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Last month, leaders in the fields of protein engineering and synthetic biology met at the campus of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, for the 3rd Protein Engineering Canada (PEC) Conference 2018. The PEC Conference encourages the exchange of ideas and aims to build collaborations in an engaging atmosphere by bringing together students, young investigators, and protein engineering experts. SGI-DNA was a proud contributor to the conference and hosted a lunch seminar entitled “Emerging Technologies: Library Construction using the BioXp™ 3200 System,” presented by Steve Riedmuller, Sr. Director of Field Application Science.

In the well-received seminar, Riedmuller discussed advantages of using the BioXp System for library construction. The BioXp System is an automated benchtop genomic workstation that builds synthetic linear DNA fragments with powerful applications for synthetic biology. DNA libraries are vital for drug discovery, and scientists working in protein engineering, discovery biology, structural biology, synthetic biology, antibody engineering, and enzyme engineering can benefit from BioXp™ Libraries to quickly determine an optimized targeted gene. The BioXp System offers a wide array of library types, including degenerate, variant, and scanning libraries. Riedmuller described the capabilities of the BioXp System and presented a case study demonstrating how the BioXp System drastically accelerated library production when used in conjunction with Gibson Assembly® cloning for the direct transfection of synthetic constructs. Additional details of rapid library construction can be found in this Application Note.

Riedmuller also discussed how the BioXp System can be used for accelerated cancer vaccine production. Introducing genes into eukaryotic cells provides a foundation for cancer vaccines. The premise behind cancer vaccines is that the presence of neoepitopes (“new” peptides that are the result of mutations in cancer cells only) can be used as a target to trigger a patient’s own immune response to specifically attack and destroy cancer cells. One of the technical hurdles of these types of personalized medicines is the time required to prepare an individualized treatment, in this case, a cancer vaccine. Using the BioXp System to build epitopes based on the genetic profile of a patient’s tumor cells dramatically reduces the turnaround time required for creating personalized cancer vaccines, which is critically important to patients facing a terminal diagnosis and recently discussed in this Seattle Times article


The BioXp System offers a high throughput solution for protein engineering and synthetic biology applications. In the hands of the scientists in attendance at the PEC Conference (and readers of this blog), this instrument offers new opportunities for faster and more expansive research and discovery.

For more information about the products and applications mentioned in this blog post, please see:

BioXp 3200 System – sgidna.com/bxp3200
Gibson Assembly Reagents - sgidna.com/reagents.html
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You’re familiar with our synthetic biology solutions and services. Now we’d like to introduce you to the faces behind our innovative products, the people dedicated to building next-generation synthetic biology tools to advance your research.

First off in this new “Meet SGI-DNA” blog series is Rahul Gautam, Customer Success Manager, Synthetic Biology. Of course, we’re biased, but we think Rahul is pretty extraordinary. He’s one of the most well-liked, personable members of the SGI-DNA team and he’s a dedicated leader, who strives to ensure customer success. We recently sat down with Rahul and asked him a few questions about his experience here at SGI-DNA.

"The more I interact with customers, the more I learn about the true potential of synthetic biology."

What is your background?

I have officially been with SGI-DNA for four years now, but I started my journey, majoring in Biology and minoring in Business Administration and Management at UC San Diego. My goal as a student was to explore the business side of biotechnology. Taking business classes through UCSD’s Rady School of Management was inspiring, offering a perfect blend of science, technology, and business. During my senior year, I took Dr. Stephen Mayfield’s introductory Biofuels course, which highlighted Craig Venter and the amazing work that Synthetic Genomics was doing in the algae biofuels space. A few months later, I came across an opening for a product management internship at SGI-DNA, which had just been launched by Dr. Venter and Dr. Daniel Gibson as a subsidiary of Synthetic Genomics. Joining SGI-DNA at a unique time meant that I could parlay my internship into a full-time position on our Customer Support team.

When did you first become interested in science?

Science has always been a big part of my life. Both of my parents were scientists. My father worked at The Scripps Research Institute and my mother was at Invitrogen when it was still a small startup in the early ‘90s. Science consistently made its way into discussions at the dinner table or when my parents’ scientist friends came to visit. Growing up the ‘90’s also provided me with a dynamic environment of scientific programming on the Discovery Channel, National Geographic, the BBC as well as the cutting edge scientific programming on PBS. To this day, I still watch Nova and Nature every week.

In a nutshell, what do you do at SGI-DNA?

I do anything and everything that helps our customers succeed with our services and products. Whether helping a customer place their first order or managing complex projects, I strive to make our customers happy. In a nutshell, I act as the liaison between the scientific acumen of SGI-DNA and our customers. I’m the Magic Johnson of SGI-DNA. <laughter> Kidding aside, I think it’s a good analogy. I’m like a point guard, distributing the proverbial ball amongst my teammates to best support the needs of our customers. My objective is to ensure customer success and build customer relationships that enhance the user experience.

What do you find most interesting about what you do? What do you find to be the most rewarding?

Not to sound cliché but making our customers happy motivates me every day. Our customers are doing cutting-edge research across the industrial synthetic biology spectrum from textiles to cancer immunotherapy and novel personalized medicine therapies. Knowing that SGI-DNA technologies are fueling the research that could provide new, better treatments for patients is motivating and exciting. The more I interact with customers, the more I learn about the true potential of synthetic biology.

What do you think are the most exciting possibilities for synthetic biology?

Without a doubt new approaches to combating human disease. Synthetic biology is helping drive the advancements we are already seeing in personalized medicine. The impact of synthetic biology on the future of cancer research will be significant over the next decade. Improving the overall human experience through synthetic biology is happening on many levels— human disease, nutrition, and through the development of novel chemistry. It’s both fascinating and rewarding to be part of SGI-DNA, a company focused on synthetic biology advancements through its products and services.

What are your interests and hobbies?

I have an endless list of interests and hobbies. I love sports, especially football and basketball. I’m also interested in history and political science. I often joke that my secondary career choice would be as an Indologist (the study of Indian literature and history). As my mother always told me, “You should never have an excuse to be bored.” I guess I have taken that to heart and am completely curious about the world around me. Through my work, I get to interact with many people doing unique and interesting things, both inside and outside the company. This is an incredibly exciting time to be working in synthetic biology, the next great frontier of scientific advancement.
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