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By James Briscione — Director of Culinary Research

 

If you set foot in ICE’s Culinary Lab today, you might mistake it for a laboratory—thanks to the addition of our new rotary evaporator (or Rotovap for short).

 

This high-end, scientific tool recently made its way into a handful of the most avant garde kitchens around the globe. One such restaurant was Alinea in Chicago, where owner Grant Achatz and executive chef Mike Bagale used their Rotovap to create a clear pumpkin pie recipe —miniature pies filled with a crystal clear liquid that embodied the intense aroma of freshly baked pumpkin pie.

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By David Waltuck — Director of Culinary Affairs


Richard Olney’s book “Simple French Food” is one of my favorites. This exploration of “simple” food has a 40-page introduction explaining in detail what the author means by simple — clearly, simplicity can be complicated. The idea of the book — focusing on preparing simple foods very, very well — was made clear to me during a trip to France, years before I opened my restaurant Chanterelle.

Keep reading to discover Chef David's lessons about simple french cuisine. 

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By Tina Whelski

Anything worth having is worth waiting for, and that’s especially true with bread. 

Bread baking, especially when using wild yeast, is a faith-based enterprise,” says Chef Sim Cass, dean of bread baking at the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE). “You need to believe that the bread will rise. Then you have to have the patience required to get your perfect loaf.”

A patient mindset is just one thing students will learn during Chef Sim’s 200-hour Techniques of Artisan Bread Baking course at ICE.

 

Keep reading to discover Chef Sim's favorite bread, plus advice for beginning bread bakers. 

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By Bill Telepan — Director of Sustainability

 

It’s hard enough to create a menu using different kinds of “non-waste” food at your disposal – but creating a four-course menu from leftovers is even more of a challenge. One goal of ICE’s Sustainability Club is to plan and prepare dinners using food that would otherwise be wasted. Aside from the economic benefit, we want to give students the chance to practice the creative process that goes into planning a meal using scraps.

This project made me think about my creative process, and the need to adjust last minute when creating a meal. Two examples come to mind. Recently, I helped Rick Moonen, a Las Vegas-based chef (and one of the first chefs at Oceana over 25 years ago) to prepare a lunch featuring bronzini from Spain.

 

Keep reading to learn Chef Bill's menu planning process. 

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At ICE, we make it our mission to help students find their culinary voice — that creative drive within each of us that determines how we express ourselves through food. Whether it’s a career training program, a recreational course in pie crusts or a special event featuring handmade pasta, we’ll give you the tools to hone your culinary creativity. Join us as we ask some of today’s leading food industry pros to share their culinary voice.

 

"My culinary voice is my Korean style," begins ICE alum and James Beard Award nominated chef Rachel Yang. The co-owner of four hit restaurants in Seattle and Portland — Joule, Revel, Trove and Revelry — offers diners a unique experience, combining the culinary traditions of her Korean roots with a sense of place — the Pacific Northwest. In this video, Rachel explains how she tempers Korean cuisine to her guests' palates, and the result is addictively delicious dishes like geoduck fried rice. Watch now as Chef Rachel Yang shares her culinary voice.

 

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