Loading...

Follow British Lung Foundation | HealthUnlocked on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

9 March

HealthUnlocked and Simplyhealth are reminding people to be vigilant and aware to financial scammers.

Given that at least 3.2 million people in the UK are scammed financially every year, it is a message that can’t be shared too often.

Whether it is on the doorstep, telephone, mail, or online, it can happen to anyone. However, elderly people living on their own or caring for others are at higher risk and more likely to be targeted by criminals.

A recent AMA on the Care Community with Professor Keith Brown, Director of the National Centre for Post Qualifying Social Work and Professional Practice at Bournemouth University, revealed some top tips for keeping yourself and others safe from financial scammers:

Always be aware - think scam! If you suspect something could be a scam or just want assurance that the people you are speaking to are who they say they are, call the company directly. Never dial a phone number or reply to an email you suspect has been sent by a scammer.

Remember that scammers are not fools: They will use sophisticated methods and spend large sums of money targeting people, as they can make significantly more money back from their victims.

If it sounds too good to be true it probably is: Be aware of being hoodwinked or conned into a position where you feel you are buying goods or services at prices which are below the norm. It is likely to be a scam.

Talk to your nearest and dearest: This is especially important if you have been scammed. Anyone can get scammed, and you should never feel embarrassed. By telling your story it might help others and allow your loved ones to provide you with support now and in the future.

Use a password app: A secure password app will safely manage all your passwords (there may be a small cost for this). Smartphones and tablets are also more secure than using your laptop via wifi due to their end-to-end encryption making it more difficult to hack into.

Power of attorney: Appointing one or more people to help you make decisions or to make decisions on your behalf can help protect the finances of you or vulnerable loved ones

You can see all the questions carers asked Keith and his answers on the Care Community.

The community is a place for anyone caring for someone to ask questions and help other people going through a similar experience.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

12 March 

Everyday people come to HealthUnlocked to help other people, offer support and share their experiences. These people make HealthUnlocked what it is today and the reason so many of you turn to it so often.

We recently ran the HealthUnlocked Member and Admin Awards 2018. These awards recognise just a small amount of people who contribute and have a real life and positive impact on other members in the communities on HealthUnlocked.  

There are so many people on HealthUnlocked playing a vital role and helping people live healthier lives. For the awards, we asked people to nominate the members and admins that make the biggest difference to them. The 100s of nominations we received show just how supportive and helpful so many people are on HealthUnlocked and we have had a huge amount of feedback saying how difficult it was for people to choose just one person. This is also reflected in the help and support available from so many people everyday on HealthUnlocked. 

We are delighted to announce the winners of the HealthUnlocked Member and User Awards 2018 as:

Positive impact member: The user whose positivity helps make your life better
PMRpro and DorsetLady from the PMRGCA community.

Admin of the year: The admin who makes the biggest difference to your community
RoisinO1 in the No Smoking community.

Member of the year: The user who posts, blogs and shares information that helps you manage your health condition better or improve your health
Seasidesusie in the Thyroid UK community.

A massive thank you to all these people and every other members and admins who comes to HealthUnlocked and make it the supportive place it is.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

7 March 2018

This week is National Apprenticeship Week, 5 to 9 March 2018. To celebrate the important role of apprenticeships we spoke to Natalia, the HealthUnlocked apprentice office manager about the training she is undertaking and the work she does at HealthUnlocked.  

What apprenticeship are you doing?

Level 2 Diploma in Business Administration

Why did you decide to become an apprentice?

Taking on an apprenticeship offered me the opportunity to undertake real work experience while working towards a qualification at the same time.

What does being an apprentice involve?

There is an element of learning and training that mainly involves undertaking and completing course units. I can usually do these as part of my job role, or an assessor will come in and review my progress. I have also undertaken exams in English, Maths and ICT as part of the apprenticeship.

I do this all at the same time as working in the HealthUnlocked office full time.  

What does your role at HealthUnlocked involve?

My role at HealthUnlocked supports the efficient running of the office, both day to day and planning for the future. I also provide additional support to HR, general administration to the wider team, and help the CEO as  needed.

What is the best part of your role?

For me the best part is being able to gain job specific skills whilst working as an employee at HealthUnlocked.

What will you do after you qualify?

I will complete my current apprenticeship at the end of March. I will then continue onto an advanced apprenticeship in business administration, whilst working at HealthUnlocked.

For more information about working at HealthUnlocked see here

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


5 March 2018 

- 1 in 10 women of reproductive age in the UK suffer from endometriosis - that’s approximately 1.5 million women. This figure is comparable to the number of women living with diabetes in the UK.
- It is thought 176 million women worldwide are living with the condition.
- Endometriosis costs the UK approximately £8.2 billion a year in treatment, loss of earnings and healthcare.
- It takes on average 7.5 years for a woman to receive the diagnosis of endometriosis

This week is Endometriosis Week, which aims to raise awareness about this hidden and often unrecognised condition.

Endometriosis is a condition where cells like the ones in the lining of the womb (uterus) are found elsewhere in the body. Each month these cells react in the same way to those in the womb, building up and then breaking down and bleeding. Unlike the cells in the womb that leave the body as a period, this blood has no way to escape.

 It is a chronic and debilitating condition that causes painful and/or heavy periods. It may also lead to infertility, fatigue and bowel and bladder problems. Endometriosis can have a detrimental impact on a woman’s quality of life, having repercussions not only with their health but with education, work and personal relationships. 

If there was one piece of information we could open the door on, it would be to find out what the cause of endometriosis is. This information would serve to inform research into means of treating the condition. Although there are different theories about the cause of endometriosis, there is not a known definitive cause. There is currently no cure for the condition and diagnosis and treatment can be complex. The ‘gold standard’ for diagnosing endometriosis is by laparoscopic surgery. It takes on average 7.5 years for a woman to receive the diagnosis of endometriosis. Women are often told that the pain they are experiencing is ‘normal’ or ‘all in your head’. This can cause psychological distress for women as they continue to experience debilitating symptoms with no answers to the cause.

Alice’s experience
“I first experienced severe gynaecological pain when I was only 12, before I’d even started my periods. This crippling pain continued to visit me every month for a whole year until I eventually started my periods. Once I started my periods, the pain got even worse. It reached the point where I experienced it every day of the month and was rushed into A&E twice monthly (once during my period and once during ovulation) and would often be given morphine as pain relief. I kept being told it was ‘normal teenage cramps’. I also lost a lot of blood, easily using up to 12 tampons and pads an hour. Due to the amount of blood lost, I became anaemic and suffered from chronic fatigue.

“I was 14 and my quality of life was non-existent; I could no longer go to school because of the pain, chronic fatigue, and being in and out of hospital all the time. I finally had a laparoscopy in 2010 and was diagnosed with endometriosis. I cried with happiness when I was diagnosed with endometriosis because it meant my symptoms were no longer ‘phantom’ pains but actually a real condition!  

“At times having endometriosis has been isolating, debilitating and restrictive: I have never known adult life without it. I know I wake up in pain most nights but whether I like it or not, my endometriosis inadvertently shapes my life and who I am.”

You can get support and speak with other people who also have endometriosis from across the world in the Endometriosis UK HealthUnlocked community.

About Endometriosis UK 
Endometriosis UK is a charity which provides vital support services, reliable information and a community for those affected by endometriosis.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

February 14, 2018

If you think back to the last time you talked to your doctor, did you come away from the doctors office wondering what about half of what was said actually meant?

If you think you heard a lot of medical “mumbo jumbo” then you are not alone. It’s a frequent problem - lost in translation.

Medical experts use words that need deciphering by us ordinary people. It’s very important that we understand, so that we can be partners in our own care and decision making.

And yes, it’s ok to tell health care providers that they sound like they are speaking in Greek or Latin, because sometimes they are! Medical terms go back a long way and can be hard to say and impossible to spell.

Of course you can ask a HealthUnlocked community - most of us have had to learn this stuff too.

You will have probably used the word “morbid” before. It might refer to someone who tends to expect the worst or thinks about death all the time!

In medicine “morbidity” means that something is causing serious problems. For example overweight people who are getting lots of exercise maybe called “fat but fit”. But being very overweight in a person is usually called “morbidly obese” when there are serious health risks, or “morbidity”.

As you know, obesity and diabetes go hand in hand. Together they are called comorbid conditions. If you add in other conditions then you have comorbidities.

Let’s say for example that you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, AND you have joint pain too. That means several comorbidities that are related.

Only exercise is pretty much guaranteed to help with all the comorbid conditions you might experience, including diabetes and depression. That is why it is so important to start moving to help with joint pain and everything else.

That is the why, but what about the how? The Start Moving community can help. Find out more

By Rolf Taylor

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

February 8, 2018 

Who in HealthUnlocked makes the biggest impact to you?

Everyday people come to HealthUnlocked to help other people, offer support and share their experiences. These people make HealthUnlocked what it is today and the reason so many of you turn to it so often.

To recognise the difference these people make to you, we have launched the HealthUnlocked Member and Admin Awards 2018.

These awards will recognise the contribution, effect and real life impact both members and admins of the communities have on all of you each year.

You can nominate people to the following awards:

Positive impact member: The user whose positivity helps make your life better

Admin of the year: The admin who makes the biggest difference to your community

Member of the year:
The user who posts, blogs and shares information that helps you manage your health condition better or improve your health

You can vote here.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

February 6 

GirlTrek are a public health nonprofit for African-American women and girls in the United States. They encourage women to use walking as a practical first step to inspire healthy living, families, and communities. As women organize walking teams, they mobilize community members to support monthly advocacy efforts and lead a civil rights-inspired health movement.

We recently spoke to Onika Jervis from GirlTrek to learn more about their initiative.

“Moving is important for our bodies, our hormones, our adrenaline, and that is what gives us that shine, that energy. But we have to ask why - why is it that we see health problems in our communities? We need to recognize that for people of color we have a certain kind of internal stress because racism is part of how society is structured, and that affects us every day.”

Onika describes how in communities of color the stress levels are high, income is lower than average, and opportunities to exercise and eat well are limited. And the history of emancipation for people of color means there has been an accumulated burden over many years, accumulated stress that weighs people down and gets in the way of a healthy lifestyle. Because of this, living healthily can be regarded as a revolutionary act.

“Structural racism does affect our ability to participate, and it leads to a lack of opportunities. Although some people can afford to go run off their stress socially with their peer group, the average person of color may not easily have that option. So we may not deal with the stress in our lives in a healthy way. GirlTrek aims to fix that. We need to unlearn the unhealthy ways of dealing with our stress.”

GirlTrek figured out a healthy way forward by organizing group walks within city communities. The walks are in public spaces, so GirlTrek reaches many other people with its infectious and positive message.

“We don’t talk exercise”, says Onika. “That is not the focus. For us, walking is the new Happy Hour! I’m much more likely to go walk with my group, or run for a cause that I believe in, because I have a team waiting for me, in fact I’m more likely to do that than use an expensive gym membership. We walk, we share our stress and we share our stories. That’s our Happy Hour.”

You can read more about the initiative, get help and tips to get walking and share how you are getting moving, on the Start Moving Knee Pain community on HealthUnlocked.

By Rolf Taylor, VP Partnerships at HealthUnlocked. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Some fantastic opportunities for people to ‘ask me anything’ to doctors and experts on a range of subjects have been announced on the HealthUnlocked network.

The Ask Me Anythings (#AMAs) provide access to expert and clinical information outside of the traditional consulting room. The AMAs will be live Q&As for a whole hour and open to anyone  

To post a question you will need to pre register on HealthUnlocked and ‘follow’ the community you will be asking questions on.

HIV questions?
Tuesday, January 30, 8pm GMT / 2pm ET
HIV Partners community - ask anything to Angelina Namiba, an HIV activist with over 16 year experience working in the HIV sector
healthunlocked.com/hivpartners

Nutrition and dialysis questions?
Wednesday, January 31, 3pm ET / 8pm GMT
National Kidney Foundation (NKF) dialysis community - ask dietitian Katy Wilkens, MS, RD  
healthunlocked.com/nkf-dyalisis

Ovarian cancer questions?
Wednesday, January 31, 8pm ET / 1am GMT
SHARE ovarian cancer support community - ask anything to gynecologic oncologist Dr David Gershenson
healthunlocked.com/share-ovarian-cancer-support

Breast cancer questions?
Thursday, February 15, 1pm ET / 6pm GMT
SHARE Metastatic Breast Cancer community - ask anything to Dr. Nancy Lin, metastatic breast cancer expert and Clinical Director of the Breast Oncology Center at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
healthunlocked.com/share-metastatic-support

Also coming soon, AMA on financial scamming on the Care Community. More details on this to follow soon.

The AMAs on HealthUnlocked are a popular way to find out specific and expert information on your health condition on HealthUnlocked.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

29 January 2018 

We are pleased to announce an improvement in the way conversations and replies appear on the HealthUnlocked feed making them clearer, and easier to follow and read.

Following a large amount of feedback from our users, admins and partners on this topic, along with some suggestions as to how to improve the overall appearance, we are introducing a number of changes.

The improvements made include:

  • Changed and updated the text, making it clearer how to directly reply to another person’s post
  • Changed the overall look of the feed and replies making them easier to read and follow
  • Improved the layout and amount of indentation that happens on replies, to make the best use of space and again, improve readability

We believe these changes will make it better and easier to use HealthUnlocked. You can send your feedback on these and any further suggestions you have to support@healthunlocked.com

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

29 December 

Throughout December we have open the door on 24 health conditions for the HealthUnlocked advent campaign.

Each day we have delved into some of the diseases and conditions that affect millions of people across the world. Some you may have heard of before, whilst other health conditions may have been new to you. We hope you found it interesting and informative as you read about prevalence, symptoms and some key facts about a condition.

Despite millions of people often having the same disease, many people go through their lives never meeting anyone who has their same condition. This can be very isolating and difficult. We are trying to change this. 

Together, people can provide support and compare experiences that can really change lives. 

Each condition in the HealthUnlocked 24 days of advent has its own free online support community on HealthUnlocked. In 2018 we will bring even more online communities onto HealthUnlocked, supporting more and more people, across even more conditions, 

Each of the featured conditions is also supported by a charity or nonprofit organisation who positively change many lives every single day, not only in their HealthUnlocked community, but in the fantastic wider work they do.

We hope you have enjoyed the HealthUnlocked Advent Calender. On behalf of everyone at HealthUnlocked we would like to wish you a very happy New Year. 

See all the conditions we covered and details on them here. In each blog you will find a link to the online community that covers the condition. 

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview