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LoveCrochet |

SewYeah is back for the ultimate Summer Strawberries & Cream moment with this fabulous pompom garland. 

So Summer has certainly arrived – right now I can’t fathom Wimbledon being rained off for even one day but then who knows with the fickle English weather. To celebrate my favourite sporting competition I’ve created this cute little Strawberries and Cream Pompom Garland.

These strawberries are so cute, even if you make just one they look great attached to hair bobbles or tied onto a key ring for a mini bag charm. 


You will need:

To make the strawberries

Begin by wrapping one layer of red yard around one half of the maker. 


Next cut two 12cm lengths of the pink yarn and wind one around the maker. Wind it on top of itself so it doesn’t unwrap. Wind the second piece in a different position. 

Then wind another layer of the red yarn so none of the pink shows through. Next, wind another three pieces of the pink yarn onto the maker. Try and wind them in different places to the previous ones. 

Keep alternating between the red and pink yarn till you fill this half of the maker. Then repeat on the other half. 


When your maker is filled with yarn, close it and cut through the yarn till you see the maker inside. Take a 20cm length of the green yarn and wind it around the middle of the pompom maker, tie one tight knot then wind the yarn back around the maker and tie a tight double knot to secure. Do not trim this yarn. 

Remove the maker and give your pompom a shake. 

To trim

Begin by trimming the pompom into a rough sphere shape. As you hold the green yarn ‘stalk’ trim the lower two thirds of the pompom into a cone shape and the upper third  into a more gentle cone shape to create a strawberry shape. Remember the more you trim the neater your strawberry will look. 

To make the calyx (leaves)

Cut a 5cm square of thin card, copy the template in the pictures  and draw out a rough five pointed leaf shape. Cut out and then use this template to cut leaves from the green felt. 

Using a large needle, thread the two pieces of green yarn through the centre of the leaves. Push the leaves right down on top of the strawberry and tie a tight double knot to hold in place. 


Repeat the above instructions to make four more strawberries. You can alternate the colours of yarn and felt for a more varied punnet of strawberries! 

To make the cream

Make five dollops of cream pompoms by winding the champagne, paper white and silver yarns together around the pompom maker. 

To make the garland

Using the long strands of yarn on each pompom tie them onto the bakers twine alternating strawberries and cream as you go. 

 For more pompom fun, check out the blog!

The post Pompom Party: Strawberries & Cream Pompom Garland appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet |

We’re almost ready to fling open the doors of the July Sale, and Merion is here to help you navigate the fabulous bargains.

We crocheters love a yarn sale! I’ve been scanning through the list of yarns that will be included this July, and to help you skip happily through the sale I have picked out a few gems that I’ll be popping into my basket. After all, sales are a time for topping up the stash, for planning ahead and for trying new yarn.

Stash must-haves

Crocheters almost always have blankets and afghans planned, or half completed – and often, we are called upon to crochet a blanket in record time for emergency gifts, for people in need, or for new babies. This is why it is important to make sure that the staples in our yarn stashes stay topped up and ready for action. Sales are a good opportunity to top up the yarns you use all the time and save money at the same time.

Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran

This absolute dream of an aran weight yarn is one of my favourites, and there is always some in my stash. It’s great for blankets and cushions – but also a fabulous choice for garments and kidswear. It’s super soft, thanks to its merino wool/cashmere content, but it is machine washable and a true workhorse yarn. The signature Debbie Bliss colour palette is full of modern solid shades and a tonals option – and it would be gorgeous to combine the two in a beautiful ripple or stripe. Pssst – there are lots of other Debbie Bliss yarns in the sale too.

Favourite acrylics

Most crocheters have a healthy stash of acrylic yarn for all kinds of different projects, from granny blankets to toys. The wonderful thing about acrylic yarns, apart from them being wash and tumble-safe, is that there is a huge range of colours to choose from in most ranges, and this makes them irresistible for crochet. There are lots of brands to choose from in the Big July Sale including great value Hayfield Bonus DK which is a great favourite for toys, and Cascade Cherub DK which has 40 fabulous shades to swoon over.

Lion Brand Hometown USA

I used this yarn earlier in the year to crochet the Craft Council’s giant stitch away stress lemon pillow, and I absolutely loved it! It’s beautifully soft but it has good structure and great stitch definition which is great for a super chunky yarn, where textured stitches really bloom.  It’s a great value yarn for all your super chunky/super bulky crochet projects.

Cool cottons

Cotton and crochet are made for each other – and the gentle smoothness of cotton is not only hardwearing and perfect for projects for the home, it’s a delight to wear, and perfect for anyone with sensitive skin or allergies.  Sirdar Cotton DK and Sirdar Cotton Prints DK are in the Big July Sale, with a great range of shades to choose from, and I love sport weight MillaMia Naturally Soft Cotton for garments and baby wear – it has a beautifully gentle finish and brings elegant drape.

Sirdar Amalfi DK

It’s always fun to try a cotton multi – and Sirdar Amalfi DK summons up the rich beauty of that gorgeous Italian coastline beautifully with its jewel-dotted twists and stylish colour combos. This would be dreamy in so many scenarios – perfect for crocheted tees, matched with solid shades or for sweet accessories – bags, hats, shawls.

Try something different …

If you’re going to buy something different to try, it would make sense to buy it in a sale. If you haven’t tried crocheting with a different weight yarn – maybe a super chunky – now is the time to try! I am a texture fan – I love anything different, from mohair with a halo like Willow & Lark Plume held double with a favourite wool yarn, or the gorgeously soft chainette structure of GGH Topas, with its delicious heathery shades.

Hoooked Ribbon XL Solids

I’ve just succumbed to the delights of tape yarn – having been sceptical for a while – and I love it. I’ve made a big circular bag and it’s been great fun. Working with an 8mm hook means that the fabric is created super fast, which is great news for an impatient crafter like me! There are over 30 shades to try – and lots of patterns on site to devour.

What are you looking for in the Big July Sale?

The post How to make the most of the Big July Sale! appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet |

SewYeah’s pompom this month is a juicy watermelon. Get ready to wind!

There’s something about the colour combination of green, pink, white and black that automatically says summer to me! This pompom makes me so happy to look at even if it’s a grey and drab day outside – once glance at this little cutie cheers me right up.

p.s: The number of wraps I have written here may vary for you depending on how tight you wrap your yarn. Try not to wrap too tight as that will make the yarn hard to cut through at the end!

You will need: To make the skin

Take the Racing Green yarn and wind it 80 times around one half of the maker, work back and forth across the maker so the yarn wraps are evenly spread.

Next take the Neon Green yarn and wrap this 160 times over the Racing Green yarn so it is all covered.

Repeat with the Racing Green yarn wrapping it 160 times over the Neon Green yarn

Finish with 160 wraps of the Neon Green yarn.

To make the insides

On the other half of the maker take the Neon Pink and the Bubblegum Pink and wrap them together back and forth across the maker 60 times.

Take the Pure Black yarn and wrap it around the maker 5 times. It doesn’t matter where you wrap this yarn as you are making the seeds and they can appear anywhere.  Continue wrapping the two pinks back and forth across the maker every often adding another 5 wraps of black to make more seeds.

When the maker is three quarters full snip off the Neon Pink yarn and continue wrapping the Bubblegum Pink for a further 100 wraps or until at the layer below is covered. Repeat with the Paper White yarn.

Close the maker and cut through both sides of the pompom to expose the maker. Take two 30cm lengths of wool – one of Neon Green and one of Racing Green, wrap these both around the middle of the maker and tie a tight knot. Wrap the strands back around the maker and tie a tight double knot. Make sure the knot is at the top of the pompom where the skin meets the pulp.

Remove the maker.

Give the watermelon a good shake and a good trim. Move the individual strands of black wool to make the seeds look neater.

Take the two strands of Neon Green and twist them together. Repeat with the Racing Green (place a weight -scissors or phone on the ends of the neon green to stop them untwisting while you twist the other strands.

When the colours are twisted hold both strands together and the pompom will spin – somehow untwisting but also twisting the two strands together – don’t ask me how it does it, it’s just magic!! Use this thread to hang your pompom from your bag or somewhere eye-catching.

For more pompom fun, check out the blog!

The post Pompom Party: Watermelon Poms! appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet |

We love this stunning cushion from designer Anna Nikipirowicz, which is sure to brighten any home! Learn how to work the jasmine stitch in this free tutorial and make your very own!

Jasmine stitch, also known as Thai crochet, has been around for a long while, but recently it is having a very well deserved revival, completely unsurprisingly as this stitch is absolutely beautiful! As you crochet you form lovely jasmine flowers, since I’ve tried it out I have been totally addicted.

It is not an easy stitch to master, but once you get going you will not be able to put your hook down. I have taken you step by step through foundation row, first and second rows. I tried to be as clear as possible and hope you find my instructions easy. I have also included instructions on how to back the cushion with fabric and insert a zip, however you can just make two sides of cushion in jasmine stitch and join together, taking into account you will need more yarn.

Jasmine stitch uses a lot of yarn and works very well in bouncy yarns such as wool as the stitches puff up wonderfully, however I think it looks lovely made in cotton as well. For a cushion cover, cotton is perfect due to ease of washing.

Not what you’re looking for? Crochet a rainbow with this juicy stripy beach bag with this FREE pattern and step-by-step tutorial by clicking here.

Materials

2 x Rowan Summerlite DK in Summer sh.453

4 mm (US G/6) crochet hook

Material of choice for backing – 35 x 35 cm (13.7 x 13.7 in)

1 x 35 x 35 cm (13.7 x 13.7 in) cushion pad

26 cm (10 in) close ended zip in matching colour

Tapestry needle

Sewing needle

Matching thread

Dressing pins

Finished size

The completed cushion measures approximately 33 x 33cm (13 x 13 in).

Tension

2 full flowers to 9 cm (3.5 in)

Abbreviation

Yoh – yarn over hook

Foundation puffs

Pattern note: keep your chains and yoh nice and loose at all times, only tighten your yarn when making your final double crochet on top of each section of puffs.

1: Make a slip knot and one chain, keep the loop on hook nice and loose.

2: Yoh, insert hook into top leg of first chain.

3: Yoh and pull through the stitch. 3 loops on hook, do not pull loops tight, keep loose.

4: Yoh and insert hook into the same space as step 1, yoh and pull through the stitch. 5 loops on hook.

5: Yoh, grab hold of the yarn that is feeding into the project as indicated on pic 5.

6: Hold on to the yarn with your thumb and middle finger and pull yarn and hook through all 5 loops.

7: One loop left on hook and one side loop.

8: Insert hook into side loop.

9: Yoh and pull through loop. 2 loops on hook.

10: Yoh and pull through 2 loops on hook. 1 loop left. That is the first foundation puff made. To work the following puffs continue as follows: Remember not to pull tight on the loop, but keep it loose, [yoh, insert hook into space on top of first puff and indicated on pic 10, yoh and pull loop through] twice, 5 loops on hook.

11: Repeat steps 5 to 10.

12: 2 foundation puffs made.

Continue repeating steps 5 to 10 until you have 22 puffs. Please note that my sample for this tutorial is made out of 7 puffs.

First row

13 & 14: The last puff made will be the turning puff for second row. You will work [yoh, insert hook into space, yoh and pull loop through] twice, into top of turning puff (5 loops on hook), then into space in between turning puff and next puff ( loops on hook) and then into space between 2nd and 3rd puff (13 loops on hook).

15 & 16: Yoh, as before; grab hold of the side loop and pull yarn and hook through all 13 loops on hook.

17 & 18: 1 loop left on hook and 1 side loop, insert hook into side loop, yoh and pull loop through.

19 & 20:  2 loops left on hook, yoh and pull through both loops on hook.

Half of first flower is made.

21 to 24: To make the next half of flower work [yoh, insert hook into space, yoh and pull loop through] twice, into top of three petals (5 loops o hook) pic. 22, then into space at the base of third petal (9 loops on hook) pic. 23 and then into space between next two puffs (13 loops on hook) pic. 24, repeat steps 15 to 20.

25: Repeat steps 21 to 24 until end of row, working third petal of last half of flower into the first chain made at the start of work, turn.

26: Second row is now completed.

Second row

On this row we will work second half of flower. Working turning puff as described in steps 1 to 10 and all half of flowers as described in steps 21 to 24.

27: Keeping the loop on hook nice and loose, work 1 turning puff into space at the base of chain.

28: To make the next half of flower work [yoh, insert hook into space, yoh and pull loop through] twice, into top of turning puff (5 loops o hook), then into space at the base of turning puff (9 loops on hook) and then into space between next two puffs (13 loops on hook), repeat steps 15 to 20.

29: second half of flower is completed and you can see now first full flower.

30: Repeat steps 21 to 24 until end of row, working third petal of last half of flower into the space at top of turning puff made at the beginning of last row, turn.

Continue repeating steps 27 to 30 for 20 more rows.

Fasten off.

Making up

Weave in all ends and press gently.

1: Press 1 cm seam allowance around each side of fabric. With wrong side facing the crochet side, pin fabric in palce around 3 sides and 3.5 cm in on both sides on the 4th side, leaving middle unpined for zip.

2: With sewing thread and needle and using the overlocking stitch sew together fabric side to crochet side, remembering not to sew over the opening for zip.

3: Turn the cushion righ side out and pin one side of the zip in place around top opening using dressing pins, then sew in place. Repeat on the other side of the cushion. Insert cushion pad.

Want to brush up on your crochet skills? Click here, to explore our easy free step-by-step video tutorials.

The post Jasmine Stitch Cushion by Anna Nikipirowicz appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet |

Perfect for summer outings, Kate Eastwood’s gorgeous “Out & About” Backpack is great fun to make, and a perfect gift! Customise your finished bag with a bow, crochet flowers or pompoms  for that extra special personal touch! 

On those ‘out and about’ sort of days, what could be more perfect to put all your bits and bobs in than this pretty backpack!

The measurements of the finished backpack are approx. H 42cm x W 37cm x D 12cm, and it is modelled here by my daughter who is 5’4” tall.

The backpack is designed to have a flap over top, under which is a drawstring tie and there is a small carry handle at the top of the backpack , as well as two shoulder straps.

Kate Eastwood has so many fantastic tutorials, why not check out her dazzling Sparkly Stars Cushion FREE tutorial by clicking here!

I used four balls of Hoooked Eco Barbante for my backpack in Gris 0270 using a 3.5mm hook. This yarn is perfect for a bag as it creates a really strong, un-stretchy texture that will allow your bag to keep its shape.

As this yarn is a little too stiff to create a soft border, I used 1 x ball of Sirdar Cotton Rich Aran in Cream 0001 for all my edging using a 4mm hook.

You will also need approx. 75cm of cord for the drawstring, some ribbon and a popper to fasten down the flap. The pattern is written in UK crochet terms, but you can translate into US terms using our handy conversion tables.

The backpack is made with an oval base and then the main body of the bag is added on to this and worked in the round. The flap top and straps are added on separately afterwards.

Getting started: Chain

To begin make a chain of 26.

Round 1: Starting in the second chain from the hook work 1 DC. Work a DC in to each of the next 23 stitches and then work 3 DC in to the last stitch.

You are now going to continue on round by working down the other side of the chain. So, continuing on round, work a further 23 DC, 2 DC in first stitch, then join with a SL ST in to the first stitch. 52 sts.

Round 2: Chain 1, work 2 DC into the first DC, DC 23. Work 2DC into each of the next 3 stitches, DC 23, 2 DC in each of the next 2 sts and then SL ST to join. 58 sts.

Round 3: Chain 1 and work 2 DC in to the next stitch, work 4 DC, 4 HTR, 9 TR, 4 HTR, 4 DC. Work 2 DC in to each of the next 4 sts, 4 DC, 4 HTR, 9 TR, 4 HTR, 4 DC, 2 DC in each of the next 3 sts,  SL ST to join. 66 sts.

Round 4: Chain 1,  6 DC, 4 HTR, 9 TR, 4 HTR, 6 DC. Work 2 DC in to each of the next 4 sts, 6 DC , 4 HTR, 9 TR, 4 HTR, 6 DC, 2 DC in each of the next 4 sts,  SL ST to join. 74 sts.

Round 5: Chain 1, work a DC in to the same st and work DC all the way around. SL ST to join. 74 sts.

Round 6: Chain 1 , 2 DC, 25 HTR , 2 DC.  * 2 DC in next stitch, 1 DC, 2 DC in next stitch , 2 DC*, Repeat from * to * once. 25 HTR, 2 DC, 2 DC in next stitch, 1 DC, 2 DC in next st, 2 DC, 2 DC in next st, 1 DC, 2 DC in next stitch, Sl ST to join 82 sts.

Round 7: Chain 1 and work a DC in to the same stitch. DC all the way around. SL ST and join. 82 sts.

Round 8: Chain 1 ,1 DC, 2 DC in next stitch, 25 DC , (2 DC in next stitch followed by 1 DC ) twice,  (2 DC in next st, followed by 2 DC) three times, 2 DC in next stitch, 1 DC, 2 DC in next stitch, 25 DC, ( 2 DC in next stitch, 1 DC) twice, ( 2DC in next stitch, 2 DC ) twice, 2 DC in next stitch , 1 DC, 2 DC in next stitch, Sl St to join, 96 sts.

Round 9: Work a round of HTR, 96 sts.

At the end of Round 9, SL ST to join and finish off, sew in your ends.

You are now going to start working on the main body of the bag, but first you need to lay your base piece wrong side down and mark 34 stitches along one edge, using stitch markers. This will be the back edge of the base , the rest of the stitches (60 sts) will be the front part of the backpack and we will be increasing in to these stitches to give the bag its shape.

Once your two stitch markers are in place, and following the diagram above, working with the right side facing you and working in to the back loops only, work 34 DC from the starting stitch marker to the finishing stitch marker. (By working in to the back loops only you will see that you are able to create a ‘fold point’, so that the wall of the bag can be worked upwards from the base.)

When you reach the second stitch marker you are now going to start your increasing, so into the next stitch work 2DC, Your next stitch will be a regular DC and the following stitch 2 DC in to one. Continue this pattern all the way around and back to the first stitch marker. SL ST to join.

You should now be able to see that you have a straight back edge to the base and then a curved shape to the front edge of the base. You should now have 124sts.

You are now going to continue working in rounds.

To keep your joining seam nice and neat I join my rounds as follows:

At the end of each round, SL ST to join. Pull your yarn nice and tight, yarn over and pull through. Pull the yarn tight.

Now, keeping your tension tight, chain 1 and then work a DC all in to the same stitch. You are now ready to continue working your next round of DC.

Continue working in rounds ( 124 sts) until your work measures approx. 36cm from the straight edge of the base to the top. Finish off and sew in ends.

In the next 2 rounds you will be making the holes for the drawstring tie, so start by placing your two stitch markers on the back of the bag, to mark the beginning and end of the flat edge (32 sts).

With the back of the bag facing you, join in your yarn at the left hand stitch marker and work as follows:

DC 2, *CH 2 and skip 2 stitches, DC 5,* repeat from* four more times , CH 2 and skip 2 stitches, DC 3, CH2 and skip 2 stitches, DC 1. This will have taken you to the centre of the front. Continue working the round, working the buttonhole pattern as follows: DC1, CH 2 and skip 2 sts, DC 3, CH 2 and skip 2 stitches,

* DC 5, CH 2 and skip 2 stitches * five times, DC 2. Work 34 DC  , which will bring you back to the first stitch marker.

Do not SL ST and join as in previous rounds, as we are just going to work in a continuous round from now.

So, continuing on round, work a round of DC, working 1 DC in to each of the two chain stitches from the previous round.

At the end of this round work a further two rounds, finish off and sew in ends, leaving the stitch markers in place.

To thread your drawstring, take your piece of cord and cut it in half. Tie a large knot at one end of each piece and thread the cord in and out of the buttonholes, beginning with the knot on the inside at the back edge. (Note: the cord runs across the front of the back pack only, so there will be no cord along the straight back edge.) The two buttonholes at the centre front are where you will be pulling the cord through to the front. Adjust the length of the cords and tie knots in the ends.

To make the front flap piece:

Chain 11.

Row 1: Starting in the 2nd chain from the hook work 2 DC in to the first st, DC, then work 2DC in to the last stitch. 12 sts. Ch 1 and turn.

Row 2: DC 2 in to the first stitch, DC 12 , DC2 in the last stitch. 14 sts. Chain 1 and turn.

Row 3: DC 2 in to the first stitch, DC 14 , DC 2 in the last stitch. 16 sts. Chain 1 and turn.

Continue working this pattern until you have 32 stitches.

Work 27 rows of DC, remembering to ch 1 and turn at the end of every row. Finish off and sew in ends.

Using the cream yarn and a 4 mm hook work a round of DC all the way around the edge of the flap, working 3 DC in to the corner stitches.

For the second border row work as follows: SL ST, * skip a stitch, HTR, 3 TR, HTR all in the same stitch, SL ST in to the next st *. Repeat from * to * all the way around the edge. Finish off and sew in ends.

To make the central hand strap:

Using the cream yarn and a 4mm hook Chain 35. Beginning in the second chain from the hook work 14 rows of DC, remembering to ch 1 and turn at the end of each row.

Fold the strap in half lengthways, wrong sides together and join together with a row of DC. Finish off and sew in ends.

To make the shoulder straps:

Make 2.

Chain 101, and starting in the second chain from the hook work 11 rows of DC, remembering to chain 1 and turn at the end of each row. Finish off and sew in ends.

Fold the straps in half lengthways and using the cream yarn and a 4 mm hook, join together with a row of DC. Finish off at the end of the row.

Rejoin your yarn back at the beginning of the first row of cream and work the same scallop edging as for the flap: *SL ST, miss a stitch, HTR, 3 TR, HTR all in the same stitch. Repeat from *

To finish off the bottom of the bag:

Using the cream yarn and a 4 mm hook work a round of DC around the edge of the base of the bag. As this is the round where you were working in to the back loop only you will only be working in to one loop.

For your second round work the same scallop edging as before.

To finish your bag, pin your hand strap and shoulder straps on to the front flap. I found it quite helpful to mark the central point of the flap so that you can get the straps evenly placed. Using a needle and some strong thread sew the straps in to place.

Use your stitch markers to position the flap on to the bag, pin and stitch in place.

The final step to complete your backpack is to add either a bow or perhaps some crochet flowers to decorate the front flap. Sew a popper on the underneath of the flap and onto the front of the bag to secure the flap in place.

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LoveCrochet Blog by Emma Friedlander-collins - 1y ago

LoveCrochet |

Make Emma’s beautiful spring wreath and decorations and celebrate the colours of the season in your home!

Usually we run off to Cornwall for the spring break, and get away from it all on windswept beaches, in a cosy little caravan.  This year is a bit different; my Mum held a big, family get together where she lives in West Wales, with all the sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents coming along.  We all took something to contribute to the day, and I was nominated to bring along decorations (well, they reeeeally didn’t want to have to put up with my cooking!).   In my usual fashion, most of them had a heavy, woolly theme, and all of them were easy to pack up and rebuild once driven across the length of the country.

I really wanted to make something that would represent the spring, I thought I’d take my influence from the season itself.  Where I am in Sussex, the cherry blossoms are coming into bloom and the primroses are out in all their, golden, buttery glory, so I’ve taken these chaps as my inspiration, and made some little crochet versions.  The great things about these is that they only take 5 minutes to make, use the same pattern just in different colours and look incredibly effective, especially en masse.  Couple them with a few leaves and a handful of pompoms and you’ve got the basis of a whole host of decorations.

I made a wreath for the door and a tree for a table decoration.  The wreath is a polystyrene circle from a craft store that I’ve crocheted around, and then just used pins to attach the pompoms and flowers on the bottom.  It’s a really enjoyable, easy make, and you can festoon it with as many flowers as you like.  Here’s how to make the flowers and wreath…

Flower Pattern

Using Paintbox Yarns Simply Aran and a 5mm hook

Rnd 1: Magic Ring, 5 dc

Rnd 2: 2dc in each st

Rnd 3: *ss, (dc, 3tr, dc)* rpt to end

It’s literally that simple, for the cherry blossom you change the colours for each round, and the primrose is has a darker yellow at the centre, and rounds 2 and 3 are in a lighter colour.

The spring tree uses exactly the same pattern, a handful of pompoms and a whole host of beads, mini fairy lights and some marbled eggs to give it a bit of decadence!

Have you made any spring inspired decorations? We’d love to see them in our Community!

The post Spring wreath by Emma Friedlander Collins appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet Blog by Emma Friedlander-collins - 1y ago

LoveCrochet |

Emma’s been dreaming in colour for spring! Read on and be inspired!

As a crochet designer for all sorts of yarn companies and magazines, from February and March I start to get requests for makes and things that evoke the springtime. Colour is the easiest and most instant way of creating a spring feel, and the automatic response is to reach for the pastel shades; blues, purples and yellows which bring to mind hyacinths, daffodils, and crocuses. But I realised that these are the colours you get used to seeing in advertising and packaging around this time of year, and I very nearly fell into the trap of thinking that these are the colours you HAVE to use.

So this year I’ve decided to find a slightly different colour palette, something that still evokes the beautiful, new blooms of spring, but isn’t necessarily what you would expect. For me, the real sign that the season has turned, is when the magnolias start to bloom and the almond blossoms in my garden are open and are in their full, pale, white and pink glory. There are some incredibly beautiful, and subtle shades of buttery yellow in the primroses, or soft whites and the palest of peaches in the camellias. All of these are accompanied by a huge variety of bright, to the darkest of greens. This year, these will be my colours.

Finding yarns in these subtle shades isn’t always the easiest, but I’ve found that the range from Paintbox Yarns, has just about the right variety to bring this collection to life. I’m really not very good with pastels, I tend to lean toward the neon end of the spectrum, but there’s something very soothing about working with such soft and elegant colours. You really begin to appreciate just how incredible plants and flowers are, when you realise how they can create such a vast combination of such subtle colours. Having those yarns around you as you work really makes you feel like you’re almost a part of spring.

I can’t share any pics of the makes I create for different companies, but I can share pics of how I collect and keep those colours. I make little tags (usually from cereal boxes), write the names of the flowers or plants on the top, and then wrap strips of the colours of yarn that I see in them around it.  I only started this last year, but it’s already accidentally become a brilliant reference library of seasonal colour. I’m already excited about being able to add to it, looking with new, subtler eyes.

(I also feel that I should add here, that I didn’t just look to flowers for inspiration, I also looked to chocolate. Mini Eggs to be precise. But I didn’t manage to get many photos because the smell was literally so delicious that I accidentally ate most of them before I could get any good pictures!)

What inspires you with colour? We’d love to know! Tell us in the Comments section below!

The post New colour palettes for spring! appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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We’re celebrating terribly British patterns this week, inspired by a royal wedding and the spring birth of a new prince!

If you’re not keen on the British royal family, look away now! Here at LoveCrochet HQ we’re getting excited about the beautiful royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle! Prince Harry is very dear to the people of Britain, as the youngest son of Princess Diana, much beloved and often controversial princess who died when her cherished sons were only 15 and 12 years old. The world watched as these boys became men, and now husbands and fathers.

We thought it was a fun opportunity to find some sweet rather British themed patterns for you – so whether you are a fan of the royals or not, there might be some quaintly English style pattern that catches your eye!

Downton Abbey Hat by Olivia Kent

Olivia Kent, aka Hopeful Honey, has some fabulous patterns for cloche shaped hats, so beloved of the 1920s and 30s and featured rather beautifully in the earlier episodes of favourite period drama Downton Abbey.

The Royal Family Set by Red Heart

Now although this hilarious Royal Family set was created for Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George, we think that this handsome prince could easily be adapted to be Prince Harry himself! His hair is already red, so perhaps just a little beard is all that is needed!

Afternoon Tea by DMC

It is the custom in Britain, to have afternoon tea at every possible opportunity – and this ritual always involves tea, cake, sandwiches and scones. It’s a calorific tradition (but wonderful) – so if you are currently trying to avoid sugary treats, don’t worry, you can crochet yourself some cake instead with the DMC Afternoon Tea pattern!  This fabulous pattern includes classic British favourites cucumber sandwiches, scones with jam and cream and fondant fancies! Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, or Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK are both great yarns for amigurumi thanks to a whopping 60 shades!

Union Jack Tea Cosy from DMC

To accompany the cake, there MUST be tea – made in a teapot – and to keep that teapot warm, a teacosy! This one is a classic Union Jack flag which is great fun to crochet, and will be perfect to put away and get out again for every British celebration!

Bride and Groom by Jia Tan

Fashionistas all over the world will be holding their breath to see what Meghan Markle’s wedding dress will be like…  it will inspire years of bridal fashions! You can add whatever you like to your crocheted bride! These gorgeous little amigurumi figures by Jia Tan are such fun to make and a perfect gift for any would-be brides and grooms!

Royal Baby Coronation Crown Cap by Emily Star

A royal celebration is always a fun excuse to dress up the children! In schools across the land they will no doubt be making tiaras, crowns, wedding dresses and other wedding paraphernalia so I’ve found you a couple of sweet little dressing up ideas! This little crown (although presumably more suited to a coronation – but those are very rare indeed!) would make a sweet little hat for a baby or – as pictured here, a favourite teddy! Emily Star’s pattern includes crocheted jewels, but you can stitch on buttons, plastic jewels or add flowers!

Royal Baby Union Jack Bib by Emily Star

Teddy is modelling again – another lovely pattern from Emily Star, this time a Union Jack bib for baby – just a gorgeous little touch for photo opportunities that will last a lifetime!  Even the baby gets to dress up for the royal wedding!

Strawberries by Jennifer Raymond

British strawberries are at their sumptuous best in the summer months, and the Wimbledon Tennis Championships are famous for them, served with cream. It’s a match made in heaven! You can crochet your own beauties with Jennifer Raymond’s perfect pattern!

What are your favourite British traditions? Will you be crocheting for parties and weddings this year?

The post Best of British themed crochet patterns! appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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LoveCrochet |

We’re celebrating terribly British patterns this week, inspired by a royal wedding and the spring birth of a new prince!

If you’re not keen on the British royal family, look away now! Here at LoveCrochet HQ we’re getting excited about the beautiful royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle! Prince Harry is very dear to the people of Britain, as the youngest son of Princess Diana, much beloved and often controversial princess who died when her cherished sons were only 15 and 12 years old. The world watched as these boys became men, and now husbands and fathers.

We thought it was a fun opportunity to find some sweet rather British themed patterns for you – so whether you are a fan of the royals or not, there might be some quaintly English style pattern that catches your eye!

Downton Abbey Hat by Olivia Kent

Olivia Kent, aka Hopeful Honey, has some fabulous patterns for cloche shaped hats, so beloved of the 1920s and 30s and featured rather beautifully in the earlier episodes of favourite period drama Downton Abbey.

The Royal Family Set by Red Heart

Now although this hilarious Royal Family set was created for Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George, we think that this handsome prince could easily be adapted to be Prince Harry himself! His hair is already red, so perhaps just a little beard is all that is needed!

Afternoon Tea by DMC

It is the custom in Britain, to have afternoon tea at every possible opportunity – and this ritual always involves tea, cake, sandwiches and scones. It’s a calorific tradition (but wonderful) – so if you are currently trying to avoid sugary treats, don’t worry, you can crochet yourself some cake instead with the DMC Afternoon Tea pattern!  This fabulous pattern includes classic British favourites cucumber sandwiches, scones with jam and cream and fondant fancies! Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, or Paintbox Yarns Cotton DK are both great yarns for amigurumi thanks to a whopping 60 shades!

Union Jack Tea Cosy from DMC

To accompany the cake, there MUST be tea – made in a teapot – and to keep that teapot warm, a teacosy! This one is a classic Union Jack flag which is great fun to crochet, and will be perfect to put away and get out again for every British celebration!

Bride and Groom by Jia Tan

Fashionistas all over the world will be holding their breath to see what Meghan Markle’s wedding dress will be like…  it will inspire years of bridal fashions! You can add whatever you like to your crocheted bride! These gorgeous little amigurumi figures by Jia Tan are such fun to make and a perfect gift for any would-be brides and grooms!

Royal Baby Coronation Crown Cap by Emily Star

A royal celebration is always a fun excuse to dress up the children! In schools across the land they will no doubt be making tiaras, crowns, wedding dresses and other wedding paraphernalia so I’ve found you a couple of sweet little dressing up ideas! This little crown (although presumably more suited to a coronation – but those are very rare indeed!) would make a sweet little hat for a baby or – as pictured here, a favourite teddy! Emily Star’s pattern includes crocheted jewels, but you can stitch on buttons, plastic jewels or add flowers!

Royal Baby Union Jack Bib by Emily Star

Teddy is modelling again – another lovely pattern from Emily Star, this time a Union Jack bib for baby – just a gorgeous little touch for photo opportunities that will last a lifetime!  Even the baby gets to dress up for the royal wedding!

Strawberries by Jennifer Raymond

British strawberries are at their sumptuous best in the summer months, and the Wimbledon Tennis Championships are famous for them, served with cream. It’s a match made in heaven! You can crochet your own beauties with Jennifer Raymond’s perfect pattern!

What are your favourite British traditions? Will you be crocheting for parties and weddings this year?

The post Best of British themed crochet patterns! appeared first on LoveCrochet Blog.

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