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Did you know that one in three teens is abused physically, sexually, emotionally or verbally by a dating partner? As an educator, you are likely already in contact with students who are being abused by their partner or who know someone who is, whether they have revealed the abuse to you or not.

Often educators feel unequipped to recognize the warning signs of abuse and provide support and resources to students facing dating violence.

Warning Signs Your Student May Be Experiencing Dating Violence

Teens who are being abused rarely disclose their abuse to an adult. Because of this, it can take an observant social worker or teacher to see the signs of abuse at school and in the classroom. While some signs may seem obvious, others are less easily identifiable.

Three warning signs of teen dating abuse identifiable in the classroom

1.  Your student’s physical appearance changes:

  • Your student begins to have unexplained or sudden illnesses
  • They begin to wear more makeup or stop wearing makeup all together
  • They start wearing baggier clothes
  • They seem passive or withdrawn
  • You notice frequent bruising
  • They begin self-harming behaviors such as cutting, hair pulling, etc.

2.  Your student’s dating relationship lacks balance:

  • Your student excessively checks in/texts and/or sends photos to their partner to prove where they are, or may seemed stressed about doing so
  • They make excuses for their partner’s behavior
  • You observe extreme jealousy between your student and their partner

3.  Your student’s behavior with peers and in the classroom changes:

  • You observe a loss of friendships and general isolation of your student
  • They are often late or do not attend class
  • They seem worried that their dating partner may show up or know where they are because they attend class
  • They seem unable to concentrate, are passive, compliant or withdrawn
  • They have newly failing grades
What can you do if you believe one of your students is being abused by their partner?
  1. Focus on being a safe and stable presence in your student’s day. While they may never disclose to you that they are being abused, you may be helping them more than you know by just allowing them the space to breathe and rest.
  2. Let your school’s social worker, psychologist, or counselor know about your suspicions privately and in a respectful and fact-based manner. These professionals are trained in issues of teen dating abuse and will be able to follow up with your student.
  3. Teach your students how to Take a Stand FOR Healthy Relationships and incorporate teen dating violence awareness resources from NCADV into your classroom. Find out more about the resources available to teens experiencing abuse, have those resources available to all students and encourage your administration to explore the resources.
Want to learn more?

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV), in collaboration with Discovery Education, has recently created a curriculum aimed at equipping teachers and students with the tools, resources, and knowledge they need to Take a Stand FOR Healthy Relationships.

Take A Stand FOR Healthy Relationships empowers young people by providing middle and high school classrooms with educational resources and immersive program tools, including self-paced modules and interactive lesson plans, to encourage young learners to exercise skills in communication and self-awareness as they develop friendships and relationships of their own. Get started today and explore our curriculum at teens4healthyrelationships.com.

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Discussed in this week’s update:

    • DEN Summer Institutes are now open! Log in to Discovery Education and select Discovery Educator Network (DEN) from the left-side tool bar. Look for the Participate tab at the top of the page and select Summer Institutes. Find everything you need to know about the summer’s events, along with the application.
    • Check out the Professional Learning Center (PLC), in the Learn and Lead section for Resources for Student Exploration. These are rsources for sharing Discovery Education with students, including ideas for exploring interests, research, organizing evidence, and communicating ideas.
    • Current Events:
      • There are professional learning webinars happening throughout the month to provide you with integration ideas, updates on our services and ways to use Discovery Education resources with your students.  Check out #DENCHAT on Thursday evenings, as well.
    • Be sure to visit the DEN Online Community for the conversations happening in the discussion threads, but also don’t miss the library- filled with items shared by fellow Discovery Educators.
    • Don’t forget to get inspired by the #DE100 Ways campaign.
    • As always, we’ll leave you with a little #DENspiration

https://twitter.com/BSGSCSFoster/status/955769140542869504

— Lindsay Foster (@BSGSCSFoster) January 23, 2018

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Get reacquainted with one of these free webinars:

Differentiating Instruction

Whether you are new to Discovery Education or looking for new ways to maximize your experience, allow the Discovery Education team guide you through how to receive the latest updates on your MyDE page, maximize your search to access multimodal resources, increase engagement by launching the student experience, explore digital integration strategies available through the Professional Learning Center, and connect with other Discovery Educators through your DEN Online Community.

Thursday, February 15 | 7pm ET Thursday, March 1 | 6pm ET Thursday, March 15 | 7pm ET Favorite Instructional Strategies for Using Digital Content

Are you looking for new and creative ways to integrate digital media into your curriculum? Join DEN Community members to explore the top ten instructional strategies from our Spotlight on Strategies (SOS) series. SOS are creative, research-based instructional strategies, presented by teachers for teachers. These simple instructional strategies incorporate digital media in meaningful, effective and practical ways.

Tuesday, February 27 | 6pm ET Tuesday, March 13 | 7pm ET Top 5 Things to Know About Discovery Education Streaming

Whether you are new to Discovery Education or looking for new ways to maximize your experience, allow the Discovery Education team to guide you through how to receive the latest updates on your MyDE page, maximize your search to access multimodal resources, increase engagement by launching the student experience, explore digital integration strategies available through the Professional Learning Center, and connect with other Discovery Educators through your DEN Online Community.

Tuesday, February 20 | 7pm ET Tuesday, March 6 | 6pm ET Tuesday, March 20 | 7pm ET

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The Spotlight On Strategies series (CDN subscribers) is one of Discovery Education’s most popular resources. First introduced 2012, these strategies help teachers use media in effective and engaging ways in their classrooms.

The best part about the SOS is that they are flexible and can be used across grade levels and content areas. We are excited to share SOS Story: an SOS series that spotlights teachers showing how they put the SOS to work in their classrooms.

Teacher:  Melissa Murray

SOS Strategies: Sticky Back (CDN Version)

District: Marysville Joint Unified School District

Role: 2nd Grade Teacher

Twitter Handle: @lifeofmrsm

Melissa’s Story

I first discovered SOS Sticky Back (CDN Version) by browsing through the Discovery Education Professional Learning Center Strategies and Resources, which is home to the entire Spotlight on Strategies series. I chose this one specifically because it worked well with the learning goal I had for my students, which was finding key details in a text. My second graders are familiar with taking notes on Post-its, so SOS Sticky Back seemed to be a great tool to try out. I also felt that it would be a fun way for my students to process the information they were learning because it has a competitive spin to it. 

Using the Strategy

First, I had my students read a short article from their language arts books about opossums. They read the article as a whole group, pausing every so often to check for understanding. As they read, I asked students to think of one unique fact that they found interesting and encouraged them to select one that they didn’t think a friend would also choose. I mentioned that facts that were related to the topic (opossums) would receive one point, but if their fact was original (meaning that no one else mentioned it) they would receive a whopping five points. This is where their competitiveness kicked in: the challenge was on!

After reading the article, students wrote their names and facts on the back (sticky side) of their Post-its. Then, they turned them in by sticking them to the easel in our classroom. I read each Post-it aloud and organized them into two categories: original facts and duplicate facts. After all the stickies were sorted I tallied up the points. If you play several rounds of Sticky Back you can tally up the points and the students with the most points win! Because this was the first time my class used this strategy, we only did one round and didn’t designate a winner. Even so, all of my students were excited about collecting the points and want to play Sticky Back again.

SOS Sticky Back helped engage my students in the learning activities. They successfully cited evidence in the text, and because we reviewed each Post-it they retained and could retell the key details from the text as we continued investigating more about opossums throughout the week.

Strategy Adaptations

I allowed some of my students to draw pictures or diagrams to explain their facts, rather than requiring written text responses only. When it was time to read their Post-it aloud, these students were able to vocalize to the class what fact they chose from the article.

I also modified the point system to reflect how I manage my classroom.  The original SOS states that the winner is the student who has the most points. However, in my classroom, I ask students to participate in a lot of partner and group work, so I felt that tallying up the points by table groups was a more appropriate way to measure participation in the strategy.

Ideas For Sharing

Last school year I challenged myself to use a variety of SOS each month, so this school year I thought it would be neat to bring that same challenge to my colleagues. Each month I challenge my colleagues to utilize one or two different SOS with their students, and so far it has been going very well. I select an SOS and print the PDF for each teacher. I distribute the strategies and talk about how to use them at staff meetings. At the end of each month I love hearing all the ways that these strategies have helped their teaching and their students learning. It has brought me such joy being able to guide and support my colleagues with Discovery Education and the Spotlight on Strategies!

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Learning is: Exposing Misconceptions in Math

Visit Mrs Harach’s  grade 7 class in Spruce Grove, Alberta Canada. This month, they allowed our Discovery Education Community to join them in using an SOS in their Math class

The Big Idea

Mrs Harach uses Discovery Education’s SOS  to facilitate student learning in Structures Mathematics. Students have utilized the strategy, “Three Truths and a Lie” in other context and today they are using it to explore misconceptions in Math, specifically around fractions.

Step Inside

Learn more by stepping into a 360-degree view of Mrs Harach’s classroom. Here are tips to maximize the experience:

    • After launching the 360-degree image, spin your view to find the pin that showing the “i” icon. Play the embedded video to meet Mrs Harach as she explains the lesson.
    • Click on any pin. While they are numbered, it is not critical to follow them in order. Each pin represents various elements and aspects of the lesson as well as student work.

View the 360 Experience in a separate tab here.

Resources

Interested in creating a similar experience in your class?  Check out the strategy and resources used by Mrs Harach.  You can also explore additional resources and lesson plans by utilizing the updated “Search by Topic” feature within your Discovery Education resources.

Content: Explore over 900 resources on Fractions for grades 6-8
US link
Spotlight on Strategies: Three Truths and a Lie (US link)

Don’t be afraid to reach out to Mrs.HarachYou can find Sherri  on Twitter at @sherriharach

New to Discovery Education or interested in learning more about what you can do with Discovery Education Streaming Plus? Explore resources in the Professional Learning Center. (CND subscribers)

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All over China and the world, it’s time to celebrate the Lunar New Year. With many similarities to other New Year’s celebrations, such as fireworks, friends and family, and food, Chinese New Year celebrations focus on culture and history. Help your students understand the Chinese culture by studying this holiday and participating in some of the celebrations.

Featured Resource

Content Collection: Chinese New Year
Discovery Education Streaming
Grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, Assorted Resources

Celebrate the start of the lunar new year with a look at Chinese history and cultural symbols.

Be There via Video

One of the many benefits of video is that it can put you in another place through sight and sound. These videos take students into Chinese celebrations, where they get to know specific people and witness their holiday traditions. During the videos, use the strategy Connect the Dots to help students make text-to-self connections and strengthen comprehension.

 
Eureka!: China: Fun and Firecrackers: Eat, Play, Boys, Girls
Discovery Education Streaming
Grades K-2, 3-5, Full Video

A Chinese family in a city celebrates Chinese New Year. Everyone helps prepare the feast, and there are fireworks and gifts for the children.
 
Chinese New Year
Discovery Education Streaming, Social Studies Techbook
Grades 6-8, 9-12, Video Segment

Sheds light on the biggest festival of China’s calendar, Chinese New Year. The segment highlights Hong Kong’s explosive and elaborate fireworks display.

Celebrate with Color

Take a stress break by allowing students to color our clip art dragon, either independently or on an enlarged image on butcher paper hung on the wall. Have them use the video segments and other resources from Discovery Education to inspire their color choices.
 
Chinese Dragon
Discovery Education Streaming
Grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, Clip Art

 
 

Interested in joining classrooms around the world to Celebrate holidays year round? Check out our Timely Content Page for our Virtual Viewing Parties and more Instructional Strategies.

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From guest author Shana White. DEN Community Member, Lower School Physical Education Teacher, and Coach at Wesleyan School, Peachtree Corners, GA

February marks the beginning of Black History Month in the United States, when students commonly learn about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and other influential African Americans. Much of the history we study is familiar: they are the stories we’ve all been studying – and with good reason – for most of our lives. This year, I challenge you to go beyond the most mainstream narratives to grapple with some more nuanced stories of struggle and triumph. Whatever narratives you choose, though, I urge you to approach and present them with sensitivity, because the history can be painful and the stories are intense and must be taught with care. Students should never be placed in positions that may be dehumanizing, such as in simulations or debates.

If we wish to develop critical thinkers and digitally literate students, we must move past the commonly tempered historical context of the civil rights movement, slavery in America, and Black History as a whole. Educators should be encouraged to teach about lesser known Black Americans, those who were the first in their field, or whose visionary and innovative ideas and practices impacted so many. We must strive to share truth, as appropriate per age group, of the breadth and depth of Black stories and viewpoints. We must dig deeper into and regularly include the rich, impressive, and powerful history of Black Americans not only in February, but throughout the year, if we are to be responsible, culturally competent educators. By actively choosing to include Black figures in our regular lessons as well as diversifying the text and media we use, we provide students a new and improved perspective of the Black race and its rich history and culture.

Here are some lesson ideas to make Black History lessons and topics more meaningful, authentic, and culturally relevant.

  1. Have students research the Black Lives Matter Movement and compare and contrast it to the Black Panther Party during the Jim Crow era. Who were the major leaders of these movements? What were their stances on major issues of the time? Students can hold a Socratic seminar about the leadership, ideas, and effectiveness of the two groups.
  2. Introduce the story of Ruby Bridges and the Little Rock Nine and allow students to research these individuals. Have students examine various data from text about desegregation efforts of the past and the segregation that still exists in American schools. Have students examine the images from these students’ first few days in newly integrated schools. Using the SOS strategy Circle of Viewpoints, have students select a viewpoint and write a letter to a friend about the first day of school integration. (Possible viewpoints: a white student, a Black student, parent of a Black student, parent of a white student, school teacher/administrator.)
  3. Provide students a collection of images from the civil rights movement of the 60s and 70s and current day protests and marches. Using the SOS strategy Multiple Perspectives, have students pick several people out of each image to write about. [What emotions might these people be feeling? What might their body language convey? What are they marching about/protesting? How might you (the student) be able to relate to the emotions you imagine these people are having?] Have students reflect in written and video form.
  4. Provide students with information and videos about the Underground Railroad. Using Google Maps and other resources, have students create a potential route on the Underground Railroad from the South to the North. Have students calculate the distance traveled, determine potential stopping points, normal gait characteristics (for adult males and females), and estimate the amount of time it may have taken. Have students investigate the terrain of their potential route as well as seasonal and weather variables that could impact travel. This lesson is a non-dehumanizing way to teach the significance of the Underground Railroad and its role in liberating enslaved people and an opportunity to implement STEM concepts.
  5. Have students research the following terms: racism, bias, bigotry, privilege. How are these terms related to each other? How are they different? Examine the writings/text of speeches by Dr. King, Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde and other civil rights leaders. How did these civil rights leaders define the terms above? What are examples of systems/laws they believed to be racist against Black Americans? How have the systems changed – or not changed – today?
  6. Have students research famous Black musicians, dancers, and hip hop artists. [What are some of their accomplishments? What artists had conflicts and/or collaborated with each other? Whose music/dancing from current day was influenced by them? Who are some of the non-black artists (e.g., Elvis Presley) whose music/dance style was influenced by Black musicians/dancers?] Then, have students create their own music, dance, or song lyrics using styles and techniques similar to the Black musician, dancer, or hip hop artist they researched.

Here are other great resources for incorporating Black Americans and Black History into your curriculum throughout the year.

Shana is a veteran educator of twelve years serving in both public and private school during her career. Shana is a passionate educator who believes in purposeful disruption of status quo, is passionate about safe and inclusive schools for all students, and works as an advocate for marginalized groups in education. 

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Valentine’s Day is all about heart. Heart candy, heartfelt emotions, heart-shaped cards and gifts. Why not celebrate this day by studying the actual heart with your students? The possibilities are endless: anatomy, biology, art, careers, history. We’ve gotten the ideas pumping and offer these resources and activities for you. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Use our Valentine’s Day Content Collection to find resources for all grade bands, including content, lesson starters, and instructional strategies.

Anatomy and the Heartbeat

Engage your students in the beat of the heart – literally. Start the activity with the strategy Surround Sound from our Spotlight on Strategies series and challenge your students to 1) identify the sound and 2) identify which heartbeat is normal, fast, and very fast. Then, use the videos, below, to review what’s behind each heartbeat.

 
Heartbeat
Discovery Education Streaming
Grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, Sound Effect

Heart Beating Normal Speed
Heart Beating Fast Speed
Heart Beating Very Fast Speed
 
More Science Please: Follow the Beat of Your Heart
Discovery Education Streaming, Science Techbook
Grades K-2, 3-5, Full Video

Explores each part of the heart and reveals how the heart provides the entire body with blood and oxygen.
 
Science in Progress: Reviewing the Cardiovascular System
Discovery Education Streaming, Science Techbook
Grades 6-8, 9-12, Full Video

Provides a detailed overview of the cardiovascular system by introducing the role of each part of the heart, and by revealing how the cardiovascular system works with other body systems.

Health and the Heart

Help younger students understand the relationship between healthy habits and the heart by assigning this virtual lab, available in English and Spanish.
 
On Your Mark, Get Set…Start Your Heart!
(Spanish Version)
Science Techbook
Grades K-2, 3-5, Virtual Lab

The cycling team needs help getting in shape for the big race. What kind of exercise will make them “heart healthy” so they can win? Students try a variety of exercise schemes to find out.

Art, Robotics, and the Heart

Make the connection between art and robotics and careers in the medical field. Have your students read or watch these resources and complete Quick Writes from the SOS series about whether they would be interested in any of the aspects depicted in these career fields.
 
From Art to Heart
Science Techbook
Grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, Reading Passage

How art helped doctors develop the artificial heart.
 
 
Heart Surgery
Science Techbook
Grades 9-12, Video Segment

Cameras and robotic arms assist a surgeon as he performs arterial bypass surgery. The patient’s health improves, allowing her to return to a more normal life.

Interested in joining classrooms around the world to Celebrate holidays year round? Check out our Timely Content Page for our Virtual Viewing Parties and more Instructional Strategies.

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Welcome to our special SOS Top Ten series. This month, we’re highlighting some of the most popular ways to use Spotlight on Strategies (CDN Version) in Social Studies classrooms.

Whether you are asking students to analyze a historical photograph, order events in a chronological progression, or compare primary source documents written during a specific time period, teaching Social Studies means immersing students in learning about people and their relationships with one another and the world.

The Spotlight on Strategies (CDN Version) series offers many opportunities for students to investigate different perspectives, explore new ideas, and develop an understanding of the progression of events over time.

When asked about their favorite strategies to use for teaching Social Studies concepts, your DEN Friends were staunch advocates for strategies that involve students in critical analysis, discussion, and synthesis of information. They also picked strategies that encourage students to be creative and really dig into topics they are studying.

Top Ten SOS: Social Studies

Visual Walkabout (CDN Version) Give students a sneak peek of the content in an upcoming unit with a gallery of images that students visit, make connections with, and ask questions about.

Multiple Perspectives (CDN Version) Have students assume a perspective other than their own while learning about an historical event and write a narrative piece about it from that perspective.

They Said What? (CDN Version) Ask students to demonstrate their understanding of an historical event by creating dialogue based on content knowledge between the characters shown in a still photo.

Sample Fakebook page created by a student during a study of Dr. Martin Luther King in Audra Barton’s classroom.

Fakebook (CDN Version)  Have students create a mock profile page for a person they’re learning about. Ask them to include not only important events and places, but also have them include friend connections and comments those friends could have made on their timeline.

Make It Concrete (CDN Version)  Ask students to demonstrate understanding by making concrete poems.

Journals (CDN Version) Encourage students to summarize their learning by keeping a daily journal that includes drawing a picture and writing a few phrases or sentences.

Thinking Hats (CDN Version) Assign students thinking styles and have them use only that style to consider the information in a Social Studies digital resource.

321 Pyramid (CDN Version)  This pyramid framework is helpful in guiding students in the process of summarizing information.

Silence Is Golden (CDN Version) Redirect student attention away from the audio and toward the imagery in video segments. Have them and discuss what they are seeing with one another and make predictions about what is to come.

Inquiry Chart (CDN Version)  Have students gather information from multiple sources in a chart that helps them to synthesize information they’ve gathered. The Inquiry Chart is an excellent tool for guiding research.

Thank you to these DEN Friends who contributed their ideas for using Spotlight On Strategies to teach Social Studies concepts. Reach out to them via social media to find out more!

Cecilia Wilburn-Davis

Luke Strawser

Audra Barton

Dacia Jones

Lauri Vitale

Katie Bollinger

Cindy Lane

Hugh McDonald

Jen Cucchiarelli

Ann Schmidt Clermont

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I am passionate about students using online tools and standalone apps to create. I truly believe creation allows students to showcase how they have turned the content into their own knowledge. Many of these tools require the use of images for creation of the product. These images can be photos taken by the student, drawings done by the student, or images found in online collections.

It is important for students to realize which online images they have permission to use and how to give credit to the creator. Here are some links, tips, and tricks to help make this easy for them!

SITES WITH FREE IMAGES

There are many sites that have free images and allow users to download, edit, and use the images without any attribution to the creator.

Pixabay, which includes photos, illustrations, and vector graphics, allows users to “copy, modify, distribute, and use the images, even for commercial purposes, all without asking for permission or giving credits to the artist.”

Flickr: The Commons is made of images shared by member institutions that have “no known copyright restriction.” The items may be in the public domain or owned by the institution itself, which is not claiming the copyright on the images. One tip: don’t have students search in the Flickr search box at the top of the page. Look down the page for “The Commons” search box.

The Flickr group, Internet Archive Book Images, is a collection of over 5.2 million historical photos and images from the books in the Internet Archive. Each image carries a “no known copyright restriction” license, so can be used for any purpose and edited. There is no requirement to cite the images, but enough information is included in the description to do so.

SITES WITH FREE IMAGES THAT REQUIRE ATTRIBUTION

Pics4Learning is targeted to student and teacher use of images and includes curriculum-related items that can be used for projects, on the Web, and in portfolios. The collection is comprised of user-contributed images. Images all include this usage information- “This image may be used by teachers and students in school and classroom activities for the express purpose of improving student educational opportunities. The photographer retains the copyright to this image.” Each image includes the full text citation for the image. I could not find this expressly stated on the site, but I am assuming, if the photographer holds the copyright to the image, the images should not be edited without the permission of the creator.

OpenPhoto is a collection of images primarily for artists, developers, students and teachers. The photographers freely license the images and the attribution code is included.

Wikimedia Commons includes millions of free images, sounds, and videos to use. The usage page states: “Everyone is allowed to copy, use and modify any files here freely as long as they follow the terms specified by the author; this often means crediting the source and author(s) appropriately and releasing copies/improvements under the same freedom to others.” What is great about this collection is that it can be searched in many different languages, making it a tool that can be used effectively by all learners.

FINDING FREE 360° IMAGES

With the growth of the use of VR to support teaching and learning, here are some online places to find 360° images to use with a simple head-mounted display. Again, students would have to search for images they are allowed to use by checking the licensing and usage rights.

The Flickr 360°group includes almost 30,000 images with many students can download and use with a headset or a 360° viewer app.

The Flickr Equirectangular group includes images that are taken or created in the 2:1 format that make them usable with a VR headset.

I have created a Flickr group, 360° Images for Schools, to collect Creative Commons-licensed 360° images from teachers and students around the world. The collection is growing to be a depository of images that can be downloaded and used in schools.

CURATED COLLECTIONS

Oftentimes, in schools, we would like to use collections that are curated and vetted with our students to avoid any “surprises” when students are searching for images. In addition, collections that permit student editing and transformation of images to meet their learning goal is welcomed.

Discovery Education Streaming includes over 42,000 searchable images  to support teaching and learning. Each image can be downloaded in various sizes, edited, and re-used. In addition, the citation for the image in MLA, APA, and Chicago Manual of Style formats is included.

CREATIVE COMMONS

In March of 2015, my Kathy’s Katch blog post dealt with information literacy. One section of the post included information about the Creative Commons project, and it is worth reposting here!

The Creative Commons project has helped immensely with the ease of finding images that can be used in a research report or project.  The Creative Commons project allows content producers to explicitly state how their content may be used. These creators make a determination of whether their asset may be used commercially or just non-commercially, can be transformed into a new product by someone else, and, if they allow transforming of their work, the creators can also require the person who made the changes to apply the same Creative Commons license to their new creation and allow others to edit the new work.

When creators upload images to Flickr or a video to  YouTube, they can pick the combination of permissions they want to allow for the use of their creation, and the Creative Commons license is published.

Here is an overview of the components of the license.

The Creative Commons site has a search engine that allows students to search by license terms, but the three places that students usually search for information and images — Google, Flickr, and Bing — also have Creative Commons-licensed image searching built right in. It works pretty much the same way in each of these tools.

CITING IMAGES

It goes without saying that students should include citations for images they use in a project on a works-cited page. Another idea is to place the citation directly on the image, so it stays with the image if it is used again. This can easily be done in any of the meme apps or tools that allow text to be put on top of an image or in any traditional image-editing software. Another easy way to do this is for students to locate their images and save them on separate slides in Keynote, PowerPoint, or Google Slides. Then they can use the text tool to add the citation to the picture on the slide. When done collecting and adding citations to the images, students can simply export/save the slideshow out as JPEGS and the images are all set to use!

The image citation components from MLA include the following:

It is rare, on most image collections sites, to be able to identify all of these components in an attribution. The student should include as much information as possible and always include the URL of the image. In Flickr, when looking at an image in a collection, the student should go back to the original image and use that URL. For instance, an image in the 360° Images for Schools group will have a URL that looks like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/141855263@N03/27492650579/in/pool-360images4schools/

If I simply remove everything before the reference to the group, shown above in red, I am led to the creator’s Flickr account and the actual URL of the image which is https://www.flickr.com/photos/141855263@N03/2749265057 which is the URL that should be used in the image citation.

In addition, in Flickr, when looking at all sizes of the photo in order to download one that is the needed size, the URL changes, too. When picking the 1600×800 version of the image, as shown below, the URL changed to https://www.flickr.com/photos/141855263@N03/27492650579/sizes/h/ 

Again, simply delete the information after the photograph’s number, as indicated in red above, and use the URL of https://www.flickr.com/photos/141855263@N03/27492650579 in the citation.

There is one interesting Creative Commons image search engine designed for schools called Photos for Class. When a student does a search, and finds an image to download, the image downloads with the citation attached in a black bar at the bottom of the image (shown below). The citation includes the name of the creator, the title of the photo, and a clickable URL to the original image, and the Creative Commons license.

I think the site makes it easy for students to find images they have permission to use (even commercially) and have permission to edit. However, since the search engine only searches images that have this same license (CC BY 2.0), students are missing out on images that don’t allow editing, don’t permit commercial use, or  those requiring students to share their new work with the same license.

Do you have any favorite image sites to share or ways in which you teach students to search for and cite images? Please share in the comments!

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