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We often take our hands for granted, not realizing how vital they are to our everyday life.

From brushing your teeth in the morning to driving a car, hands play a massive role in the way our society operates. Because hands are crucial to our standard of living, it’s important to know how to protect them from compromising situations.

According to PEC Safety, a technology and training company for contractors,
“The hands are the most frequently injured part of the body. One-third of all oil and gas industry accidents are hand injuries.”
In this field, having capable hands can make or break you. Here are a few ways to make sure that you’re handling the dangers on-site: Make sure you have the right PPE – personal protective equipment
  • Gloves can be a lifesaver, literally. Depending on what kind of job you’re doing, make sure that your gloves can protect from chemicals, electricity, power tools, sharp objects, and more. Not only do they have to be the right type of glove, but the right size. Comfort is critical for everyday usage. Inspect gloves to make sure they fit correctly, that they are right for the job and are not ripped or damaged.
Stay focused
  • It can be easy to get distracted or become complacent but that’s when most accidents happen. Remember to be aware and watch out for your hands and others!
    New equipment
  • Old equipment can become dangerous if it’s outdated or broken. Make sure that your tools are up-to-date for smooth operations.
Knowledgeable
  • You can have the best equipment out there, but if you’re not properly trained it won’t matter. Knowing how to use the machinery is a top priority for safety and efficiency.
Watch out for your buddy
  • If you’re looking out for others, they’ll look out for you too. Stay ahead of accidents by keeping one another accountable!
Taking Care of Injuries
  • If there is an incident, report it right away and take the necessary precautions for medical attention. It’s important to take care of your health!

If you agree or know someone who could use a few safety tips, share this post and spread the love!


Now for the month of August, you can be entered to win a YETI cooler, Bass Pro Shop gift card, RigUp gear, WiFi hotspot, cell booster and $1,000 cash! All you have to do is complete your RigUp profile! The first 100 entries will receive an exclusive Make Oil and Gas Great Again hat! Learn more about RigUp’s Summer Sweepstakes here.

The post Hand Safety On Location appeared first on RigUp Blog.

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If you’re working on location, day in and day out, sweating through the high summer temperatures and not getting enough water – RigUp has one question for you:

What are YOU doing to stay hydrated and safe?

Safety is always a number one priority when working in the field. Without knowing how to prevent dangerous situations or how to recognize symptoms, your work zone can quickly become hazardous.

To avoid certain accidents, here are several tips and tricks to make sure you can get back to work producing that sweet, sweet crude.

Because you are often working tirelessly in the heat, your body can have a difficult time cooling itself off. Your body produces sweat as a means to keep your body temperature down, but when it is unable to produce enough sweat, you can be at risk for heat exhaustion. Extreme heat exhaustion can threaten your life.

Symptoms:

Dizziness

Lightheaded

Chills

Headaches

Low blood pressure

Faintness

Prevention:

Drink water BEFORE, DURING and AFTER work. Keep your body running effectively by drinking water, drinking water, and drinking even more water.

A great measure of preventing an accident for everyone on location comes from Wes Higgins, an HSE Professional, at Parsley Energy Inc.,

“We are our brother’s keeper. Watch out for your buddy, and your buddy will watch out for you.”

Higgins recommends to apply this manta across the board. Whether the goal is to prevent heat exhaustion or another type of incident, we need to look out for one another. At the end of the day, your co-workers may see something you miss. “It’s the old guy looking out for the new guy and the new guy looking out for the old guy that makes things work in the field.”

It is crucial to replenish the fluids within your body as well as taking breaks in the shade. This allows your body to naturally cool down, get out of the sun, and recover from overheating.

If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated.

A good way to check how hydrated or dehydrated you are is by looking at your urine. The color of urine is an excellent indicator of how much fluid is in your body. Clear urine is a sign of hydration and health. Yellow urine is adequate but an indicator that you might be dehydrated. Those with dark yellow or brown urine should consult with a medical professional. Try to avoid drinking alcoholic beverages and energy drinks during the work week since this adds to dehydration. Instead, make sure to eat a filling meal at night and including an apple to your morning for energy.

Treatment:

If you suspect heat exhaustion, the easiest solution is getting to a cool place as quickly as possible. This includes indoors (preferably with air conditioning), a shady spot, or at the very least in front of a fan.

Rehydrate your body with plenty of ice water and electrolytes. You can find electrolytes in sports drinks such as Gatorade, in small packets to mix with water, or even in fruits and vegetables.

According to Medical News Today, electrolytes “regulate nerve and muscle function, hydrate the body, balance blood acidity and pressure, and help rebuild damaged tissue,” all of which are crucial functions to someone working on the field.

Before work, prepare for the day with ice packs to keep drinks cool and use on your neck, back and armpits. During the workday, soaking a bandana in cool water is an easy technique to keep your forehead and neck moist while working.  At the end of the workday, you can cool down easily by taking a cold shower. This immerses your body and immediately lowers body temperature.

The most important piece of the safety equation is people.”

– Oil and Gas Journal

Takeaways:

  • Consistently drink water before you start your day, throughout the day, and at the end of the day.
  • Replenish and hydrate your body with electrolytes
  • Stay cool in the shade or inside to allow your body to recover
  • Ice packs and wet bandanas are preventative measures to lower body temperature on the job.
  • Look out for your buddy and watch over one another

Do you know someone who needs to drink more water? Share the blog with #rigup and follow us on Facebook @rigup or Instagram @rigup_inc !

You may even win a prize and who doesn’t love a free hat or t-shirt?

Spread the love and stay hydrated!

The post How to Prevent Heat Exhaustion in the Oilfield appeared first on RigUp Blog.

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