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Star Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5
Thirteen Cents
K. Sello Duiker
Kwela Books, July 2013
Online Price: R236

 
 
 

In the novel Thirteen Cents Duiker paints a vivid and heart wrenching picture of how, in post-apartheid South Africa, overt and covert marginalization still prevail. Racism, tribalism, exploitation, classism, corruption, crime, violence, violation, starvation, and displacement, are still a reality to a Black child. Even more toxic, complex and dangerous as it is camouflaged, nuanced, pretentious and insidious.

Ten-year-old protagonist Azure, unceremoniously leaves Johannesburg for Cape Town after the funeral of his parents who were brutally murdered. In Cape Town, however, he does not find the solace he had anticipated. Adults are unscrupulous, evil. Friends leave. Police are corrupt. Banks are sharks. He is kidnapped. Drug dealers are king. Sexual violation is rife. Closeted white men sleep with underage homeless boys. Female workers are harassed and exploited.

Azure grapples with issues of identity and belonging. His unique blue eyes on his black skin are a result of his many woes. The brutality and trauma he experiences, leads him to physically and mentally escape up Table Mountain. Where through the super natural, he seeks to avenge himself. While elevated on the mountain, he evokes and reaffirms the spirit of Saartjie Baartman, the Khoi people and their existence. Towards the end it appears as if justice will prevail.

Aaartjie Baartman appears to Azure in this fashion.

“At the cave I meet a woman who looks like she lived a very long time ago. She is short, and her bum is big, but she has the lightest smile I’ve ever seen. She wears only a leather thong and her long breasts are like fruit, like fat pears. She is shy and hides in the cave. I follow her in, careful as I walk. She sits in the corner of the cave while a small fire burns. I go inside and sit next to her. I can’t stop looking at her face. She has a beautiful face and a yellow skin that seems to glow” page 184

The story is deliberately and skillfully related in the first person with a raw innocence of a child protagonist. The text is further enhanced and authenticated using local slang that blends Afrikaans, English, Sesotho and isiXhosa. The effective use of short sentences and plenty of dialogue made the read fast paced and easily consumable.

Thirteen Cents is a shock to the system, dark, deep, and emotionally intense. It left me in a constant state of anxiety. Happy or light moments were far and in between. The violent and sexually explicit content was glaring. Not for the faint hearted. It took me out of my comfort zone as it tackled issues normally branded taboo.

Duiker merges reality and the supernatural. In his conversation with Sealy after Gerard’s demise, Sealy and Vincent are depicted as angels, Gerard as an evil spirit who was present in Soweto when Azure’s parents died, and their house set alight. On Table Mountain Azure transforms into a powerful magical being with paranormal powers.

An unhappy open ending. The book ends but the dire condition of a Black child and the illusion of post democratic South Africa prevails.

The author K. Sello Duiker was born in Soweto. He also lived in East London, Cape Town, and briefly in France and the UK. He suffered from mental illness, bipolar. In 2005 he committed suicide by hanging, this after having stopped taking his medication which he claimed stifled his artistic creativity. His great grandparents changed their surname from Lesufi to Duiker to pass off as “Coloured” for economic reasons because of apartheid. He was also gay. His other two books are Quiet Violence Of Dreams (2011) and The Hidden Star (2006).
Duiker drew generously from his lived experiences in his writing. Particularly on issues of mental illness, queerness and identity. Having been one of the only two black pupils at Redhill School added more to his anguishes regarding identity and inequality.

— Review for Africa’s Lit by Puleng Hopper

About the reviewer:

Puleng Hopper is a credit manager at a commercial bank by day, an avid reader, aspiring writer, lover and supporter of literature, local literature particularly. She is frequently spotted at book festivals, launches, and book clubs.

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Q1: Can you tell us a little about the book?

A: [Nomsa Mwamuka]: This anthology documents the experiences of women who lived through a time of transition from colonialism to independence. The setting is largely Zimbabwe from the seventies – war years, to the eighties – the heydays of independence and of course till now. The stories are expressions of emotional, psychological, spiritual and personal change set against the backdrop of the social, cultural and political milieu of these times. Written in first-person narrative, the authors tell their own stories. There are reflections, memories, odes to forebears, parents and mentors and acknowledgements of current achievements. Most importantly, though, these stories document elements of Zimbabwean, Southern African and African history and will serve as an inspiration to future generations.

[Farai Mpofu]: The contributors to this literary work share something not previously discussed or honed into an anecdotal account of what it meant to grow up in Rhodesia, and to experience the transition to black rule in Zimbabwe. With the benefit of hindsight, this anthology offers a personal glimpse into events, and decisions made by parents and guardians, which moulded this unique cross-over generation. It also pays tribute to the older generation, without whose wisdom, resilience and foresight, we would not be what we are today.

[Rutendo Hadebe]: For me, the word ‘transition’ represents fundamental personal change and circumstances. Thus, I returned to my childhood and tried to share the many ambivalences, conflicts and understandings that I associate with Zimbabwe’s political transition. While for many the signifier was the ecstatic crowd of a hundred thousand people that welcomed Robert Mugabe on his return to Harare from exile in Mozambique, on 26 December, 1979, mine is a little different. My notions of the transition do not begin in 1980 when ZANU-PF and Robert Mugabe came to power but rather when a Methodist Bishop became the Prime Minister of the country with a ‘surname’, Zimbabwe- Rhodesia in March 1978. It was during this critical period that my life took a drastic turn and I experienced transition of my persona, society and nation.

[Wynne Musabayana]: When I got the invitation to contribute a piece for this anthology, I thought: ‘What a great opportunity to reminisce over my youth’ while paying tribute to the two people, my parents, who gave everything to provide me with a firm foundation in life! She paints a vibrant picture of growing up on the copper mines:

Our friends were a cosmopolitan bunch; Manyika, Karanga, Zezuru, Korekore, Ndebele, Shangani, Ndau, Chewa, Nyanja, Zulu, Sotho, Bemba, coming as they did from Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and South Africa. A world which prepared her to be an ‘international citizen’ though she didn’t know it at the time.

[Isabella Matambanadzo] My contribution is prepared for a series of stories of Zimbabwean women who were born and raised in the country’s ghettos. For its preparation, I have reviewed various family historical records and photographs in my custody. In the tradition of oral storytelling which is part of my inheritance, I have listened to assorted accounts of our family stories as told by my uncles Edmund and Francis Matambanadzo, my aunt, Ronia Kahari and my mother. I have also re-visited various places in Zimbabwe to establish as accurate a record as possible. I am indebted to my brothers for their collective remembering of certain key events. I have also relied heavily on records housed at the National Archives of Zimbabwe. In addition, I have utilised school reports and records, and raw interview notes that were generously availed to me by Volker Wild from his research in the 1990s on African entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe. To the best of my ability I have relied on the reservoir of my memories to create an authentic record.

[Xoliswa Sithole]: When I was first asked to contribute to this book I was conflicted because I did not think that I could write a decent piece. As an artist who values honesty and openness, how was I going to write about my wayward, wonderful and glorious life and at the same time pay homage to a country that raised me and grew me? How also, and most importantly, was I to pay tribute to a mother who knew that there had to be something better than apartheid, even though it was still Rhodesia when we arrived in Zimbabwe in 1969?

For [Tambu Muzenda], her reflections provide a personal exposition of a life straddled between the rural areas and townships of Mabvuku and Tafara. She reminisces about her youthful sense of what sex and sexuality meant and considers the prevailing attitudes around HIV/AIDS. She remembers life with the nuns – ‘Missionaries and modernisation yani?’ – in a context of traditional customs and practises around life and ultimately death. It is an intimate story written largely in Shona, interspersed with English.

The narratives are as much individual biographies, as they are stories of a country. The question is: how do we harness these experiences, to inspire a desire for change, to make a better future for our country and the continent as a whole?
Traditionally we say, paivapo! To which the response is: dzefunde! May you enjoy the stories.

Q2: Zimbabwe has a history of prolific writing over the years, can you tell us about the culture of storytelling in Zimbabwe?

[Farai Mpofu]: My comments are more anecdotal and from my own experience. Like the rest of Africa and other parts of the world, Zimbabwe has a strong oral storytelling tradition. Stories were told to preserve events in the memories of listeners, to educate and impart knowledge, to entertain and other purposes. Storytelling was the preserve of a few with the traditional, cultural, social and intellectual standing to do so, with some aspects of this custom being handed down from parent to child. This tradition is not dead, but it has naturally been nudged aside by rising literacy and access to books and other technological repositories of stories. Audiences have become more demanding and many distractions compete for the attention of that audience.
Mobility and exposure have also provided alternative views of the world, some which question the single view offered by oral stories which are located in a particular tradition and therefore genre.

Books have been part of Zimbabwe for decades; their availability predates Zimbabwe and goes back to the late 1800s when the country was first colonised. So only the ability to read stood in the way for one who was keen to see what was contained therein. Missionary education bolstered literacy rates meaning anyone who could read and write could now begin to keep records of their personal and communal stories. Furthermore, Africans were beginning to access higher learning at home and abroad, which saw the widening of horizons and perspectives. I studied Literature at university and a large component of my course was dedicated to African and then Zimbabwean writers. That was my true introduction to what had been achieved in a relatively short space of time by local writers – most of whom were men.

The arrival of Bertha Musora, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Virginia Phiri and now the wave of younger writers began to change the writer gender dynamics in Zimbabwean literary output. Today, there seems to be a greater number of women writers, perhaps it is a perception that has been fuelled by their books being profiled in media and their increased arsenal of accolades they have amassed globally – it’s all very exciting! Zimbabwean writing spans many languages and many dialects and covers a broad spectrum of experiences: from rural to urban living, politics and diasporic experiences.

Q3: How was the process of collating so many stories; how did you get to the final cut?

[Farai Mpofu]: The collection was not inundated by contributors, ours was a gradual process. It took time and patience to arrive at the number of contributions we settled for. The contributors are women who had vivid recollections of growing up in the 60/70/80s, they lived all over Zimbabwe, and in the diaspora, they come from varied professional backgrounds and occupy an eclectic mix of geographical, commercial and ideological spaces: all of this made for an exciting body of work which manifested itself as Township Girls. As with any collaborative project, there were many highs and lows! We committed to a publishing process with Weaver Press and we are all proud of the collective efforts that have ensured that a unique repository of Zimbabwean women’s stories now exists.

Q4. How’s the literary scene in Zimbabwe today and how different is it from the cultural heydays of the 80s?

[Irene Weaver of Weaver Press]: Zimbabwe has more than its share of fine writers, many of whom are celebrated internationally, and they represent both the first and second generation of writers post-independence. We can mention literary stars such as Charles Mungoshi, Shimmer Chinodya, Dambudzo Marechera, Tsitsi Dangarembga, NoViolet Bulawayo, Petina Gappah, Brian Chikwava, Yvonne Vera.
Looking at the first generation however, with the exception of Shimmer Chinodya, most of their titles are now out of print in Zimbabwe and of the second generation, most writers are now first published in the West. The main reason for this is that writers are celebrated in name, but more rarely read, and very rarely bought. Book-buying in Zimbabwe is at an all-time low, and while the main reason may be economic, it is not exclusively so. And, if the main market for books, the one that has kept publishers afloat, over the last two difficult decades, has been the education market, this is now undermined by rampant photocopying.

Local writers, who continue to publish new work within the country struggle to be heard. The two bookshop chains that provided an important outlet for locally published and other books in the eighties have ceased to exist. Libraries have generally been neglected. When people want to buy books about and even from Zimbabwe, they often do so through Exclusive Books in South Africa and or order overseas.

However, the myths surrounding publishers, who are often mistaken for printers, remain. It is so often assumed that once a book is published, it will sell like hot cakes, even by young writers who never themselves buy books. The connection between the dependency on publishers for their very survival on book sales, and the absence of market, is not made. It is possible, even likely, that independent publishers who are not publishing textbooks will cease to exist. Will this matter? Perhaps not, as many young writers in Zimbabwe now self-publish, and indeed we encourage them to do so.

Finally, within this generally rather bleak picture, one can find some small signs of hope or metamorphosis. The renewed culture of hosting literary events can and will create a buzz that can translate into a growth in book sales if it can be sustained. Without the continuing support of library sales, or dynamic literary events such as book fairs, launches remain not unlike islands in a troubled sea.

Connect with Township Girls here:
Weaver Press Facebook/Twitter
@GirlsTownship Twitter
@TownshipGirls Facebook

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Star Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5
Rumours
Mongane Wally Serote
Jacana Media, April 2013
Online Price: R226

 
 
 

Mongane Wally Serote’s Rumours explores a man’s journey to dig deep into himself in an effort to discover what it is that he already knows, but had somehow forgotten along the way. Serote uses South Africa’s post-apartheid context as the backdrop for the unpacking of the residues of the apartheid system, including the spiritual and social baggage that is carried by those who were deeply involved in South Africa’s liberation struggle and how they now have to contend with life in the new South Africa.

It could be argued that the book has autobiographical elements because the life of Keke, the central character of the book and that of Serote are similar. In the same way that Serote was an uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) veteran during the struggle; so was Keke and the plot orbits around Keke’s need to reconcile his painful past with his angst-ridden present. It can therefore be deduced that Serote is able to write with understanding and thoughtfulness about the disillusionment that is a result of intentions not necessarily translating into actions – precisely because this disappointment was a reality that he was individually faced with when South Africa’s liberation struggle ended.

At face value, Keke seems like a man who has his fundamentals in a row: he has a wife and two children, a house, and a good job that affords him a good car. However, as the story unfolds, it becomes evident that Keke is nursing a long seated meaninglessness that flows beneath the façade of his self-actualized life like a secret river. It then takes a near death experience and the intervention of the people in his life for him to embark on a journey that will force him to question everything in an effort to find the source of his suffering, and to make peace with the people in his immediate life, as well as his ancestors.

On quite a few occasions in the book Keke finds himself thinking about the gains of the struggle, and pondering whether the lives that were lost and the sacrifices that were made were necessary, seeing that today, economic freedom remains elusive and the ideal of democracy is turning out to be an anti-climactic certainty for the majority of South Africa’s population.

Rumours makes one reflect on the course of South Africa’s democracy and its consequences. As the book unfolds, it becomes evident that Keke’s unhappiness stems from the fact that he has not maintained links with his ancestors, and as such, he has no spiritual anchor. This sad state of affairs is also compounded by the fact that as parents, Keke and his wife Mmabatho have not taught their children their mother tongue, and as such, the children will be out of tune with their culture and their heritage. The book stresses the importance of maintaining cultural values by exploring the possible consequences that can be borne from societies being culturally apathetic.

This struggle between the maintenance of cultural values in an increasingly modernizing society is an issue that a lot of South African families have to balance and the excerpt below indicates some of the questions that Serote asks in his exploration of the issue:

How could he [Keke] sort out the language question for Thebe and for Thalitha? There had been four ministers of education in the eighteen years since the inception of democracy; what had they been doing all this time? Couldn’t they have introduced African languages at schools by now? Corruption, poverty, alienation from their Africaness and the diversity of South Africa were now the biggest threats to non-racism, non-sexism, democracy and prosperity in South Africa. He was started to realise that the newly democratic South Africa had produced a youth that were alienated, disgruntled and completely unaware of the meaning of South Africa. [page 130]

Ultimately, Rumours is a moving exploration of Keke’s oscillation between past and present. It is through him that readers are able to grapple with the way the past irrevocably influences the present while slowly charting a way into the future.

— Review for Africa’s Lit by Nomonde Ndwalaza

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Star Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5
This Mournable Body
Tsitsi Dangarembga
Jacana Media, November 2018
Online Price: R246

 
 

This Mournable Body is the last of a trilogy that began with Nervous Conditions and was followed by The Book of Not. The reader should be privy to the contents of the first two books, especially Nervous Conditions, for easier comprehension and context, as Dangarembga reflects back to the previous books.

The title of the book was inspired by an essay penned by Teju Cole titled Unmournable Bodies. In the essay Cole laments the fact that, in the advent of national tragedy, some bodies are deemed more equal than others. Even in death, they are discriminated against, are not worthy of mention, empathy, and grief. This resonated with Dangarembga because the scenario was playing itself out in her home country of Zimbabwe, despite the latest Chimurenga. It was business as usual, no global outcry.

The cover of the book boasts a pair of shoes, pumps, Lady Di’s – as in Diana, Princess of Wales. The shoes feature prominently in the text. For me they’re a symbol of British influence in the lives of the main character Tambudzai Sigauke, her cousin Nyasha, and Zimbabweans at large.

This Mournable Body follows the career, economic woes, life and survival of adult protagonist Tambudzai. The story opens, with Tambudzai unemployed, unmarried, childless and homeless. She had just resigned from her job in advertising due to corporate politics. She then secures a teaching post, which triggers amental breakdown. Finally she reconnects with a former student and colleague who offers her an opportunity in ecotourism. Despite being well educated, optimistic and hungry for success, post-democratic Zimbabwe proves to be a nightmare for her as a black woman. She is forced to grapple with issues of capitalism, racism, misogyny, patriarchy, status, alcohol abuse, and feminism. Circumstances force her to lie, connive, become aloof and self-centered. She is of the opinion that, “You don’t lose your appetite over another person’s problems”. Reality and the simple facts of being an adult bring her full circle to her village and a people she had shunned for more than 3 decades. The book depicts how the state of a people is oft-times directly linked to the state and status of its country.

The normalized nature of the physical and mental abuse of women is highlighted: how men generally felt (and feel) entitled to police and to harm women. For instance, Gertrude, a fellow hostel resident, is humiliated, insulted, and assaulted in broad daylight by men at the bus terminus, for, according to them, being under- and inappropriately dressed. There is also a graphic scene of the sexual violation of a female tenant, Mako by a fellow male tenant. We note how a domestic worker is beaten, accused of infidelity by her philandering gardener husband to the point of miscarriage of their baby. The physical abuse permeated race and class, and people generally were complicit and looked the other way.

The text is in second person. In this fashion Dangarembga manages to maintain a distance from the protagonist, to detach somewhat, from the emotionally overwhelming themes – themes that also affect her as a career woman and a Zimbabwean. Her book is a generous and multi-layered offering and it’s clear that her and screenwriting skills helped enhance the flow and movement of the story.

Synonymous to Zimbabwe, we encounter interesting names like Silence, Shine, Ignore, Concept, Takesure, Freedom and Praise.

I was captivated by how, through the relationship of school mates Tambudzai and Tracey Stevenson, the impact of privilege, racism and capitalism was brought to the fore. Tambudzai, despite having attended the same school as Tracey, having worked with her, being the more creative, always found herself second at the finish line.

Dangarembga writes of what she has lived, experienced and observed. She shares her passion for and confidence in her subject matter. The narration is close to the heart, it can be believed that there are shared character straits amongst Nyasha, Tambu and Dangarembga.

I was also intrigued by how Dangarembga brought to life inanimate objects like shoes, a car named Gloria, and a sack of mealie meal. She thrives on the symbolism of ants and hyenas which are utilized effectively throughout.

It was the greatest of pleasure to reconnect with Babamukuru, Chido, Netsai, Nyasha and Maiguru, characters we initially encountered in Nervous Conditions.

Sequels are often tricky in terms of keeping to a high standard set by the first book, as shown by Dangarembga’s The Book of Not. Here, great justice is done to the award-winning and classic Nervous Conditions. This Mournable Body brings us not just full circle in the series, but also in the life of our childhood protagonist Tambudzai.

— Review for Africa’s Lit by Puleng Hopper

About the reviewer:

Puleng Hopper is a credit manager at a commercial bank by day, an avid reader, aspiring writer, lover and supporter of literature, local literature particularly. She is frequently spotted at book festivals, launches, and book clubs.

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March is Children’s Month at Exclusive Books and we have a wide variety of wonderful events to keep your little bookworms entertained as well as get them excited about reading!

Fanatics get double points on all children’s titles for the entire month of March!

Click on the name of your nearest Exclusive Books store to find out what exciting events they will be hosting:

Gauteng

Bedford
Brooklyn
Cresta
Clearwater
Dainfern
Greenstone
Hyde Park
Killarney
Kolonnade
Menlyn
Nicolway
Rosebank
Sandton
Mall of the South
Woodlands

KZN

Ballito
Gateway
La Lucia
Midlands Mall

Western Cape
Canal Walk
Cavendish
Somerset
Table Bay
Tyger Valley
V&A Waterfront

Mpumalanga

i’langa Mall

* Please note that Jeff Kinney will not be in attendance at any of the in store Diary of a Wimpy Kid events. To meet Jeff Kinney please click on this link for Johannesburg author events and this link for Cape Town author events.

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Join our Ballito Junction store for the following Children’s events during March!

The Gruffalo
Date: 9 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 2 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with the Gruffalo
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Dr Seuss
Date: 16 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 2 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Dr Seuss Characters.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Diary of a Wimpy Kid
Date: 23 March
Time: 12 – 1PM
Appropriate for ages: 4 – 10 years old
Event includes: Meet Greg Heffley and take a photo of your child with Greg.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event


* Please note that Jeff Kinney will not be in attendance at any of the in store Diary of a Wimpy Kid events.

Smart Kids & Letterland
Date: 30 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 5 – 9 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Clever Cat & Emma and Stinky
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

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Join our Gateway Theatre store for the following Children’s events during March!

Oscar the Hungry Unicorn
Date: 9 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, face painting
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Diary of a Wimpy Kid
Date: 23 March
Time: 9 – 10AM
Appropriate for ages: 4 – 10 years old
Event includes: Meet Greg Heffley and take a photo of your child with Greg.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

* Please note that Jeff Kinney will not be in attendance at any of the in store Diary of a Wimpy Kid events.

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Join our Kolonnade Centre store for the following Children’s events during March!

Bennie Boekwurm & Haas Das
Date: 2 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 9 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Boekwurm & Haas Das
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Dr Seuss
Date: 9 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 2 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Dr Seuss Characters.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Oscar the Hungry Unicorn
Date: 16 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, face painting
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Liewe Heksie
Date: 23 March
Time: 10 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 9 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Liewe Heksie
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Diary of a Wimpy Kid
Date: 31 March
Time: 9 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 4 – 10 years old
Event includes: Meet Greg Heffley and take a photo of your child with Greg.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

* Please note that Jeff Kinney will not be in attendance at any of the in store Diary of a Wimpy Kid events.

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Join our Woodlands Boulevard store for the following Children’s events during March!

Oscar the Hungry Unicorn
Date: 9 March
Time: 9 – 11AM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, face painting
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Bennie Boekwurm & Haas Das
Date: 15 March
Time: 3 – 4PM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 9 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Boekwurm & Haas Das
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Liewe Heksie
Date: 17 March
Time: 11:30AM – 12:30PM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 9 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Liewe Heksie
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Dr Seuss
Date: 21 March
Time: 11AM – 12PM
Appropriate for ages: 2 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with Dr Seuss Characters.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

The Gruffalo
Date: 23 March
Time: 2 – 3PM
Appropriate for ages: 2 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, take a photo of your child with the Gruffalo
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Ladybird
Date: 24 March
Time: 11:30AM – 12:30PM
Appropriate for ages: 3 – 6 years old
Event includes: Fun Activities, Storytime, face painting
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

Diary of a Wimpy Kid
Date: 29 March
Time: 10AM – 12PM
Appropriate for ages: 4 – 10 years old
Event includes: Meet Greg Heffley and take a photo of your child with Greg.
RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event

* Please note that Jeff Kinney will not be in attendance at any of the in store Diary of a Wimpy Kid events.

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