss School of Public Health+ is offering a fantastic Global PhD Program in Public Health Sciences (GlobalP3HS) .

Could *you* be the recipient of one of the 50 doctoral fellowships [co-funded by Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (Horizon 2020 – COFUND)] that will come to one of the eight Swiss founding universities of the Foundation Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+) to purse your PhD! Read all the information of this first call for applications here!

Deadline for applications is on October 12th 2018.

The post The SSPH+ Global PhD Program in Public Health Sciences is looking for candidates! appeared first on International Journal of Public Health.

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When you read a scientific paper or when you write one yourself, have you ever wondered what happens on the other side? What exactly do reviewers and Editors do? How do they make their decisions? What constitutes a good peer-reviewer? And how does an Editor chose what will finally get published? Sometimes you might have thought that you would be a better reviewer or a better journal editor. But there might be skills required you are not aware of and challenges ahead you might not have imagined. Would you like to learn more?

We are happy to announce the upcoming course called “Walking in the Editors’ shoes: Peer reviewing and journal editing for young researchers in health sciences”. This course is offered by the PhD Program in Health Sciences of the University of Basel and it is aimed at early career scientists (PhD students and postdocs) who might be involved in manuscript peer review as authors and reviewers. It offers both theoretical background and hands on training in evaluating manuscripts in all stages of peer review. From prescreen to final decision, the course offers the possibility to take the role of reviewer, handling editor and even editor in chief! The course participants will have the chance to get a glimpse of the insights of the work done by using real world examples from an interdisciplinary public health journal (ours!). One of our Editors in Chief, Nino Künzli and our Managing Editor, Anke Berger will be teaching in this course!

With this course you will:

  • Learn about pre-screen and peer-review criteria
  • Get trained to write useful reviews
  • Learn how to evaluate revisions, take decisions on manuscripts and communicate them appropriately
  • Learn best practice standards in scientific publishing
  • Get familiar with tools to handle misconduct
  • Understand editorial strategies to increase the impact of a journal
  • Get informed about the latest trends in peer review and scholarly publishing
  • Improve your reviewing skills
  • Prepare for an appointment as associate editor

Want to have more details on this course? Then have a look at the course flyer! If you want to attend, make sure you register by 15 September 2018 following this link!

The post Walking in the editors’ shoes! Course on peer-reviewing and journal editing for young researchers in health sciences appeared first on International Journal of Public Health.

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