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Better sleep. Weight loss. A medical emergency. There’s a health app for that.  While most people with diabetes can benefit from a digital setup, many older people with diabetes don’t take advantage of the array of tools out there.

New apps and health technology are being invented every day, and fortunately, everything is getting easier to use, says Medha Munshi, M.D., Director of Geriatric Diabetes Program at Joslin Diabetes Center.  Even so, older people with diabetes need to make smart use of the right technology to improve their health. For people in their 60s and beyond, here are some benefits of becoming more tech-savvy:

Telemedicine Video-based doctor visits give patients access to the best experts in diabetes care without having to leave their home. Telemedicine can help older people if they are not able to come to the clinic, usually because they have a hard time with transportation or other medical problems,” says Dr. Munshi. “A lot of changes in a person’s health can go unnoticed or fall by the wayside, but if an older person is able to use technology to communicate then I can keep an eye on them more closely, especially when I’m adjusting their insulin dose.”

Smart phones and apps   Anyone with a smart phone can use apps to monitor blood glucose levels and share that information with their doctor.  Regular text reminders from a diabetes care team have been shown to improve outcomes.  “When we improve communication between caregiver, patient and provider, we ultimately improve the patient’s ability to manage their diabetes and our ability to make medication adjustments in real time,” says Dr. Munshi.

Incorporating technology into diabetes care may not be for everyone over the age of 65, but it’s worth exploring. “Mobile health can help people in their 70s and beyond, but it also could hurt them if they don’t have the ability to cope with it.”

Here’s how to get started:

Identify barriers

Older adults face specific problems. That may include vision, hearing and mobility issues. First, if you are caring for a parent, find out if they are willing and able to use a device. “After that, talk with their physician about specific barriers. For example, your mother is not eating on time, your father forgets to take his medicine, or your aunt is not able to get to the clinic,” says Dr. Munshi. “Based on the barrier, the doctor can choose an appropriate option to help your loved one function better and improve diabetes management.”

Dr. Medha Munshi is the head of the Geriatric Clinic at Joslin

Skip the bells and whistles

Technology helps old and young alike, but older people need easy-to-follow gadgets and apps that won’t frustrate or stress them out. Pick devices with big buttons and screens that are easy to tap. And skip features that would never be used. “Once you introduce the new technology, give them plenty of time to gradually get used to it. There’s no benefit if they are unable to cope with it,” says Dr. Munshi.

Enlist the help of a family member

“Older patients are often afraid to make changes on their own. Therefore, they need someone to guide them along and okay the change,” says Dr. Munshi.  “Another benefit of having a family member or caregiver share technology is that they then become more engaged in the person’s care.”

It’s true that there are many good health reasons to become tech-savvy. “For older people, it’s not just about giving an injection or checking glucose levels, it’s also about improving activity, eating well and staying motivated and connected,” says Dr. Munshi. “Ultimately, the right use of technology can improve everyone’s quality of life.”

For help with managing diabetes, contact our Certified Diabetes Educators at 617-309-2780 or make an appointment with our Adult Clinic at 617-309-2440.

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You know Black Friday.

You’ve heard of Cyber Monday.

But you can really get into the spirit of the season this year with #GivingTuesday, a national movement around the holidays dedicated to giving back.

As Thanksgiving now marks the kickoff to the Holiday shopping season, #GivingTuesday aims to inspire charitable activities and giving to non-profit organizations. Taking place Dec 2– the Tuesday after Thanksgiving – #GivingTuesday will harness the power of social media to create a national sense of holiday giving. Similar to how Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become days synonymous with holiday shopping, #GivingTuesday will motivate people to take collaborative action to improve their local communities and give back to the charities and causes they celebrate and help create a better world.

This #GivingTuesday we hope that you will consider supporting Joslin.  Joslin is a non-profit organization, which means everything we do—all the research into causes of and treatments for diabetes, all the content we produce to make sure you’re up to date on diabetes, and all the care we provide to make sure you’re the healthiest you can be with diabetes—depends heavily on donations and gifts from individuals, corporations, and foundations.

As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, all of the donations and funds we receive are directed towards arriving at our vision of “a world free of diabetes and its complications.”  We are certainly thankful each year for our dedicated group of donors and volunteers that allow Joslin Diabetes Center to run as successfully as it does, and we are supporting the #GivingTuesday movement in the hopes of spreading excitement and passion for our mission and vision.

Participation in #GivingTuesday can take the form of donations, volunteer service, or even something as simple as spreading the word.  Please be sure to visit www.joslin.org and our social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the others featured above and to the left of this post tomorrow, Dec 2.  You’ll get a look into this premiere diabetes organization, and how Joslin operates to move closer to our vision of a future without diabetes.

Please visit us online to make a donation today!

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Thanksgiving is a carb fest.  There is no way around it; traditional Thanksgiving meals are mostly carbohydrate.  And they bend the needle quite far on the fat-o-meter too.  Okay, there’s the turkey and a nod to the world of greens with the ever-present green bean casserole (which, with its use of cream of mushroom soup, isn’t exactly a paen to the low-fat, high-fiber, low-calorie image non-starchy vegetables are supposed to present) and possible a green salad on some tables.  But that is basically it.

Think about it—the rest of the meal: mashed potatoes, rolls, sweet potato casserole, stuffing and a variety of pies.   Oh and, even the turkey isn’t carb free.  It comes with the slightly cloying, but ever so addictive, cranberry sauce and gravy.

Now not every family will serve a traditional Thanksgiving meal and some people couldn’t care less about the types of food that are usually served.  If you are one of these folks stop reading now- you already have a plan.

So, if you’re still following along with bated breath, how do you realistically enjoy the  Thanksgiving repast?   Well, remember the 80/20 rule- 80 percent of the time you follow your meal plan, the other 20 percent you can indulge in greater latitude.  You decide, not your family, your health care providers or anybody else if this meal is important enough to you to make it one of your 20 percent days.

If it isn’t, then stick close to your meal plan (you will likely have to expand your carb allotment somewhat.  If you generally have only 30 to 40 grams of carbohydrate at meals, you won’t be able to try very many dishes) by choosing one or two of your favorite foods and filling up on the salad and plain roast turkey.

If you’re willing for this to be one of the times that you are not going to have perfect control but still not make a glutton of yourself, then make a plan.  Remember there is no reason for anybody, whether they have diabetes or not, to be so stuffed that they are uncomfortable and nodding off in front of the college bowl games.

Focus on the meal and forget the appetizers, unless they are vegetable nibbles such as carrots sticks.  Don’t starve yourself the rest of the day.  Know the timing of the meal in advance and eat appropriate snacks to keep from going too long without food. This will stave off excessive hunger and keep glucose levels balanced.

Now we get into the fine detail.  Visualize your dinner plate into thirds.  Instead of the traditional plate method of carb counting where ¼ of the plate is starch, today you get a third, plus a small sampling of dessert.  Translation: choose a reasonable slice of one of the pies and no, it doesn’t have to be pumpkin.  Choose the one you like, be it pumpkin or pudding or pecan.

If you take insulin, determine beforehand how you will want to account for the extra carb. If you don’t know how to do this, talk with your educator or doctor in advance. (Knowing how to do this is a good idea in general, not just for the holidays.)

Think about how you can incorporate physical activity into your day.  Remember exercise makes your cells much more insulin sensitive and also burns some calories.  The more you do, the more you get to eat without a  rise in blood glucose. Fit in a gym session before heading off to the feast, or get together a family flag football game pre-dinner.

One more point—extra calories and/or extra carbohydrate on one day have almost no effect on overall glucose control or weight.

And whatever you decide to do about the food, enjoy the holiday!  Remember, Thanksgiving is also about reconnecting with all your family or friends.

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Joslin President Peter S. Amenta, MD, PhD announced the appointment of Dr. Albert Hwa and Dr. Sanjeev Mehta as Joslin’s inaugural #GivingTuesday co-chairs. In this role, Drs. Hwa and Mehta will serve as Joslin’s public-facing representatives for this annual day of giving.

“Each day, both Dr. Hwa and Dr. Mehta work tirelessly toward Joslin’s ultimate vision of a world free of diabetes,” Dr. Amenta said. “Their unwavering passion for Joslin will be on full display this coming #GivingTuesday, and I am sure they will inspire numerous friends of Joslin to support us on November 27.”

Albert Hwa, PhD is the Operations Director for Joslin’s Center for Cell-Based Therapy for Diabetes (CCTD) and a Lecturer of Harvard Medical School. Dr. Hwa works to identify technologies ripe for translation and establish the research programs to bring them to clinical testing. He also serves as program manager for the Boston Autologous Islet Replacement Therapy program (BAIRT), which coalesces academic and industry collaborators around the goal of bringing autologous stem cell-derived beta cell replacement to clinical testing. Dr. Hwa came to Joslin from JDRF, where he was Director of Discovery Science.

Sanjeev Mehta, MD, MPH is a pediatric endocrinologist in Joslin’s Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Section and serves as Joslin’s Chief Medical Information Officer and Director of Quality. For nearly 15 years, his clinical practice and research focus on strategies to more effectively manage diabetes across the lifespan with the goals of optimizing a person’s quality of life while preventing the complications associated with diabetes. He has a strong interest in using health information technology and novel analytic tools, such as artificial intelligence, to improve care delivery and health outcomes for all individuals with diabetes, at Joslin and around the world.

Celebrated on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday harnesses the power of online giving and social media to advance the important work of hundreds of thousands of non-profit organizations worldwide.

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Thanksgiving can be a great holiday—a day dedicated to giving thanks to everything we have in our lives! But with the spirit of the holiday comes a ton of tasty food, which can get tricky if you have diabetes. We asked people who have diabetes to share some of their tips for making the most of this holiday.

Below is a selection of some helpful tips to navigate Thanksgiving Day:

Include physical activity into your Thanksgiving celebration: Many people commented that they try to balance out a day centered on eating by integrating exercise into their celebrations. Whether you are playing hockey, dancing or taking a walk after the meal, including physical activity is an effective way to offset the focus on food.

  • Taking a nice walk between courses or after dinner sure helps – Debra H.
  • Since I’m cooking this year, I’m doing what I always do when I cook: get down! Dancing leads to thirst, thirst leads to more water consumption, more water consumption leads to less eating. – Charita J.
  • I’ve always played ice hockey, and for the past few years I’ve skated early on thanksgiving morning. It seems to help me at the end of the day to keep my levels more stable – Chris D.

Everything in moderation: A big part of celebrating Thanksgiving is enjoying a large meal, but this also means that there are plenty of unhealthy foods available. One way to enjoy the meal while safely managing your diabetes is to use portion control. By having smaller servings, you are still able to enjoy your favorite holiday foods without consuming too many unhealthy foods.

  • Portion control and moderation is my plan! Hasn’t failed me yet – Deanie F.
  • Test like crazy and and extra insulin, if necessary! Stay well hydrated, too! – Rose K.
  • Well, I used to eat a cocktail of small pieces of fresh fruits before indulging in a big meal , so that I feel full and be satisfied with a small cut of turkey. – Ali A.
  • Fat free chocolate sugar free cook & serve pudding pie, make it for my son on the holidays. Joyce O.

And, of course, tempting as it may be,

  • Don’t eat the entire turkey in 1 sitting. – Keith J.

The social aspect of Thanksgiving: Enjoying time with family and friends is another great way to partake in holiday festivities without solely concentrating on the eating.

  • Be thankful for our amazing team in Joslin Pediatrics, and focus on blessings rather than diabetes! The food is good and fresh so we count our carbs, cover with insulin and keep focusing on fun and family. – Regina H.
  • I try to focus more on the social part than the food. Eat small portions and only one small piece of dessert – Anne S.
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While some people choose to manage their diabetes on their own, family members also live with diabetes and witness their loved one’s diabetes management. Until recently, there was very little data that examined the emotional impact of diabetes for family members of people with diabetes. This lack of information prompted healthcare companies, such as Novo Nordisk, as well as Joslin Diabetes Center, to explore the impact of diabetes on family members in clinical studies.

Novo Nordisk conducted the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 (DAWN2) study, a global study aimed at understanding the unmet needs for people with diabetes and their families. In addition, this study hoped that their results would improve self-management and psychological support in diabetes care.

The results of the DAWN2 study demonstrate that there is a significant emotional burden on family members of people with diabetes, with 63 percent of family members expressing anxiety about the possibility that the person they live with will develop serious complications from diabetes.

Joslin conducted a similar study that was published in Diabetic Medicine, called the Impact of continuous glucose monitoring on diabetes management and marital relationships of adults with Type 1 diabetes and their spouses: a qualitative study.

Co-author of the continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) study Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Senior Psychologist in the Behavioral Mental Health Unit at Joslin and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, discovered that a majority of spouses were uneducated about diabetes and CGM, which contributed to the bulk of their difficulties surrounding diabetes management.

“The main thing that I think both studies show [is] the importance of including family members in diabetes management,” explained Dr. Ritholz. “As our study shows, the only spouses that had any education around CGM were those where the patient was pregnant. Otherwise, the spouses knew nothing; they were never invited to attend [information sessions], either by the clinic or by the person who had diabetes, so therefore it contributed to them feeling helpless and unable to assist their loved ones.”

Dr. Ritholz also pointed out that three-fourths of spouses were most worried about hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. For this reason, understanding how CGM operates and participating in CGM use was crucial to decreasing anxiety among spouses.

Derived from her clinical observations, Dr. Ritholz noticed that the families or spouses who were involved with their family members’ or spouses’ diabetes created a more open home environment that was better suited to managing diabetes.

“[Based] on my clinical experience, patients who are able to involve their families are certainly more open to discussing their diabetes and want the assistance of family members so that there is an open dialogue,” said Dr. Ritholz. “The wish to do it totally on his or her own … makes for greater difficulties with diabetes management.”

Overall, the Joslin study concluded that CGM may positively impact collaborative diabetes management and marital relationships of people with type 1 diabetes and their spouses. The use of CGM, when spouses are properly educated about its use, exerts a positive influence by decreasing spouses’ anxiety concerning hypoglycemia, promotes a collaborative environment and increases a spouse’s understanding about diabetes. Along with these solutions, the CGM study also highlights the need for more diabetes education for spouses.

Although the DAWN2 and CGM study focused primarily on adults, Jessica Markowitz, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist and Research Associate in Pediatrics at Joslin, stressed that it is important for a patient of any age to have the family’s support in managing their diabetes.

“When I work with kids and families, we are looking to increase family support and help families work with kids to result in the best outcomes in terms of their diabetes,” said Dr. Markowitz. “Diabetes has a huge impact on families, so regardless of the age of the patient, families are affected by the lifestyle change.”

Part of this whole change in lifestyle, as shown in both studies, is that the home environment often needs to adapt to a more diabetes-friendly lifestyle.

“I feel that – and I tell this to patients – that diabetes is a family disease,” commented Dr. Ritholz. “When people are living with diabetes they have to be living in an atmosphere where others are aware and cognitive of what it means to live with diabetes. It [also] helps the patient, as you saw in the CGM study, to feel less alone; it feels like they have collaborators.”

This story was originally posted on Sept. 27, 2013.

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If you have diabetes and are flying with an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor this holiday season, screening at airport checkpoints can cause stressful delays. But according to Crystal Woodward, Director, Safe at School, Government & Legal Advocacy, American Diabetes Association (ADA) the best way to get avoid unnecessary delays is to be well-prepared.

Woodward offers the following tips if you are traveling by air:

Arrive early

Arrive at the airport two to three hours prior to the flight. 

“The best way to avoid potential problems is to be prepared with a good attitude, understanding that it might take some extra time getting through security checkpoints,” says Woodward. “My motto is to always look for opportunities to turn lemons into lemonade. And if you do encounter problems, we at the American Diabetes Association would like to hear about them because we work with the TSA to address those problems, usually with training.

Check security polices before you depart

Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors are permitted through Transportation Security Administration (TSA) checkpoints, but the devices are subject to screening.

Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors are permitted through Transportation Security Administration (TSA) checkpoints, but the devices are subject to screening. Methods of screening may involve imaging technology, metal detector or pat-down. You can ask to do a self pat-down of your insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor without disconnecting from your device.  But you will want to inform the TSA officer about your device before the process begins. It is also a good idea to provide the officer with a TSA notification card or other document that describes your condition. (Visit TSA’s website for more information.)

TSA highly recommends Pre-Check for passengers with medical conditions or disabilities such as diabetes

The TSA recently announced a new policy for people who are registered for TSA Pre-Check, a program that prescreens passengers to expedite airport checkpoints. “TSA highly recommends Pre-Check for passengers with medical conditions or disabilities such as diabetes,” says Woodward. The new policy provides that if devices do not cause the imaging technology or metal detector to alarm, no additional screening is required.

“The benefit of the new policy is that you are not subjected to a pat-down,” says Woodward. “If your device does trigger an alarm, then you will be required to conduct a self pat-down of the device, followed by swab testing of your hands and other external devices for explosives and screening by a hand-held metal detector.”

In standard security lanes, your device may be screened by advanced imaging, metal detector or pat-down. “That pat-down should be limited to the area where the device is worn. So if you wear your device on your abdomen, the security officer shouldn’t be checking your legs,” says Woodward.  “I recommend passengers keep TSA policy information handy, either on their phone or printout, so that if there is a problem they can point it out to the TSA agent.”

If you do experience intrusive screening, or are told you have to disconnect from the pump, calmly explain the TSA policy to the officer. You can say, “I’m familiar with TSA policy and it is my understanding that I do not need to remove my device.” Also you could explain how the insulin pump is delivering a constant stream of basal insulin, so disconnecting from the pump, even for a few moments, could adversely impact blood glucose levels.

“It’s rare, but it’s a lack of knowledge and being unfamiliar with the technology that sometimes causes problems,” says Woodward.  “At the American Diabetes Association, we are always working to ensure TSA has access to the most current information on diabetes technology.”

If there is a problem, ask for a Passenger Support Specialist (a highly trained TSA officer) or a TSA supervisor, says Woodward.

Call TSA’s toll-free helpline

TSA Cares is a helpline (855-787-2227) you can call 72 hours prior to traveling if you have questions about screening policies, procedures or what to expect at security checkpoints. “Upon request they also will provide a TSA Cares representative to accompany the passenger through the screening process,” says Woodward. “The aim is to ensure that the passenger gets through the screening process without unnecessary delay.”

Contact the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) to report problems.

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Guest Post by Cheryl Conklin, wellnesscentral.info

If you have diabetes, you’ve no doubt taken steps to improve your health. You eat right, exercise, and monitor your blood glucose. However, one thing you may not realize is that your sleep habits play a part in your physical — and mental — health.

If you find that each night is less-than-restful, keep reading for tips and tricks on how to wind down and get to sleep.

It will come as no surprise that the day after a poor night’s sleep is stressful. When you don’t get enough rest, you’re cranky, short-tempered, and weak-willed. You may eat more of the wrong types of food — not so good for someone with diabetes — and say yes to every request just to avoid having to think.

And when you do have to think, you’ll find that you aren’t as sharp or responsive or attentive as you are after a solid eight hours. This, too, is not a good place to be in for someone who is self-managing a condition as complex condition as diabetes.

Avoid Your Vices Before Bed

It’s no secret that caffeine is a stimulant. However, different people metabolize caffeine in different ways, and the way your body reacts can change over time. Don’t drink coffee after 3 pm, noon if you go to bed early. Likewise, eating chocolate, drinking sodas, and smoking cigarettes can get your heart rate up, which is not good when you’re trying to settle in for the evening. And though alcohol initially acts as a sedative, once it begins to work its way through your body, it can actually wake you up when you do get to sleep.

Make Sure You’re Sleeping on the Right Surface

Kids are notorious for falling asleep in any situation, whether it’s sitting up in the car or in the middle of dinner. That said, you’re not a child, and your body needs a comfortable surface upon which to rest. If you’re noticing that you regularly wake up uncomfortable and groggy, it might be time to replace your mattress — especially if it’s older than seven to 10 years.

When shopping around, it’s important to find the best mattress for your sleep style. If back pain keeps you up at night, for instance, swap your old inner coil mattress for a memory foam model, which cradles the spine.

Don’t Watch the Clock

They say a watched pot boils never boils; likewise, a watched clock never stops ticking. According to this sleep guide from Harvard Medical School, staring at the clock is a good way to keep your eyes wide open when they should be shut tight.

Stay on Schedule

Create a predictable bedtime schedule. Not only will this help you plan your day, but it will also help you regulate your internal clock. Go to bed and wake up within 30 minutes of the same time each day and night to help develop your routine.

Get Moving, But Not Before Bed

If you haven’t already established a daily exercise routine, today is as good a day as any. Exercise is known to prime the body for sound sleep. The best time to exercise is in the morning or at least a few hours before bed. You must give your body time to ease into a nighttime routine. Exercise triggers the brain to release cortisol – the stress hormone – and also elevates your heart rate and can leave you gasping for breath. None of these things are conducive to sleep. Dr. Doni Wilson goes into greater detail on how cortisol affects sleep.

How Sleep Affects Mental Health

Over the long term, insomnia can lead to paranoia, depression, anxiety, and even visual and auditory hallucinations. Chronic sleeplessness can lead you to depend on drugs or alcohol as you scramble for ways to trick your body into shutting down for the night. Mental Health America further suggests that sleep problems can lead to impaired memory and increase your chances of being involved in an accident.

While sleeping is not the only healthy thing you can do for your body, it’s one of the most important. By getting adequate rest, you make yourself stronger and more able to fight off disease or handle the side effects of illness.

If sleep doesn’t come naturally, a few changes to your lifestyle can help. And the sooner you find a solution, the better.

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Sleeping well is an essential part of good health. Getting enough sleep can help to keep your blood sugar at steady levels—and that’s key to taking control of diabetes and avoiding diabetes-related problems.

But what if you’re tired all the time?  Don’t just brush it off, especially if you’re struggling with your weight or have diabetes.  Insufficient sleep impacts your hunger hormones and changes the way your body processes glucose, says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, FACE, Medical Director of Obesity Clinical Program and Inpatient Diabetes Program at Joslin Diabetes Center. This, in turn, can make type 2 diabetes worse, or, if you’re on the diabetes borderline, increase the risk of full-blow diabetes.  It can also lead to weight gain.

How poor sleep is linked to weight gain and diabetes

Sleeping less, eating more. Short sleepers—those who sleep less than 6 hours a day—become more resistant to insulin and start to gain weight, says Dr. Hamdy. Lack of sleep raises the levels of ghrelin, the so-called hunger hormone that stimulates your appetite. At the same time, insufficient sleep also lowers leptin, the satiety hormone that tells your body you’re full. “Even after one night of too little sleep, the hunger hormone goes up and the satiety hormone drops, setting the stage for a day of overeating, says Dr. Hamdy.

Undiagnosed sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a condition where you stop breathing very briefly for dozens of times during the night. About 60 percent of people with diabetes are affected by this condition, but most don’t know they have it. “It is very important for patients to be on the lookout for signs, because sleep apnea is one of the most under diagnosed conditions in medicine and it can lead to significant insulin resistance,” says Dr. Hamdy.

If you’re having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep or just feeling less than refreshed the next day, here are three things that can help improve your sleep:

Dr. Osama Hamdy

Embrace sleep.  Sleep may be like the Rodney Dangerfield of risk factors, it gets no respect. Start by employing some pro sleep strategies: Make your bedroom a sleep haven by painting the walls a soothing color and investing in a high-quality mattress. Set the room temperature between 60 and 67° F, because an overheated bedroom can keep you up at night. And get in the habit of going to bed at the same time every night.

Stop sleeping with your smartphone. Abstain from using your smartphone or tablet a few hours before bed, says Dr. Hamdy. Exposure to the light from bright screens right before bedtime suppresses melatonin secretion, making it hard to nod off.

Get checked for sleep apnea.  If you or your partner notices that you snore or gasp in your sleep, discuss it with your doctor. Other signs of the condition include a thick and short neck (a collar size of 17 for men and 16 for women) and feeling tired all the time, says Dr. Hamdy. We have found that correcting sleep apnea helps people lose weight and usually improves their diabetes significantly.”

The good news is that studies show that people with diabetes who get high-quality sleep improve their blood sugar control, says Dr. Hamdy.  And if you’re trying to shed pounds, getting adequate sleep will improve that effort as well. Although people can feel rejuvenated with a range of sleep hours, about seven is ideal for most.

For more information about diabetes or to answer any questions about diabetes management, contact our Certified Diabetes Educators at 617-309-2780 or make an appointment with our Adult Clinic at 617-309-2440. 

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Hear the story of how Joslin’s Beetham Eye Institute changed the face of diabetic retinopathy treatment. From lasers to high resolution microscopes, learn about the cutting edge technology the Beetham has pioneered to make living with diabetes better.

To learn more, visit www.joslin.org/Beetham

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