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It’s no secret that employees use social media during the workday. What might be surprising is just how much it’s used. According to a recent report from Bambu by Sprout Social, nearly 20 percent of employees say they spend more than an hour on social media every day and 10 percent say that time exceeds two hours. While some companies try to limit their employee’s social media use, it can be more challenging than you think, and leave trust issues with your employees.


As the saying goes, if you can’t beat them, join them. While there’s always a risk with encouraging social media use, there can be several employer benefits as well. Below we’ll outline the five types of posts that are most helpful for employees to share, as well as strategies to encourage thoughtful posting. Ready? Let’s dive in.

 


1. Employer Brand


Employer branding showcases what it’s like to work at your company. These types of posts include photos taken at company events or even quotes from your leadership team.


What’s the value: There’s tremendous value in your employees posting their own photos as they are more authentic and natural, reducing any feeling of “forced fun” that photos from your company’s official account sometimes express.


How to encourage posting: For notable events, create and promote a hashtag for employees to use when sharing photos. That way, employees’ social networks are able to trace the photos back to your company.

 


2. Company News


Did you just raise a round of funding? Maybe you just opened a new office? Any positive change or update about your business is great material for a post that employees will be proud to share on their social platforms.


What’s the value: When employees share their genuine excitement about the success of your business online, it’s always a good sign that they’re engaged and committed. The more they share about your growth, the more you’ll grow.


How to encourage posting: When announcing updates to your organization, create pre-drafted messages for each social platform that your employees can easily use to share the great news. It never hurts to include images as well!

 


3. Milestones and Promotions


As a company, you’ve invested in the growth and retention of your employees. They should be proud of their growth, so why not give them the go-ahead to show off their success through posts about personal milestones and promotions?


What’s the value: If your employees are excited to share the growth they experience at your company, they’re definitely engaged. Better yet, their networks will see you as an organization that promotes individual growth, building your reputation as a respected employer.


How to encourage posting: If posts about an employees promotions alone seem awkward, encourage employees to post about hitting personal milestones like anniversaries, certifications, or attending an upcoming conference. Remind them to tag the company!

 


4. Product Services


While your marketing team is hard at work finding places to promote your product or service updates, there’s a vital spot they don’t have access to: employees’ social media profiles.  


What’s the value: Encouraging your employees to share the success of your platform or service builds buyer confidence in your company. Not to mention, it helps share your name and assist to the sales process.


How to encourage posting: Educate your sales and client success teams on the value of building a personal brand on their social media, especially LinkedIn. Help them craft posts that address pain points and buyer needs in a more personal and conversational tone.

 


5. Employee Referrals


Leveraging employees’ professional networks is a great way to fill your team with more high-performing candidates. In fact, a study conducted by SHRM showed that referrals remain the top source for talent accounting for 45% of new hires last year.


What’s the value: Tapping into your referral network is a great way to attract talent that will add to your company culture and drive your company forward. It also reduces the high costs of external recruiting agencies and career search sites.


How to get them: While you can encourage employees to post about open positions, the most effective and efficient way is to set up an employee referral program. Not sure how to get started? Join Namely and JazzHR for our upcoming webinar, Building a Great Company with Employee Referrals. We’ll take you step-by-step through the process of building a program that takes your talent acquisition efforts to the next level.

In tandem with your new push for engagement on social, consider creating a social media policy to ensure employee posts align with the company’s values and expectations. Once you’re all set, don’t be surprised to see the sales calls, job applications, and press inquiries come flooding in!

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Namely Blog by Lyssa Test - 5M ago

At Namely, our coworkers are one of the top reasons we love what we do. The Meet Namely series spotlights real Namely employees across the company. Read on to learn how our employees are helping us build better workplaces.

Mavreen studied religion, classical Greek, and Islamic studies before serving in the Navy. When a back injury ended her Navy career prematurely, she stumbled into video game testing and realized her love of breaking things. In April, Mavreen joined Namely as a Software Testing Engineer and has since taken over testing for Namely’s mobile app—with military precision, we might add.


We chatted with Mavreen about her role and what it’s like to have a career in software testing.


How did you end up in your role at Namely?
 

I fell into testing. My background is actually in religious studies and classical Greek. I got my master’s in Islamic studies from the University of London and I was trained to be either an academic or intelligence officer. I briefly served in the Navy until I injured my back. While I was recuperating, a friend reached out about a job opportunity at Blizzard Entertainment, a video game company. I took the job and tested Diablo III. I ended up loving testing and that’s how I slowly moved into tech.


Namely was on my radar last year when I was hunting around for new jobs, but the timing wasn’t quite right and I accepted an opportunity at Snapchat. Unfortunately, Snapchat had significant layoffs and I was forced to job hunt again. I called up my friend who worked at Namely and the timing was right. I was technically unemployed for less than six hours and I started at Namely two weeks later.


What’s your favorite thing about your role?
 

I get to break things. My mom said I’d never make a career out of breaking things but look at me now! My company likes it when I break things!


What does your average work week look like?
 

We work in two-week sprints. So in the beginning of our sprint, I’ll have more meetings and later in the sprint I’ll work on writing automated testing for new features that are coming out or I’ll try to learn something quickly to help out another team. Right now we’re building a large framework, so I’m doing a lot of reading and evaluating to figure out what would be the right tool for us.


Is there something that would surprise people about your job?


It isn’t just about breaking things. You have to be able to put things back together in a better way. It requires a lot of imagination to think about what could potentially go wrong. When people think of engineering, they assume it’s all black and white ones and zeros, but you need to have a great imagination to be a test engineer.


If you weren’t in this role, what would you be doing?


I do a lot of screenwriting in my spare time, so I probably would have sold my soul to Netflix to get one of my series published. I’m actually writing and producing my own web series right now that will be filmed this fall. The main character makes cars and costumes for superheroes.


What’s your favorite thing about working at Namely?


I like how collaborative it is. I can walk up to anybody and say, “Hey, I have this problem and I’ve heard that you are the person who might be able to help me.” People here are always enthusiastic about answering my questions. I never found that attitude at the other companies I’ve worked for. It’s great to be able to collaborate like that.


What’s your favorite thing about working in the Engineering Department?


I don’t have a technical background and I can ask all these insanely brilliant people how things work and they are always more than happy to help.


What’s your favorite office snack?


The huge vat of M&Ms.


Do you have any advice for someone who wants to do your job?


You need to be able to learn quickly, imagine all the potential outcomes, and think about the big picture. It’s easy to get down in the weeds and fixate on an individual test, but you need to understand how everything is related at a macro level. We will never achieve zero-defect software, but we need to mitigate the risk so we can roll out new features faster and be certain that one change won’t bring all of Namely crashing down.


What do you like to do outside of work?


I love ice hockey. I’m a huge New York Rangers fan. I’ve spent way too much money on tickets, but it’s worth it. I also volunteer with different theater groups and acting guilds. I’ll write sample scripts and sample dialogue for the actors to practice.


What was your best day at work?


I just had it! I’ve been working on code coverage for the last three weeks. It measures how many lines of code execute while you’re running automated tests. Now that it works, this functionality can help with the test framework we’re building for the front end and manual testing teams. When we’re trying to make decisions and move faster, everyone will be able to know what’s going on with a higher degree of certainty.


Who has inspired you to get to this point in your career?


I had a family friend, Pam, who passed away when I was 18. She always encouraged me to be curious, creative, and persistent and to always make the bold, scary choice. I’ve had some pretty varied experiences, but that advice is what glues them all together.

Stay tuned for more from the Meet Namely series to learn how we put HR for humans into practice.

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“At first we called it what you would expect—getting laid off, being let go. Then we got creative. We said he’d gotten the ax, she’d been ****canned. Lately, a new phrase had appeared and really taken off. ‘Walking Spanish down the hall.’”


For our August HRreads book club pick, we read Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris. The dark yet humorous novel depicts a period of paranoia as a failing ad company faces layoffs. Though the novel reveals the anxiety and tension from the employee perspective, HR is all too familiar with the hazards and consequences of company downsizing.


As the pseudo-mediator between employee and employer, HR is often tasked with delivering difficult news. While letting employees go is always going to be a difficult conversation, we spoke to seven HR professionals about how the handle layoffs with compassion and grace.

 


1. Show Empathy


“Remember that while it is uncomfortable for you to communicate your message, it is life-altering for the employee receiving it.”


- Anonymous, HR Manager

 


2. Depersonalize the Decision


“Know and make it clear that it isn't a personal decision, but a business decision. It has nothing to do with performance.”


- Jackson Stodgel, Human Resources Coordinator at IXL Learning

 


3. Be Considerate


“Be considerate. All parties in a layoff have families and personal situations that should be reflected in the way the layoff is occurring. Layoffs are a part of business but can be handled in a respectful manner.”


- Mary Lanier-Evans, People & Culture Officer at 360training.com

 


4. Plan Ahead


“Be organized in your approach. Layoffs are never fun, but for HR, it's one of the most critical times to be cool, calm, and collected. Carefully planning who knows what, when, and in what way can make the difference between a well-orchestrated event, and mass chaos and confusion. Owning communication and working closely with management to ensure the right people are in the know ahead of time is one of the best ways of still preserving relationships and mutual respect among your existing and departing teams. When faced with an upcoming layoff, plan everything that’s within your scope of control, like the time you'll meet to share the news with managers, peers, departments, and individuals. Document what you'll discuss in each so that everyone is given information that is accurate, timely, and pertinent.”


- Anonymous, Director of HR

 


5. Be Direct


“While employees will always remember how a layoff was handled, they may not remember why they were laid off. Don’t beat around the bush. Be straightforward and don’t draw it out. No one wants to be limbo about their job and the second the phrase ‘layoff’ is uttered, you can expect the office to get tense. If possible, offer basic resources to the employees being laid off such as a partnership with a local recruiting agency where the employee can send their resume. It won’t cost the company anything and shows a good-will effort.”


- Caleb Wood, Administrator, Payroll and HRIS at Kestra Financial, Inc.

 


6. Offer Transitional Support


“Treat employees the right way. When you set your employees up for success with severance, benefits, and references or assistance finding another job, you can make the layoff process a little less painful. Knowing that your company takes care of their employees during hard times will also help the morale of the employees staying at the company.”


- Jessica Neves, People Operations Manager, Longboard Asset Management

 


7. Provide a Physical Takeaway


“If the situation allows for it, prepare! Before delivering the message, get a packet together that explains the following: last paycheck info, 401k info, COBRA info, any required notices. Basically, anything that you would want to know if you were laid off."


One of the benefits of doing this is that whoever delivers the message can conclude by encouraging the employee to carefully review the information packet, and then follow-up with questions at a later time.


It makes for a natural and less uncomfortable end to the conversation. Hopefully.”


- Jovanny Chonillo, People Manager at Labelmaster

“It was a shrill, carping, frenzied time, and as poisonous an atmosphere as anyone had ever known—and we wanted nothing more than to stay in it forever.”


Layoffs can be detrimental to company morale and employee engagement, so it’s important to act as an ongoing resource to the remainder of your workforce. Consider the reactions and fears of other employees during and after a period of layoffs, and be sure to let them know you’re there to support them through the difficult times.

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Namely Blog by Lyssa Test - 6M ago

At Namely, our coworkers are one of the top reasons we love what we do. The Meet Namely series spotlights real Namely employees across the company. Read on to learn how our employees are helping us build better workplaces.

With over 20 years of payroll experience, it’s no wonder that Emmett Swan is Namely’s go-to compliance guru. Emmett joined Namely in 2016 as a Product Manager but his role quickly evolved to incorporate more of his payroll expertise, ultimately earning him the title of Senior Payroll Compliance Manager. When he’s not catching up on new payroll laws, Emmett likes to dabble in local politics and travel the Caribbean.


We chatted with Emmett about his role and what it’s like to have a career in payroll compliance.


How did you end up in your role at Namely?


I started off working part-time for the Better Business Bureau while I was in college studying finance and investments. After graduation, I was hired as an Arbitration Administrator and was quickly promoted to Director of Arbitration. Eight years later, I got my first payroll job at CompuPay. I then became an analyst at PSEG Services Corporation and was there for six years before they started downsizing. I started looking for my next move and found Namely. I initially interviewed to be a Product Manager in Compliance, but after I came on board the position evolved into Payroll Compliance Manager and we saw it was a better fit to move to the company’s legal team.


What’s your favorite thing about your role?

 

There’s never a boring day. There’s constant reading, learning, and interpretation within the confines of the law. You have to stay abreast of evolving regulations and laws and understand how they will impact Namely and our clients. I love that my job is always evolving and tax laws are always changing.


I also love the collaboration here at Namely. I get to work with so many stakeholders like our product, engineering, and client success departments. We all work together to get things done on time so that our clients don’t have to worry about payroll.


What does your average work week look like?


My average work week starts on my commute to work. I catch up on the latest publications and alerts so that when I come into the office, I can create my compliance tickets. We use tickets to monitor the progress of our internal work. Throughout the day, I handle any issues that pop up and I usually have a few meetings to attend.


Is there something that would surprise people about your job?


That it can be fun! It’s investigative. It’s analytical. It’s really all about searching, understanding, and applying it to what we do as an organization. It’s crazy to think of the impact you can have across the board.


If you weren’t in this role, what would you be doing?


I love payroll, but I think that I would probably be involved in a non-profit that would help people who are struggling financially. I would love to use my finance knowledge to help people get back on track.


What’s your favorite thing about working at Namely?


My number one favorite thing about working here has to be the people. We have a lot of conscientious, smart individuals at Namely. I love working with people who are invested in a common goal which is excellence. It’s a really fun atmosphere. There are challenges and things do get complicated and busy, but at the end of the day we come together and get the job the done.


What’s your favorite thing about working in legal and compliance?


Again, I work with an excellent group of people. I work closely with the VP of Legal and Compliance, who is always busy but still finds the time to answer any questions, help with interpretation, or advocate for us.


I also have a great department of lawyers. They’re the coolest lawyers I’ve ever met. Everyone is so hardworking and we’re all here to help each other.


What’s your favorite office snack?


I love those cheese puffs!


What's something yourcoworkers don't know about you?


I’m very involved in civic responsibility. When I moved to my town ten years ago, I ran for city council. I didn’t win, but I believe strongly in civic engagement.  


Do you have any advice for someone who wants to do your job?

 

I would first recommend that they hone in on the skill of critical thinking. You need to concentrate on what you’re reviewing, gather others’ suggestions and opinions, and be critical. You must be cognizant of the quality and integrity of the information that you receive. This role has a tremendous impact, so there is absolutely no room for error. You must dot your I’s and cross your T’s.


What do you like to do outside of work?


I love going on cruises and I try to take one every year. I’ve been on 22 different cruises on five different cruise lines. I’ve been to around 14 different territories. In October, I’m going to Bermuda, Turks and Caicos, and the Dominican Republic.


What was your best day at work?


There was an all hands meeting and I was appreciated by Andy Przystanski from our marketing team. Andy wrote this wonderful poem about me and recited it in front of the whole company. I have the original poem in my den and I’ve framed it. It was very heartfelt and such a generous thing for someone to do. I will always remember it.


Who has inspired you to get to this point in your career?


My dad has always been my inspiration. He had a modest upbringing but worked very hard, put himself through school, and became a fund manager. He always encouraged me to make my work my hallmark. He told me your work indicates who you are as a person and that you should give 100 percent to everything you do. He’s given me advice that has served me well throughout my life and inspires me every day.


Anything else you want to share about yourself or Namely?
 

I feel that I’m fortunate to work at Namely. It’s humbling not only to work at an organization that’s disrupting an industry, but also to look back and see how my individual contributions have helped us get to where we are today. I appreciate the opportunity and I look forward to a long career at Namely.

Stay tuned for more from the Meet Namely series to learn how we put HR for humans into practice.

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With unemployment at record lows, companies are looking for innovative ways to attract top talent and stand out from the competition. While paid time off (PTO), family leave, and even sabbatical have all been touted as game-changing perks, there’s one workplace benefit that both helps employees disconnect and serves a greater purpose. In addition to traditional vacation days, many companies are now offering volunteer time off (VTO).


What is Volunteer Time Off?


VTO allows employees to do community service during the workday while still getting paid their usual wages. It is separate from an employee’s regular vacation days. Companies offering VTO can allow employees to choose which charity they donate their time to or can partner with local organizations that align with their brand’s mission and values. Depending on the specific policy, employees get their supervisor’s approval in advance for their day of service and submit a VTO request to the HR department. Once their application is cleared, employees volunteer on their designated day and note that the time was VTO in their company’s payroll platform.


What are the Benefits of Offering VTO?


Some detractors think VTO is just an administrative headache, but offering it has many benefits like improving employee wellbeing and employer brand.


Don’t buy it? A 2017 UnitedHealthcare study discovered that individuals who regularly volunteer report lower stress levels (79 percent), improved moods (93 percent), and improved self-esteem (88 percent). Respondents also said that volunteering has helped them develop professional and collaborative skills.


VTO also can appeal to job candidates and improve employee loyalty. A 2016 Cone Communications study revealed that 76 percent of millennials consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work. With millennials now the largest demographic in the workforce, corporate social responsibility is an important factor when trying to attract quality talent and retain employees. Over 70 percent of employees who volunteer at work report feeling better about their employer as a result, according to the UnitedHealthcare survey cited earlier. Even just offering one day of VTO can dramatically improve employee loyalty and demonstrate your company’s commitment to the community.


How are Other Companies Using VTO?


A 2017 employee benefits survey by the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) revealed that 22 percent of U.S. companies offer VTO. Salesforce gives employees up to seven days of paid time off for volunteering and donates money to charities recommended by employees. In addition to having an entire webpage devoted to corporate responsibility, Patagonia goes a step further with its’ VTO program. It offers eight hours of VTO for all employees and an Environmental Internship Program for employees looking to make more of an impact. The program lets employees volunteer for up to two months while still receiving their pay and benefits.

Offering VTO is a great way to support your employee’s passions. That said, it isn’t the only way to keep employees engaged. Letting your employees periodically unplug and relax is key to increasing their happiness and productivity and also helps prevent employee burnout. From unlimited vacation plans to summer Fridays, we break down your options for taking your PTO program to the next level in our free ebook Building Employee Loyalty with PTO.

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Namely Blog by Andy Przystanski - 6M ago

While it's gone by many different names, the HR profession has existed for over a century. According to some historians, it might even date back to ancient times.
 

You might be an expert in HR best practices, but how well do you know your HR history? Put your knowledge to the test with our new quiz. When you're finished, take an even deeper dive (or work on improving your score) by reading our new eBook, The History of HR. 

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At Namely’s recent summer celebration, employees from all over the country came together to volunteer and celebrate the year’s achievements. As part of the festivities, employees were asked to nominate colleagues who live our core values and shape the Namely community. Our company values center around the simple idea that drives everything we do—BE HUMAN:
 

Be Yourself
Expect Excellence

Help Each Other
Unite Around Our Mission
Make Our Clients Heroes
Act As An Owner
Namely Cares

 

With over 500 incredible employees across five offices, it was nearly impossible to select just a handful of winners. In the end, these individuals stood out due to their above and beyond contributions to both the business and community. Without further ado, meet the seven winners of this year’s Be Human Awards:

 
Be Yourself

Yasar Mohebi, Senior Benefits Analyst


Yasar is known around the San Francisco office for his infectious free spirit. He’s always quick to volunteer for responsibilities outside of his job description and leads the charge when it comes to organizing fun team events.

“To me, ‘Be Yourself’ means recognizing that everyone has their own story, problems, and triumphs. You create a culture of acceptance when you walk a mile in another person's shoes–whether they be Nikes, Louboutins, or Converse. But not Crocs ‘cause those are just ugly.”

 

 

Expect Excellence

Sarah Mann, Talent Acquisition Partner


When Namely decided to open up a new office in Atlanta, Sarah didn’t hesitate to hop on a plane and head south to hire and train the new team. Sarah cares deeply about the Namely employee experience and does everything she can to make sure Namely is an
excellent place to interview, onboard, and work.

“We all face difficult challenges in our jobs—this process is broken, this could be better, or I don’t know how to achieve that. To me, “Expect Excellence” is to be empowered to take on those challenges and thrive when the going gets tough. I joined Namely knowing that all of our employees are able to make an impact. Our culture allows us to focus on making our work better and to always drive towards meaningful results.”

 


Help Each Other

Aaron Manasque, Payroll Consultant


Aaron is approachable, knowledgeable, and selfless. He’s always ready to answer a question, help someone in need, and guide others to realize their full potential. From training new hires to helping out other teams, Aaron has a true teacher’s spirit and is always willing to lend a hand.

“I know how it feels to be extremely stuck on a new, complex task. I wish someone had come up to me and said, 'That's simple, just do this and that and you're done.' I want to be that person for other people. Why would I have my teammates reinvent the wheel when I can take a few minutes out of my day to save them an hour? I want people to feel welcome and supported at Namely. It just makes for such a more positive work environment.”

 
Unite Around Our Mission

Martin Kess, Principal Software Engineer


Martin’s dedication to diversity and inclusion within the engineering department is unrivaled. From candidate interviews to daily collaboration, Martin is always mindful of his impact on his team and the greater organization.

“Our mission is to help mid-sized companies build a better workplace. To achieve that mission, we need to build a diverse and high performing company. Every day I try to create an opportunity for individuals, teams, and departments to work together and communicate effectively. I want people to be able to bring their whole selves to work so they can apply their unique perspectives and skills to serve our customers and build that better workplace.”

 
Make Our Clients Heroes

Sam Rothman, Client Service Lead


Sam goes above and beyond to handle all the challenges that come his way. He’s always willing to hop on calls with clients and lend a helping hand. He never hesitates to roll his sleeves up and tackle any problem with a smile.

“‘Make Our Clients Heroes’ is the motto that shapes my mentality every day at work. Making our clients heroes means empowering them to be successful in utilizing the Namely platform to improve their HR process. Forming a partnership, not a ‘provider-client’ relationship, is what allows our clients to feel like heroes!”

  
Act As An Owner

Jesse Quinones, Director of Shared Services


Jesse always has a way of showing people the big picture even when they can't see it themselves. He always makes time to help others, even those not on his team. He empowers his coworkers every day and inspires them to be their best selves.

“I feel that acting as an owner is the key to our success. We are not our titles! This is simply our primary area of impact. We should all feel responsible for Namely's success and not just that of our team. We need to do our best every day to support our partners and clients. When we are empowered to act as owners we don’t look up the hierarchy for answers, we take responsibility to solve problems where they occur.”

 
Namely Cares

Olivia Small, Office Coordinator


Olivia is the go-to person in the New York office. She cares deeply about the Namely employee experience and took the lead in orchestrating all of our Be Human Week volunteer programs.

“Office coordinators usually focus on keeping employees happy enough so they can perform their jobs well. But, it's more than that—it’s personal. I want to know our employee’s interests and dreams outside of work and have a real connection with them. Namely Cares is the opportunity not only to help our community, but also show them that they can act compassionately towards each other too.”

Company values give a stronger meaning to both the work that you do and the community you inhabit. As these winners demonstrate, employees identify with their company’s values and use them to inspire a better work every day.


Congratulations to all the winners and an honorable mention to all the Namely employees who live our company values every day!

 

Company values, policies, and more! Here’s what to include in your employee handbook.
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Company milestones, birthdays, work anniversaries, and fun holidays—there’s always something to celebrate. Who says HR can’t be the life of the party? We’ve put together an employee engagement calendar of some serious (and not so serious) holidays you can celebrate in your workplace.

 

January

 

Month-long celebrations: Mental Wellness Month, National Mentoring Month
 

1/4   - Trivia Day

  • Whip up some company trivia and see who knows your industry the best!

1/8   - Clean Off Your Desk Day

1/19 - Popcorn Day

1/22 - Hot Sauce Day

1/24 - Compliment Day

1/28 - Data Privacy Day

1/30 - Croissant Day

  • Cater breakfast for the office with this French pastry favorite.

 

February

 

Month-long celebrations: Black History Month, American Heart Month
 

2/5   - Chocolate Fondue Day

2/9   - Bagel and Lox Day

  • Carb lovers rejoice! Offering breakfast and bagels is a popular workplace perk.

2/12 - Clean Out Your Computer Day

2/14 - Valentine’s Day

2/16 - Chinese New Year

2/17 - Random Act of Kindness Day

  • Encourage employees to help each other out and share their good deeds on your company feed or on social media with a hashtag.

2/24 - Tortilla Chip Day

 

March

 

Month-long celebrations: National Disabilities Month, Women’s History Month
 

3/1   - World Compliment Day

3/2   - Employee Appreciation Day

  • Plan a company happy hour, give out awards, or host an open-mic all hands meeting so employees can thank their coworkers.

3 / 8 - International Women’s Day

  • Celebrate and honor women’s achievements by having a speaker and networking event.

3/14 - Pi Day

3/17 - St. Patrick’s Day

3/23 - Puppy Day

  • Partner with a local shelter to bring adoptable puppies into the office. Puppy playtime can brighten your employees days and a pup might even find its forever home.

3/25 - Waffle Day

 

April

 

Month-long celebrations: Financial Literacy Month, National Volunteer Month, Stress Awareness Month

4/1   - Fun at Work Day / April Fools

4/6   - Walk to Work Day

  • Lace up your sneakers and encourage your employees to hoof it to work!

4/10 - Be Kind to Lawyers Day

  • Hopefully, you’re kind to your lawyers every day, but here’s an excuse to give your legal team a little extra love!

4/12 - Grilled Cheese Day

4/14 - International Moment of Laughter Day

4/16 - Wear Pajamas to Work Day

4/20 - Look-Alike Day

  • They say imitation is the highest form of flattery. Encourage employees to dress up as a teammate or coworker.

4/25 - Administrative Professionals Day

4/26 - Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

 

May

 

Month-long celebrations: Asian Pacific Heritage Month, Jewish American Heritage Month, Mental Health Awareness Month, National Bike Month
 

5/5   - Cinco de Mayo and the Kentucky Derby

5/6   - National Nurses Day

5/18 - Pizza Party Day

  • Pick up a pie for the team and chow down!

 

June

 

Month-long celebrations: National Safety Month, LGBT Pride Month, National Caribbean American Heritage Month
 

6/1   - National Doughnut Day

6/2   - Leave the Office Early Day

6/19 - Juneteenth

  • Have a potluck lunch to celebrate freedom and equal rights in the United States.

6/14 - Bastille Day

6/22 - Take Your Dog to Work Day

 

July

 

7/1   - International Joke Day

7/4   - Independence Day

7/9   - Sugar Cookie Day

  • Forget the beach body and order up some tasty cookies for the office.

7/22 - Ice Cream Day

  • Cool off from the summer heat with a build-your-own sundae bar.  

7/28 - Milk Chocolate Day

 

August
 

 

8/2   - Ice Cream Sandwich Day

8/3   - International Beer Day

8/31 - Eat Outside Day

  • Encourage your office to get some vitamin D by having a picnic outside if the weather permits!

 

September

 

Month-long celebrations: German American Heritage Month
 

9/3 to 9/7 - National Payroll Week

9/10 - Swap Ideas Day

9/15 - National Clean Up Day

  • Organize a Saturday volunteering squad to help clean up a local park, trail, beach, or mountain.

9/16 - Guacamole Day

9/30 - Hot Mulled Cider Day

 

October

 

Month-long celebrations: German American Heritage Month (cont.), National Cyber Security Awareness Month, National Disability Employment Awareness Month, National Work and Family Month, Polish American Heritage Month
 

10/1 - International Coffee Day

10/4   - Taco Day

10/5   - World Smile Day

10/6   - Card Making Day

  • Partner with a local children’s hospital to create fun cards for kids.

10/8   - Pierogi Day

10/16 - Boss’s Day

10/27 - American Beer Day

10/30 - Candy Corn Day

  • With Halloween right around the corner, celebrate the spooky holiday with a candy and dessert bar.

10/31 - Halloween


 

November

 

11/3   - Sandwich Day

11/12 - Happy Hour Day

11/13 - World Kindness Day

11/22 - Thanksgiving

  • Celebrate Thanksgiving with your work-family with an office potluck before the craziness of the holidays.

11/26 - Cake Day

11/30 - Computer Security Day

 

December

 

12/3   - Make a Gift Day

12/12 - Gingerbread House Day

12/20 - Sangria Day

12/21 - Ugly Sweater Day

  • Encourage everyone to sport a chunky and funky holiday sweater and host a hot cocoa happy hour.

12/26 - Thank You Note Day

Unfortunately, work can’t be all parties. Sure, you know the date of National Donut Day off the top of your head, but do you know when your company’s Form 941 is due? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with our 2018 HR Calendar, so you’ll never miss a reporting deadline. Download the calendar by clicking below.

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Namely Blog by Andy Przystanski - 6M ago

Think you know your history? Over the last 150 years, the emergence of new technologies, business philosophies, and political movements have all played a part in shaping the HR profession as we know it today.


In Namely’s newest ebook, The History of HR, we dive into the full scope of that evolution. Below, we’ve included a sampling of the key moments in history that ultimately changed HR forever. Consider this your course syllabus.

1. The First HR Conference (1904) 

Nearly a century before SHRM’s annual conference sold out exposition halls across the country, there was the Conference on Welfare Work. In 1904, the National Civic Federation invited business owners and personnel departments from across the country to the opulent Waldorf Astoria in New York City. The purpose? To exchange strategies on how to boost employee morale and wellbeing.
 

By this point, personnel management (called human resources today) was barely three years old. But in that short time, its thought leaders had created a variety of enticing perks to both attract and retain workers. Attendees, who hailed from all industries, shared “engagement hacks” like hosting Sunday picnics, screening silent movies at noon, and even providing employees with an on-site bar. And yes, there was ping pong as well.

Pictured: One company at the 1904 conference shared that it had built a bowling alley and game room for employees.

2. Passage of the Fair Labor Standards Act (1938)

 

Most of the employee protections we take for granted today didn’t exist before the mid-1930s. Child labor was legal, the minimum wage didn’t exist, and there were few workplace safety rules to speak of. If you were lucky enough to be employed during the Great Depression, your workweek was likely 50 or more hours long.
 

After a series of department store strikes across the country, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the most important labor law in U.S. history: the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA set limits on working age, capped the workweek to 44 hours, and created a minimum wage of 25 cents an hour. It also created a new form of compensation: overtime pay.
 

Almost overnight, HR teams had to shift focus. It wasn’t enough for companies to say they were compensating employees fairly—they needed to prove it. In 1940, even in wartime, the DOL conducted over 6,400 inspections and awarded workers over $5 million in back pay. Ever since the FLSA was passed, compliance has been an HR priority.

 

3. The HR Information System Arrives (1980s)

 

The first HR information system (HRIS) dates back to the 1970s, but it was prohibitively expensive, unintuitive, and physically cumbersome. Because all data had to be stored on location, offices sometimes had to dedicate entire rooms for the necessary hardware. For most companies, “going digital” was cost prohibitive and not so attractive of an alternative to using paper files.
 

By the early 1980s, personal computers had started to enter the workplace in growing numbers. This created the perfect conditions for the HRIS as we know it today. For the first time, employee and payroll data could be electronically stored in one place and easily referenced at a moment’s notice. From their office computer or a designated kiosk, employees could even access their own records without asking for help. These developments freed up hours of HR’s time, empowering them to focus on more strategic and forward-looking tasks.

In the 1970s, personnel data was sometimes stored on physical, on-premises mainframes.
 

4. “People” Departments Emerge (2000s)

 

By the turn of the century, HR teams were dealing with an image crisis. With developments in computing and the eventual arrival of the internet, businesses had new opportunities to improve their bottom lines by automating tasks or transitioning roles overseas. That meant layoffs, and lots of them. In 1987 alone, an estimated 3.5 million U.S. workers lost their jobs. HR, tasked with giving employees the bad news themselves, were characterized as workplace “angels of death.”
 

The time was ripe for a rebrand. While the origin of the first “people” department remains unknown, what’s clear is that Silicon Valley led the charge. In the 2010s, Google and Facebook made headlines for their workplace cultures, unique perks, and novel take on the century-old HR profession. Suddenly, people operations had entered the corporate lexicon.
 

Need proof? Look no further than LinkedIn for a sampling of some of the HR job titles popular today. One industry report found that HR teams sometimes even used titles like Chief Happiness Officer, Head of Optimistic People, and People Guru. While it takes more than a rebrand to signal intent, the new verbiage represents a step in a new direction for the profession.

There’s no shortage of articles and opinions about the future of HR. But to get where you’re going, you need to know where you came from—and in HR’s case, that story is a surprisingly rich one, full of plot twists, memorable characters, and valuable lessons. Before making your own history, get the full story by reading our ebook, The History of HR.

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Namely Blog by Rachel Bolsu - 6M ago

When presenting to your board, leadership team, or even workforce, it’s helpful to have one datapoint to sum up the overall sentiment of the company.. Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) is an extremely helpful metric on overall employee engagement, but in order to drive it up, you need to know exactly what’s going on in the company.


As an HR professional, you’re often working with limited time and resources, not to mention, each employee has a slightly different set of needs and priorities. To increase your eNPS, you need to identify the driving factors of employee happiness and address any major barriers. “In my experience, employees want to be heard, included, and communicated with openly,” says Nneka Craigwell, HR Business Partner at Namely. “When leaders do any combination of the three, it makes a ton of difference.”


Here are four tips to help you increase employee morale and your employee NPS:

 


1. Collect Qualitative Feedback


Time spent speculating about what your workforce wants is time wasted. More often than not, employees are happy to tell you exactly what they need for a better work experience. Include open-ended questions on your employee engagement surveys to explain ratings and give feedback. The more information you collect, the easier it will be to find out what you need to do to boost morale.

 


2. Continue the Conversation


To holistically improve the quality of life at your company, it takes more than just an annual survey. Once you understand some of the factors driving your eNPS, it’s time to start talking to your population. Consider assembling a cross-departmental task force to voice the sentiment of their respective teams. Alternatively, you might schedule individual meetings with employees from across the organization. You’ll want to hear a variety of voices to help you prioritize your resulting initiatives.

 


3. Don’t Neglect Data


By definition, eNPS reveals a lot about why employees are choosing to join or leave a company–and whether or not they would encourage others to apply. Through onboarding and exit interviews, you should be collecting data on what attracts employees to your company and what impacts their decision to leave. This information can help you identify any disconnect between expectation and experience, and pinpoint exactly what needs to be done to reconcile it.

 


4. Follow Up


Asking for feedback and neglecting to take action will diminish employee trust. Your company’s eNPS is a direct result of the perceived response to feedback. HR may do a lot of work behind the scenes, but without ongoing communication, employees may not even realize they have been heard. Communicate any initiatives launched as a result of employee feedback and solicit further feedback to make sure the problem was adequately addresses.

As you continue to collect HR data, be careful not to get so caught up in the numbers that you lose sight of the people you’re serving. Communication and active listening are key to increase employee morale, productivity, and as a result, your eNPS score.

 


Looking for inspiration? Try these 14 proven hacks to increase employee engagement. 
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