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Those who regularly read my blog are aware that I'm a bit skeptical of the current AI "benchmarks" and whether they serve the field well. In particular I think that the lack of definition of intelligence is the major elephant in the room. For a proof that this apparently is not a well recognized issue take this recent twitter thread:

Aside from the broader context of this thread discussing evolution and learning, Ilya Sutskever, one of the leading deep learning researchers, is expressing a nice sounding empirical approach: we don't have to argue, we can just test. Well, as it may clearly follow from my reply, I don't think this is really the case. I have no idea what Sutskever means by "obviously more intelligent" - do you? Does he mean better ability to overfit existing datasets? Play yet another Atari computer game? I find this approach prevalent in the circles associated with deep learning, as if this field had some very well defined empirical measurement foundation. Quite the opposite is true: the field is driven by a dogma that a "dataset" (blessed as standard in the field by some committee) and some God given measure (put Hinton, LeCun or … Read more...

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Piekniewski's Blog by Filip Piekniewski - 1M ago

Introduction

Almost six months ago (May 28th 2018) I posted the "AI winter is well on its way" post that went viral. The post amassed nearly a quarter million views and got picked up in Bloomberg, Forbes, Politico, Venturebeat, BBC, Datascience Podcast and numerous other smaller media outlets and blogs [1, 2, 3, 4, ...], triggered violent debate on Hacker news and Reddit. I could not have anticipated this post to be so successful and hence I realized I touched on a very sensitive subject. One can agree with my claims or not, but the sheer popularity of the post almost itself serves as a proof that something is going on behind the scenes and people are actually curious and doubtful if there is anything solid behind the AI hype.

Since the post made a prediction, that the AI hype is cracking (particularly in the space of autonomous vehicles) and the as a result we will have another "AI winter" episode, I decided to periodically go over those claims, see what has changed and bring some new evidence.

First of all a bit of clarification: some readers … Read more...

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In some recent email exchanges I've realized that when people by some coincidence make it to this blog, they rarely end up visiting my main website, and even if they do, they rarely browse through the teaching materials. This is not really a complaint, I hardly ever visit my website myself, but there are some materials there that I go back to every once in a while (though I have copies on my laptop). These are the lecture notes I made for a lecture on mathematical foundations of neuroscience.

As a bit of a background, in 2009 after I defended my PhD and before I joined Brain Corporation I was briefly an Adjunct Professor at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. During that time I decided to refresh everything I gathered about mathematics of neuroscience and prepare a lecture series complete with exercises, lots of pictures, graphs, and all the necessary theory. And even though 9 years have passed since then, the lectures hold up pretty well, hence why not bring that content to a broader audience?

The lecture consists of 15 main pdf presentations, a number of sample exercises as well … Read more...

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Piekniewski's Blog by Filip Piekniewski - 1M ago

There has been a lot of stuff going on recently and I've been super busy. I have a few posts in early stage of development and a few ideas in the pipeline but it will likely take me quite some time before I get this stuff to a state in which it would be readable.

In the meanwhile, by a complete coincidence I've learned that my 2017 PVM talk I gave a University of California Merced is actually available online. It was a very good visit, organised by Chris Kello, David Noelle and others. I had some good chats with these guys and with Jeff Yoshimi (author of simbrain) among others.  Somehow I did not realize the talk was recorded... Anyway, here it is, better late than never I guess. Since I generally hate to listen to myself, I had to increase the playback speed to 2.0 at which point it actually sounded OK, so I recommend those settings (plus it only takes 50% of the time).

Slides are available here.… Read more...

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Piekniewski's Blog by Filip Piekniewski - 1M ago

In recent weeks I've been forced to reformulate and distill my views on AI. After my winter post went viral many people contacted me over email and on twitter with many good suggestions. Since there is now more attention to what I have to offer,  I decided to write down in a condensed form what I think is wrong with our approach to AI and what could we fix. Here are my 10 points:

  1. We are trapped by Turing's definition of intelligence. In his famous formulation Turing confined intelligence as a solution to a verbal game played against humans. This in particular sets intelligence as a (1) solution to a game, and (2) puts human in the judgement position. This definition is extremely deceptive and has not served the field well. Dogs, monkeys, elephants and even rodents are very intelligent creatures but are not verbal and hence would fail the Turing test.
  2. The central problem of AI is Moravec's Paradox. It is vastly more stark today than it was when it was originally formulated in 1988 and the fact we've done so little to address it over those 30 years is embarrassing. The central thesis of the paradox is
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