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Ask the Vet - Keratoma, sarcoids, fecal egg counts and more! - March 2019 - YouTube

 


You asked, we answered! In this episode of our monthly series, Ask the Vet, Dr. Lydia Gray and SmartPaker Dan answer 5 new questions on topics like hoof keratomas, equine sarcoids, fecal egg counts, how much hay to give when it gets cold, whether or not you can ride your horse with a fly mask on and so much more! Dr. Gray even divulges one product she uses with her horse during fly season to make their rides go smoother.

Make sure to SUBSCRIBE so that you know when the next episode comes out – your question may be featured!

If your question was answered in this video, reach out to us at CustomerCare@SmartPak.com and let us know! We’ll get your gift card out to you as soon as we can! Have some of your own questions? Ask away using #AsktheVetVideo! If your question gets selected to be in one of our Ask the Vet videos, you win a SmartPak gift card! How awesome is that!?

Additional reading/watching material mentioned in the video:
Ask the Vet individual topics playlist
Ask the Vet blogs
Horse Health Library Videos
Ask the Vet form
Learn how to body condition score your horse
Estimating weight in horses
Ask the Vet – Why would a horse shake its head?
Ask the Vet – What is moon blindness in horses?

Questions answered in this episode:
1. My horse recently had a keratoma “scare” in her right hind foot. My farrier noticed the growth and we had the vet perform x-rays about a year and a half ago. The vet saw a small growth in the x-rays but it was no where near the bone so she wasn’t concerned and said just to keep an eye on it. Since the x-rays, my vet has left her practice. My horse is barefoot and sound and we have been documenting by taking pictures every time we trim her. My question is, what is a keratoma? How are they treated? And when should we know to have more x-rays taken if any. Thanks so much!!!
2. What is the best estimate for how much hay to give the average horse on the colder days/nights? I’ve been reading that hay, rather than grain, is best for warmth using their hindgut. Don’t want to risk colic.
3. I have tried my best to go through your previous videos but couldn’t find one on running fecal egg counts and what to do with the results! There are so many opinions out there on deworming schedules and running those egg counts! What do you suggest? I have a new retired OTSB that had a Idexx McMasters Fecal Egg Count of 700- high shedder… she was dewormed with 1 dose of Panacur because the records I received with her indicated her previous deworming 8 weeks prior was with Ivermectin. I see some suggest running another FEC in 14 days after deworming and some say to wait 8 weeks!!!! Help Thanks!!!
4. Can you do a segment about ridding your horse of sarcoids? I am currently using blood root but it is painful. My horse has fibroblastic sarcoids on sheath and inner thigh. I have seen some food additives that cure from “the inside out?”
5. Is it safe for the horse to wear a fly mask while riding? I really want to protect the horse’s eyes.

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When most people say “work hard, play hard,” they don’t mean at the same time. But we’re not most people. We’re a little more awesome than that, and we’re willing to bet that you are too.

About the job:

Our team is maniacally focused on powering healthy horses and happy riders. The Control Buyer will be responsible for controlling inventory, maximizing fulfillment and turn while minimizing markdown risk within assigned merchandise categories. This individual will work closely with Merchandising, Marketing, Retail, Operations, Sales Team, and Suppliers to ensure timely product flow to meet target deliveries and sales plans. Please note, if experience warrants it, there may be an opportunity to join the team at the Senior Control Buyer level.

What you’ll do (big-picture responsibilities):

  • Plan and forecast catalog, web, and store sales of products selected by merchandising at SKU level, making initial and replenishment purchases in addition to initiating markdown strategies to optimize sales in support of plans, projections, and inventory goals.
  • Roll up item plans to merchandise assortment plans and advise management on the potential of product categories to meet or exceed sales plans.
  • Place buys with selected vendors to maximize fulfillment and minimize logistical costs while ensuring inventory turn and good vendor relations.
  • Monitor, evaluate, and re-forecast inventory needs of new, seasonal, and repeat products, adjusting for changes in projections, sales trends, merchandising, availability, catalog layout, circulation, and financial forecasts.
  • Prepare quantitative and qualitative historical sales analysis and forecasts to support plans, purchases, and merchandising assortment recommendations. Analyze historical data identifying trends, seasonality, and promotional impact.
  • Assess and maintain database integrity in relation to products, sales, and inventory, ensuring that software systems and website are accurate, properly maintained, and utilized for maximum efficiency.
  • Other duties as assigned.

How you’ve done it before (experience + qualifications):

  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • 4+ years Merchandising/Procurement Experience
  • Strong Excel and PC skills.
  • Mathematical and analytical skills and an understanding of accounting practices.
  • Understanding of forecasting and sales planning, procurement, and inventory cycle.
  • Ability to collect, analyze, interpret and organize data for management review. – Define problems, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions.
  • Organizational skills and the ability to work under deadline pressure in a fast-paced environment.
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills.
  • Self-motivated and resourceful multi-tasker.
  • Attention to detail.
CLICK HERE TO APPLY! SmartPak is an affiliate of Covetrus. Covetrus is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against applicants or employees on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, disability that can be reasonably accommodated without undue hardship, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, citizenship, marital or veteran status, or any other legally protected status.
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When most people say “work hard, play hard,” they don’t mean at the same time. But we’re not most people. We’re a little more awesome than that, and we’re willing to bet that you are too.

About the job:

Our team is maniacally focused on powering healthy horses and happy riders. As a key member of the Finance team, the Senior Financial Analyst works with the Manager of Finance and other key members of the Finance department to support management planning and decision making by identifying, maintaining, and evaluating information and recommending actions. This individual will assist in developing the Company’s annual budgeting process, monthly financial forecasting, ad-hoc analyses and special projects. This person will also provide financial consulting and strategic support to senior management including financial presentations, industry/peer group comparisons, new business opportunities, acquisition analyses and other projects as requested. The position reports to the Manager of Finance and will be based at the Company’s headquarters in Plymouth, MA.

What you’ll do (big-picture responsibilities):

  • Develop comprehensive support for areas such as Operations, COGs, Capital Expenditures, etc.
  • Responsible for lead certain elements of the budgeting and forecasting process, while working closely with Senior Management on long term strategic planning/modeling.
  • Develop and prepare the monthly financial reporting package including the appropriate level of detail on actual vs. budget analysis and any implications to the monthly forecast. This package will be used as a guide for discussion in BOD meetings, monthly and quarterly reporting schedules for the parent company, and other audiences.
  • Monitor performance indicators, highlighting trends and analyzing causes of unexpected variances.
  • Perform monthly reviews of budget vs. actual with departmental managers.
  • Oversee the continued enhancement/automation of budgeting, financial forecasting, and modeling tools.
  • Develop financial models and analyses to support strategic initiatives as needed.
  • Interpret data, analyze results using statistical techniques and provide ongoing reports
  • Acquire data from primary or secondary data sources
  • Cross functional support for the Senior Management Team and Department Heads across the Company.
  • Ad-hoc reporting and analysis

What you’ll also do (day-to-day):

  • Partner with other members of the Finance team to support company financial transparency and education
  • Work closely with the Accounting, Finance & Analytics teams and Senior Executives
  • Perform other duties as assigned

How you’ll do it (skills):

  • Must be self-directed and driven
  • Be articulate and comfortable presenting to a broad range of audiences (ranging up to the executive level)
  • Work as a team player and ambassador to all SmartPakers who will thrive in a fast-paced environment while maintaining a calm demeanor
  • Sense of humor

How you’ve done it before (experience + qualifications):

  • MBA or Bachelor’s degree in Finance or Accounting
  • At least 3 years of financial analysis or modeling, planning and reporting in companies with at least $50 million in revenues
  • Experience with exceptional financial analysis background, strong business process skills and knowledge of business performance metrics
  • Comfort analyzing unstructured business problems in areas such as Operations, COGs, Capital Expenditures and other various Operating expenses
  • Advanced knowledge and capabilities in Excel, PowerPivot, PowerBI, SQL or SSIS skills
  • Previous work in a high-growth company is a plus
CLICK HERE TO APPLY! SmartPak is an affiliate of Covetrus. Covetrus is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against applicants or employees on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, disability that can be reasonably accommodated without undue hardship, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, citizenship, marital or veteran status, or any other legally protected status.
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When most people say “work hard, play hard,” they don’t mean at the same time. But we’re not most people. We’re a little more awesome than that, and we’re willing to bet that you are too.

About the job:

Our team is maniacally focused on powering healthy horses and happy riders. The Senior Business Analyst is a member of the business analytics and insights team responsible for leveraging analytics to drive results that help SmartPak power healthy horses and happy riders. The Business Analyst works directly with all corporate departments, providing them with analysis and insight to improve the business and support our mission of changing the world four hooves at a time.

What you’ll do (big-picture responsibilities):

  • Field ad hoc analysis requests by bringing insight from the enterprise data warehouse (EDW) to support various business needs using experience in analysis techniques including:
    • Customer and segment profiling
    • Test reads
    • Pre/Post analyses
    • Deep dive questions
    • Financial modeling
    • Trending and forecasting
  • Develop and implement recurring information delivery solutions at the department and enterprise level
  • Work with the EDW team on data integration projects, providing data quality and architecture feedback
  • Garner and leverage knowledge of company performance and objectives to proactively improve quality of output/work
  • Manage a prioritized task list and communicate progress

How you’ve done it before (experience + qualifications):

  • Bachelor’s degree in a quantitative discipline (applied mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, or related field).
  • Advanced degree preferred.
  • 2+ years of experience in database marketing and analytics.
  • Outstanding SQL skills
  • Excellent business acumen
  • Adept in presenting complex concepts in an easily understood and actionable way
  • Strong knowledge of retail business
APPLY HERE! SmartPak is an affiliate of Henry Schein, Inc. Henry Schein, Inc. is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against applicants or employees on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, disability that can be reasonably accommodated without undue hardship, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, citizenship, marital or veteran status, or any other legally protected status.
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Vote for the questions in the April 2019 episode of Ask the Vet - YouTube

You asked your questions, now it’s time to vote on the ones that get answered in the next Ask the Vet video! Follow SmartPaker Dan’s instructions in the video above to vote right here in the video, then scroll down to keep voting.

You can vote as many times as you want in our traditional poll, so if you asked a question that you really want the answer to or there is a question that someone else asked for which you want the answer, vote as many times as you want! PRO TIP: Vote once, refresh the page, and vote again! Come back in April to see which questions got voted into the Top 5 and were answered in our latest Ask the Vet video by Dr. Lydia Gray, SmartPak Staff Veterinarian and Medical Director!

Thanks for Asking the Vet, and #haveagreatride!

To check out all previous Ask the Vet videos and other horse health videos, check them out in our Horse Health Library!

Twitter polls coming soon!

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From irritating your horse to ruining your ride, flies can be a big problem around the barn. That’s why we developed Fly Stoppers, the smartest way to stop the flies before they start. In order to make sure these tiny, beneficial bugs can do everything they can to protect your horse and your barn, check out the smart tips and frequently asked questions below.

FAQs
How do I know if my Fly Stoppers are ready to be released?
Release your Fly Stoppers when you see 12 or more tiny black insects moving around inside the bag. Hatching typically starts between 1-14 days after you’ve received them, but it’s okay if they’re already hatching upon arrival or if it takes longer than 14 days.

When should I release my Fly Stoppers?
Release them at dawn or dusk when temperatures are cooler and there’s less light to ensure safety from daytime predators such as ants and birds.

Where should I release my Fly Stoppers?
Release Fly Stoppers in fly-breeding “hot spots,” areas where organic matter is decomposing and where animals eat, drink, and frequent, such as manure collection sites. Moist places where they won’t get stepped on by animals or eaten by ants or birds are best.

How do I release my Fly Stoppers?
Make a small hole in the ground and sprinkle a small handful of the contents of the bag into the hole. Cover lightly with dirt, straw, or manure. Apply to as many locations as possible and release a new shipment every 3-4 weeks during fly season.

How do I know if my Fly Stoppers are working?
You should see a decrease in the number of adult flies after about 30-60 days when used continuously every 3 to 4 weeks. Remember, Fly Stoppers affect fly reproduction but won’t affect the existing population of adult flies.

Will Fly Stoppers hurt me or my horses?
No, Fly Stoppers won’t bite, sting, or harm humans or other animals.

What kind of flies to they help control?
Fly Stoppers work on “filth” flies such as house flies, blow or bottle flies. They don’t, however, work on any type of water-breeding flies.

What if my dog eats my Fly Stoppers?
Neither the Fly Stoppers or the wood shavings inside the bag are toxic to dogs, however, the plastic bag itself certainly isn’t a good idea to eat.

Smart tips
• To speed up the hatching process, try storing your Fly Stoppers in a warm place (80 ̊F)
• To slow down the hatching process, store them in a refrigerator at 42 ̊ F for 3-5 days
• Avoid using pesticides or fly sprays near your Fly Stoppers
• Manure management is key – remove, dry, and consolidate as much as possible
• Fly Stoppers can only travel about 50 feet, so if fly management on neighboring properties isn’t up to scratch, consider fly traps or other alternatives to keep neighboring flies in check
• Fly “hot spots” can include places such as fence lines, under water troughs, and the edges of manure piles
• Watch out for ants and birds, including chickens, that will eat your Fly Stoppers. Try placing them away from ant piles or in piles of grass to protect them from birds.
• Start using Fly Stoppers as soon as the night temperatures are above 40 ̊ for three nights in a row and use continuously throughout fly season
• Use the total number of animals on your property when considering how many Fly Stoppers to use
• Use in combination with OutSmart® Fly Spray and SmartBug-Off® Pellets for comprehensive fly control

As always, if you have any other questions, you can always reach out to our product specialists on our Customer Care Team.

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On Saturday, January 19th of 2019, the Student Chapter of the American Association of Equine Practitioners at the Texas A&M Veterinary School hosted hundreds of veterinary students from schools all over the country to attend their annual wet lab. They had about twenty labs for students to choose four to participate in. When I arrived to the veterinary school with two other Illinois students and one student from Missouri, we saw the beautiful veterinary school that Texas A&M has. We were told that it is a relatively new building, and it was fantastic – fireplaces in an indoor study room, outdoor study spaces, relaxing courtyard, and the list goes on.


The first lab that I participated in was on alternative medicine. We learned about acupuncture and even got to practice placing acupuncture needles! However, first we had the opportunity to place an acupuncture needle in our own arms (so that we had a better idea how it feels for the horse) in a point that was supposed to be relaxing. I wasn’t able to push the needle in as far as it was supposed to go for my arm (it was weird placing a needle into my own skin), but I did better than I had anticipated I would be able to do! Placing needles in the horse were so much easier, and I definitely think that he became more relaxed during our session, because he dropped his head lower and lower. Alternative medicine has been growing in popularity and I am interested in pursuing some of these techniques following my graduation from veterinary school.


My second lab was all about hind-limb lameness. There was an equine veterinarian from Texas that enjoys lameness that was there to teach us about different ways to look for hindlimb lameness – what sorts of things he looks at when he is looking for lameness in the hind end – stuff like hip hike and drop, and also the fetlock drop. He also talked about various hind limb flexions that we can perform in order to help focus the lameness to various aspects of the limb. The best part was that we were able to watch two lame horses jog (trot) so that we could figure out which limb was lame and also practice our flexions.


My third lab of the day was an ophthalmology lab. Here we learned how to perform an auriculopalpebral block in order to desensitize a branch of the facial nerve. This is a good block for doing eye exams on horses where you will be touching the eye because it blocks their blinking so that you can examine their eye easier. One of our ophthalmologists at school said, “I don’t care what anyone says, the eyelids are the strongest muscles in the body – if they don’t want you to look in their eye, you won’t be able to.” Next, we got to use an ophthalmoscope to find the optic disc and look for any sorts of abnormalities present in their eyes. After this, we got to place a sub-palpebral lavage in a cadaver. This can be performed in horses that are receiving frequent medications, won’t let their owners administer medicine into the eye directly, are head shy etc. This is a procedure that veterinarians can perform so that medicine administration can be done not directly next to the face and also not holding the horses face, because it contains a very small, flexible tube that runs from the horses eye, through the mane, to the withers and can be loaded with medication that can be given over the course of days.

My last lab was on field anesthesia, where we learned about how to anesthetize and recover a horse safely in the field. This can be done to perform a castration. All in all, I really enjoyed the wet labs that I participated in at Texas because I enjoyed the hands-on ability that all of the labs had and the huge variety of labs that we could choose from.

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I am interrupting my usual blog pattern of sharing with you where my travels with Visa are going, to talk to you about karma, foreshadowing, humility, and education. These are all very important topics as they currently relate to me, and I hope you will allow me to explain.

During my last blog I talked about developing my relationship with Visa, my lack of fear in my younger days, and some of my current fears and challenges. I passed that blog entry along to be posted on a Wednesday. I don’t mind telling you that I was feeling pretty pleased with myself and really happy with how nicely everything was moving along. That, my horse friends, as many of you are probably already shaking your heads and saying to yourself, was my big mistake. I left work that very same night and drove over to the barn looking forward to a nice solid ride. That was when everything changed again. This will be the interruption where I share what happened next, in order to be able to address topics like karma, foreshadow, humility, and education.

I arrived at the barn to discover a veritable beehive of activity. The tack room was getting a much overdue cleaning and organization. I thought “How refreshing!” I’m a pretty neurotically organized person so I love a nice organized and clean space where everything is accessible and well labeled! I collected my gear and got out of the way and went to go collect Visa.
While not normally known for having a suspicious attitude, Visa was not totally on board with the large green bag of trash that had been placed a little way down the aisle as a result of the cleaning project in progress. I put her on cross-ties but rapidly had a change of heart about that when I saw exactly how not on board with that bag of trash she was. Thinking that perhaps I would save us all a lot of trouble and an unpleasant experience, I removed the cross-ties. With some friendly barn help we introduced Visa to the bag of trash to firmly establish that it was not in fact a zombie dragon come to get us all. It took some time but she finally half-heartedly agreed that it was probably just a trash bag full of trash.

Thinking how terribly clever and smart we all were we didn’t stop there. We got out the trusty tarp in the indoor and went on in to do some tarp work as well. I’m sure many would say timing is often everything, and perhaps Visa was still just a bit keyed up over the dragon bag incident. Many also say that the road to hell is paved with good intentions and I assure everyone that we had nothing but the very best of intentions in doing some tarp work. Which, incidentally, went very well. Given such positive experiences we headed back in to tack up.

In writing, foreshadowing is a very important element and in real life it can be equally crucial. Visa gave the dragon bag a meaningful look on our way back in but we passed without incident. We tacked up and I even took the precaution of having a more experienced rider hop on first for a few minutes and just make sure we were in a good place. All of this was foreshadowing.


Visa was calm and responsive and we quickly decided it would be appropriate for me to mount up which I did in short order and we proceeded to have a very nice ride. Now that fantastic tarp was still over in the corner all folded up and put away and Visa displayed no real reaction to it each time we passed but I did note that she made a point of looking at it each time we went by. I still didn’t have any deep concerns. We were having a good ride, working on some transitions, getting in a nice workout. All was well.

As we neared the end of the ride I wanted to get just one more transition to and from the canter tracking left and felt we could end there on a good note. As we walked around getting ready to do that the last 2 other folks in the barn – who had been cleaning and organizing the tack room – called out and asked if I would be ok if they headed out for the evening. I responded by confirming I intended to canter once more and then end my ride and should be fine. I actually thought to myself “They won’t even be down the driveway by the time we are done.”
Without giving too much thought to where we were I asked for the canter. I happened to be in the corner passing the folded tarp and Visa happened to be looking at the tarp and not paying that much attention to me who was not paying enough attention because I was busy saying goodbyes. I asked for a canter and she willingly gave it, but was a bit startled by the request while her attention was elsewhere and I was unprepared for her to be startled. I think we all know what happened next.

Visa moved into her canter roughly, I sat down and overcorrected in response, her head came up and turned a bit to look at me as if to say “Why did you do that?”. Because I was also startled I caught her in the mouth a bit as I sat back and things just started falling apart at a rapid rate of speed. Visa was already making a very rough transition from canter to trot as she quickly figured out we were not organized, and I was jostled and didn’t have an even grip with both legs and became very unbalanced.

All the bad things happened at that point, and my worst suspicion about my right leg came to fruition. I tried to get myself sat back down in the saddle, Visa kept craning around trying to see what on earth was happening, I started losing my balance as my left leg applied more strength than the right effectively pushing me to the right, and I very slowly but very surely succumbed to a controlled fall over the right side. It was so classically one of those situations where you go “I got it. I got it. I got it. Ugh, I don’t got it.” This was where karma arrived in the story having just submitted a blog where I talked about my lack of fear in the past.


I had a very slow and very controlled fall over Visa’s right side into some nice soft arena dirt. I was able to fall well, if such a thing exists, and did not hit my head and barely even had my wind knocked out of me. Visa very kindly came to a complete standstill when she felt me going over so I did not have to contend with any forward motion. In my efforts to avoid this chain of events I failed to let go of the reins and they snapped at the buckle and my stirrup band snapped.

Otherwise, we were all relatively unscathed and I stood right up. I did however give a shout on the way down and our Barn Manager, who had not quite left yet, heard me and came running on the double. Her first words were, of course, “Are you ok?” and I responded by assuring her I was and that I had not hit my head and everything seemed to be in its original locations with respect to bones and parts. She said that she was sure I hadn’t hit my head, which I assumed meant that she had witnessed the fall. She then let me know that my backside had a nice dirt imprint displaying itself as the only location that had touched down, and proceeded to help me dust off.

We quickly found a replacement band for the stirrup, I mounted right back up immediately. I was back in the saddle within minutes of my fall. I proceeded to walk, trot, and canter for a few minutes before dismounting, by choice, and ending my ride. I can’t thank Holly enough for her care and concern and for remaining at the barn just a bit longer while I overcame any nerves about getting back on.

The rest of the evening was uneventful. Visa was a bit subdued and while I try not to anthropomorphize I do believe she was just as embarrassed as I was to have had this happen. I do believe in the inherent honesty of a horse and by no means was Visa at fault. I think she just had an honest reaction, as did I, and it ended out of our favor. I was glad that I got myself right back in the saddle so that I didn’t allow the event to build a lot of psychological momentum for myself or her.

I shared all of this so that I could get to the part where I tell you about what happened after that interesting Wednesday evening. If you would like to know and continue to follow me as I go through this process please look forward to my next entry. I believe this interruption has significantly contributed to my journey and has engendered a lot of new changes in the process and can’t wait to share them with you along with where humility and education come into this story.

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Some of us catch the “horse bug” as children and others later in life. Whenever the discovery is made, one thing can be agreed upon, life will never be the same. Horses have been enriching the lives of man since the dawn of time. While the passion and joy they bring to our lives is unmeasurable, sometimes life has other plans for us.

I sit down and start to imagine life without my sassy redhead nickering at me down the aisle way every day and it almost seems impossible. Your journey as a horseperson is ever evolving and that’s going to be very important to remember over the next few decades. One thing I’ve learned recently is that it always seems to be the hard choice that is the right choice. Early on in our riding careers we’re taught that “if it’s not good enough for you, it’s not good enough for your horse” or “the horse comes first.” These are all bits of invaluable advice that shape us from the start. So, when you come to a crossroad in your life where horses just don’t seem like an option or owning is just too much to take on right now, remember that “the horse comes first.”

While it was with an insanely heavy heart and puddles of tears in my eyes that I kissed my beloved redhead goodbye, I knew she was off to bigger and better things. For years we had grown together and experienced so much. This time we would both continue to grow but on separate paths. This was the turning of a page but also the beginning of a new book for both of us. As I began my journey into motherhood, the fun-loving and sometimes boisterous critter I loved so much would no longer be the right mount for me. As the demands on my time shifted dramatically I knew that sitting at the farm was no life for such a talented creature. So, we found her a loving home where her true potential could be realized. I guess my point in all of this is that ‘the horse comes first’ and they always will. That the right choice was the hard choice. Sometimes when you really love your horse you must do what hurts so much and let them go so they can grow.

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