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Congratulations to the following five prize winners in our 2019 Colour in Thirds Sewing Competition.

First Place goes to Sarah with her self-drafted dress and jacket. Sarah made very clever use of all three fabrics, creating a floaty empire line dress and a fully reversible kimono-style jacket that she “‘pimped’ up a bit by adding in a split with ties at the nape, along with ties at the sleeves (which are removable)“. We really loved both pieces – how they look separately and as a combined outfit together. The design perfectly  complements the fabric and shows just how dreamy it is for gathering. Congratulations Sarah!

Second Place goes to Rebecca with this gorgeous V neck dress that perfectly showcases the competition fabric. The floaty, gathered-waist design has been sewn using predominately the khaki colourway. The overall style is quite simple with some clever little details that take it to another level. We love how she’s broken up the ‘sameness’ of the main fabric with a cleverly positioned frill that incorporates all three colours of the competition fabrics. This design detail is similarly featured on the sleeve cuffs and extends into a plaited belt tie which hangs from both front and back waistband.

Third Place goes to Renay with her sensational two piece. On first glance it looks like a a jumpsuit but this outfit comprises a pair of wide leg pants with front pleats and a v-neck blouse and both garments feature a spectacular rouleau detail that’s used on the neckline, pocket openings and to attach the sleeve flounces.

Fourth Place goes to Manju with this stunning Vogue 9186 shirt dress. This was such a clever choice for the competition fabric, and in our indigo colourway, makes for a real knock-out garment. And check out the floatyness of that asymetrical hem! You can read more about Manju’s winning entry in her blog post here.


Fifth Place goes to Rebecca with her Jazz Jumpsuit. This was just a pattern/fabric match made in heaven and the two looks – belted or not – give such different looks. As Rebecca said in her entry email, “The fluid movement and comfortable fabric make it lovely to dress up with a belt and heels, or dress down with sneakers and some fun earrings!”

Congratulation to all our winners, all our entrants and thank you for joining the fun. Once again, you have so perfectly shown us why sewing is a magical thing when one fabric (in three colours) can create such a mind-blowing range of garments. As a viewer or participant, we hope you enjoyed the competition and we look forward to doing it again soon.

All the entries can be viewed here and we still have competition fabrics available to purchase here.

The post Colour in Thirds Competition Winners appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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In 2013 we released our Tokyo Jacket pattern with a lot of love and just a little fanfare. There was a blog post, an email and that was about it. Back then we were pretty green around the social media gills and we didn’t even shout out the release on Instagram. Oh the horror!

This pattern has alway been a favourite of our ours but with the less than average imagery of our first attempt, we knew we’d never really given the pattern the justice it deserved. So for a really long time we’ve been meaning to update the instructions and re-photograph all of it. The decision to finally do it lead to some minor design tweaks and now, six years later, we can FINALLY introduce to our Tokyo Jacket (mark II).

So what’s new? We’ve made the instructions more comprehensive and improved the accompanying  step-by-step photos. Design wise, we’ve removed the centre back seam which eliminates some of the swing that featured in our original design. And for more functionality we’ve made the pockets a little deeper.

Most importantly, we’ve extended the sizing up to 22. The pattern is sold in two separate size ranges – sizes 6-16 and sizes 16-22 – so if purchasing, be sure to select your correct sizing.

Colette’s wearing her Tokyo Jacket (above) made up in EU Natural Sand linen and (below) in our Nero Motiv wool crepe. For this pattern we recommend drapey fabrics such as viscose, polyester crepe, wool crepe, linen and medium weight silk.

My version (below) is made up in Grey Skies. It’s pure wool. Also pure heaven.

The Tokyo Jacket comes in two (Australian) size ranges  – Size 6-16 and Sizes 16-22 – and is now available in both hardcopy and PDF copy shop/print-at-home versions.

The post UPDATED Tokyo Jacket Pattern appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Meet the skirt that’s been a solid four months in the making. It was actually finished, even worn, last October before I decided to make a minor adjustment which relegated it to the alteration pile. In my world, the alteration pile can be a place where clothes go to die. Ok, exaggeration. More of a place where clothes go to get forgotten…for a really, really, REALLY long time.  But – happy ending – this skirt made it out to the other side and I’m very glad it did.

The pattern is Megan Nielsen’s Brumby Skirt. It’s simple and lovely but how about those pockets!? Let’s all give them a round of applause because they’re actually the very thing that pocket dreams are made of. The waistband for this pattern is contoured and I’m pretty sure that somewhere along the sewing way, I mucked something up. You can see in this photo below that the top edge started to stretch out which made me think I might have cut it slightly off grain. In any case, after a few wears I decided that 1) it would definitely need to be replaced and 2) I didn’t love the wide waistband.

To (eventually) fix this, I removed the centre back zip and closed up the seam. I then cut a narrower waistband and added an extra third of fabric to the back waistband. In this, I encased a width of elastic and basically turned it into an easy slip on/off dress. Super comfy.

All up it took me just over an hour to fix which then resulted in me having an intense session with my alteration pile which then resulted in me feeling pretty virtuous. New skirt equals productive day equals happy Lisa.

The fabric is our Ring Around Jacquard linen in this gorgeous rust colour way. There’s a little bit of magic in this fabric because, depending on the light, the spots can appear obvious or super subtle.

In all these photos I’m wearing my Coni Tunic cropped as a top and made up in our Granite Crinkle linen.

The post The Brumby Skirt appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Remember Skylines? And before that Cut Out Lace? And even before that In Season? Well, we’re very excited and inspired to launch our latest competition – Colour in Thirds.

Colour in Thirds – Indigo

Colour in Thirds – Khaki 

Colour in Thirds – Black

This year, the competition fabric is a Japanese polyester crepe de chine and comes in three colours – indigo, khaki and black. For the competition duration, it’s half price at just $14 per metre. This fabric is currently enjoying enormous popularity in the fashion industry and has been sourced from a well known designer renowned for producing quality garments. It’s silk-like in feel, cool to wear, machine washable, exceptional for draping and pleating and perfect for a wide variety of garments.

Entry guidelines are super simple. Sew whatever style you want. Sew something that’s sympathetic to the fabric. Sew an original design or use a pattern. You can use one, both or a combination of all three competition fabrics.

As entries are received, we’ll upload images to our competition Pinterest board. We’ve got the ball rolling  by pinning some inspiration in a wide range of styles to help you get a creative taste of just what’s possible with this fabric.

First Prize is AUD1000 cash and Second and Third places will respectively win a $500 and $250 Tessuti gift voucher. The winning prizes are all quoted in Australian dollars and competition is open to both local and international entrants.

Entries close midnight AEST Sunday 14th April 2019.

Please note that the following Terms and Conditions apply to enter our competition:

  • Enter as many garments as you like.
  • The submitted garment outer fabric must be made entirely in the competition fabric. Unless made from the competition fabric, no trims or embellishments (e.g. embroidery, beading, smocking etc.)  are allowed and you cannot dye the fabric. Regular closures such as zips and buttons are permitted.
  • Lining fabric is permitted and may be purchased elsewhere.
  • It is a condition of entry that the garment, images and any associated materials be permitted for promoting Tessuti and the images may be supplied to media for promotion.
  • The winning entrant gives permission for Tessuti to use images of themselves and the winning garment on the Tessuti website, blog and other promotional opportunities if required.
  • The decision of the judges is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • If the winner is an entrant outside of Australia, money will be awarded at the current exchange rate equivalent to the AUD1000 prize relevant to the prize-winner’s currency of residence.
Make your garment/s, take up to ten great photos, email them to us at fabrics@tessuti.com.au (Subject heading: Colour in Thirds Competition) and we’ll upload them to our Pinterest competition board.

Photo guidelines are as follows so please ensure you include:

•    at least one photo of your garment/s in the design/development stage
•    at least one photo of the close up details of your design
•    at least one photo of the stitching/construction inside the garment.

Try to:

•    crop the photos to 500 pixels wide and 750 pixels high.
•    submit photos that show off your creation at its best. As an example, please include at least one front, side and rear photo.
•    photograph the outfit being worn on an actual person – not a dressmaker’s form or coat hanger.
•    have a photo or two of the dress under construction.
•    have a close-up photo or two of the garment/s to show features and quality of construction.
•    take clear photos in good, natural light. Blurry, dark photos will never do your garment justice!

And finally, if you’re sharing an entry on Instagram please don’t forget to use the #tessuticolourinthirds hashtag.

Happy sewing and if you have any questions, feel free to email us fabrics@tessuti.com.au or leave a comment below.

The post Colour in Thirds Sewing Competition appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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When this Airmail Stripe linen arrived last month, I loved it straight off the bat. It’s a 98% linen, 2% viscose blend with classic fine stripes. Say no more. I was looking for an easy, casual style to make it up in so decided to revisit two of our patterns to show you how good it looks made up in either.

I’ve made a couple of Athina Tops since it was released just over a year ago but both were made as gifts. If, like me, you love a-quick-sew-as-a-gift-sew then this pattern is a total winner. Depending on your sewing ability, it’s a two to four hour make. Tops.

We’re often asked if our Mandy Boat Tee pattern can be made up in a woven. It can’t, but our Athina Top comes pretty damn close. I made the shorter length (as per the pattern) and shortened the sleeves to bracelet length, which can be worn down…

…or rolled up.

This pattern works beautifully in plain fabrics but is also a great one to showcase a gorgeous print. My friend Amanda made hers in this Flying Colours cotton and it’s seriously good. Also important to mention about Athina – she’s available as a free download (also available in hardcopy).

The other pattern I made was our Georgie Top. Georgie’s turning four in April and seriously does not look a day over a new release. This pattern is an absolute classic and after wearing out my first two makes ages ago, I can honestly say I’d forgotten how much I loved her.

The pattern provides sleeve length options for both short or bracelet length, which are finished with a binding. My sleeves are slightly longer than the short length with just a regular hem. As a personal preference, I also shortened the overall pattern length to finish just above hips so I can wear it either out or tucked in.

Which brings me to the other thing I love about Georgie. This pattern is highly – and easily – adaptable. We blogged this dress version in the same year we released the pattern and it’s still a much-loved item of Gabby’s wardrobe. Sophe from @urbanrootshandmade added a simple sleeve ruffle that looks so good. And my aforementioned super-sewing pal Amanda made an incredible silk chiffon dress using Georgie for the bodice. With the addition of a few added ruffles to sleeves and skirt, she made this magic happen…

If you want to see more magnificent makes of either pattern, do check out the #athinatop and #georgietop hashtags on Instagram.

The post Getting back to basics: Athina & Georgie appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Say hi to our very first pattern of 2019 – the Coni Tunic! We’re pretty excited to release this pattern while there’s still some life and warmth left in our summer yet. And we’re equally excited to release it to followers in the northern hemisphere who are inching closer and closer to spring and maybe (hopefully?) starting to feel that seasonal sewing shift.

Coni Tunic (wide sleeve band) made up in our Ebony Crush Washed Linen

Coni is a relaxed, tunic-style dress featuring a wide neckline, stitched down side pockets and, for that all-important warm-weather ventilation, side splits. The dropped shoulder is finished with sleeve bands and the pattern provides two band options for either narrow or wide width. The latter can be worn out to give an extended sleeve line (shown above) or turned back (shown below) as a cuff feature.

Coni Tunic (wide sleeve band, turned back) made up in our Aloha Cruz

This style is great as a stand-alone dress but looks equally fabulous layered over pants or leggings. And in a lighter fabric (like a crinkle linen, below), it makes a makes a truly excellent beach cover-up. It really is the perfect addition to any summer wardrobe, especially those holiday ones.

The Coni Tunic glides nicely across the apparel spectrum that is part dress, part tunic and part kaftan. Play around with your fabric choices and it can be anything from elegant to beachy to casual to smart. The timeless style works for all ages and all shapes and has the added benefit of being both cool and supremely comfortable.

Recommended fabrics for this pattern include linen, linen blends, silk crepe de chine, viscose, rayon, cotton cheesecloth or gauze. The Coni Top comes in four (Australian) sizes – Size 1 (6-8-10), Size 2 (10-12-14), Size 3 (size 14-16-18), Size 4 (18-20-22) and is now available in both hardcopy and PDF copy shop/print-at-home versions.

And in case you were wondering…yes, this pattern can absolutely and easily be cropped to make a simple, breezy top at your preferred length. I made this one in our Granite Crinkle Linen, raising the neckline (just a personal preference) and cutting the fabric on the cross grain so the crinkle runs horizontally.

The post Introducing the Coni Tunic Pattern appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Our linen range has been flying out the door and nothing beats wearing a natural linen sundress in summer. This slip-on dress was a special request from my daughter Gabby after she spotted our latest washed European linen collection. She quickly chose these colours – Tumeric (now sold out, but fingers are crossed we can get more next summer) and Dusty Pink for this cute paper bag tie strap sundress. She slips it on when heading out to the beach and has had many requests from friends and passers by.

No pattern was used. It’s simply rectangle pieces cut for the body (front and back), hem panels (front and back) and tie straps, with in-seam side pockets added. The front and back body panels are turned back 2.5″/6.5cm at the top edge, stitched down 1″/2.5cm from folded top edge to create the 1″/2.5cm frill above elastic tunnel. Then, just neaten the bottom edge and stitch  3/4″/2cm down from stitching line at bottom of frill for elastic tunnel.

The only pattern piece that needed some minor adjustment was the front body. More length (approx 2.5″ or 6.5cm ) was added at the hem (at centre front) and blended smoothly to curve back at the side seams.

This allows for bust shaping and an even hemline. If you don’t do this the hem pulls up at the front. Note that depending on your bust size, this amount will vary so best to test this on your body with a toile first. This dress is definitely suited for the smaller busted ladies and equally gorgeous for childrenswear.

Note: Finished measurements for:

Front/Back Body Panel measure 35.5″/90cm x desired length – cut 2 – total circumference around body is 71″/180cm.

Hem Panel measures 35.5″/90cm x desired length – cut 2

Tie straps measure 23.5″/60cm x 1″/2.5cm/  or 23.5″ x 1″ – cut 4

The post Paper Bag Tie-Strap Dress in European Linen appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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She almost didn’t make it to our 2018 list, so we’re very happy (also relieved!) to introduce you to our new Hilary Top pattern.

This pretty, peasant style top features a bloused bodice, pleated peplum, boat neckline, gathered waist and bishop style raglan sleeves with gathered wrists. The perfect item to wear casually or dressed up, it can be worn with pants, shorts or skirts.

Hilary is our tribute to the current trend that is The Statement Sleeve. The raglan sleeve extends into an elegant bell shape and is finished at the wrist with a narrow, cased elastic.

The neckline has a facing and the shoulders are detailed with a gathered feature, also done with elastic.

The box-pleated peplum is sewn to the bodice and the seam allowance is used to create a casing for the waist elastic.

This black beauty is made up in our Murlo Italian linen.

The white version pictured below is sewn in our cotton broderie anglaise,  Love The Vine.

Here, the double scalloped hem has been used to great effect on the peplum. And while we haven’t included details in our instructions/notions, here’s the layout and meterage if you’re interested in using this fabric (or our Bayou Border) . Both fabrics are 125cm wide.

125cm (double scalloped edge) – 1.65m, 1.70m, 1.75m, 1.80m, 1.85m, 1.90m

Recommended fabrics for this pattern include woven fabrics such as lightweight linen, crinkle linen, cotton poplin, cotton voile, cotton eyelet, silk crepe de chine and viscose. The Hilary Top comes in (Australian) sizes XXS-XL and is now available in both hardcopy and PDF copy shop/print-at-home version.

The post Our NEW Hilary Top Pattern appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Sew Tessuti Blog by Lisa - 5M ago

True story. Earlier this year we replaced the old cover of our Robbie Pants pattern with this photo below and since then, we’ve been fielding weekly queries asking us if the pattern is ours and/or where can I find it?

And so, with that volume of replies and a third version now under my belt, I thought it was high time to write down all the details down in a blog post and give due homage to this excellent pattern.

This is Marilla Walker’s Maya Top pattern with a few super simple modifications. I can’t take credit for this hack – there are loads of beautiful versions out there and unquestionably inspired by Elizabeth Suzann‘s beautiful Georgia Tee.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – I don’t often make up a pattern multiple times. And if I do, it’s because…

A) it’s a relatively quick sew

B) it’s an easy, wardrobe go-to

C) it’s comfortable

D) all of the above

This top? Most definitely a hard D.

So here are my changes. The pattern has a neckline facing but I subbed this for a double fold bias binding, as outlined in this tutorial. I made the body a little bit wider by extending both the centre back and front foldlines by half an inch, giving me an extra inch on both sides. I cut a size 2 and extended the sleeve out to size 6 length. The cuff pattern dimensions are 17cm x 36cm (the latter is the sleeve circumference, plus seam allowance). All you need to do is sew the narrow ends together (with right sides together), fold in half and overlock/sew to the sleeve circumference. And that, lovely readers, is it.

My grey version was made up in a long stashed linen and the Spiced Stripe is unfortunately now sold out. My black tunic length version is made up in our Black Lave Linen.

The Maya Top is such a great, basic pattern and totally lends itself to a whole heap of simple hacks to make it your very own. Check out the hashtag on Instagram and you’ll see what I mean. Three Mayas down and I’m pretty sure I’m not done yet…

The post The Maya Top appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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Thanks for yesterday’s amazing response to our latest Romy Top pattern. For those of you who’ve already purchased the pattern, we’re super excited to see your versions out and about. And if you have, or are thinking about it, here’s a simple modification that you might like to consider.

In the weeks preceding the pattern release, we received some incredible Italian linens and, true to my linen-loving form, fell pretty hard for a few of them. Specifically the Vivien Blue Small and Large checks. Straightaway, I knew I wanted to combine both fabrics in one garment and so decided on a super simple dress style that’s been floating around in my head for a while now.

I used the Romy Top for the bodice, cropping 22cm/9″ from the full pattern length so it finishes just below my natural waist. The attached gathered skirt has a finished length of 76cm/30″ and was measured at double the circumference of the bodice hem. I’m 160cm tall, and the full finished length of the dress (from front neckline) is 112cm/44″.

The linen is quite sheer so I had to add a full lining. To do this, I used a black cotton voile, extending the facing and attaching a knee-length, less-gathered skirt.

Because any option to avoid a loop turner is always my preferred option , I subbed Romy’s shoestring straps for black 15mm grosgrain. Grosgrain straps are ace and can you tell I really love them? I also added pockets but on that day, my arms were clearly much longer than they really are because my eye-balling instinct was well, well off. They’re sitting about 15cm lower than they should be so I’ve added that to the list of Things I Need To Fix But Probably Never Will. Or the list of Things That Might Sh*t Me, Might Not. We’ll see…

And that’s it. I’ve already worn this dress on the few hot days that Melbourne has graced us with and I really love it. It’s all the lovely, loose and light that a good summer frock should be.

The post My Romy Top to Dress appeared first on Sew Tessuti Blog.

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