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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com A Wright Brothers glider in 1902. When they added a motor, they achieved heavier-and-air powered flight.

“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.” – Leonardo da Vinci 

The idea of heavier than air flight, in which men would have the freedom of the air like the birds, is an ancient one.  Think of the myth of Icarus, who was destroyed when he flew too close to the sun.  Or the designs of Leonardo da Vinci for both a flying machine and a helicopter.

Leonardo da Vinci drew ideas for both the glider and helicopter. But is age lacked knowledge of aerodynamic as well as the necessary materials and technology?

But it took a combination of more modern technology and an understanding of aerodynamics for the earliest versions of powered aircraft to come about.  First came the glider, for which inventors learned how a curved wing of a certain design generates lift by directing air across the top of the wing to flow faster than that below, creating a pressure differential and therefore lift.

“I have often said that the lure of flying is the lure of beauty.” — Amelia Earhart

There were many attempts to create a successful aircraft design, but most of them didn’t work.

Even the Wright Brothers, the Dayton, Ohio bicycle mechanics who eventually made the first powered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903, began by building gliders.  In fact, looking at their glider design you can see it is clearly the ancestor of the eventual Wright Flyer.  The added element necessary for the powered flight was, of course, the power – and engines in those days were so relatively heavy for their horsepower output that the Wrights had to come up with their own design for a motor as well as an airframe

The term aviation, noun of action from the stem of Latin avis “bird” with the suffix – action meaning action or progress, was coined in 1863 by French pioneer Guillaume Joseph Gabriel de La Landelle (1812–1886) in “Aviation ou Navigation aérienne sans ballons“.[3][4] – Wikipedia

By the time of WWI, airplanes were much evolved, with advanced flight controls, more powerful engines – and often equipped with machine guns.

The development of the airplane was rapid after that. And, photographers were on hand to document this development.  Starting with basic designs similar to the Wright Flyer, innovations were added such as ailerons and landing great.  More powerful engines were introduced.  Aviators, especially in Europe, began undertaking amazing and record-breaking flights.

“Feathers shall raise men even as they do birds towards heaven: That is by letters written with their quills.” — Leonardo da Vinci

On 25 July Louis Blériot won worldwide fame by winning a £1,000 prize offered by the British Daily Mail newspaper for a flight across the English Channel, and in August around half a million people, including the President of France Armand Fallières and David Lloyd George, attended one of the first aviation meetings, the Grande Semaine d’Aviation at Reims. – Wikipedia

The wreck of the Fokker Triplane piloted by the Red Baron. After a huge number of air-to-air victories, he was brought down by the ground fire.

Progress in aviation was so rapid that slightly more than 10 years after the Wright brothers first flight we saw the use in World War I of relatively sophisticated fighter planes and bombers.  Aviators like The Red Baron and Eddie Rickenbacker became popular heroes.  But most pilots fighting that war did not survive the conflict.  The Red Baron himself was killed, not in combat with another plane, but by gunfire from the ground as he flew at a very low altitude.

However, you didn’t have to be flying in a war to die in an airplane in those days.  Flying in airplanes constructed of wood covered by fabric and held together with numerous wires and fragile structs was a dangerous activity.  Even as late as the 1930s, when more advanced planes were constructed of more sturdy metal and powered by much more robust engines, the list of pilots of commercial airlines who were killed while flying for airlines is depressingly extensive.

Eddie Rickenbacker was America’s foremost ace in WWI. He was lucky because the majority of fighter pilots didn’t survive combat.

Flying today, even with much more advanced aircraft, electronic instruments, radar, and better weather reporting can still be dangerous.  Look at the list of celebrities who have died in air crashes, including Buddy Holly, members of Lynrd Skynrd, Rick Nelson, John Denver, Otis Redding, Patsy Cline, Jim Croce, and Stevie Ray Vaughan.  There were all crashes by small planes.  Thankfully, scheduled flights by the major airlines are relatively safe, with millions of miles flown with very few casualties.

But if flying in small planes today can be hazardous, think of the pioneer aviators in their rickety, privative airplanes, faced with the threat of mechanical catastrophe, changing weather conditions and the ever-present threat of pilot error.  This was as dangerous as was driving the earliest race cars.  In fact, it is interesting how many early race drivers were also pilots.  Obviously, thrill-addicted adrenaline-seekers.

Lots of designs were proposed in the early days of aviation. Most didn’t work. A lot of them killed their pilots.

“There are only two emotions in a plane: boredom and terror.” –Orson Welles

But being able to “fly like a bird” was such an exciting and inviting prospect that many ignored the dangers and took to the air.  After WWI there were numerous “barnstormers” who flew all over the United States giving demonstrations and offering rides to the public.  Many later pilots report that their first introduction to flying and later decision to become flyers came from seeing or riding with these barnstormers. Added to this, early movies frequently focused on airplane-related subjects so that the public was able to sit in darkened theaters and thrill to the exploits of fighter pilots, pilots flying the mail and other “heroes” of flying.  Howard Hughes spent a fortune and many years producing his movie Hell’s Angels, which incidentally resulted in the accidental death of several pilots.

The movie Hell’s Angeles introduced many to a realistic vision of WWI air combat – and the lovely Jean Harlow.

Nowadays, we are so accustomed to the idea of heavier-than-air, powered-flight that it is hard to grasp how revolutionary this was when airplanes were first invented.  The sight of an airplane flying overhead caused people to stop, stare and point.  Thousands would flock to early air shows and demonstrations.  We now take for granted the ability to fly cross-country or to foreign countries in a matter of hours, distances that would formerly take days by train or weeks by boat.

Sometimes, flying feels too God-like to be attained by man. Sometimes, the world from above seems too beautiful, too wonderful, too distant for human eyes to see.— Charles A. Lindbergh, The Spirit of St. Louis, 1953.

When Charles Lindbergh successfully flew non-stop from New York to Paris in 1927 he became an American hero.

A very humorous perspective on the invention of the airplane was created by comedian Bob Newhart in a routine called Merchandizing The Wright Brothers.  Told that the longest flight so far was 105 feet, the sales manager replies, “That’s going to cut our time to the coast.”

The Wright Brothers created the single greatest cultural force since the invention of writing. The airplane became the first World Wide Web, bringing people, languages, ideas, and values together.— Bill Gates

Wilbur and Orville Wright could hardly have imagined supersonic flight, space shuttles and rockets to the Moon and Mars.  But this kind of technological evolution is an established aspect of modern life.

Meanwhile, those daring young men in their flying machines, many who gave their lives in their zeal to be aviators, were the adventurous pioneers who helped make the future of aviation possible.

If God had really intended men to fly, he’d..

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After months of the internet speculating as to when Disneyland would open Galaxy’s Edge, the largest Disneyland expansion to date, CEO Bob Iger revealed earlier this year that the planet of Batuu would be ready to accept visitors in May 2019.

Fans were excited, to say the least.

For us, we couldn’t wait for the following:

  • To secure a reservation time, which we got for early June.
  • And, to grab the Nikon Z 6 and shoot any and everything we could.

Our reservation day finally arrived: Sunday, June 9th, between 5pm and 9pm. Needless to say, we had a blast! From start to finish, visiting Galaxy’s Edge was truly a special experience.

Chewbacca greeting 5pm-9pm guests

Just a heads up, when you line up to enter, you will see a sea of cameras and tripods. Everyone wants to capture their first look at the new land.

Pro tip: tripods that extend are NOT ALLOWED inside the Disney Parks

Why did we choose the Nikon Z 6? Having to go through security and then being on our feet all day, we didn’t want to get weighed down by a ton of gear. The Z6 paired with the 24-70mm f4 proved to be the perfect theme park companions because, in short – our kit was light, compact, fast and powerful.

Check out our captures from our first trip to the planet Batuu.

Greetings from Batuu! The line to get on the Cantina waitlist (yes, there’s an actual cantina). Guests are given a return time to enter Oga’s Cantina. Galaxy’s Edge is highly immersive. All Batuuans remain in characters and interact with guests, including members of the First Order. “Do you have any intel…?” A Batuuan poses for a quick photo near the Cantina Smuggler’s Run is, currently, the only attraction in Galaxy’s Edge. Guests have the opportunity to pilot the Millenium Falcon. Docking Bay 7 is one of the quick-service food options on Batuu. The Smoked Kaadu Ribs come highly recommended. Our favorite part of Galaxy’s Edge? – The attention to detail. Interior: Den of Antiquities Guests are welcome to interact with characters. By doing so, they become part of the story that is unfolding on Batuu. Til the spire…

From til June 23rd, guests can only enter Galaxy’s Edge with a valid reservation. Starting June 24th, Batuu will welcome the general public.

All photos were taken with the Nikon Z6 and 24-70mm f4 lens.

The post We Took the Nikon Z 6 to Photograph Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland appeared first on Samy's Camera Photo Blog.

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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography

We’ve just commemorated the 75th anniversary of the invasion of France at Normandy which pretty much spelled the doom of Hitler and Nazi Germany.  Anyone wanting to know what the experience of landing on the beach during that invasion should watch the beginning of Saving Private Ryan, which experts say comes as close to reality as any movie has – or probably can without actually blowing people up.

If your pictures aren’t good enough, you aren’t close enough. – Robert Capa

We know a lot about how this action looked because of the combat photographers who were brave enough to go in with the invasion troops, many of whom lost their lives.  One of the most famous of these photographers was Hungarian-born Robert Capa, the only civilian photographer landing on Omaha Beach on D-Day – shooting for Life Magazine.  Capa was an experienced war photographer whose photos of the Spanish Civil War were considered especially significant.

Photojournalist Robert Capa was the only civilian photographer who landed with the troops during the Normandy invasion. | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW The war is like an actress who is getting old. It’s less and less photogenic and more and more dangerous. (1944) – Robert Capa

Robert Capa’s adventures involving D-Day didn’t end when he got off the beach.  Most of the photos in this post are not by Capa.  Here is a description of what happened to his photos, reported by PetaPixel:

Robert Capa landed on Omaha Beach with the first wave of assault troops at 0630 on the morning of June 6, 1944 (D-Day), on freelance assignment from LIFE magazine.  He stayed there for 90 minutes, until he either inexplicably ran out of film or his camera jammed. During that time he made somewhere between 72 and 144 35mm b&w exposures of the Allied invasion of Normandy on Kodak Super-XX film.

| Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW

Upon landing back in England the next day, he sent all his film via courier to assistant picture editor John Morris at LIFE’s London office, instead of delivering it in person. This shipment included pre-invasion reportage of the troops boarding and crossing the English Channel, the just-mentioned coverage of the battle on Omaha Beach, and images of medics tending to the wounded on the return trip.

When the film finally arrived, around 9 p.m., the head of LIFE’s London darkroom, one “Braddy” Bradshaw, inexplicably assigned the task of developing these crucial four rolls of 35mm Omaha Beach images to one of the least experienced members of his staff, 15-year-old “darkroom lad” Denis Banks.  After successfully processing the 35mm films, in his haste to help Morris meet the looming deadline Banks absentmindedly closed the doors of the darkroom’s film-drying cabinet, which inexplicably were “normally kept open.” Inexplicably, nobody noticed that Banks had closed them.

FRANCE – JUNE 06: American soldiers, their feet in the water, are landing on a Normandy beach. In the background are the American military ships which transported them. (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images) | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW

As a result, after “just a few minutes,” that enclosed space with a small electric heating coil on its floor inexplicably became so drastically overheated that it melted the emulsion of Capa’s 35mm negatives.  Notified of this by the horrified Banks, Morris rushed to the darkroom, discovering that eleven of Capa’s negatives had survived, which he “saved” or “salvaged,” and which proved just sufficient enough to fulfill this crucial assignment to the satisfaction of LIFE’s New York editors.

That darkroom catastrophe blurred slightly the remaining negatives, “ironically” adding to their expressiveness. Furthermore, as a result of the overheating, the emulsion on those eleven negatives inexplicably slid a few millimeters sideways on their acetate backing, resulting in a visible intrusion of the film’s sprocket holes into the image area.

| Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW While troops were hitting the beach, paratroopers were landing inland to cut off German reinforcements. | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW

Photographers who have lost valuable photos or feared to lose them can relate to this story.  This is especially true in the digital age when we no longer have negatives and transparencies locked up in a file but where our images exist in electronic form on hard drives, DVDs or other too easily erased or lost media.

Robert Capa himself survived the war and went on to cover other conflicts.  In the early 1950s, Capa traveled to Japan for an exhibition associated with Magnum Photos. While there, Life magazine asked him to go on assignment to Southeast Asia, where the French had been fighting for eight years in the First Indochina War. Although a few years earlier he had said he was finished with war, Capa accepted and accompanied a French regiment with two Time-Life journalists, John Mecklin and Jim Lucas in Thái Bình Province. On 25 May 1954, the regiment was passing through a dangerous area under fire when Capa decided to leave his Jeep and go up the road to photograph the advance. Capa was killed when he stepped on a land mine.[4]:155[47]

He was 40 at the time of his death. – Wikipedia

I hope to stay unemployed as a war photographer until the end of my life. – Robert Capa The most famous of Robert Capa’s De-day photos. | Source: http://bit.ly/2K81pUW
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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

There are millions of bicycle riders all over the world – riding all sorts of bikes including those equipped with complex multi-gears, cruisers, BMX bikes, mountain bikes, recumbent bikes, bicycles-built-for-two and nowadays an increasing number of electric bikes.

But while the idea of two-wheel transportation goes back centuries, when the early ancestors of the modern bicycle were introduced in the 19th century, very soon riding a bike turned into a cultural craze and even a lifestyle.  In an era in which personal transportation was limited to horses and carriages, suddenly anyone would just jump on a bicycle and get from place to place, at no additional cost, at up to 20 miles per hour or more.

People joined bicycle clubs.  They went on bicycle excursions.  The invention of the “girl’s bike” allowed women, even wearing long skirts, to get in on the fun.

History of the Bicycle

Text contributed by
www.bicyclehistory.net

Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS

Before the creation of today’s modern bicycle, there were several examples of simpler bicycle transport devices. It all started in the 16th century with the discovery of 1493 Leonardo da Vinci’s sketches, which included simple designs for a bicycle. Some historians claim that either his student Gian Giacomo Caprotti made this drawing or that is altogether fake. That design was never produced into a working model and in following four hundred years horses remained only affordable means of transport on a public road.

The German Baron Karl von Drais invented precursor to the modern bicycle during the early 19th century. This velocipede named “Laufmaschine” consisted of two wheels that were held together with one central bar. The driver of that vehicle had to walk and run to gather the needed speed and then raise his legs and continue to cruise until his momentum faded. Design of Von Drais was improved in England with the commercially successful “Dandy Horse”.

Lots of designs were tried before the modern bicycle was invented. Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS Before bicycles with gears and chain drives were invented, you needed a very big wheel to get going at any speed. But the dangers of this kind of bike are obvious. | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS

That design remained in use for almost 40 years until two French carriage makers came to the idea that would revolutionize the bicycle world. Pierre Michaux and Pierre Lallemen saw how “Dandy Horse” is used and they devised the plan to attach the pedals to the front wheel, and install the driving seat on the support beam.

Altering the frame to allow for wearing skirts, encouraged riding a bike to be very popular with women. | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS A transitional design between the big wheel bicycle and the latter kind with chain drive and gears. | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS

In 1864, they made their first model that proved to be very efficient and easy to produce. Four years later, they gathered the funds for mass production and begun improving their initial design into what will become known as “Boneshaker”. Bicycle frame was made from Iron instead of wood, and soon they started including rubber tires and ball bearings. One of the most popular designs of that time was the bicycle model with a larger front wheel. Created in 1869 by the Frenchmen Eugene Meyer and mass-produced by Englishman James Starley, high-wheel bicycle improved several aspects of its use (more comfortable than “boneshaker”, higher speeds and lighter frame) but it added few disadvantages (difficult downhill and uphill riding). First high wheel models become available during the 1870s in England, where they were received in a good light.

| Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS

After those first few years of high wheel bicycle popularity, in 1885 Englishman John Kemp Starley created his first “safety bicycle”. Today that invention is regarded as one of the most important moments in bicycle history. It had featured chain that connected pedals to the rear wheel and steerable front wheel. This device (called Rover) ignited the era known today as “Golden Age of Bicycles”. Since that time, bicycle design and equipment became standardized across the world and they satisfied all four basic aspects – safety, speed, comfort, and steering. They all had the basic diamond shape made from metal, pneumatic rubber tires, roller chain, one gear, coaster brakes and more. Golden Age of Bicycles lasted from the 1900s to 1950s in which bicycles became one of the primary means of public road transportation. Early bicycle clubs popularized recreational driving across America and Europe. During the years their manufacturing costs came down significantly, which increased their use all over the world.

The classic bicycle – although this one seems to have no front brake, and that’s where most of the force of braking comes from. | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS The bicycle built for two is not a new idea. | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS If two on a bike is good, why stop there? | Source: http://bit.ly/2KpOtsS

The modern age of bicycles started in the 1960s and 70s with the increase of North American consciousness of the benefits of exercise and energy efficient transport. In 1975, over 17 million riders started driving a new sort of much lighter and cheaper bikes. Since then racing bikesmountain bikes and BMX became the standard for the bicycle drivers all around the world, with the recent addition of hybrid commuter bikes (specialized for city use with a wide range of equipment taken from mountain and speed bicycles). Standard materials from which modern bicycle frames are made is aluminum and carbon fiber.

In 2010, worldwide production of bicycles is in the range of 125 to 130 billion.

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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com The 34th edition of the International Festival of Fashion, Photography and Fashion accessories
The festival promotes young creation in fashion, photography and fashion accessories areas.

Every year, the festival is organized around three contests, exhibitions and roundtable discussions.

Competitions bring out ten fashion designers (since 1986), ten photographers (since 1997) and ten accessories designers (since 2017) who are selected by professionals.

The quality of these images demonstrates that even in the digital age, with smartphones everywhere and more photos being shot than ever before, the eye and the imagination of the photographer is still what creates great pictures.

FROM BRITISH JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY

written by Marigold Warner

From Gravity and Grace, 2018 © Hubert Crabieres

Alice Mann, Hubert Crabières, Hilla Kurki, and Elsa & Johanna scoop the prizes for the fashion festival’s 23rd annual awards for emerging photographers

Alice Mann has scooped the prestigious Grand Prix prize for photography at this year’s International Festival of Fashion, Photography and Fashion accessories in Hyères, France, with three other awards for emerging photographers going to Hubert Crabières, Hilla Kurki and Elsa & Johanna.

This year, 10 photographers were selected to exhibit their personal projects in competition for the main prize, as well as two new pieces of work for the Still Life Prize and the American Vintage Photography Prize.

Hilla Kurki was awarded the Still Life prize, and Hubert Crabières the American Vintage Photography Prize. Crabières wins a €15,000 commission, and Kurki a €5,000 prize. The Public and City of Hyères Award went to French duo Elsa & Johanna, for their self-portrait series, Beyond the Shadows.

Alice Mannis the winner of this year’s Grand Prix, with her series on young drum majorettes in South Africa – also the winner of the 2018 Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize. Mann wins a grant of €20,000, plus a solo show at next year’s festival.

A total of 700 photographers entered this year’s awards, with the final 10 picked out by a jury that included Craig McDean (photographer, president of the jury); Marc Ascoli (creative director, AnOther Paris); Patrice Haddad (producer, Première Heure Paris) and Eva O’Leary (winner of the 2018 Grand Prix).

The exhibition will be on show until 28 May, including work by all ten finalists. The finalist for 2019 were Federico Berardi, Kerry J Dean, Tommy Kha, Hilla Kurki, Vincent Levrat, Andrew Nuding, and Jean-Vincent Simonet.

www.villanoailles-hyeres.com

From Drummies, 2017 © Alice Mann From Drummies, 2017 © Alice Mann From Beyond the Shadows, 2018-2019 © Elsa & Johanna From Beyond the Shadows, 2018-2019 © Elsa & Johanna From Beyond the Shadows, 2018-2019 © Elsa & Johanna From If You Are a Wound, I Am the Scar, 2017 © Hilla Kurki From If You Are a Wound, I Am the Scar, 2017 © Hilla Kurki From If You Are a Wound, I Am the Scar, 2017 © Hilla Kurki From Gravity and Grace, 2018 © Hubert Crabieres

*******************************************************

Bill Dobbins is a professional photographer, videographer and writer based in Los Angeles.  His work has been exhibited as fine art in two museums, a number of galleries, and he has published eight books, including two fine art photo books:

The Women: Photographs of The Top Female Bodybuilders (Artisan)
Modern Amazons (Taschen)

WEBSITES

BILL DOBBINS PHOTOGRAPHY
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

BILL DOBBINS ART
www.billdobbinsart.com

FEMALE PHYSIQUE SITES
www.billdobbins.com

EMAIL: billdobbinsphoto@gmail.com

The post Hyères 2019: Photography award winners announced appeared first on Samy's Camera Photo Blog.

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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com
African Elephants, Chobe National Park, Botswana. Photo©Art Wolfe

In this age in which the profession of a photographer is becoming more and more problematical, Art Wolfe continues to build upon an already legendary career.  Both a photographer and conservationist, Wolfe is best known for color images of landscapes, wildlife, and native cultures.

“His photographs document scenes from every continent and hundreds of locations, and have been noted by environmental advocacy groups for their “stunning” visual impact.[3] – Wolfe’s career has been described as “multi-faceted”, involving wildlife advocacy, art, journalism, and education. According to William Conway, former president of the Wildlife Conservation Society, Wolfe is a “prolific and sensitive recorder of a rapidly vanishing natural world.”[3] In the last 30 years, the public has viewed Wolfe’s work in more than sixty published books, including Vanishing Act, The High Himalaya, Water: Worlds between Heaven & Earth, Tribes, Rainforests of the World, and The Art of Photographing Nature.[3] -” Wikipedia

Andalusian horse, Washington, USA. Photo©Art Wolfe Camargue horse. Photo©Art Wolfe Camargue horses. Photo©Art Wolfe

The son of commercial artists, Art Wolfe was born on September 13, 1951 in Seattle, Washington, and still calls the city home. He graduated from the University of Washington with Bachelor’s degrees in fine arts and art education in 1975, where he studied under professors such as Jacob Lawrence. His photography career has spanned five decades, a remarkable testament to the durability and demand for his images, his expertise, and his passionate advocacy for the environment and indigenous culture. During that time he has worked on every continent, in hundreds of locations, and on a dazzling array of projects.

“Art Wolfe is a virtuoso whose eye brings home, again and again, the absolute need to preserve what we have.”
—Morgan Freeman

Wolfe’s photographic mission is multi-faceted. By employing artistic and journalistic styles, he documents his subjects and educates the viewer. His unique approach to photography is based on his training in the arts and his love of the environment. His goal has always been to win support for conservation issues by “focusing on what’s beautiful on the Earth.” Hailed by William Conway, former president of the Wildlife Conservation Society, as “the most prolific and sensitive recorder of a rapidly vanishing natural world,” Wolfe has created millions of images in his lifetime and travels nearly nine months out of the year photographing for new projects, leading photographic tours and seminars, and giving inspirational presentations to corporate, educational, conservation, and spiritual groups.

“Art Wolfe’s brilliant and sensitive photographs, is a powerful stimulation for changing attitudes.”
—Jane Goodall

Long before the genre of ‘conservation photography’ was conceived, Wolfe was practicing it. In 1997 he created a conservation-themed photography contest as “an event for the advancement of photography as a unique medium capable of bringing awareness and preservation to our environment through art.” The contest culminated in 2012 in which the International Conservation Photography Awards drew entries from around the world and was exhibited and traveled by The Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in Seattle.

“Art Wolfe’s work tells a story that is overwhelming, breathtaking, and vast.”
—Robert Redford

In 1978 he published his first book Indian Baskets of the Northwest Coast with the late Dr. Allan Lobb, a close friend, and mentor, who also gave Wolfe a start by putting the young photographer’s work into patients’ rooms at Swedish Medical Center. Wolfe was soon photographing for the world’s top magazines such as National Geographic, Smithsonian, Audubon, GEO, and Terre Sauvage. Magazines all over the world publish his photographs and stories, and his work is licensed for retail products and advertising, as well as products such as USPS stamps, of which he has three.

The numerous US and international venues have featured monographs of his work as well his traveling exhibitions, Earth Is My Witness, Travels to the Edge, and Beyond the Lens. He has had four major exhibitions at Seattle’s Frye Art Museum, including One World, One Vision. Today his work is available online at www.artwolfe.com and at the Carnevale Gallery in Las Vegas.

“Art Wolfe is an artist. He works with all of the artistic elements . . . line, form, texture, composition, light
and shadow and produces visual masterpieces…”
—Robert Bateman

Since 1988 he has published at least one book a year—1997 alone saw seven titles in the United States and abroad. He has released over 100 books in eight languages, including the popular titles The New Art of Photographing Nature and The Art of the PhotographVanishing Act, and award-winning titles Human CanvasThe High Himalaya, Water: Worlds between Heaven & Earth, Tribes, Rainforests of the World, Pacific Northwest – Land of Light and Water, as well as numerous children’s titles, including O is for Orca and Animal Action Alphabet. Graphis included his books Light on the Land and the controversial Migrations on its list of the 100 best books published in the 1990s.

In 2000 he formed Wildlands Press and subsequently published his signature work: The Living Wild, which has more than 70,000 copies in print worldwide and garnered awards from the National Outdoor Book Awards, Independent Publisher, Applied Arts and Graphis; Africa (2001) and Edge of the EarthCorner of the Sky (2003), both of which captured significant publishing awards, including IPPY (Independent Publishers), Benjamin Franklin (Publishers Marketing Association), and the National Outdoor Book Award.

Photo©Art Wolfe Father knows best. Photo©Art Wolfe

In 2014 Wolfe began a publishing relationship with Earth Aware Editions. This has resulted in numerous award-winning books including the encyclopedic Earth Is My Witness, also published in German, French, and Italian language editions by National Geographic; an all-new edition of Migrations, and in 2018 the Nautilus Award-winning Trees: Between Earth and Heaven. 2019 will see the publication of Wild Elephants: Conservation in the Age of Extinction and the trade edition of Human Canvas.

“The intensity, texture, and strange density of Art Wolfe’s photographs are truly astonishing.”
—Peter Matthiessen

Wolfe has ventured into the world of television production with On Location with Art Wolfe, Techniques of the Masters and as host of American Photo’s Safari, which aired on ESPN 1993-1995. In May 2007 Art made his public television debut with the high definition series Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge, an intimate and upbeat series that offers unique insights on nature, culture, and the realm of digital photography. The thirteen-episode first season garnered American Public Television’s 2007 Programming Excellence Award—unprecedented for a first season show. The thirteen-episode second season garnered five Silver Telly Awards, their highest honor, for outstanding achievement. It has been broadcast hundreds of thousands of times in the United States on PBS and CreateTV affiliates and in global syndication, and on Amazon Prime. Wolfe is the on-screen talent for two of the six episodes of Season I of Tales By Light, first airing in 2015 in Australia and New Zealand and now in distribution on Netflix. The show was produced by Canon Australia and National Geographic Channel in conjunction with Untitled Film Works.

“…we enjoy a grand tour of the world as only Art Wolfe can bring us. In a way, you could call Art the
ultimate tour guide.”
—Rick Steves

Les Aiguilles and Lac Blanc Savoy Alps, France. Photo©Art Wolfe
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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

As more and more photographic images flood the Internet in this age of digital photography, this abundance tends to lessen the impact of any specific pictures.  Thankfully, there are institutions and organizations devoted to selecting and celebrating the very best of contemporary photography and the photographers responsible for shooting these pictures.

The Sony World Photography Awards is one of these.  And their selection for this year is Federico Borella.  Below you will get to experience the impact of his amazing work.

India, Tamil Nadu, May 2018. One of the skulls claimed to be the skull of a farmer who committed suicide, held by Mr Premkumar, a member of the South Indian Farmers Association. This skull was also used during a protest in Delhi in 2017, where farmers demanded a drought relief package and loan waiver for peasants from the state © Federico Borella, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Documentary, 2019 Sony World Photography Awards

The Italian photographer scooped the $25,000 top prize at the Sony World Photography Awards with a series on climate change and suicide among Indian farmersFederico Borella has been named Photographer of the Year at the 2019 Sony World Photography Awards, winning the $25,000 prize for his series Five Degrees– a look at male suicide in the farming community of Tamil Nadu, southern India, which is facing its worst drought in 140 years. The Italian photographer’s work takes its lead from a Berkeley University study, which found a correlation between climate change and increased suicide rates among Indian farmers, and explores the impact of both via images of the farming landscape, mementos of the farmers, and portraits of their survivors.“As global warming changes the face of life ever more rapidly – particularly in developing and underdeveloped nations – the work of artists such as Borella becomes ever more needed,” commented Mike Trow, chair of the professional jury. He added that this year’s submissions “provoked a lot of debate and interest amongst the jury” with works “pushing the boundaries of photography and challenging the perceptions and expectations the audience”.

The Sony World Photography Awards are divided into four categories – professional, student, youth, and open – which this year received over 326,000 submissions from 195 countries and territories. In total ten winners were picked out in the professional categories, with Borella winning the Documentary category with his project.Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw

The Architecture prize was taken by Stephan Zirwes, Germany for his series Cut Outs – Pools 2018; Rebecca Fertinel, Belgium won the Brief category for her series Ubuntu – I Am Because We Are. Marinka Massaus, Netherlands, won the Creative category for the series Chosen [not] to be; the Discovery prize was taken by Jean-Marc Caimi & Valentina Piccinni, Italy for the series Güle Güle. Yan Wang Preston, UK won the Landscape prize with the series To the South of the Colourful Clouds.

Jasper Doest, Netherlands, won the Natural World & Wildlife category with his series Meet Bob; Alvaro Laiz, Spain, won the Portraiture category with his series The Edge. Alessandro Grassini, Italy, won the Sports category with the series Boxing Against Violence: The Female Boxers Of Goma; and Nicolas Gaspardel & Pauline Baert, France, won the Still Life category with the series Yuck.

Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw

Under the chair Mike Trow, the 2019 Professional competition was judged by Erin Barnett, director of exhibitions and collections at the International Center of Photography in the US; Brendan Embser, managing editor of Aperture; Emma Lewis, judge and assistant curator at Tate; Liu Heung Shing, founder of the Shanghai Center of Photography; and Isabella van Marle, head of artist & gallery relations at Unseen Amsterdam.

Nadav Kander was awarded the 2019 Outstanding Contribution to Photography prize, while the Student competition was won by Sergi Villanueva from the Universidad Jaume I in Spain. Zelle Westfall, who is 18 and from the US, won the Youth Photographer of the Year. The Open Photographer of the Year was taken by Christy Lee Rogers, from the US.

The shortlisted work will go on show at the 2019 Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition at Somerset House, London, before going on tour around the world; this exhibition will also include a section dedicated to Nadav Kander’s work.

The 2019 Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition is on show from 18 April until 06 May at Somerset House, London. 

www.worldphoto.org/sony-world-photography-awards-exhibition

Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw

Source: http://bit.ly/2VAksgw

Text contributed by Diane Smyth

*******************************************************

Bill Dobbins is a professional photographer, videographer and writer based in Los Angeles.  His work has been exhibited as fine art in two museums, a number of galleries, and he has published eight books, including two fine art photo books:

The Women: Photographs of The Top Female Bodybuilders (Artisan)
Modern Amazons (Taschen)

WEBSITES

BILL DOBBINS PHOTOGRAPHY
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

BILL DOBBINS ART
www.billdobbinsart.com

FEMALE PHYSIQUE SITES
www.billdobbins.com

EMAIL: billdobbinsphoto@gmail.com

The post Federico Borella Wins Photographer of the Year appeared first on Samy's Camera Photo Blog.

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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

The technology of photography went through a rapid evolution in the 19th century after being introduced to the public in 1839.  The first major development after the Daguerreotype was one that allowed the creation of a negative from which any number of positive prints could be made.  This was the wet plate collodion process.  A glass plate would be coated with an emulsion and put in a holder.  The exposure had to be made and the plate developed before the emulsion dried.  Therefore there had to be a darkroom facility available to make this happen.  This could be a darkroom at the photo studio or, when on location, one in some kind of wagon.

Photography moved on eventually to dry plate technology, then to film and nowadays using electronic imaging.  But even as new processes become available there are still those who choose to work with the old ones.  This not only gives them a look to the photos that is different from those created by other technologies but also creates a different experience and relationship to the finished images for the photographer.

To celebrate this, Modern Collodion holds an annual competition for the best wet plate photos.  Below are the 2019 winners.

Modern Collodion has just announced the winners of the 2019 Wet Plate Competition, the second annual contest for wet plate collodion photographers around the world after launching last year.

This year, over 220 photos were submitted by 90 photographers based in 19 different countries. The judges, Michael GodekGiles ClementAlex TimmermansTom DeLooza, and Paul Barden, spent nearly a month on “difficult deliberation” before deciding on the handful of winning wet plates.

Here are the 2019 winning photos, artists, and stories:

Grand Prize: “Two Nails” by David Russo

I first became interested in collodion after seeing the work of Sally Mann in a photo book several years ago. I found the photographs moving and the process itself rather compelling. In 2013, I attended a workshop at the George Eastman Museum to study under Mark Osterman and learn the wet plate process. I’ve been practicing ever since.

Two Nails is an attempt to share something of my own experience with the world. It comes from an ongoing body of work titled The Framer. I’ve been working professionally as a picture framer for nearly a decade now, and it seemed like a natural extension of my working life to begin photographing the tools of the trade. With this ambrotype, I wanted to make a self-portrait that sought beauty in its simplicity.

Making the plate itself was a real labor of love. I say this, in part, because it took two months to work through. How does one make nails float? The answer, it turns out, is a lot of hard work. Through the use of selective focus, lighting, perspective, and a bit of custom fabrication, I was able to achieve the illusion. For me, the process was all about trial and error. I’ve discovered you learn a lot in the trying.

Studio Portrait, 1st Place: “Gestation” by Gianni Eros Cusumano

I have always lived in big cities, now I live in a tiny medieval village surrounded by nature. My approach to photography, through wet plate collodion process, reflects the slowness of the place where I live.

I also really like portraiture, the result of a tension between me and the subjects in front of me that results in a unique image.

This plate (10×12 inch) is part of a series called “Gestation” consisting of four collodion plates on clear glass. Each plate is the result of double exposure: one image of the silhouette of my pregnant wife, obtained through a backward illumination of the subject with continuous light; and another one of the grain I placed on a black background.

The idea comes up during the period of my wife’s pregnancy and was created two days before my daughter Giorgia’s birth. Seeing the transformation that my wife had during her pregnancy time was an incredible experience. Day after day her body has become more and more beautiful and strong in order to protect the life she was carrying on.

Studio Portrait, Runner Up: “Waltnessmonsta” by Matt Alberts

Feeling frustrated with the meaninglessness of most digital photography in combination with a desire to make something with my hands, I found the wet collodion process. In February of 2013, I took a class taught by Quinn Jacobson and thereafter we became good friends. I related to Quinn’s philosophy that the collodion process should be used to create something meaningful; he took me under his wing and he became my mentor. While apprenticing at Quinn’s studio in Denver, I invited my close friend and skateboarder, Walter Lacey, over to show him the process and take his portrait.

The plate “Waltnessmonsta” was one of the earliest images I made for the LIFERS project series. This shot was made using an 11×14 Deardorff studio camera with a 320mm CC Harrison Petzval lens. The image is on black glass.

Natural Light Portrait, 1st Place: “Ballet in the Castle” by Gabriel Kiss

This photo is the result of a three days long preparation and negotiation. The photo shooting took place in one of Hungary’s most beautiful castles, the Esterhazy Palace. Because it is a scheduled monument we needed a lot of permits. With the figure of the ballet dancer, I did not want to point out the dance but rather to emphasize the tension surrounding the dance itself, its edges and lines.

Natural Light Portrait, Runner Up: “Gravity” by Keira Hudson

I originally studied printmaking at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia from 2009-12 before transitioning to photography. I worked digitally for five years until I grew tired of working in front of a screen and decided to enroll in a tintype/ambrotype workshop at Gold Street Studios in Trentham.

I am inspired by a mixture of artists, writers, films and TV shows, and have a large hard drive full of media collected over 10 years. The artists whose work I regularly revisit include Berlinde de Bruyckere, Jenny Saville, Lauren Simonutti, and Sally Mann. I am drawn in by the rawness of their work, and the treatment of the human body in their respective practices.

For the past few years, I have been working on a series centered around anxiety, and the body’s physical and emotional responses to persistent overthinking. I incorporate props such as thread, clothing, plastic wrap, and glass vessels into my photographs to restrict and compress the flesh, and recreate the daily feelings of anxiety I experience. In “Gravity”, I wanted the body to be suffocated in a glass and water cage.

Still Life, 1st Place: “Incroyable!” by Libby & Stephen of Henrietta’s Eye

We are primarily self-taught having been introduced to wet plate collodion almost by accident when a friend showed us the basics of the process. Admittedly, there’s more than a little bit of punk rock, DIY attitude in us, so making photographs the hard way somehow naturally meant for us that we’d also learn the hard way.

About our piece, fully titled Incroyable! (Wednesday, November 9, 2016): intentionally referencing the surrealist painter Magritte, it’s our attempt at expressing the collective spasm of disbelief felt by many following the 2016 presidential election in the United States — not just the surreal nature of that moment but the outrageous nature of life since. Beyond the symbology of the carnation, the suit and tie, and mushroom cloud-like explosion, it was thematically relevant to use the in-camera trick photography associated with the early 1900s spiritualist movement to express this communal gasp and the experience of being hoodwinked by charlatans.

Still Life, Runner Up: “The World and The Man” by Gabriel Kiss

My photo was born from the idea that the egg as the origin of our world – the birth – has already been set on its edge and has to balance on it. And the scissors as the sword of Damocles are swaying above the egg. The rope can break any time and they can smash into the fragile eggshell.

Landscape/Architecture, 1st Place: “A Quiet Lakeside” by Maximilian Zeitler

Last October someone broke into the shared place I use for a studio and stole nearly all my large format cameras and a very rare and big lens I got borrowed from a friend for ultra large format portraits. Gathering equipment for wet plate always means searching auction houses and hoping to be lucky. Since I started wet plate about four years ago I, therefore, tried to get good equipment to work – that then was gone.

When I had overcome the first shock I packed the last ‚portable‘ wooden camera and all my darkroom equipment and drove into the Spreewald near Berlin to escape the studio and all the bad thoughts. At this small lake in the woods, I set up the camera from 1890 together with an old wide angle lens from 1880 and exposed one plate around 60 seconds.

One should always keep on doing what you love!

Landscape/Architecture, Runner Up: “The Best Day” by Lynnette Bierbaum

I started doing wet plate collodion two years ago and glassblowing shortly thereafter. I stumbled through being self-taught with wet plate in the beginning but wanted to learn more about the process. I took a wet plate collodion class taught by Dan Estabrook at Penland School of Crafts in the summer of 2018 and returned again as a studio assistant for Jill Enfield in the spring of 2019.

These opportunities allowed me to refine and continue printing on my blown glass forms. I strive to find a balance between two and three-dimensional planes within my art. I blow the glass vessels to create an extension beyond the photograph that is just as important as the image itself.

I use positives in contact with the wet plate emulsion under an enlarger to expose the images onto the three-dimensional glass forms. Next, I develop, and varnish before removing the frame from the glass.

The idea behind the forms was my constant search for belonging and a place to call home. I always knew that the Midwest wasn’t the place for me, so I started traveling around the world looking for my idea of a home. Home is more than just a place, it’s about finding the right person, community and artifacts to make a place your home. The image printed on this glass vessel was taken in Ebeltoft, Denmark.

You can find a gallery of Honorable Mention wet plates as well as the full gallery of submissions over on the competition website (warning: some of the photos are not safe for work).

MODERN COLLODION WEBSITE

Special thanks to Michael Zhang

*******************************************************

Bill Dobbins is a professional photographer, videographer and writer based in Los Angeles.  His work has been exhibited as fine art in two museums, a number of galleries, and he has published eight books, including two fine art photo books:

The Women: Photographs of The Top Female Bodybuilders (Artisan)
Modern Amazons (Taschen)

WEBSITES

BILL DOBBINS PHOTOGRAPHY
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

BILL DOBBINS ART
www.billdobbinsart.com

FEMALE PHYSIQUE SITES
www.billdobbins.com

EMAIL: billdobbinsphoto@gmail.com

The post The Winning Photos of the 2019 Wet Plate Competition appeared first on Samy's Camera Photo Blog.

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By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com Hedy Lamarr was widely considered the most beautiful woman in the world back in her day. | Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

“The public pays and it feels it is entitled to participate in the
personal affairs of a performer.” – Hedy Lamarr 

Hedy Lamaar was an actress in the 1930s and ’40s who was considered by many (including my father) to be the most beautiful woman in the world.  She has been called the Angelina Jolie of her time.  She appeared in Hollywood movies alongside such stars as Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, William Powell, Charles Boyer, Robert Taylor, and Victor Mature.

She was born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler on November 9, 1914 in Vienna, Austria. At age 17, Hedy starred in her first film, a German project called Geld auf der Strase.

“If you use your imagination, you can look at any actress and see her nude.
I hope to make you use your imagination.” – Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr with Clark Gable (the “King”) in 1940. Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv Hedy Lamarr with Charles Boyer in the movie Algiers. “Come with me to the Casbah.” Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

Even as a young girl, Hedy Lamarr possessed remarkable beauty.  She was married young to an Austrian industrialist who was both overly controlling and a Nazi sympathizer.  Since Hedy was both Jewish and possessed of an independent spirit, she found a way to leave him and go out on her own.

“All creative people want to do the unexpected.” – Hedy Lamarr 

Early in her career, Hedy Lamarr starred in Ecstasy, a movie which contained an extended nude scene considered highly scandalous but helped make her name well known. Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

According to Reel Rundown: “Hedy Lamarr’s film career started in Austria in the early 1930s when she starred in the German film Ecstasy, which featured a nude scene of Hedy, as well as a scene in which she feigns an orgasm. In Hedy’s autobiography, Ecstasy and Me: My Life as a Woman, published in 1966, Hedy wrote that the director of the film had to lie underneath her and prick her with a pin to simulate in her the throes of sexual arousal. Hedy saw the film with her parents – who bolted from the theater before it was finished. In spite of its sexual content – or because of it – Ecstasy won awards. Not a bad start for Hedy, an 18-year-old woman who wanted to be in pictures.”

“Confidence is something you are born with.  I know I had
loads of it even at the age of 15.” – Hedy Lamarr 

Hedy Lamarr and Robert Taylor. Publicity photo for the 1939 movie Lady of The Tropics. A film featuring two of most beautiful stars in the movies. Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv Hedy Lamarr and William Powell from the movie Heavenly Body | Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

Hedy Lamar eventually arrived in New York City and, as the story goes, somebody from MGM saw her at a party and in short order she was brought to Hollywood and the attention of Louis B. Mayer.  Once making films in Hollywood she soon became a major star and the epitome of sophisticated glamor.  But although she played a few roles that demonstrated her acting talent, in most of them she was presented more like eye candy, there to be seen, with relatively few lines or the opportunity to develop a character.

What Hollywood and the audience didn’t know is that Hedy Lamarr was as bright as she was beautiful, and even though she was extremely successful in the movies, she became very frustrated by the limited roles she was given to play.

“Any girl can be glamorous.  All you have to do is
stand still and look stupid” – Hedy 
Lamarr 

I Take This Woman – Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr, 1940. Tracy is playing a scientist Lamarr really was one! Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv Hedy Lamarr helped invent a technology that is essential in the operation of today’s cell phones. Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

As if being a beautiful, talented actress was not enough, Hedy was also extremely intelligent. In addition to her film accomplishments, Hedy patented an idea that later became the crutch of both secure military communications and mobile phone technology. In 1942, Hedy and composer George Antheil patented what they called the “Secret Communication System.” The original idea, meant to solve the problem of enemies blocking signals from radio-controlled missiles during World War II, involved changing radio frequencies simultaneously to prevent enemies from being able to detect the messages. While the technology of the time prevented the feasibility of the idea at first, the advent of the transistor and its later downsizing made Hedy’s idea very important to both the military and the cell phone industry. – The Official Hedy Lamarr Website.

“The ladder of success in Hollywood is usually a press agent, actor, 
director, producer, leading man; and you are a star if you sleep 
with each of them in that order.  Crude, but true.” – Hedy Lamarr 

Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

According to Wikipedia, in the last decades of her life, the telephone became Lamarr’s only means of communication with the outside world, even with her children and close friends. She often talked up to six or seven hours a day on the phone, but she spent hardly any time with anyone in person in her final years. A documentary, Calling Hedy Lamarr, was released in 2004 and featured her children, Anthony Loder and Denise Loder-DeLuca.

Source: http://bit.ly/2ULnWYv

A documentary about her life, Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story, is currently available on Netflix.

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Awarded To The Photography Staff of Reuters
By Bill Dobbins
www.billdobbinsphotography.com

In this time when video is ubiquitous from sources like TV news and YouTube, there are still types of information that are most effectively delivered by the traditional means of the still image – in this case, the news photo.

Every year a Pulitzer Prize is awarded for Breaking News Photography.  This year the prize goes the photography staff of Reuters for a vivid and startling visual narrative of the urgency, desperation, and sadness of migrants as they journeyed to the U.S. from Central and South America.

We live in a time of very divisive politics, in which there are very different opinions regarding immigration in general and migration to the US from countries to the south in particular.  A series of photos will not tip the discussion in one direction or another.  But they can help us to realize that, whenever we hear news about “migrants,” “Syrians,” or any other group, what is really being talked about is PEOPLE – with the same desires, fears, emotions, family ties, ability to experience joy and pain as any of the rest of us.

Anita Areli Ramirez Mejia, an asylum seeker from Honduras separated from her six-year-old son Jenri near the Mexico-U.S. border, is reunited with him in Harlingen, Texas on July 13, 2018. (Loren Elliott) A rooster walks past the dead body of a Barrio-18 gang member in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (September 28, 2018/Goran Tomasevic) A migrant girl traveling with a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the U.S. holds her belongings while making her way to Mapastepec from Huixtla, Mexico at sunrise on October 24, 2018. (Adrees Latif) A migrant caravan from Central America proceeds towards Tapachula from Ciudad Hidalgo, after crossing the Guatemala border into Mexico, while en route to the United States on October 21, 2018. (Adrees Latif) A Honduran migrant protects his child after fellow migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., stormed a border checkpoint at the Guatemala – Mexico border, in Ciudad Hidalgo on October 19, 2018. (Ueslei Marcelino) A migrant boy, part of a caravan from Central America trying to reach the U.S., cries due to excess heat and humidity as migrants seek asylum at the Guatemala Mexico border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on October 20, 2018. (Edgard Garrido) Luis Acosta, helps carry 5-year-old Angel Jesus, both from Honduras, as a caravan of migrants from Central America en route to the United States crossed through the Suchiate River into Mexico from Guatemala in the outskirts of Tapachula, Mexico, October 29, 2018. A second caravan of migrants bound for the U.S. border waded through the Suchiate River into Mexico after they clashes with Mexican police at the border bridge. Dozens were injured and one was killed by a rubber bullet. (Adrees Latif) A United States Marine fortifies concertina wire along the San Ysidro Port of Entry border crossing as seen from Tijuana, Mexico on November 20, 2018. (Adrees Latif) Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, return to Mexico after being hit by tear gas by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials after attempting to illegally cross the border wall into the United States in Tijuana, Mexico on November 25, 2018. (Adrees Latif) Maria Meza, a 40-year-old migrant woman from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, runs away from tear gas with her five-year-old twin daughters Saira Mejia Meza (L) and Cheili Mejia Meza (R) in front of the border wall between the U.S and Mexico, in Tijuana, Mexico on November 25, 2018. (Kim Kyung Hoon)
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