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The psychological and physical benefits of openers, what role pain tolerance plays in performance, how to increase confidence and speed in descents, plus your live questions will all be covered in Episode 211 of the Ask a Cycling Coach Podcast.

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Pain Tolerance, Body Fat, Descending and More – Ask a Cycling Coach 211 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • How Nate is becoming a fast descender!
  • What is the best mountain bike for a beginner?
  • Tips to increase confidence with mountain biking
  • Jonathan’s bike setup for Leadville
  • Tahoe Trail 100 course preview
  • Should you avoid events longer than your goal race?
  • How to recover from a big race
  • How the Leadville corral system works
  • How cortisol affects your training
  • A deep dive into how your body uses fat
  • How to find your w/kg limit
  • How to taper for intense events
  • How to balance climbing and descending training
  • What is Variability Index and how to use it
  • What role does pain tolerance play in performance?

Pain Tolerance, Body Fat, Descending and More – Ask a Cycling Coach 211 - SoundCloud
(6278 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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Clif Bar Racing’s Pete Morris will join us for a deep dive into the mechanics of a sprint, how much FTP increase you can expect in a year, equipment tips for the Leadville 100, how to regain motivation and more!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Sprinting, FTP Increase, Leadville Equipment and More – Ask a Cycling Coach 210 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • Carson City Off-Road race analysis
  • Congrats to the Stans-Pivot Pro Team and Clif Bar Racing’s Nick Gibb!
  • Course recon tips
  • Triathlon relay tips
  • Low hanging “aero” fruit
  • How to train for a specific course
  • How to know your limits without power
  • What most people misunderstand about fueling rides
  • How to train for races that start hard
  • A deep dive on the mechanics of a sprint
  • Leadville equipment tips
  • How much FTP increase is normal in a year?
  • How to regain motivation

Sprinting, FTP Increase, Leadville Equipment and More – Ask a Cycling Coach 210 - SoundCloud
(7775 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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Special guest and 4x Argentine National Champion Sofía Gomez Villafañe of the Stans Pivot Pro Team joins us for a preview of Nate & Sofía’s Cape Epic plans, a deep dive into DOMS, race strategy and more!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Cape Epic, DOMS, Strategy with Sofía Gomez Villafañe – Ask a Cycling Coach 209 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • 4x Argentine National Champion, Sofía Gomez Villafañe
  • Outside workouts are live!
  • Epic Rides Carson City Off-Road Preview
  • Nate and Sofía’s Cape Epic plan
  • Strength training benchmarks
  • How to build an MTB race strategy
  • How to get better at sustained power
  • How to drop somebody that’s faster than you
  • Is muscle pain proportional to training load or quality?
  • A deep dive on DOMS
  • How to feel okay with celebrating
  • How to gain “free” speed
Cape Epic, DOMS, Strategy with Sofía Gomez Villafañe – Ask a Cycling Coach 209 - SoundCloud
(6664 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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Why Outside Workouts?

The key to getting faster is structured training. Since most people don’t want to spend all of their time riding indoors, outside workouts ensure users have the same access to high-quality, structured training when they are outside.

Now you can get faster year-round, inside or out, with TrainerRoad outside workouts on your Garmin Edge or Wahoo head unit (Wahoo coming soon).

Outside-Optimized Workout Library

Every workout in your training plan has an outside-optimized version to make it easier to follow when riding outside, but still deliver the training benefit you need.

Every workout in our training plans has an outside-optimized version.

We accomplished this through a lot of research and testing. Every workout in our training plans aims to bring about specific adaptations for an athlete in appropriate ways. For example, one workout may target an increase in muscular endurance with longer, more sustained work at a lower intensity, while another workout may target an increase in repeatability by having you do short, high-intensity repeats with time between efforts being equally short and at threshold.

We want to make sure those adaptations still occur, but some of those interval formats are too difficult to follow outside. In those scenarios, we created workouts specifically around the context of riding outside that would still fulfill the original need of the workout, but you don’t need to worry about any of that. All you have to do is stick to the plan, inside or out, and you’ll get faster.

How Do I Use Outside Workouts?

The first step is to re-authorize your Garmin Connect sync so that your workouts can be sent from TrainerRoad to your head unit. If you haven’t synced Garmin Connect and TrainerRoad yet, the process will be the same.

Once you’ve synced the accounts, there are two ways to make any workout an outside workout.

When adding a plan to your calendar, not only can you select which days you typically train, but you can also specify which days you typically ride outside. This is a handy feature for those Saturday group rides, or mid-week evening rides.

You can also make any workout that is on your calendar an outside workout by clicking on the workout, and selecting “outside”. If you find yourself not able to ride outside as planned, you can click “inside” to make any workout an inside workout as well.

Once a workout has been made an outside workout, sync your Garmin Edge head unit with Garmin Connect and load the workout from the “Training” menu on your head unit.

Best Practices For Outside Workouts

In our research and testing of this feature, we have a few tips on how to get the most from it, and be as safe as possible when on the road.

Create a Custom Screen

For the closest thing to following a TrainerRoad workout, we recommend creating a custom screen with the following data fields: Elapsed Time, 3 Second Power, Lap Power, and Time to Go.

It’s important to note that not all Garmin Edge devices will have Time to Go. In that case, we recommend having Lap Time.

Once it has been created, order your new custom screen next to the standard Garmin workout screen so you can easily reference both.

Executing a Workout

Once you’ve loaded your workout and started riding, we recommend switching to your custom screen. We’ve designed the warmups to be flexible in intensity and duration, and your warmup interval won’t end until you hit lap. We recommend riding until you have reached the spot where you want to do your intervals, then hitting lap to exit the warmup and start your first interval. Once you hit lap, you will see the duration and power target range for the first interval.

With workouts that have singular sets of intervals (4 sets of 8 minutes at Sweetspot, for example), you will need to push the lap button to begin a work interval. This lets you make sure you are in a safe and appropriate location to start the interval.

Workouts that have short intervals grouped together within a single set (4 sets of 16 x 5 seconds at Anaerobic, for example), the workout will automatically advance between rest and work intervals. Once you have completed a single set of those intervals and recovered for the specified time, you will have to hit lap to start the next set.

These differing formats will seem natural once you get out and do them, and it makes the process of following an outside workout much easier.

Safety

This should go without saying, but riding on the road is inherently dangerous for many reasons. Please be careful to select low-traffic areas with sufficient space and visibility to do your workouts, and remember, staring at your head unit is a bad idea.

Once you settle into the interval, you will recognize what that power target feels like, and we encourage you to pay attention to and hold onto that feeling, occasionally checking in with your head unit, rather than staring at it constantly to make sure you are on target. Your power will fluctuate outside more than it does on the trainer, but that’s okay. You’ll smooth out over time, and safety always comes first.

FAQ’s
  • I don’t have a power meter. Can I still use outside workouts?
    Yes. When you click on a workout in your calendar to make it an outside workout, you can toggle the workout between “Power Based” and “RPE Based”. RPE Based workouts will give you RPE targets for each interval.

  • I don’t have a Garmin head unit. Are you going to support other brands?
    As of the publish date of this post, we are working on Wahoo support. We don’t anticipate supporting other head units, but if the demand is sufficient for another brand, we will support it.

  • Why do some outside workouts have a different name than my scheduled TrainerRoad workouts?
    Not all TrainerRoad workouts are easily completed outside. To address this, we created many new “outside approved” workouts designed to give the same training benefit as their inside counterpart.

    The other example of this is with Endurance workouts. Since many of these follow a more generic structure, these are grouped together so that one outside workout would be prescribed for a group of inside workouts.

  • Why are some outside workout equivalents longer than my scheduled TrainerRoad workouts?
    Riding outside is less efficient. Things like terrain, stoplights, and weather have to be taken into account when heading out to ride. Riding inside controls all of these external factors, and therefore allows the workouts to be incredibly precise. To account for these external factors, many TrainerRoad outside workout equivalents will be between 15 and 60 minutes longer (depending on TR workout length) to ensure you are getting the same training benefit while riding outside.

  • Why aren’t outside workouts visible on the desktop apps?
    We are working on the ability to swap between Inside and Outside workouts in the desktop apps, so stay tuned for that functionality!

  • Is there a library of outside workouts I can view?
    Not yet. We have plans to continue building more outside workouts, but need to restructure parts of the website for outside workouts to be clearly understandable at a glance.

  • Can I export an outside workout to my Wahoo or other head unit?
    We are working on support for sending outside workouts to Wahoo head units. We have no plans for other head units at this time.

  • Where can I find more information on outside workouts?
    Search Forum.TrainerRoad.com and see these articles in our Help Center:
    Outside Workouts Overview
    Pushing an Outside Workout to Garmin
    Creating a Custom Garmin Screen
    Garmin Workout Sync Best Practices
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Team Clif Bar Racing’s Pete Morris joins us again as we go over Coach Chad’s strength training plan, how to gain weight and get faster, what your heart rate data means during a ramp test, and much more!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Strength Training, Heart Rate and Testing, Elevation & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 208 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • How to increase your FTP with TrainerRoad
  • Why you experience numbness when riding hard
  • Barely holding on to a fast group, or leading a slower group: What’s best?
  • How to use an olympic tri to prep for a Half-Ironman
  • How to taper before a Half-Ironman
  • Why course replica workouts aren’t good training
  • How to make the most of course reconnaissance
  • Tips to avoid a tight lower back
  • How elevation affects pacing
  • How to use “negative split” pacing
  • How to pick the right gearing for a climb
  • How to gain weight and get faster
  • Coach Chad’s Strength Training Recommendations
  • Should you reach max heart rate during a ramp test?
  • How to make a hot and humid room cool and dry
  • Training in the heat vs. cold
  • Tech that measures recovery
Strength Training, Heart Rate and Testing, Elevation & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 208 - SoundCloud
(7752 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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To be a faster cyclist, you need to be a strong cyclist. Strength limitations are too commonly a performance limiter whether riders recognize it or not. These limitations also correlate strongly with bone deficiency and muscle atrophy in the lesser-used, ‘non-cycling’ muscles, so we’ve created guidelines to address these strength-related shortcomings and make you faster.

Strength That Makes You Faster

We’ve assigned three levels to endurance athletes ascending from Level One (Basic strength requirements) to Level Two (Intermediate strength requirements) to Level Three (Advanced strength requirements). These requirements are based on our perception of the differing strength demands of particular cycling disciplines.

Careful consideration has been given to the mass:benefit ratio, i.e., the performance benefit of added muscle mass related to the amount of work necessary to carry the added body weight. For example, the benefit of one added pound of mass seen by a criterium racer is likely to be greater than that seen by a pure climber. Consideration has also been given to the need for greater strength requirements during longer, multi-hour events.

Level Three (Sprinter)

Criterium Racers, Short Track Cross-Country Mountain Bikers, Gravity-Oriented Mountain Bikers, Enduro Racers, Cyclocross Racers, Track Sprinters

Level Three – Men
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (175lb/80kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 150% BW260 lbs / 120 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 125% BW220 lbs / 100 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat165 lbs / 75 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench165 lbs / 75 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps15 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press100 lbs / 45 kg
Level Three – Women
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (135lb/60kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 105% BW140 lbs / 65 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 87% BW120 lbs / 55 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat90 lbs / 40 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench90 lbs / 40 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps5 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press55 lbs / 25 kg
Level Two (All-Rounder)

Cross-Country Mountain Bikers, Time Trialists, Rolling Road Racers, Cross-Country Marathon Mountain Bikers, Full-Distance Triathletes, Endurance Track Cyclists

Level Two – Men
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (175lb/80kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 100% BW175 lbs / 80 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 75% BW130 lbs / 60 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat100 lbs / 45 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench100 lbs / 45 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps10 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press60 lbs / 30 kg
Level Two – Women
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (135lb/60kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 70% BW95 lbs / 45 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 50% BW70 lbs / 30 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat55 lbs / 25 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench55 lbs / 25 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps3 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press30 lbs / 15 kg
Level One (Climber)

Climbing Road Racers, Sprint Triathletes, Olympic Distance Triathletes, Half-Distance Triathletes, Gravel Racers, Gran Fondo Riders

Level One – Men
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (175lb/80kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 75% BW130 lbs / 60 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 50% BW90 lbs / 40 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat70 lbs / 30 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench70 lbs / 30 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps5 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press40 lbs / 20 kg
Level One – Women
ExercisePrescriptionExample Prescription (135lb/60kg)
Deadlift5 Reps 50% BW70 lbs / 30 kg
Back Squat5 Reps 35% BW50 lbs / 20 kg
Bench Press75% Back Squat35 lbs / 15 kg
Barbell RowSame as Bench35 lbs / 15 kg
Pull/Chin-UpsNumber of Reps1 Reps
Military Press60% Bench Press20 lbs / 10 kg
How to Use This Strength Plan

All recommendations are relative to body weight. Then, in some cases, the recommendations are based on a percentage of a similar lift/excercise. For example, back squat is based on a percentage of body weight, bench press is then based on a percentage of back squat weight, and military press is then based on a percentage of bench press weight. Pull-Up/Chin-Up recommendations are based on our personal views. When necessary, round the specific weight recommendations to the nearest five pound increment for practical purposes.

Women’s recommendations are based on 70% of men’s recommendations for lower body lifts. The upper body requirements are similarly based on percentages of the lower body lifts, just as the men’s requirements are. If you feel the need to adjust these further, please do! We want you to be training at the right intensity.

All of these recommendations are aimed solely at endurance athletes concerned with enhancing their endurance capabilities, improving their basic quality of movement in day-to-day life, decreasing their likelihood on crash-related injuries, and decreasing their odds of bone mass loss and related diseases as well as decreasing the rate of muscle loss that takes place with aging and/or disuse–these standards won’t stand up when leveled at dedicated strength athletes.

Past Level Three requirements, we don’t see the benefit of added strength outweighing the penalty of added body mass and excess time spent training strength over endurance. In other words, the endurance performance returns diminish too far when strength training is emphasized too much.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • When should I incorporate strength training during my training week?
    Getting stronger and getting faster both require adequate recovery, so scheduling your strength training on recovery days is seldom a good idea. Performing your strength work later in the same day as your tougher endurance work allows you to reap better training benefits thanks to higher-quality recovery. Ideally, separate your strength training from your endurance training as much as possible within the same day. For example, perform an endurance workout in the morning, then perform your strength training as late in the day as possible (or vice versa) without negatively impacting your sleep.
  • Do I have to wait until the off-season to start strength training?
    No. Strength training is a year-round necessity if you want to maintain any strength gains you’ve established. Typically, the Base phase is the best time to maximize the volume of strength training (2-3x/week), the Build phase is a good time to transition into heavier lifting (2x/week), and the Specialty phase is the proper time to enter into maintenance training (1-2x/week).
  • How much rest between sets?
    In the interest of furthering strength with no concern for metabolic conditioning (you’ll get that on the bike), recovery between exercises should be thorough. Recovering for at least 3 minutes before repeating an exercise is sufficient when pursuing improvements in strength since it’s the minimum time necessary to adequately restore your anaerobic energy stores for another round of work.
  • What if I’m stronger than these goals?
    Then you’re already as strong as we deem necessary to perform well as an endurance athlete. This probably means that strength deficiency isn’t one of your performance limiters. Further gains are always at your discretion, but we strongly feel that they’re not likely to further enhance your endurance capabilities.
  • I’m very bad at pull-ups, any tips?
    The use of rubber bands like Rogue’s Monster Bands is a great option for anyone training alone. Another option for those training solo is the use of eccentric reps (negatives) or holds. Eccentric reps mean you’ll start with your chin above the bar and slowly descend to the bottom of the movement over the course of a few or several seconds. Holds start with your chin above the bar as well, but this time you simply hang there and resist gravity as long as possible. The use of a spotter to assist your pull-ups is another option.
  • Should I split my exercise into different days? (Upper vs Lower, etc.)
    Split routines are an excellent way to break up strength training, and they’re definitely an option, but they add another workout to your calendar and potentially absorb another possibility for recovery. But if your schedule accommodates a split routine, you can separate your exercises into pushing days & pulling days or upper body & lower body days.
  • Can I do variations of any of these exercises? For example dumbbell bench press instead of barbell bench press?
    Variations are always welcome and encouraged, especially if your gains have plateaued below your goal weights or reps. But if you’re looking to adhere to our particular movement/weight recommendations, variations should be used supplementally rather than as replacements for the exercises we’ve specified.
  • Do I have to do all the exercises in the same session in order for it to count?
    No. You can achieve all of your goal weights/reps on different days as long as they aren’t separated by an unreasonable length of time. Ideally, you’ll complete all of your goal weight/reps within the same week.
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What it takes to win a World Cup STXC race, a deep dive on how the body cools itself, how cyclists should be using protein and BCAA, and much more in Episode 206 of the Ask a Cycling Coach Podcast!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

FTP Improvement, Sleep Deep Dive, Training Outside & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 207 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • New TrainerRoad apps!
  • How to do TrainerRoad workouts outside
  • Coach Jonathan’s mini training camp
  • How to incorporate and recover from a training camp
  • How to train as a busy parent
  • Time management techniques for busy athletes
  • A deep dive on sleep and performance
  • How to be a better descender
  • The risks of using race data to update your FTP
  • Cramming for an ultra-endurance race
  • Stage race preparation tips
  • The Mongolia Bike Challenge
FTP Improvement, Sleep Deep Dive, Training Outside & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 207 - SoundCloud
(7419 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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What it takes to win a World Cup STXC race, a deep dive on how the body cools itself, how cyclists should be using protein and BCAA, and much more in Episode 206 of the Ask a Cycling Coach Podcast!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

How to Win a World Cup Race, Cooling, Protein & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 206 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • (2:50) Chloe Woodruff’s World Cup STXC win!
  • (5:45) Advice for cyclists with diabetes
  • (10:20) How to pace an ultra-distance race
  • (15:40) Why more people should do low-volume plans
  • (21:35) Hacks and tips for fitting in training with a busy schedule
  • (31:00) Do topical skin products affect cooling?
  • (33:40) A deep dive on cooling
  • (44:05) Are baselayers effective?
  • (48:30) A deep dive on protein and BCAA for cyclists
  • (1:05:00) Understanding race prioritization
  • (1:11:55) Returning from a crash
  • (1:32:35) When should you use solid foods on the bike?
  • (1:40:10) How to be fast for an entire race series
How to Win a World Cup Race, Cooling, Protein & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 206 - SoundCloud
(6814 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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Hot weather training and racing tips, why you might not need rest weeks, tips for aerodynamic field testing and more, all covered in this week’s episode of the Ask a Cycling Coach Podcast. Join us live this Thursday at 8:00am Pacific!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Hot Weather Tips, Rest Weeks, Aero Field Testing & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 205 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • How to beat hot weather
  • Why you may not actually need rest weeks
  • Are hiking and stair running good cross training
  • How to balance training with pregnancy
  • How long can you ride in the Sweet Spot zone?
  • How the digestive system reacts to a race
  • Tips for riders with small hands
  • Tips for aerodynamic field testing
  • How to pin your race number
Hot Weather Tips, Rest Weeks, Aero Field Testing & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 205 - SoundCloud
(6813 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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Join us for discussions on dominant team tactics, the best pre-workout snacks, a guide to understanding CTL and more!

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.

Dominant Team Tactics, Pre-Workout Snacks, Understanding CTL & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 204 - YouTube
Topics covered in this episode
  • What to pay attention to when you pre-ride a course
  • Tire pressure: how low is too low?
  • Why you should start with lower pressure than you think
  • How to develop a Plan B race strategy
  • Pacing long climbs
  • A guide to understanding CTL
  • Why are you always out of breath climbing stairs?
  • Should you ride with a flat or rounded back?
  • Why you can put out power on climbs, but not flats
  • How to be fast on flat terrain
  • Should you eat beans before your next workout?
  • How to counter a dominant team
Pro Stage Race Tips, Altitude and Caloric Burn, Understanding TSS & More – Ask a Cycling Coach 203 - SoundCloud
(6308 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.

Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at support@trainerroad.com

Transcription to be added after recording.

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