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"One Love, one heart,
Let's get together and feel all right!"
Lyrics from Bob Marley song!
.
The melodies of one of my favorite songs from Bob Marley replayed in my head when I came across two beautiful fabric; a solid yellow and tropical print. They both screamed Jamaica, Caribbean, cruise vibes and summertime fun in the sun. I instantly fell in love and had to select them for my May Fabric Mart blog post.  



When I saw this sun yellow polyester/lycra crepe techno fabric, it reminded me so much of the Jamaican flag.  I knew I had to  grab a few yards before it was sold out.   
My first choice was to make a wrap dress but fearing that I would look like a yellow highlighter with my hips, I decided to go with a top instead.  I always wanted to create McCalls M7812 and knew it was the perfect fabric for this style based on the texture. 

I cut the small and used view A bodice with view B sleeves and made no modifications.  The next time around I will definitely lengthen the bodice by an inch as this is a great pattern for summer.  This was a quick and easy sew as I did sewed up most of it before heading out to work at 8am.
I am in love with the front gathers and found the perfect drawstring in my notions pile! 

1 INCH elastic for the sleeves
This beautiful tropical floral double brushed jersey knit screams paradise vacation. This fabric and print hit the nail and is perfect for Mimi G's Simplicity new summer pattern S8915.  I fell in love with the booty gathers the minute Mimi shared as it is perfect for the curvy girls.  I love a great maxi especially if it has a great drape and length.
Typically, I do not sew a commercial pattern more than twice unless it's TNT but I do plan to make this again using lycra, and the other view using a jersey as it is an easy sew and great fit right out of the pattern envelope. 

 I needed an extra 1/2 yard based on the bottom back piece and instead of cutting it on the fold, I decided to join 2 pieces creating my own fold as I did not have enough.  It worked out just fine and yes, I am satisfied with the look.
The two modifications to fit my curves and my height are: 
 - Graded the waist from a size 12 to the 14 hips. 
- Added 1 inch to the length.  

 It came out absolutely perfect to my taste when I tried it on and I was floored with the fit.
Another minor tweak that I will make next time is removing 1/2 or 3/4 inch from the back bodice piece.


I am happy with both looks and can't wait to sew down my stash of knits purchased from Fabricmart.

I am counting down to summer break which starts on June 7th, and can't wait to rock both makes in Jamaica this summer.  

Thank you so much for reading and for always showing love! Don't forget to check out my latest makes on the blog and my Instagram page.

Photos taken by my daughter Arielle (10 years old)!

One Love,

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Happy spring everyone!  I hope you are all experiencing warm days and sunshine!  
Today, I am reviewing a fun denim dress from a cute Simplicity pattern.  This pattern is what I consider a classic, staple dress pattern.  I don't think it will ever go out of style.  



As I write this post, the denim I used is sold out, but here is a nice choice: Selvage Denim

If you want something with a bit of stretch, a twill with lycra is a great choice as well.  Those you can see at this link: Twill


This is a fun pattern.  In case you are wondering what the envelope looks like, here's an image.


See what I mean about classic and a staple dress pattern?



Here's an image of the back.  I love that yoke with the gathered back.



The details of this dress are fun.  There's loads of topstitching, a shaped lower hemline, and those pockets!


The fit of this is pretty great as well.  I made alterations at the bust line and to compensate for the added length, I also added at the back between the shoulder blades and waistline.




Using white thread for topstitching on black denim is a risky choice.  It takes careful topstitching and some time with your seam ripper to make sure you are happy.



Without the belt, it skims your curves.




Here you can see how shaped the lower hem is.  Did I mention that I used cotton machine quilting thread for my topstitching?  I am going to use this thread type for topstitching on a heavier fabric, such as denim, more often.

Thanks for reading!
Sue
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Hot Patterns Fast & Fabulous Fiesta Knit Top in red matte jersey

Hi everybody, this month I decided to sew with a fabric I don't work enough with: matte jersey! Recently FM had some designer matte jersey and I knew it was the upscale quality as it is 100% rayon, not some ordinary synthetic kind.

Originally I had planned a wrap dress or a maxi skirt, but I thought perhaps it would be too clingy and I don't feel like being constricted in a Spanx type underwear. Now that warm weather has finally arrived, I wanna walk and move! I went for a fun top that would showcase the drapey nature and the luscious color of this fine cloth: Hot Patterns 1142 Fast and Fabulous Fiesta Knit Top.



Hot Patterns 1142: Fast and Fabulous Fiesta Knit Top


Hot Patterns Fast and Fabulous Fiesta Knit Top back view


Pattern and fabric:

The Fiesta knit top is an interesting pattern for a casual top that will transition from spring to summer, comfortable to wear and a nice alternative to a t-shirt for everyday dressing. It features batwing sleeves, a waistband and neckline and sleeves finished with a self fabric band. It is indeed fast to make, and fabulous!





I made a size 6, which is my usual with Hot Patterns. To be honest with you, the size 6 is gigantic and I remember when I first made this top a couple of years ago that it looked more like a mini dress on me than like the top in the pattern illustration! I raised and narrowed the neckline approximately 1 1/2 inches, and lost count of how many inches I removed to shorten the bodice and the sleeves. If you want to make it, make sure to make a muslin first!


I love the Hot Patterns Fiesta Knit Top paired with skinny jeans!


Now can we say a few words about this gorgeous fabric? I had forgotten about how matte jersey drapes beautifully when paired with a pattern that let it express itself, and besides wrap dresses and skirts, I can envision all kinds of t-s, camis and draped tops with this fabric.

I'm especially drawn to 100% rayon or viscose matte jersey as I love natural fibers, and I know the colour will stay beautiful. Quality matte jersey is almost as nice as silk jersey in my mind. If it's made from rayon or viscose it will shrink, so make sure to either prewash it or take your garment to the dry cleaner. If you want to keep your seams light and avoid imprint marks when you press, I highly recommend lightweight serger thread such as Gutermann Mara 150 (Tex 20); the cutting will also be easier if you use scissors such as Kaï serrated specialty shears.

Fabric Mart is now out of stock of this red and the black that I ordered a while ago, but make sure to check regularly. I know I will! You can see their full stock of Jersey knits here.




I also made the Fiesta top in this beautiful black matte jersey!





I'm very happy with my tops for casual, everyday wear, and I'll definitely keep an eye to see when FM gets more designer matte jersey. Is that a fabric you work with, and what kind of garments do you make with it?

I'll leave it there for now, and see you in June for another post!

Cheers,

Virginie
from
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Mission: Should I choose to accept it?  For the sixth year in a row--make a dress for the annual school auction.  Year one of this endeavor is pictured here.  Year two is here.  Year three is here (at the FM blog!).  Year four here (also the blog).  And year five here at the bottom of the post (yet again, the blog).  Are you seeing a pattern?



This was almost the dress that wasn't, for a number of factors.  One, I am just overwhelmed by school activities and keeping up with all the responsibilities that come with helping a bunch of eighth grade students prep for graduation and moving onto high school.  Two, I am currently trying to start a youtube channel (it's here, I mainly do unboxings and reviews of clothes, but hope to incorporate sewing pattern reviews, too, eventually).  YouTube is a time suck, lol.  And three, the dress that almost wasn't felt like it wasn't going to work initially, and I was all stressed that I would try to make a dress and have it fail, and the effort would be for naught.

But, my wise friend Liza told me, "girl, keep pushing, you've got a reputation to keep."  (The whole I make my dress every year reputation.)

So I did, and boy am I satisfied that I did push through.  No doubt, this is one of my most satisfying and lovely makes I have ever crafted, and was worth the fussy (but GORGEOUS) fabric, a pattern that didn't include a lining, but I wanted one anyhow, and substantial fears that the modern pattern wouldn't look "roaring 20s" enough to pass itself off as vintage (ultimate goal as a perfectionist history nerd).


Initially I set out to use a sequined fabric, but when Fabric Mart announced their first "from the vault" sale to Julie's Picks customers, I had to take a look.  And, "gasp," I exclaimed upon seeing the burnout velvet made from real silk (that is so tough to find anymore), and in a perfect pattern and color and sheerness (it is very much like a chiffon at its base) that my sequined fabric paled in comparison.  And at $29.99 a yard (I can only imagine how much it cost at retail at its original Garment District home*), I knew it was a bargain to boot.  So I bought 2.5 yards (about 3 came), and set out to find images to guide me in my journey.

You can find it here, but there is also another lovely yellow/gold burnout velvet here, too.

*Other well known garment district purveyors of high end quality silk velvet like this have prices that range from $80-125 per yard.


This was my initial find that made me think, "hey, that fabric could work in this silhouette."  Though it is not a vintage piece, it has a very 20s feel, and I knew it could be a jumping off point.

I also liked it as it seemed more historically appropriate and accurate as to what women actually wore out more commonly than the more ostentatious tight fitting fringe style frocks we normally associate with the era's high flying women.  (I wanted more Downton Abbey and less frat party!)

This version's drop waist, fairly modest hemline, and straight cut evoke the era well, especially when I have the Victoria & Albert museum backing me up:

"At the very beginning of the 1920s it was fashionable for women to wear high-waisted, rather barrel-shaped outfits, and tunic-style tops were popular. However, between 1920-2 the waistline dropped to hip level, obscuring natural curves for a tubular, androgynous look. Young, very fashionable 'flappers' wore their hems at knee level, with neutral coloured stockings and colourful garters. Hemlines drifted between ankle and mid-calf for the duration of the decade. Jewellery was prominent, including large brooches and long strings of pearls. Hair was worn bobbed, sometimes close to the head, and the distinctive cloche hat (a close fitting, bell-shaped hat) was very popular."

So with that done, I knew I had a look.  Now for more inspiration (actually vintage), and a pattern!

Jean Patou Beaded Dress

Though not exactly the same as the one I created, it is a similar color and feel, and made by one of the most iconic names in fashion, Jean Patou.

But what to do in an era of the anti drop waist, get dressed up society we live in?  Most patterns today veer wildly in the direction of athletic wear or very tightly fitted, waist cinching dresses.

I also knew I couldn't go vintage pattern, especially since many are in the $80-90 range.

But then it happened, I found it...


New Look 6373.  Version D.  (Angels singing from above, just imagine.)

The drop waist!  The straight cut!  The fact the hips would probably fit me since it is a gathered drop waist!  Hallelujah!

I ended up deciding to go with a size 14 at the bustline (one bigger than I usually wear) and grading it out from bust to upper hip to an 18. I kept the neckline and straps at a size 12.

It worked well, and I far prefer this looser cut as it really amps up the boyish frame so many of the flappers were trying to emphasize.  I have a fairly flat bustline, so this works as long as I keep things flowy over my hips and rear.


LOVE THIS SHOT.

Not only do I love it because of the fun factor (my great friend Sarah is with me), but I love how awesome the lowlighting shows off the fabric, its sheerness, and just how exquisite the burnout silk velvet looks (it feels amazing, too, of course).

But ooh boy, what a crazy slippy fabric to cut and to sew.  I won't go into great detail, but do bring thousands of pounds of patience when working with something this sheer and fine.  It took a really long time to accurately cut all the pieces out, and when just sewing the velvet to the velvet, it was tough to keep my sewing machine from screaming at me.

Fortunately, even though the lining meant I would have to make a whole other dress, and eschew any facings, I was grateful for the tan colored bridal lining (from David's Bridal, sold by Fabric Mart a couple of years ago), as it helped tame the beast that was the velvet.  Sewing the velvet to the lining was actually pretty easy, and it pressed well and without crushing the velvet (I did use a thick sock balled up to iron on and always used a press cloth, though).

I couldn't wrap my head around attaching a lining to the dress with the side seams sewn up, so instead I sewed the front lining to the front, and the back lining to the back, and after sewed up the side seams with both fabrics attached to each other.  Trying to pin those seams were tricky, but it looks and feels great and I like that the lining will stay put with the dress at all times.


Here is another shot of me with my awesome friend Stephanie.  I chose to accessorize the dress with Mardi Gras beads from the Bacchus parade last year (caught so gracefully by me in this photo lol).  The headband is from Anthropologie, and my feather clip-in is another Mardi Gras purchase (much more graceful shot of it here).  From what I can tell my accessories were spot on...


And to finish up, here's a fun shot of a flapper enjoying herself in a very typical dress of the time...


And here are Sarah and I recreating the fun the lady above was having (even edited into black and white, natch)!

I hope you all have a great weekend, and I hope that your sewing endeavors lead you to beautifully luxurious fabrics made up into historically (nearly) accurate designs!

(Let me know what you have done to recreate another era's fashion--and link to a photo!  I'd love to see them!)

See you in July!
Dina--My Superfluities.
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Hello Fabricistas! It's Meg from Cookin' and Craftin'... I'm here to announce that I have both spring fever and jumpsuit fever.


The weather in Vermont isn't quite consistently warm enough for short sleeves and bare ankles, but I don't think that's going to stop me from wearing this jumpsuit immediately, and often!




This is the Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit, a lovely, relaxed-fit, wrap-style jumpsuit with two sleeve options and ankle length pants. It's got nice big slash pockets, tucks in the bodice and pants for shaping, and no closures (my favorite!).


The Zadie jumpsuit has been a really popular pattern in the sewing community recently (check out all the versions on Instagram!), and for good reason. It's easy to sew, easy to wear, and looks fabulous on a variety of bodies. It also has a wide size range, which I love, UK 6-28.


The Zadie is designed for medium weight wovens, perfect for this gorgeous linen/cotton blend floral. The earthy green background color and the large-scale print were what drew me to this fabric, and they didn't disappoint!


I had originally planned to make a casual blazer with the linen blend, but it was lighter weight than I anticipated, with a looser weave, and so, so soft after washing. I decided it would work best for a floaty jumpsuit.

This is a size 18 Zadie, which worked perfectly for me. I made a few minor construction changes: I cut the back bodice on the fold, used package bias tape as a facing for the wrap neckline (because I had ordered enough fabric for a blazer, I was ever-so-slightly short on fabric for the jumpsuit and didn't have enough for self-fabric binding) and I topstitched the waist ties to give them a little bit more heft.

I am absolutely delighted with my Zadie jumpsuit! The fabric and pattern combination worked out perfectly, and it is incredibly comfortable and chic. Now bring on the warmer weather so I can wear it without a jacket!


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I never thought I was a floral person, I tend to be drawn to geometric or abstract patterns. However, since I've started sewing I've learned I do like some floral prints like this large scale floral liverpool knit. This print stood out to me because of how the bright orange and blue flowers stood out against the black and white flowers. It didn't hurt that I love liverpool knit. It's a spongey, stretchy double knit that has a crepe like texture on the right side and a brushed wrong side. This particular print is sold out, but check out the current selection here.




When I have a bold print I tend to go with a simple pattern. I chose M6754 because I knew I wanted a simple dress with a big full skirt so as not to break up the floral print. This dress is a great beginner knit pattern as it is quick and easy to sew. Having whipped up this pattern several times I knew that the back has quite a low scoop.  Its not so low that it isn't bra friend, but it's low enough to check which bra you wear it with so I raised the back neckline about 1-1/2". I also took the shoulders up about 3/4" at the seams to account for the vertical stretch in this knit.


Spring has sprung here in the south and summer will be here soon. Is it warm where you are? Have you started your summer sewing? 

Tiffany
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Linen season is upon us.  [YAY!!!!!!] With my trio of boys in soccer right now and the sweat of baseball season around the corner, I want to wear all the linen.  My project this month is a pair of Burdastyle 5-2017-102 wide legged pants in this emerald designer linen.
Lately I've gotten to this point where I want everything I make to work with what else is in my closet.  If I can pair a given garment with at least 3 other things I already own, I know it's a keeper.  Paired with 3 tops, these are sure to be a summer favorite.


Burdastyle 5-2017-102 Wide Legged Linen Pants
image from Burdastyle
Before I get into the styling, let's talk about the pattern.  It's a pretty basic wide-legged pants pattern with a single patch pocket and wide hem bands.  There's a side zip which is different for me.  I almost always put in fly fronts in my pants.  I don't know that I'm a side zipper convert, but I like this one!
I took the liberty of lining the slant pockets with a linen print from my stash.


The only real change I made to the pattern was to shorten the legs by 4".  I have another pair of cropped pants with a similar total inseam length.  I knew without the shortening that I'd be somewhere in the neighborhood of that high-water look!  Cropped is good, high water, not so much!

The sewing itself was pretty easy.  Linen is so forgiving to work with.  You would think that it's airy weave would make it a little fussy to handle, but it's not so!  In fact, I got to use my favorite pinless methods for handling the seams, so it was a quick sew.
Look 1:  Sewing machine tee + coral wedge espadrilles

This tee is one of my favorites.  It was a birthday gift from my husband a couple years back.  Since I altered it by fitting the side seams, it's been a summer staple in my wardrobe.

The fitted tee with the more relaxed pants is definitely my m.o.  Being a pear-shaped lady, it's good to play with that balance.   
Look 2: Asymmetric stripe tank + coral wedge espadrilles

This second look features a refashioned tank I made a couple years ago.  It started life as a twin set, and I cut it up to make a angled colorblocked section. 

Unlike the sewing machine tee, this tank is not at all fitted.  I was postpartum when I made it, and it definitely could be more fitted.  That being said, sometimes it's nice to have some looser fit clothes too.

When the heat of baseball season hits and I'm sitting through all the practices and games, I'm going to be glad for this combo!  Linen is like wearing air!
Look 3: back cowl bodysuit + crazy bowling shoes
 
I always forget about this back cowl bodysuit!  Maybe it's because I still have yet to figure out how to really wear a bodysuit.  Definitely, I need to experiment more with this.

This is a Kommatia Patterns back cowl bodysuit.  The pattern doesn't call for a lining on the cowl, but I found the style was too much for me.  So I added a fitted lining on the cowl.  My sun-sensitive skin thanks me for the extra coverage!


Next I added my crazy bowling shoes.  These shoes actually were sapphire blue.  They looked really nice to begin with, but truth is that I have zero true blue in my wardrobe.  I've been playing around with Angelus leather paintsfor a while.  The best example of how great these paints work is on this faux leather jacket I made for a cosplay.  For these shoes, I mixed up my favorite sea green and a solid turquoise for an accent.  Painting takes a little patience, but then you have a totally different shoe.

I love how the cropped length gets to show off the bonkers shoes.  I've always loved non-neutral shoes, and these totally fit the bill!
Linen + wrinkles =not at all sad face

Linen is really a special fiber.  There's so many things that we make that just look wrong when they're all wrinkled, but for linen, I think it's different.  Yes, of course press as you're going along.

*Quick tip*:
press your linen over a ham or with strips of brown paper under the seams to avoid overpressing the linen and making it all shiny.  Shiny linen is sad linen.  You can't fix that easily.

But in the wearing, I think it's okay to relax about the way linen wrinkles.  It's a natural thing and linen is relaxed to the max.  There's a beauty in that.  

I for one will never pass up the chance to add more linen in my wardrobe.  Sewing with linen is the gift you make for yourself for hot weather!
How about you?  What linen projects are in your future?
~Sew something creative


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Happy Saturday and Happy Easter All!
Have you ever had your sewing plans all laid out, pattern cut and then something better came to mind?  I felt like these past three weeks I was a bit overwhelmed because everything that I planned on making was sidelined after seeing another inspiration photo from Pinterest or Instagram?  This is exactly what happened with this beautiful crepe fabric that I used to create this vest.  


When I selected this crepe suiting fabric a few months ago, the first thing that came to mind was a jacket. Unfortunately, this color is sold out but here is another beautiful vibrant color for Spring/Summer or the classic neutral here. I  chickened out dreading the task ahead to jump into making a tailored jacket. Moreover, knowing me, I would rock it once or twice during spring or summer and then let it sit for months in my closet.  
 I scrapped that project and then settled on tailored pants, selected the pattern and was ready to cut.  I struggled back and forth as I have created so many palazzo pants over the past year and did not want to add another.  Right at the last minute, I decided to create a VEST with pockets that I always wanted to add to my classic pieces that I can rock and style all year long. 
The pattern I selected to create this classic vest is Simplicity 8265 (VIEW E), which is a great wardrobe builder.
I absolutely fell in love with the design lines of the coat or vest, especially the front darts.  The is a great beginner project and the vest or jacket is not lined but can be. 
To create the vest, the instructions are straightforward and no adjustments were needed for the size I cut (Size 12).  The only changes I made was eliminating the side slit.
Here are a few tips when making this VEST based on the facing pieces!
The pattern did not state to understitch the facing but I always do it with any garment that has a facing. This helps so much with ensuring that it lays flat. 
To secure the neck and shoulder facing, stitching them down (stitch in the ditch) in the shoulder seams will help.  
For the most part, the armhole and neck facing laid flat after stitching my facing in the seams at both shoulders, sides, and center back.
Working to ensure that the inside of my finish garment looks just as beautiful as the outside.
I plan to wear this over a bodycon dress, with jeans and heels during the spring and summer months. 

 I know for sure this will be on heavy rotation as the color is perfect this time of year.  I am happy with the final fit and plan to rock it all year long.  


Thank you so much for reading and be sure to let me know how you would rock this VEST!  Don't forget to stop by my Instagram page or by my blog to check out my 2019 first quarter makes.  

One Love,
Marica - Overdriveafter30

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Those are quite the three words, eh?

Blue.  Velvet.  Jumpsuit.



This is the only jumpsuit I've ever owned as an adult, and as no surprise with that information, the first I've ever sewn for myself.  Definitely not my usual speed sewing-wise, but I have been wanting to try my hand at sewing a jumpsuit for a while now, and was pretty intrigued by Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit.




I'd been hunting for a stretch velvet to play with all winter and I decided on this pretty Stormy Blue Hammered Stretch Velvet.  It's definitely not your average textured/crushed velvet; it has a really fun pattern that's a little hard to photograph.  Here's a closer shot.



It was definitely a gamble when it comes to marriage of pattern and fabric:  the Sierra calls for a light to medium weight woven, but I crossed my fingers this light weight knit with only mechanical stretch would work out.  This stretch velvet is pretty dang springy for no listed spandex content, so I was even more prepared for this to either be a super wonderful make or a super regrettable one.  I'd say my wager worked out pretty well in my favor, eh?


 But, "It's Spring!" you say.  Wisconsin has a funny way of doing Spring.  On Monday we had a sunny high of 70 (!!) degrees, which was the warmest yet this year.  On Wednesday the high was 35 and it snowed.  I took these photos on Tuesday, which allowed me to go sleeveless.  My personal benchmark for when Wisco delivers reliably pleasant weather is my mom's birthday, which is in late April.


This pattern was quite the roller coaster to execute.  I went from neutral to raging pretty quickly when I realized my neck edge interfacings and the tie facing for the short end were all backwards.  I recut all.  Then I realized the whole bodice of the jumpsuit was opposite of the technical drawing.  What the heck?  There was almost TWO HOURS of pondering, seething, texting and muttering to myself about how this could happen before I finally found the reason in very small writing on the cutting layout page:  they expect you to cut this with the main fabric wrong side up.  I have honestly never seen this before, so take heed!  I've only ever seen patterns cut on a single layer with the right side of the fabric facing up.  I can't fathom why they would do it this way, other than making the minimal number of markings a little easier to apply.


This is not my first Papercut Pattern.  I've also made their Coppelia cardigan (blogged here: 1 2) and Ooh La La Leggings (blogged here), but those were both symmetrical so there was no room for a possible cutting mistake like this.


Beyond this first issue, things were fairly smooth sailing.  Though, I was a bit dismayed to have to hunt and hunt for the seam allowance (which was the same as the other patterns of theirs I've used, but I wasn't about to assume), which was only included in a block of text as an intro to the pattern, next to the directions.  I wish it had been more prominent, perhaps called out in the materials or size chart sections or even within step 1 of the pattern directions.


Fabric-wise, I had some issues with the velvet rolling on pieces that were cut across the width, which was really only the long tie end and the front waistline seam.  I tried pinning the waist, going without pins and finger pinning, and I could just not stop it from shifting until I got some wonder clips involved.  It was a very short seam to sew, but it got me frustrated enough to fantasize about tossing the whole business in the garbage.  If that's the only bit of frustration with a slippery piled fabric, I'd say that's a win!


I have to mention:  I love the way the pockets are put in.  They're in seam pockets but don't require precisely positioning each half of the pocket bag on the front and back pant pieces.  The first pocket bag is inset onto the front leg and then the second bag is sewn on behind it.  It's worth noting that if you cut the pocket bags from lining as directed, you WILL see lining on the outside of your garment.  To make sure this didn't happen in my version, I cut one set of pocket bags from the garment fabric and one set from the lining.


I didn't make a muslin.  I'd planned on it, but as often happens in my sewing life (and just...life) time became short and I went for a sew and pray.  I'm fairly short waisted and only 5'4" so I figured this was bound to be long enough in the torso for me.  And that gamble turned out in my favor as well.   Despite the one back shot above (oops) this isn't really heading up my backside.


 I cut a straight small and made very few pattern adjustments. I usually need a full bust adjustment in most patterns but did not this time (though I did lower my bust darts 1"), hoping the knit would stretch enough, and I'm pretty happy with how it turned out!  Because I often need a bit more booty room, I slashed from the back crotch curve to the hip and spread 1/2" then, slashed further down in the crotch curve to the inseam, spreading again to true it up the curve.


If I were to make this again, I'd raise the armscye by 1/2" to 3/4" (likely by pinching out the fullness at the shoulder) to properly cover my bra and I'd omit the invisible zip if using a knit: I'm able to very easily get it off and on without using it.  I'd probably still put the zipper in on my first woven make of this pattern just in case.  Not too much to change!


Pretty jazzed about this shiny, pettable jumpsuit of mine.  Here's to the rest of Spring and to the Summer sewing yet to come!

Until next time, ladies and gents!

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Happy April everyone!  

I hope you are all making some fun things to wear for the upcoming warm weather.  :)  At the time I am taking these photos, we are in the midst of a winter storm.  Yes, you read that right!  A winter storm.  Interstates are closed, school is closed and there is no sign of spring today.  That however isn't stopping me from creating some spring makes!  

Here's the pattern I used.  I love how many Indy patterns Fabric Mart carries.  Here's a link to the pattern: Named Kielo Wrap Dress



I really feel like I must be the last person on the planet to sew this dress.  There are so many great versions of it in so many colors and fabrics.  I know, I tend to go with neutral colors but I knew that this would work with fun sandals, great jewelry, and even fun jackets.



Here's my version: 


The front on this is the showstopper.  The wrap is brilliant.  Before I go further, this is a jersey knit from Halston.  It's all sold out but there are great options if you click here: Jersey Knits


See how large the front really is so that you have enough to wrap and give you that great front drape?  Front and back pieces are similar in size however the back has darts to give this shape.  


Sorry about the weird look on my face.  I was trying to cue a grandchild who is in the adjacent room to stop doing what he was doing.  It didn't work.  TMI...sorry!


For knits, I always use SewKeyE fusible stay tape for knits that Fabric Mart sells.  This stuff is amazing.  


I really love this dress.  


I used the stay tape at the neckband, hems. and vents.  This tape keeps all the edges nice and neat when you sew.  If you've never tried it, do!  It works great!


My only alteration to the pattern (other than the FBA) was to SHORTEN this!  For reference, I am 5'7".  I don't recall the last time I shorted a garment!


This pattern sews up quick and easy and did I mention that it's cute and stylish?  No wonder so many people have made this pattern.


Thanks so much for reading!  Until next time...
Sue 
Ilove2sew!
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