Loading...

Follow SALESmanago BLOG on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Abolition of private property, children raised by the State and a ban on painting. The first ever political utopia sounds like the worst totalitarian nightmares. Still, the idea of the State as proposed by Plato contains several elements that today could inspire not only politicians, but also company directors.
 

 
The starting point for the analysis of Plato’s (427-347 BC) thoughts on politics addresses the problem of what people need the State for. According to Plato, it is necessary as no one can achieve self-sufficiency ( also referred to as autarchy). The State is, therefore, like a company – an organisation whose members are all interconnected. Plato insisted, that the State should be organised in a way that would guarantee maximum efficiency.
 

The majority of the members of the ideal state would, of course, be its rank and file – farmers, artisans and traders, addressing the needs of citizens during times of peace. According to Plato, such common tasks required nothing more than simple technical skills, which is why the philosopher paid little attention to them. Of much greater importance were two other classes: soldiers and guardians and much more was required of them. Plato proposed a complex system of education in the case of these groups, for whom he also advocated abolition of private property and tight control over procreation. What were the origins of these totalitarian, by modern standards, limitations and why should common people be exempt from them?
 

In order to get a clear picture of the situation, we should begin with the metaphysical foundations of Plato’s proposition. The philosopher recognised the existence of two realities: one that is material and imperfect, which we explore through senses, and the other one – immaterial, which is accessible to people through reasoning. The spiritual world is the world of timeless and unchangeable ideas, which are reflected in the material world constructed by God (demiurge). To illustrate it, Plato used the famous allegory of the cave, at the entrance to which various objects have been placed so that people closed inside the cave can only see their shadows on a wall. Matter is a substance that has its flaws, therefore insofar as there exists a model of perfect man in the world of ideas, the actual people created in its image have various faults, of which the fundamental one is our (people’s) mortality.
 

However, according to Plato, mortal human body is inhabited by immortal soul, which used to reside in the world of ideas but was sent to Earth as a punishment for the evil deeds it committed. Thus, the goal of man’s life on earth is to set his soul free – so just like farmers, who make sure the bodies of the citizens know no hunger, guardians should, first and foremost, take care of their souls.
 

All the strict restrictions imposed on guardians–philosophers were therefore meant to protect them against corruption. Thanks to the abolition of private property, they were supposed to avoid being attracted to the pursuit of riches. Taking children from biological parents and raising them by the State would, according to Plato, prevent conflicts and fights between families, ensuring that the guardian-philosopher would treat all citizens as his relatives. Finally, the ban (or, rather, censorship) imposed on artistic expression was to keep artists safe from drifting into the world of phantasmagoria known from paintings and poems.
 

So even if the means Plato proposed in his utopia seem to be, from the modern perspective, the ultimate aberration, the aims behind these means sound quite reasonable even today. A good leader, whether a politician, company president or military commander, will certainly recognise the relevance of the four cardinal virtues which, according to the Greek philosopher, leaders should demonstrate. Firstly, prudence – here seen as knowledge of conduct appropriate for a particular situation. Secondly, fortitude – i.e. the ability to remain calm and composed not only when faced with a threat or danger, but also – when steering clear of excessive euphoria or other passions. Thirdly – temperance, which means being disciplined and knowing one’s place and status in hierarchy. Finally – justice, which is understood as proper recognition of one’s skills and doing exclusively what one has been appointed to.
 

The ideal CEO by Plato would therefore just focus on great visions and completely ignore all of the day-to-day corporate routine. He – or she – would perhaps not be great fun to talk to during corporate events, but, equally, would not panic over all those minor hitches that trouble us on a daily basis. Such a CEO would be a demanding boss on the one hand, yet a good one on the other as guardians, in Plato’s view, should expect more of themselves than of others.
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We close the first half of the year by welcoming as our new customers not only the representatives of the largest group of customers – eCommerce, but also a German Gin manufacturer, a provider of software for restaurants, as well as a publisher of a news magazine.
 

 
Breaks – Gin– a manufacturer of premium class Gin, offering different flavour variants.
 
ART-BUD – a company offering supply services for industry, construction and administration. It is one of the most frequently chosen suppliers of machinery and equipment, as well as of building materials, finishing materials and tools on the Polish market. The company has been operating since 1991.
 
Resmio – a provider of software for comprehensive booking management and creating websites for restaurants.
 
Chrum – one of the first Polish, completely independent clothing brands, with an online store established in 2002. Since 2014, they have had their own sewing shop where all Chrum.T-Shirts and Chrum.Sweatshirts are made.
 
Best Stuff – a shop with a very wide range of products in the following categories: clothing, gadgets, games, toys for children, and accessories for home.
 
OXMO – fashion jewellery brand. They offer bracelets made of precious and semi-precious stones, decorated with SWAROVSKI CRYSTALS elements, as well as pendants made of gold-plated silver with a 925 sample
 
Vygon – a leading manufacturer of medical products for clinical use. It develops, manufactures and sells products for clinics and outpatient care in the areas of medical care, anaesthesia, emergency medicine, obstetrics, and surgery.
 
Wonduu – an online shop offering products in various categories, including home accessories, children’s toys and sports equipment.
 
Miasto Włosów – an online shop where you can find professional hair cosmetics of brands such as Joico or Paul Mitchell. You will also find the latest trends in the world of hairdressing, product reviews, information about promotions and events, as well as expert advice on hair care and styling.
 
Stylowo-Mieszkam.pl – a shop with a wide range of furniture for both home and office.
 
Navera – offers the highest quality plant proteins and vitamins, superfoods and supplements of plant origin. They are totally committed to nature and do not tolerate artificial additives, preservatives, synthetic sweeteners and dyes.
 
Perfumik – an online shop offering perfumes and other accessories.
 
Deweloper Media – Holistic News – an information portal, a place for engaging debates, giving room to discuss topics regardless of views, status, continents and borders. It is a place on the Internet that gives space for presenting a full picture of the world.
 
Cuksy – manufacturer and distributor of personalized sweets and occasional packaging.
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Thousands of years ago a Chinese philosopher came to the conclusion, that the art of life does not mean spectacular acts. The trick is to live your life with no need for them.
 

 
In one of many anecdotes contained in the ‘Zhuangzi’ – a text that is fundamental to Tao teachings, the Emperor asks his court doctor to name the best doctor of the whole Empire. The latter answers: „Master! I can cure hopeless cases no one else cure – and this is why everyone in the whole Empire has heard of me. My elder brother can cure an illness as soon as it develops – and this is why everyone in the whole village has heard of him. And yet, the best doctor of the Empire is my eldest brother, who knows how to live so that you never fall ill – and this is why only my family has heard of him.
 
According to Taoist philosophers, the whole universe is permeated with the Tao, which is, roughly speaking, a kind of cosmic balance. What one should aim for in life is finding this balance. Thus, a truly wise man is not the one who does much, even if achieving some relative success. You should follow the Wu Wei – that is: ‘action without action’, where your role is to let things take their course. In the above anecdote, the greatest of all doctors is not the one who treats the worst of cases, but the one who has mastered the art of healthy living so that there is no need for medical intervention in the first place.
 
This is exactly the kind of advice a proponent of the Tao would give all those who work in sales. The art of marketing, as seen from this perspective, would not consist in masterminding an awesome marketing strategy that would allow selling everything to everybody. It would, instead, make a product sell itself, without any great campaigns. The latter approach could appear to be less spectacular (like in the quoted parable, where the miracle doctor would be the most famous one) yet the most effective of all. But what can be done if the product itself is utterly useless? Let us try another story:
 
Master Zhuang and a logger were once passing a dry tree. ‘Look, Master – said the logger – the tree is utterly useless’, to which the Master replied: ‘You’re a fool! The tree being dry and rotten keeps standing while others were felled a long time ago’. Some time later, the men happened to walk past a huge, magnificent oak, by which the logger stood in awe, speechless. The Master, who kept walking without even glancing at the tree, said: ‘If that tree had any value, it would have been felled a long time ago’.
 
Taoism as a philosophy is extremely relativistic. The world we perceive is, indeed, a unity that is kept together by the Tao, while the fact that we see it broken down into various objects and phenomena is a result of our weakness that comes from hanging on to our personal, subjective points of view.
 
So, there is no such thing as a poor product or unreachable consumer. There are simply products we want to sell to wrong consumers and consumers we keep offering all the wrong products. A few years ago Apple tried to launch an ‘economy’ version of iPhone. The plan fell through as people who are into cheaper smartphones find iPhones dull (or downright scary) while those who look for an iPhone are OK with steeper prices. See this as a perfect example of a failed attempt at forcefully compromising the rule of the Tao.
 
Taoism may prove perfectly applicable in marketing not only with regard to what the selected strategy will look like but also how it will be designed. Tao Master strives to perceive the world’s phenomena holistically. Ideally, the mind should be cleansed to an extent that all individual perceptions disappear and one can see the world as a whole, achieving full harmony with the Tao. However, the very same rule can be applied to other, more down-to-earth matters. When doing anything, including marketing, all too often we get limited by the narrow walls of ‘obvious’ practices and habits. ‘The ideal time to publish posts on Facebook is…’, ‘each text should be supplemented with graphic content’, “‘close your entry with a ‘call to action’ ” and many many others.
 
In contrast, no thing is obvious for a Taoist. The Tao can be reached through elimination of the obvious and realisation of the full scope of possible ways. Samsung set out to export dried fish. Would it be what it is today had it been stuck in the world of the obvious and predictable?
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

An NSDAP member, fighting off his mid-life crisis getting involved in an extra-marital affair with an 18-year-old student and, last but not least, one of the most important contemporary philosophers. Can that man have anything in common with developing a sales strategy for an automotive business?

He surely can. More than you could ever imagine!
 

 
At a first glance, it might seem that consumers, when making a purchase, aim to satisfy some specific needs they have. So there is a customer – call him Jack, there is a product – be it a new car, and, finally, there is a purchase made at a car showroom. Theoretically, Jack’s decision to buy a family van, an SUV or a compact city car is based on the needs that the car’s properties, again – theoretically – are meant to satisfy. In this traditional model, sale is achieved through figuring out what our product has to offer and who needs whatever is on offer and then – using an array of fine-tuned channels – reaching that person and closing the deal.
 
This traditional model would certainly appeal to many generations of philosophers who, following René Descartes, made a clear-cut distinction between the process of cognition (or any other activity – in our example this being buying), the subject that performs it (Jack) and the object ( the automobile). This approach sees the subject as an autonomous, consistent and rational being that enters into interplay with an equally autonomous and consistent object, which makes both the subject and the object seem to meet half-way, coming from two opposite directions.
 
However, if you adopt a perspective proposed by Martin Heidegger, all these elements should be seen as one coherent and integrated whole, which is – Jack himself.
 
This German philosopher directed his attention to the problem of being. He concluded that the term ‘Jack is’ has no meaning itself. It is because no being is an abstract entity hovering in a void as, instead, it always exists in a specific time and place, in a particular historical context. Every human being exists in their unique, individual way. To refer to this ‘being-in-the-world’, Heidegger used the German word ‘Dasein’ , which translates into English as existence.
 
Back to Jack: so far the story seems nothing short of cliché. Jack is a businessman, single and no kids, in his late thirties, with loads of cash and only few responsibilities and now you can see him buying a sports car. But why should a well-to-do single businessman be assumed to drive a sports car instead of, say, a van? Heidegger would have a ready answer to this question.
 
What Jack is, in fact, is the sum of all his choices and what they, in the specific time and place of his existence, mean. It’s not like there is a rich single man called Jack and therefore he is buying himself a Ferrari. It is thanks to the Ferrari he is buying ( as well as a number of other choices he has made, not only as a consumer, but also as a man with all of his private life) that he can call himself a rich single man. Well, in fact, both as with every similar decision, his specific identity gets reinforced and what you get is a closed loop since the more you are the specific person you are, the more you tend to reinforce your identity. This can account for why the poor-suddenly-turned-rich (a major win on the pools being a good example) are likely to lose all the money they have all of a sudden acquired: those seemingly lucky ones cannot live in the new reality they have been thrown by a twist of fate.
 
This is why Jack won’t buy himself, let’s say, a Volkswagen Sharan. There is a widespread assumption that rich businessmen do not drive family vans. If he decided to impress his equally well-to-do friends with his Sharan parked among a bunch of Lamborghinis and AMGs, his mates would most likely see his vehicle as an alien spaceship of a sort. Unless Jack is this kind of alien-businessman himself, because then… he should definitely buy a Sharan as it is thanks to such decisions that he is the alien he is. Ingvar Kamprad would not have been the Ingvar Kamprad had he not both set up IKEA and driven his 20-year-old Volvo.
 
One tip from Heidegger to an aspiring salesman? Do not tell anyone that they need something only because people of their kind need exactly this thing. Rather, tell them they are who they are because this very thing is what they need. A small group of consumers need a Ferrari. However, there is a whole lot more guys in this world who only aspire to this small exclusive club. Bear this in mind as even if they might not be able to afford the car, they could still buy a bottle of perfume with a Ferrari logo on it.
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Will spending your time in the company of other marketers make you a better one? This is how Woody Allen seems to question the sense of making it to yet another industry conference. Find out more of Woody Allen’s quotes that look as if they were meant specifically for the world of marketing, giving you an insight into a sure-fire way of becoming a better marketer.


 

Woody Allen (1935 – ) is a film director born to a family of American Jews. For many years, he worked as a comedian and a stand-up performer, which seems to have weighed heavily on his future career as a film-maker. The combination of black humour and the absurd went on to become his hallmark, even though his style quite possibly delayed his fame as it remained on the margins of the mainstream Hollywood film-making. His most famous productions include: Annie Hall, Manhattan or – somewhat more contemporary – Midnight in Paris. As a director, he received widespread recognition and, despite some controversy that followed in he aftermath of the ‘#MeToo’ movement, still many film stars shows appreciation for working with him. He made frequent appearances in his own movies as an actor, he also wrote scripts for his movies. Apart from his achievements in the film industry, Woody Allen is best known for his innumerable quotes and comments on the nature of the world, love or relationships.
 

‘Standing in a garage no more makes you a car than standing in a church makes you a Christian’

Do you seriously believe that going to marketing conferences and attending industry events will make you a better marketer? Or perhaps you are falling victim to popular beliefs, common knowledge and commonplace viewpoints which, in fact, make you run in place? How about taking part in a philosophy lecture, joining a math club or enrolling in a course you simply find interesting? Be it a belly-dance instructor classes, your-small-pet-first-aid course or a training programme for sober-only party entertainers. Rest assured that any of these would give your skills a stronger boost than any of marketing round-up with your personal level of creativity showing a marked improvement.
 

‘I can levitate birds. No one cares’

Marketers tend to fall victim to an illusion that anything they do is remarkable, noteworthy and downright amazing while their magic powers may lead to consistently more-than-average results. However, in practice, nature often gains the upper hand and regardless of the techniques you use, certain parameters will stay unaffected as they remain forever in the domain of general mechanics of things. A good example should be the Pareto principle, which underlies one of the fundamental statements in the marketing trade: ‘80 % of potential customers are not yet ready to buy”.
 

‘If you’re not failing every now and again, it’s a sign you’re not doing anything very innovative.’

The ‘always-be-on-the-safe-side’ policy is what afflicts not exclusively politicians. The majority of marketers, fearing loss of jobs or being ridiculed, will be very reluctant to think – and act – outside the box, which begs the question of whether this is the best way to build a real competitive advantage. Will following only those well-known paths be enough to equip marketing with all the new experience it requires?
 

‘Confidence is what you have before you understand the problem’

Superficial judgments give you an illusion of self-confidence. However, any attempts at a more detailed analysis of a problem invariably lead to increased uncertainty – sometimes to such an extent, that at the end of the day, according to other experiments, instead of final reasoning, a dice roll will statistically yield similar odds of accurate judgment.
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Arthur Schopenhauer is a philosopher known mainly for pessimistic memes discouraging us from taking action. It turns out, however, that his thoughts are surprisingly well aligned with the reality of a marketer’s job.


 
Schopenhauer devised a system, which aptly describes the way we act. He noticed a force inherent in human beings, which he called the will to live (German: Wille zum Leben). One can either confront this force or follow it – most of us opting for the latter, since it is when we are given a chance to manifest our will by constantly struggling with adversities that we feel at our best. Consequently, we proceed from one deficiency to another and as it happens, we become better equipped to handle adverse circumstances along the way. When experiencing deficiency, we also tend to feel the need to remedy it and mitigate the state of the resulting tension as our will to live is a manifestation of the ultimate desire. To all intents and purposes, the only time when we are free from this force are the moments of aesthetic contemplation of nature or art. These are our only moments of respite.
Dear Marketer – if you are reading these words, you are likely wish you could high-five Mr. Schopenhauer!
 

Human dreams are driven by our will to live

Why should one even bother, if we all are going to die one day? This is how Schopenhauer’s philosophy is interpreted in the way that not only simplifies but even completely distorts the ideas put forward by this great thinker. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) was a German philosopher, who became famous as a proponent of a system that aimed to explain human behaviours. The core category around which he built his concept was the will to live a force that determines all human activity. Schopenhauer was far from promoting resignation and passive anticipation of death – in fact, his ‘will to live’ is praises the human ability to adapt to circumstances.

The notion can be understood as an uncontrollable urge toward self-preservation. What it entails is not only the desire to avoid death (that each of us wants to survive is beyond any doubt) but also the willingness to pursue a ‘better’ life – by making it better. According to Schopenhauer, the entire hostile world keeps mounting difficulties for us to confront and yet, since our desire to live prevails, we eventually always succeed in adapting to the new conditions and overcoming adverse circumstances. This is also how you could generally characterise the marketing profession – as a continued struggle with difficulties, dynamic and full of change.
 

Your strength comes from discomfort

Schopenhauer claimed that all willing stems from suffering – which means that each action which is good for us is preceded by the state of discomfort. To give you an example: the feeling of hunger [suffering] makes you eat [benefit]. Our will to live manifests itself in our attempts to stop an unpleasant experience. To this end, we do not choose death but instead, we try a number of techniques that decrease our discomfort at any given moment. Experiencing deficiency, this is how we attempt to attain fulfillment – just like marketers, who propose ready solutions to those who do not want to look for them themselves.

However, according to Schopenhauer our efforts never bring us to the state of happiness – they only help us sort out some problems as they occur. One problem solved is always replaced by another – ‘The ceaseless efforts to banish suffering achieve nothing more than a change in its form” , as Schopenhauer put it. It is just what marketers face on a daily basis: constant challenges, unexpected situations, varied and not always intuitive tasks – their job involves a continued pursuit of transcending their own limitations.
 

Devastating monotony of habit

As it was mentioned before, suffering or distress always come before our willingness to improve the situation. However, if we are constantly exposed to what we see as adverse circumstances, we slowly begin to take them in our stride. Consequently, we end up being desensitised to the negative factor – this is how we make our lives easier to live. Just as we do not want to get stuck in a rut, we do not like sticking to one solution for too long. Even the prettiest and newest car will finally lose its appeal and become boring. It is where marketers can come to your rescue as they do the lion’s share of work in the pursuit of brand-new products or services suitable for you.
 

As you develop you achieve your goals

Schopenhauer demonstrates that even though we are in a state of constant tension, we have some amazing powers, which allow us to overcome practically any obstacles and that continuous improvement in an inherent part of human life. There were times when the will to live expressed itself mainly in the struggle for survival. Of course, today we no longer need to choose between life and death. Still, some traces of that historical struggle have remained in our lives to this day – we keep grappling with some more or less ideal conditions in which we work, spend our time or live. Paradoxically, this is the best part of our human existence. The feeling of relief that comes with successfully coping with a crisis is critical to our experience of complete satisfaction. It is then that you see how much impact your actions have had on you and how you have developed.

This trait – albeit at a higher level – is also a requisite for success in performing marketing duties. When faced with a new situation, you are likely to experience both fear and a thrill of positive emotions – you are, to put it differently, in constant stress. In such cases, fighting and attempts at winning with the new factor are the only logical consequence – both self-development and the feeling of triumph from a task well done come as obvious and long-awaited.
 

The experience of nature and art makes you stop fighting

Schopenhauer considers the aesthetic contemplation of beauty to be a unique departure from the principle of desire for self-preservation. Admiring paintings or landscapes makes us stop thinking about adversities and the ways of combating them. We do not know whether Mr Schopenhauer would agree with the statement that marketing itself – or the idea underlying it – exists for the sole purpose of offering people some respite. Why? Because it allows one to forget about reality and offers a promise of a better life as it visualises our desires. Marketing is equivalent to a mountain hike or a visit to a museum. And how about this idea being expressed through the regular visits to numerous conferences and team-building events a typical marketer attends?
 

Be like Arthur Schopenhauer

Schopenhauer makes a perfect patron of marketers. His philosophy fits in perfectly with their day-to-day working routine. Marketing professionals have to face up to numerous difficulties and adapt to ever-changing conditions which – owing to the specific nature of the profession – can be completely unfamiliar, as their activity is still only being properly recognised (e.g. all kinds of social media). To be a great marketer, you will have to take Schopenhauer’s ideas to heart and act accordingly – turning all obstacles and adversities into success stories and adaptation in an environment which is still – possibly – unknown.
 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We are glad, that variety of companies decided to using SALESmanago, because it confirms comprehensive opportunities of Marketing Automation.
In May circle of our customers has increased of online stores, advanced devices’ producers and a big car dealer.

GAZDA GROUP– seven modern authorized dealer points of well-known brands: BMW, Skoda, Fiat, Alfa Romeo, Jeep, Fiat Professional and Abarth.

Grocasa – a real estate company offering complete customer support, specialising with real estate and financial advising and helping with buying or selling properties.

Home&Cook Outlet (Groupe SEB Iberica) – online store offering lots of everyday home items and products, especially kitchen utensils.

Hanna Instruments – physicochemical measure devices producer for measuring parameters of liquids and air.

Shokobox – online store with personalised chocolates, what is a great gift for beloved ones, as well as it can be a promotion gadget.

Corbetoboots – Corbeto family shop, established in 1948, with high quality shoes and accessories for country lovers and cowboy and Wild West fans.

Pienso y Mascotas – one of the largest stores with pet’s food in Spain. 10 years of experience, low prices, variety of products and highly educated advisors make the company trustworthy among pet owners also in Portugal, Italy, Great Britain, France and Germany.

GRUPO LAR – an international development company, running in Poland since 2006. When pursuing investments in Warsaw, company continues a great period of success. There are key strengths of them: great location, high quality projects, perfect performance. SALESmanago mainly helps them with sales support for the newest investment – MOKOsfera http://www.mokosfera.com/pl/

SVANTEK – one of the world’s leader in producing oscillation and noise measure devices. Main company’s attributes are high innovation connected with great production and durability. The main branches of production are handheld sound and oscillation measures which are sold under the label SVAN. The company has departments in Poland, Great Britain, Italy, Spain and Germany.

Neptuno Resort & Spa (Centrum Podróży Bentur) – a special place for those, who wants get some rest, forget about everyday problems and take care of body and mind.

bewood – online store with large assortment of wooden products: wooden phone cases, office supplies, home decoration, wooden watches, bracelets, earrings or broches. Bewood’s products are handmade, with carefully selected wood, precisely finished. The whole process includes caring about details, so final product is refined with all particulars.

JAKAMATA – online store with professional items, inland deliverer of specialistic yoga assortment.

OptiDiet – a company run by passionate people, who create diets suitable for clients’ preferences. The company promotes good nutrition rules. Now, OptiDiet has also an online store, when people can buy healthy products for those who bother with food intolerance or who want to find alternative products for their diets.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Possessing allows us to become the people we want to be. According to Lacanian psychoanalysis – we desire what we do not have because we want to make real our imaginary vision of ourselves. The increasing popularity of a so-called ‘sharing economy’ does not let this vision come true.

What we say has a meaning we are not aware of

Psychoanalysis is usually associated with Freud. There is no surprise in that – he laid the foundations of it. But afterwards there were others who were inspired by Freud’s ideas, those who pursued psychoanalytical thought concerning the human mind – among them was a French psychiatrist, Jacques Lacan (1901-1981). He revolutionised psychoanalytical thinking, because he primarily focused on language – he claimed that this shared communication system causes us to get entangled in a network of unexpected mutual dependencies. According to Lacan, ‘the unconscious [is] structured like a language’, and therefore we can express the unconscious through speech.

Jacques Lacan’s objects of desire

Lacan claimed that each of us has his own object of desire – he called it an other (l’autre) or a small ‘a’ (objet petit a) – something that one wants, but cannot have. It symbolises a lost perfection or, in other words, comes down to what we really want to possess. It does not necessarily have to be a physical object. A small ‘a’ is expressed in our behaviour, speech or activities – it is not something we could define, we can only speculate what our object of desire really is. According to Lacan, our whole life is sacrificed achieving this purpose.

Just to give an example – let us assume that John’s object of desire is being an elegant, powerful and intelligent man. He cannot exactly define what it means, so he cannot ever know if he has actually achieved his goal – he could be better anyway. But, aiming for this, John practices and invests in his self-improvement, buys expensive watches or cars, he does everything he can to develop. Lacan claimed that this is the point of human life – a continuous fulfilling of desire. When one desire is achieved, another one appears in its place. When John stops thinking about being such a successful man, he is going to strive for something else – e.g. a love lost years ago or a perfect home – and he is going to subordinate his life to it. Each of us would do the same, at least in Lacan’s view.

So is a sharing economy for us?

Lacan did not live to experience a sharing economy, which creates an illusion of possessing in an easy way. We rent cars, yachts, or even luxurious epilators. When you want to live for a while in an apartment in the heart of London, you use the Airbnb app; you want to watch a movie – you stream it on Netflix or HBO.  This minimises average user’s costs while simultaneously still providing the privilege of owning.

So why do we still want to have products, if we can use them?

Because ultimately renting does not satisfy us – we have a need to possess. A sharing economy, from Lacan’s perspective, is a bad idea; it never gratifies our needs, because temporarily owning a product only makes us desire it more. We will always strive for something, so objects which are available just for a moment fuel our urge for owning them. Moreover, when a product is finally ours, we can do whatever we want with it – break it, throw it away or change its purpose. Then we feel the true power.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


 

Sferis is a dynamically growing online store that offers its customers an extremely rich product portfolio. The store’s offer includes products for consumer electronics, homefurnishings and accessories for developing your hobby. The idea of the store is to provide the highest quality products and services to the market, while offering as much choice as possible at the most competitive prices.

Sferis strives to make customers like to buy from them. Therefore, they focus on permanent development. Constantly searching for new, attractive products and technical solutions that will allow them to more competently meet Customers’ expectations. One of such solutions is Marketing Automation.

Challenges:

  • Broad offer and necessity to diversify communication depending on interests.
  • Constant communication with clients using various marketing channels.
  • Building a permanent relationship with customers purchasing for the first time and increasing loyalty among current customers.
  • Increase conversion on already generated traffic on the page.

Solutions:

  • Dynamic segmentation matrices
  • Dispatch of mass newsletters
  • Web push notifications
  • Personalization of communication in accordance with the interests of clients
  • Dynamic e-mails after the visit

Find out more about the solutions we offered and the effects of implementation – here

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Customers’ reviews can be one of the most significant factors that trigger purchasing decisions. They can ensure shoppers about their choice or help to select other products. Moreover, they are social proof of your products’ quality and build trust. As Spiegel Research Center claims, displaying reviews can increase conversion rates by 270%.

 

 

While some online retailers can hesitate to use reviews because of the negative opinions that may appear, there’s no need to worry about that! First of all, every unfavorable review is precious feedback for you – maybe it’s time for changes in customer service or products’ descriptions!

Additionally, if you don’t give your customers an opportunity to complain they’re going to find another way and for example, use social media for that purpose. Last but not least, negative reviews give your store credibility, as 95% of consumers get suspicious of fake reviews if there are no bad opinions.

One can wonder if customers actually read reviews. In fact, they are. Survey shows that 94% of shoppers typically read written opinions.

Now you know how crucial it is for online retailers to use reviews. Read on for tips and tricks on how to increase your ecommerce conversion rate!

 
Simplify the process to get more reviews

If you want to get more reviews for your online store you need to make it user-friendly. Certainly, only use a one-page form with floating labels and ask just for the essential information, not everything you’d like to know.

Decide which aspects will be essential in this context. A good idea can be to set your form to automatically correct mistakes in real-time. You can be almost sure that a given customer would correct them, on the contrary of getting such request a few hours later via email.

Moreover, pay attention to your website’s loading time and all of the other user experience aspects.

 
Use the power of email follow-up

A crashing 80% of reviews originate from post-purchase emails. Time plays a significant role here. Send your messages shortly after purchasing so that your clients could be still excited about new products and preferably amazed by your customer service.

Don’t hesitate to send several follow-ups. Although remember to ask kindly for honest opinions and show concerns about customers experience. Highlight the fact, that by leaving a review, a given consumer mostly helps other customers in the decision-making process.

Additionally, you can offer special discounts or exclusive deals for those who shared their opinion on your ecommerce.

 
Ask for a quick review via web push notifications

This email alternative can be resultful because it’s much faster to click a notification than open an email. Additionally, you don’t need to worry about spamming your clients, because only customers who accepted receiving such messages will get them.

Again, pay attention to the timing of your requests and be friendly!

 
Don’t hide reviews on your website!

As it has been already established before, reviews can help you increase conversion. People willingly read opinions about products, but they need to be visible. Therefore, don’t push them down on the site but expose them by adding a review badge to product photos or descriptions. Show overall rating in numbers, stars or any other way and let your customers rely on other users.

 
Deal with negative reviews

Unfavorable opinions give your ecommerce credibility and thus your customers are not suspicious about false reviews. Additionally, you can always turn bad opinions around! Respond quickly, but do it right. Don’t argue with a complaining customer. Everyone makes mistakes so potentially your team could also omit something. Kindly apologize for the inconvenience and most importantly, assure you’re going to improve this issue. You can also consider a special offer to make it up to this client.

You should have the same approach on social media and external platforms for reviewing.

 
Leverage packaging

Reviews are published online but that doesn’t mean you can’t ask for them offline. If someone didn’t open your email with such a request you can also remind them about it in a message attached to your products. While opening a package a customer can immediately try out a recently purchased item, read your kind request and leave a comment on your site. Fingers crossed for a positive one!

 
Ask for video and image reviews

Rich media review works even better than a regular written opinion and give more information about the products. Not only do they give your customers an opportunity to upload such materials but they also encourage them to do so! You can reward the most helpful reviewers with special deals.

Use social media posts with your dedicated hashtag as a form of rich media reviews. A showcase on your website filled with user-generated content might be a brilliant idea.

 
Include reviews in your social media ad campaigns

By using quotes from your customers’ opinions in your ads you don’t only make it visible for people seeking opinions but also you can reach more of your potential clients. A good commercial copy is a tough nut to crack. Let your clients speak for your brand!

 
Conclusion

Reviews can work wonders for your ecommerce conversion. They even improve SEO! Don’t worry too much about negative opinions and use them for your benefit.

Take your time on designing the best possible strategy for online reviews, including user experience and methods of encouraging customers to leave comments about purchased products. Executing such a plan is not the end of this journey though. Constantly optimize the reviewing process and watch your conversion increase.

 
Download the Growcode Ecommerce Optimization Checklist

If you’re looking for inspiration for your optimization campaigns, or if you want to evaluate and troubleshoot your site, then you need Growcode’s 115-point ecommerce optimization checklist.

It’s probably the most comprehensive optimization checklist on the web. Or anywhere, for that matter. Oh, and it’s free too.
 
 
author: Paweł Ogonowski
Pawel is the co-founder of Growcode, the first conversion rate optimization System as a Service that guarantees revenue growth for B2C online stores. With 10+ years of ecommerce experience, Pawel has been helping companies (e.g. Limango, Virgin Mobile, Eniro, 4F, Showroom, Budapester) leverage data from their online channels to improve user experience that results in higher conversion rates, average order value and customer lifetime value.

Visit growcode.com and learn more about ecommerce conversion rate optimization.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview