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1. Drugs don’t care about your bank account.
Drug testing is used for more than just low-skilled workers. With workplace drug use on the rise across industries, more and more companies who hire white-collar workers are making drug testing part of their workplace policy. In fact, drug testing programs are implemented for a wide range of job types including skilled laborers, transportation workers, and salaried employees.

2. Reefer minus the madness
With 33 states passing medical marijuana legislation, the social taboos behind this drug are decreasing. When restrictions go down, marijuana use goes up. And going to work under the influence of any drug presents obvious issues. This makes testing for this kind of liability all the more relevant.

3. Our Not-So-United States
Drug testing is viewed differently from state to state and things are changing. Many states now have extended their employee protections as a response to their new marijuana laws. So be aware and as an employer, get the facts in your state when it comes to your drug-free workplace policies.

4. Employees are bringing their addictions to work
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2013 and 2016 at-work overdose deaths attributed to the non-medical abuse of drugs or alcohol increased by 38% annually. These tragic events give rise to the need for workplace drug testing in an effort to decrease the abuse that leads to so many senseless deaths.

5. The real cost of opioids
The economic burden of opioid misuse is staggering. When you factor in increased healthcare, substance abuse treatment, lost productivity, and criminal justice, annual US costs exceed $78.5 billion, according to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. That doesn’t even take into account the challenges faced by businesses resulting from absenteeism, lost productivity, job turnover, and retraining.

6. Testing passes the test
Research shows that drug testing can help improve employee morale and productivity while decreasing absenteeism, accidents, downtime, turnover, and theft.

In short, with a little research and the right partner, you can design a drug testing program that will make your workplace a more productive and, most of all, safer place to prosper. 

For more information about drug testing, visit our website.

The post 6 Things You Didn’t Know About Drug Testing: A Rookie’s Guide appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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One of the highest priorities of a workplace substance abuse policy is to establish and maintain a safe, healthy, and drug-free work environment. There are many benefits employers can receive from drug testing programs including1

  • Decreased absenteeism
  • Improved employee productivity
  • Lowered employee turnover
  • Reductions in on-the-job accidents and workplace crime, including theft and violence
  • Compliance with state or federal regulations

Not all drug tests, facilities, R&D practices, and analytes are created equal. It’s critical to work with a drug testing laboratory which consistently offers reliable, accurate, and timely drug test results.

How can an employer assess the quality of a workplace drug testing laboratory?
Laboratory accreditations and inspections can help to ensure accurate drug testing and verify that processes, instrumentation, and lab personnel adhere to the highest standards of quality. There are two national programs that certify or accredit laboratories:

  • National Laboratory Certification Program (NLCP), which is contracted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (HHS/SAMHSA)
  • College of American Pathologists Forensic Drug Testing (FDT) accreditation program

Both programs use proficiency testing and on-site inspections to assess laboratory compliance with their stringent program requirements. Certification under the NLCP is required for testing Federal employees or for the federally mandated drug testing of private sector employees (e.g., U.S. Department of Transportation-mandated testing of truck drivers, train engineers, and airplane pilots). Many states also require certification under one of these programs for a laboratory to perform employment-related drug tests in their state.

All three Quest laboratories that perform employment-related drug tests are certified under both the NLCP and FDT programs. Our labs also maintain all applicable state licensing and certification. Specific licensure held in each laboratory is dependent upon its location and the drug testing being completed. For example, our licenses include, but are not limited to, the New York Department of Health and Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration.

Quest Diagnostics performs millions of drug tests annually. Because every test can directly impact an individual’s livelihood as well as workplace safety, quality is our top priority. We work to ensure every one of the millions of drug test results reported by our laboratories is accurate. 

Take a video tour of our Lenexa, KS laboratory.

Watch The Life of a Drug Test webinar which details the journey of a drug test specimen through our lab.

See a list of our laboratory licenses and accreditations.

To learn more about drug testing quality, visit our website.

1 National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Drug Testing. www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/drug-testing

The post The value of an accurate drug test appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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Companies who choose to have a drug-free workplace program help to promote the health and safety of their employees. Many companies have the option of choosing to drug test their current or prospective employees, while others perform regulated drug testing mandated by the Federal government.

What is a regulated drug test?

A regulated drug test typically involves a urine or alcohol collection performed for specific agencies categorized as “safety-sensitive” workplaces because of the potential influence of their job on public safety. Safety-sensitive workplaces fall under the Health and Human Services (HHS) or Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) testing authority, or are part of one of the following agencies under the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT):

  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • Federal Motor Carrier Service Administration (FMCSA)
  • Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)
  • Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
  • Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)
  • U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)

Which drugs are tested under a regulated drug screen?

Sometimes referred to as a “DOT drug test,” a regulated drug test includes these five drug classes:

  • Amphetamines
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Opiates
  • Phencyclidine (PCC)

The regulated drug test collection process and Federal drug testing program requirements are guided by the DOT’s meticulous set of rules known as 49 CFR Part 40.1

What is 49 CFR Part 40?

49 CFR Part 40 is aU.S. Department of Transportation rule that details the requirements for employers to conduct and adhere to workplace drug and alcohol testing programs for those occupations deemed to be safety-sensitive.1 As drug use in the workplace continues to be a concern, regulated drug screens help promote testing rigor for both the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce, as well as non-regulated workplaces through the use of “DOT look-alike” panels that mimic the specifications of regulated drug tests.

Drug use in safety-sensitive workforces

Data from the Quest Diagnostics Drug Testing Index (DTI) indicates that in the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce, positivity for post-accident urine testing jumped more than 51 percent year-over-year (3.1% in 2017 versus 4.7% in 2018) and increased by nearly 81 percent between 2014 and 2018. The positivity jump in 2018 was largely driven by the addition of prescription opiates to the panel, which helped to drive post-accident positivity for the semi-synthetic opiates (hydrocodone and/or hydromorphone) and for oxycodones (oxycodone and/or oxymorphone) to 1.1 percent and 0.77 percent, respectively.

Post-accident positivity in the general U.S. workforce climbed 9% year-over-year (7.7% in 2017 versus 8.4% in 2018), and 29% over 5 years. The post-accident positivity rate has risen annually since 2011 in the general U.S. workforce and since 2010 in the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce.2

Substance abuse in the workplace is not new. However, the latest DTI data illustrates drug use in the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce continues to increase, making ongoing drug testing even more important.

To learn more about regulated drug screens, visit our website.

Resources

1 U.S. Department of Transportation. Procedures for transportation workplace drug and alcohol testing programs.

https://www.transportation.gov/odapc/part40

Updated Monday, April 29, 2019. Accessed June 2019.

2 Workforce Drug Testing Positivity Climbs to Highest rate since 2004, according to new Quest Diagnostics analysis [press release] April 11, 2019

https://www.questdiagnostics.com/home/physicians/health-trends/drug-testing

Accessed June 2019.

The post Ask the experts: What is a regulated drug test? appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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One of the few constants in state marijuana legislation is that it continues to change. Most recently, Nevada passed a law effective January 1, 2020 that places restrictions on how employers handle positive tests for marijuana for job applicants. This comes just two years after voters approved the legal sale of recreational marijuana in 2016 to adults aged 21 and older. We asked industry expert Barry Sample, PhD, Senior Director of Science and Technology, Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions, about this change to employment practices in the Silver State.

“The new law is not as cut and dried as the headlines indicate. The state of Nevada did not ban pre-employment drug testing or even testing for marijuana. The new law makes it, in most cases, an unlawful employment practice for an employer to refuse to hire a prospective employee because he or she submitted to a drug screening test and the result indicated the use of marijuana,” said Dr. Sample.

Typical in the political and legal landscape of marijuana legislation, the new law is not as cut and dry as the headlines may lead us to believe. Dr. Sample noted some important language to be aware of in the new Nevada legislation.

  • The new law only pertains to applicant drug testing and excludes testing of current employees.
  • Positions such as firefighters, emergency medical technicians (EMT), and drivers are exempt from this law.
  • Federal drug testing guidelines remain unchanged for federally mandated testing.
  • Jobs that “in the determination of the employer, could adversely affect the safety of others” are excluded.  The law says the employer should define and be able to justify what “safety-sensitive” means for roles in their company.
  • Job applicants may submit an independent drug test result within 30 days of the initial pre-employment drug test if they wish. The law says the employer give appropriate consideration to the result of that subsequent test.

According to the latest data from the Quest Diagnostics Drug Testing Index, in 2018, marijuana positivity in Nevada was 4.0% in combined workforce urine drug testing. This rate is more than 40% higher than the national average of 2.3%.

Read the full text of Nevada Law AB132.

Download our marijuana whitepaper.

For more information about drug testing, visit our website.

The post Ask the expert: New marijuana law in Nevada appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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The healthcare industry is tasked with keeping secure records for patients, donors, clients, and anyone who utilizes our services. For employer drug testing, record keeping has historically fallen in line with the tried and true standard – paper. From the handling of the drug test specimen at the time of collection through its life in the laboratory, the traditional, five-part paper Custody and Control Form (CCF) is used for drug test ordering and chain of custody documentation. But utilizing paper does come with drawbacks. Fortunately, a more efficient solution is available to help streamline the drug testing process: electronic custody and control forms (eCCF).

In our upcoming webinar, Flip the switch: why you should turn on digital drug testing, Quest Diagnostics experts Denise Mullins, senior technical product development manager, Ryan Osborn, technical product development manager, and Anthony Magazzolo, technical product development manager will discuss the value of adopting digital solutions for drug testing.

Topics will include

  • An explanation of eCCF
  • The benefits of switching to paperless drug testing
  • By the numbers: paper forms vs. eCCF
  • How to get started

Register for this webinar and gain access to an exclusive case study, Paper is the past, step into digital drug testing with eCCF, which takes a deep dive into making the switch to paperless drug testing.

Your transition to eCCF begins with this webinar on Wednesday, July 31, 2019 at 1 PM CST. Register today!

To learn more about eCCF, visit our website.

The post Webinar: the true value of electronic Custody and Control Forms (eCCF) appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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Unlike drunken driving, limited research is available about the risks of driving under the influence of illicit drugs and the involvement of drugs in accidents. Today, a majority of information is compiled from roadside surveys, injury and fatality reports, and blood analysis following accidents.

Drugged, or drug-impaired driving, is defined by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) as driving under the influence of substances such as alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, opioids, as well as drugs prescribed by a physician.[1] Often people mix substances, which can change the effects of a drug, making them unpredictable. Drug use can slow reaction times, cause drowsiness or dizziness, impact judgment, and increase aggression —all dangerous factors when operating a motor vehicle. This translates to a driver weaving in and out of the lane, driving slower or faster speeds than permitted, and paying less attention to the road or traffic signals.

How many people drive under the influence of drugs?
According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, approximately 12.8 million Americans aged 16 or older self-reported that they drove under the influence of illicit drugs in 2017.[2]

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes research about the impact of drug-impaired driving and compares its data to previous years.[3] The most recent findings say:

  • Approximately 20% of surveyed drivers tested positive for potentially impairing drugs.
  • The number of drivers who tested positive for marijuana increased 48% from 2007 to 2014.
  • Weekend evenings from 10 PM until midnight and from 1 to 3 AM show a higher prevalence of drug-impaired driving.

Changes to state marijuana legislation coupled with a gap in education has led to misconceptions about the effects of marijuana, including how driving under the influence of marijuana may pose risk to our roadways.

  • Data shows that driving after smoking cannabis interferes with psychomotor function and driver’s ability to multitask.[4]
  • A report from the Governors Highway Safety Association says that 41.1% of the drug-positive fatally-injured drivers were positive for some form of marijuana in 2016.5 The report concluded that “the best overall estimate of marijuana’s effect on crash risk in general is an increase of 25-35%, or a factor of 1.25 to 1.35.”
  • Since recreational marijuana was legalized, marijuana-related traffic deaths increased 151% while all Colorado traffic deaths increased 35%, according to the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area report.[5] The Colorado Department of Transportation surveyed 11,000 marijuana users and non-users. Of those surveyed, 69% admitted to having driven high at least once during the past year.

Lastly, it is illegal in every state to drive impaired by drugs or alcohol. A driver cannot typically assess their own impairment; however, law enforcement officers are trained to recognize the signs of drugged driving.

Download our marijuana white paper.

For more information, download our Common Drugs of Abuse reference or visit our website.

Photo courtesy of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[1] National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Drug-Impaired Driving. Accessed June 4, 2019 https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drug-impaired-driving.  

[2]  Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality.Results from the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables. Rockville (MD): SAMHSA; 2018. Accessed June 4, 2019 https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/cbhsq-reports/NSDUHDetailedTabs2017/NSDUHDetailedTabs2017.pdf

[3] National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2013–2014 National Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers. Accessed  June 4, 2019 www.nhtsa.gov/behavioral-research/2013-14-national-roadside-study-alcohol-and-drug-use-drivers

[4] Desrosiers NA, Ramaekers JG, Chauchard E, et al.  Smoked cannabis’ psychomotor and neurocognitive effects in occasional and frequent smokers. Journal of Analytical Toxicology 2015;39(4):251-261. Accessed June 4, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1093/jat/bkv012

[5] Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. The legalization of marijuana in Colorado: the impact volume 5. Accessed March 11, 2019 https://rmhidta.org/files/D2DF/FINAL-%20Volume%205%20UPDATE%202018.pdf

The post Drug-impaired drivers on our roads appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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A typical knee replacement surgery starts with a 6 to 10-inch incision and can take up to 2 hours. Several weeks post-surgery, patients may resume light activity such as walking and driving.1 All the while; there is lingering pain from the surgery, physical therapy, and everyday movements. Pain management is a critical step in the recovery process: it means helping people engage in the physical activities needed to regain pain-free mobility. Oftentimes pain management may involve prescription medications like hydrocodone or OxyContin®, both powerful opioids.

Do you know someone who had a major or life-altering surgery? Did that person take prescribed opioids as part of their pain management regimen? How did they describe their experience?

A Mayo Clinic study published in 2010 reported that an estimated 1 million hip and knee replacements were completed in a single year in the U.S.2 In 2017, 58 prescriptions for opioids were written for every 100 Americans with an average of 3.4 opioid prescriptions dispensed per patient.3 Under these conditions, pain management can transform from a necessary component of the healing process into something dangerous and potentially deadly.

If someone close to you were struggling with a dependence on opioids, would you know how to spot a problem or see the signs of addiction?

Identifying someone’s dependence on a drug can be challenging, especially if the drug has not completely overtaken a person’s life. They may work a full-time job, keep their appointments, meet for lunch dates, and, in the age of social media, post flattering and positive depictions of their lives. A substance use disorder does not happen overnight; it is gradual and can be difficult to detect even in those closest to you. Nearly a third of Americans say they know someone who is or has been addicted to opioids or prescription painkillers.4

Here are some common signs of a potential opioid addiction.5

  • Taking more of the prescribed opioid than originally prescribed or continuing on the drug for a longer amount of time
  • Using the prescribed medication as a preventive for pain when no pain is present
  • Significant mood swings
  • Losing medications and needing to get refills
  • Seeking pain management help from multiple physicians and obtaining multiple prescriptions during the process
  • Poor decision making

People who take potentially addictive drugs as prescribed rarely abuse them or become addicted. However, not taking medicine as prescribed or using the medication for an extended period of time can increase the risk of misuse and addiction.5 In 2016, more than 11.8 million Americans reported misuse of prescription opioids;6 130 people die every day from opioid overdoses.7

How do we help to prevent opioid-related deaths?

Shedding stereotypes of drug addiction can be the first step in helping those who are susceptible or struggling with a dependence on opioids. Statistics show that addiction to opioids like heroin affects people from all age groups and all socioeconomic backgrounds.7 Federal agencies, like the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, lay out a clear and tangible approach to help combat the opioid crisis.8

  • Better addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery services
  • Better data and research
  • Better pain management solutions
  • Better targeting of overdose-reversing drugs

If you or someone you know is struggling with a growing dependence on opioids, the following resources are available to help start the conversation about recovery or assistance.

At some point in our lives, most of us will need pain medication—after dental surgery, broken bones, joint replacement, or other serious health issue. Pain management is part of the healing process; when used responsibly, opioid use does not have to become opioid dependence or addiction. Education and awareness is key to identifying what an addiction to prescription opioids looks like. Learn how substance use disorders can evolve over a lifetime in our white paper, An Exploration of Addiction.

Download our opioid crisis in the workplace white paper to see the impact of opioid misuse on the American workforce.

To learn more about opioids, visit our website.

The post Under the influence: prescription opioids appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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Joe Yoest, Toxicology Confirmations Supervisor, has been a familiar face in the laboratory since its construction. He reflects on the drive of our laboratory technicians and the growth that has sprung from that determination. In this month’s “I’m there” post, Joe explains what “we’re there when you need us” means to him. Read the full story.

Employer Solutions is commitment to being there when our clients and colleagues need us—at every possible opportunity. Through unique stories from our team, you will get a more personal perspective on what commitment means to us. To learn more about this series, read our introductory post.

For more information about Employer Solutions, visit our website.

The post I’m There: Joe Yoest appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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On January 4, 1987, in Chase, Maryland, a locomotive engineer and his brakeman were smoking a marijuana cigarette while on duty operating a trio of Conrail locomotives. They failed to react to stop signals and collided with an Amtrak train carrying more than 600 passengers. In total, 16 people died and 164 were injured. Some of the injured were trapped in the wreckage for more than 10 hours before they were finally freed. Although the two Conrail crew members initially denied smoking marijuana, their drug test results were positive. This tragic incident led to the formation of stricter drug testing laws for federally mandated, safety-sensitive workers, which evolved into workplace drug testing as we know it today.

Following a workplace accident, an employer may be required or may choose to drug test individuals involved in the accident to determine if drugs played a role. Post-accident drug testing is the third most common reason for drug testing, behind pre-employment and random testing. New findings from the Quest Diagnostics® Drug Testing Index show the following important facts about post-accident urine drug testing.

  • Post-accident drug positivity for urine testing has been increasing annually since 2011 across the combined US workforce
  • For the general US workforce tested, post-accident positivity in 2018 was 8.4%, up 9% from 2017
  • 1 in 12 general US workforce employees tested was positive for drugs following an accident
  • For the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce tested, post-accident positivity in 2018 was 4.7%, up 51% from 2017

In the safety-sensitive workforce, the 2018 addition of four semi-synthetic opiates to the standard drug panel contributed to the significant increase in positive drug tests. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid prescribing rates in 2017 were still very high in certain areas across the country. Having a valid prescription does not mean a medication is risk-free or is being properly used. Furthermore, opioids are often obtained illegally without a prescription. Opioids are highly addictive and medication interactions are often unknown and unmonitored. Rising post-accident positivity rates across the combined American workforce subject to testing indicate an opportunity for employers to strengthen their drug testing policies.

Accidents in the safety-sensitive workplace may seem more dangerous and significant; however, accidents within the general US workforce are also harmful and costly. Analysis of post-accident urine drug test specimens show that marijuana positivity rates in the general US workforce have been increasing each year since 2009. In 2018, marijuana was more than twice as likely to be detected by a post-accident drug test than in 2009. Marijuana can impair body movement, cause difficulty with thinking, and may even cause hallucinations and delusions when taken in high doses. All of these impacts can pose a risk and lower a user’s productivity regardless of the workplace setting.

According to the National Safety Council, 4.6 million workplace injuries happen annually in the United States. The cost for each medically consulted injury in 2017 was $39,000; the cost for each fatality was estimated at $1.15 million. In 2017, 104 million production days were lost because of work-related injuries. Workplace accidents are expensive and dangerous, but in many cases, they are also preventable. Having a robust drug testing program in place can help prevent drug-related accidents in the workplace. Programs that include pre-employment and random testing policies work to deter drug use among employee populations. With testing programs in place, employers can expect to have fewer employees using drugs, and ultimately fewer workplace accidents.

Several years following the Conrail-Amtrak disaster, the Conrail engineer was released from prison, and stated during a newspaper interview that the collision would never have happened if not for his marijuana use. Clearly, drug testing can and does play a role in helping to prevent drug-related workplace incidents.

See positivity data for post-accident drug testing.

For more information about drug testing, visit our website.

Sources:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, July 31, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/maps/rxstate2017.html

National Safety Council (NSC) Work Injury Costs 2017. https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/work/costs/work-injury-costs/

National Safety Council (NSC) Work Safety Introduction 2017. https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/work/work-overview/work-safety-introduction/

The post Preventing drug-related workplace accidents appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) mission is to create safer roads by helping to decrease crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses through education, research, enforcement, and technology.1 The FMCSA is taking steps to strengthen their role as overseers of roadway safety by implementing the new Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse.

This electronic database will maintain information about driver’s violations of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) drug and alcohol testing programs by CDL holders.2 Once live, the database will aid in ensuring that drivers are eligible to operate commercial vehicles before they hit the road.

With the help of the FMCSA’s resources, we have put together a list of common questions about the Clearinghouse, how it may affect your business, and what to expect in the months and years to come from this innovative program.        

Q. Who will be required to take part in the Clearinghouse and what is required per the FCMSA’s Final Rule on the new database?

A. Medical Review Officers (MROs), Substance Abuse Professionals (SAPs), consortia/third-party administrators (C/TPAs), and other service agents must report information to the Clearinghouse related to violations by current and prospective employees of the drug and alcohol regulations in 49 Code of Federal Regulations, parts 40 and 382.2

  • Employers will be required to query the Clearinghouse for current and prospective employees’ drug and alcohol violations before those employees operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) on public roads
  • Employers will be required to query the Clearinghouse annually for each driver they currently employ
  • State driver licensing agencies will be required to query the Clearinghouse whenever a CDL is issued, renewed, transferred, or upgraded

Q. When will the Clearinghouse be implemented?

A. The following timeline outlines key dates for the implementation of the Clearinghouse:

Key date Action item
December 5, 2016 Clearinghouse final rule published identifying the roles and responsibilities of those who will be required to use the Clearinghouse.
Fall 2019 Registration begins. Users may create accounts to access the Clearinghouse once it is live in 2020.
January 6, 2020 Mandatory use of the Clearinghouse requires employers to report drug and alcohol violations. Employers may also begin using the system to inquire about drivers of CMVs.
January 6, 2023 At its 3-year mark, employers are required to use the Clearinghouse database to ensure drivers of CMVs have not violated a drug and alcohol program.

Source: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Drug & Alcohol Clearinghouse

Q. How will I know what role I play with the Clearinghouse?

A. This roles card from the FMCSA details who will be involved in the Clearinghouse database.

Q. As an employer, will I have to change language in my drug testing policy?

A. Yes. If you are required to use the FMCSA Clearinghouse, you will need to add language that notifies drivers and driver-applicants about your use of the database and their role in it.

Q. Will the Clearinghouse data show a commercial motor vehicle driver’s full records of violations on January 6, 2020?

A. No. Data in the Clearinghouse will be uploaded by registered employers and consenting drivers. The final rule requires the query of data to provide at least 3 years of a driver’s drug and alcohol program violation history. On January 6, 2020, however, the three years of data will be tabulated from a mix of paper and electronic Clearinghouse records.

On January 6, 2023, paper records of commercial motor vehicle drivers’ drug and alcohol program violations will no longer be needed as the Clearinghouse will be the sole source of data from that date forward.

Q. How long are records of drug and alcohol program violations kept in the Clearinghouse?

A. The Clearinghouse data will be kept for 5 years or until the driver has completed the designated return-to-duty process.

Q. When the collection of drug and alcohol tests take place, what identifying number should be documented for drivers on the Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form (CCF) and the DOT Alcohol Testing Form (ATF)?

A. The current paper versions of the Federal CCF and ATF specifically permit the use of either the driver’s social security number or employee identification number. However, under § 382.705, the driver’s CDL number and the state of issuance must be used in place of the social security number or employee identification number when completing the Federal CCF or ATF.3

Q. How can I stay up-to-date about the Clearinghouse?

A: The FMCSA has created a user-friendly, detailed website to help with news, ongoing updates, inquiries, and general information about the upcoming database. The following links may prove helpful.

  • User role card – know what your role will be in the Clearinghouse database

We will periodically publish updates and information on our Quest Diagnostics workplace drug testing blog and social media pages and on Facebook and LinkedIn. Additionally, you may subscribe to our monthly newsletter, Results, to get our latest posts in your inbox.

For more information, visit our website.

The post The FMCSA’s new database – Clearinghouse coming soon appeared first on Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions Blog.

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