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I’d go top and shorts. It makes it easier to put on/take off and use the washroom. With the bands around the midriff, you can easily hide the transition between the shorts and shirt.

Duckie | Admin | Support the Blog (Ko-Fi) | Etsy

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If I wanted to make the mask as easy as possible I would use craft foam. It comes in black and orange so you wouldn’t need to paint it, it is fairly easy to cut those crisp spikes and it can be heat formed a bit to fit on the face. It is also really lightweight, which is a plus!

If I wanted it to be stiffer, I might do it with worbla or worbla over foam. I’ve made face masks with worbla before and you can easily get the material to form to your face shape – just be careful, too hot and you can burn yourself! I used hot water to heat the worbla for my mask, it gives an even heat and doesn’t get quite as hot as a heat gun does. Since worbla isn’t flexible when cool you can sand it and use fillers on it for a smoother surface before painting.

All the best, 

Duckie | Admin | Support the Blog (Ko-Fi) | Etsy

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The term is Lekku. You might find some inspiration by searching for “Togruta Lekku”.

There are a lot of materials you can use, depending on the texture you want. For example, you can make a sleeve out of latex to give it a rubbery skin texture, use fabric for different textures or use fur. You can wrap it with thermoplastics, paper mache or craft foam, using a filler to fill gaps. You can fill the gaps with wood filler, epoxy, bondo, foam clay or paper clay and sand it smooth. 

Hope this gives you some inspiration!
Duckie | Admin | Support the Blog (Ko-Fi) | Etsy

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jintaru:

Top 10 best cosplays of Holmat 2018.

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I don’t personally have experience with them, you may want to reach out to the Cosplay Tutorial Hangout facebook group for more people’s feedback. 

Is there a way to make it adjusted to your shape:
If you are commissioning the design or purchasing from a seller they should be able to make some adjustments based on your measurements. Some sellers have one-size-fits-most designs which may be a little off but generally should be close. Depending on where you purchase from and how close your measurements are, a one-size-fits-most design may end up baggy in some areas. 

If you are designing it yourself or modifying a template, you should be able to adjust it based on your measurements. You’ll want to get a friend to help you take accurate body measurements for this.

You can also take a straight-on, full body photo of yourself and, in a paint program, overlay the images to get a rough idea of the sizing on yourself. You’ll need to do some math to scale your picture and the bodysuit design properly. 

Where/what to search for if I want to print it

You’ll want to find fabric printers or zentai-suit specific printers. Try terms like “print a zentai suit” or “print a spandex suit” or “print on fabric”. You may want to reach out to some local cosplay groups to see what stores people recommend. I suggest local because they’ll usually be able to suggest stores that ship to your area for the best price.

what kind of fabric would be recommended?

4-way stretch Spandex/Lycra is the common material to use.

Hope this helps!
Duckie | Admin | Support the Blog (Ko-Fi) | Etsy

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Hello there!

For a garment like this, I would look for a pattern for what is called a swing dress. This is a garment that has a severe A-line shape that flares from the shoulders and is not fitted through the body. A pattern like this one would work well – just be sure to use the appropriate neckline variant, along with the long sleeves.

As for the volume, you have a couple of options.

One is to make the garment out of a fabric that has some natural stiffness to it. Since the garment is coat or cloak-like, a coating fabric, bottomweight twill, or a heavy ponte di roma would all work to varying degrees of softness and drape. Test some fabrics at the store over your arm or get a swatch to see what the drape and feel is like. This will create a soft, natural drape to the garment.

Two would be to sew horsehair braid into the hem. This is a type of plastic webbing used to add stiffness and body to skirts and similar garments (you know Sailor Moon and other giant shoujo anime ruffles? That’s how those are made), and would create a more structured body to the garment. Horsehair braid will help the bottom of the garment stick out from your body naturally to some degree, while still looking natural (that is, not like a single rigid hoop at the bottom would)

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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Hello there!

Making vs. buying is a personal choice, and sometimes it helps to talk through the pros and cons of each.

Making is good for a few reasons: you enjoy crafting and want to make things, you want custom measurements/materials/etc., you can enter it in contests (if that is your goal), you may or may not save money (more on that later), and you can get things that aren’t found easily for sale.

If you want to work on your crafting skills, learning to sew would be a good way to do so, and then you can make (or alter) costumes in the future.

With buying, you save a lot of time, may or may not save money, have the advantage of industrial techniques and equipment you may not have access to, get a professional finish, and can have matching outfits for a group.

If you want to have something quickly and not have to worry about making it, buying is often better. I also tend to recommend buying for commonly available uniforms, since it will be more uniform with a group, and simply because things like school uniforms can be simple, but also a bit of a pain. The drawbacks to buying are that you can’t get custom materials in a mass-produced costume, and often have to deal with pre-set sizes rather than custom sizing.

Cost may be another factor. Mass-produced costumes are sometimes cheaper than making it yourself, since the factories have economies of scale and assembly line production to their advantage, meaning that they can get materials cheaper (and they often use one material for most of a costume, and across many costume offerings, so it is even cheaper for them to only stock a few types of fabrics in multiple colors) and their labor is quick and cheap. Commissions are going to be more expensive than making it yourself almost every time, since the commissioner does not have these advantages (and also is hopefully paying themself a living wage, which you may not get with overseas factories).

If you don’t want to tackle the challenge of making a blazer yourself (though you may be able to find a relatively simple pattern for one – maybe this?), you can’t find a shop that does custom measurements/lets you buy the top and bottom separately, you don’t have money for a commissioner, and you don’t want to alter or have a bought blazer altered to fit, you have a third option that is a middle route: you can buy the blazer to fit, and then make your own skirt.

Knife pleated skirts are one of the simplest garments you can make, as long as you are careful with your measuring, so it would be a good option if you are just starting to sew or want to learn – a skirt in this style can be made with rectangles, so there aren’t any complicated shapes to deal with! Buying a pattern for a basic knife pleated skirt (often in the costume/cosplay section of pattern companies) would walk you through the steps. If you go this route, I would bring the blazer to the fabric store so that you can match the color of the stripes as closely as possible.

I hope that helps you decide! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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Hello there!

For a fabric mask that goes over your face, you will need to find a material more sheer than typical pillowcase material. I would still go with a natural fiber that is woven, if possible, to keep the pillowcase-like appearance and to aid with heat buildup and breathability. You can also more easily dye these types of materials, so your weathering can be done with ease and without having to add an opaque material like paint. (The weathering will also help the material look less sheer)

Cotton voile or gauze would be good options, or a batiste if you want something a little more opaque. I would go to a fabric store, hold up the fabrics very close to your face, and see what gets you the best effect that you can still see through.

I would add a closure somewhere to make it easily removable (elastic loosely around the neck?), and make sure that you take breaks while wearing it. If doing a large amount of walking or if you are in the heat, I would remove it so that you don’t end up with too much heat buildup in the mask or have a difficult time breathing.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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Hello there!

For a tail these size, you will likely need at least some stuffing, even if the entire tail is not stuffed. This is so that the shape can be held in place without any under structures showing through the outer fabric.

Here is a tutorial for a different type of tail style, but it doesn’t use stuffing and has a sturdy attachment method. I would also recommend looking through some tail tutorials to gather more ideas. The fursuiting community is also a great resource for tutorials, so if you’ve only looked for cosplay tutorials, I would branch out.

For something like this, you will want to build an armature of sturdy wire in the shape that you want, and use either a layer of batting over it for the plush roundness or a layer of soft upholstery foam for the same effect. The interior can be hollow, which will save on weight. You can then make a fur covering for it and add your attachments.

The duct tape belts that you are planning will unfortunately not be strong enough to hold a bulky and heavy item such as this is place, ad duct tape eventually stretches and wears out. You will want something firm that can hold the tail in place without sagging over time. I would recommend creating a wide belt out of non-stretch fabric to wear under the outfit or using nylon webbing, like backpack straps are made of. Make sure any attachments are padded.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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Hello there!


Lining the shorts to create extra space for the poof is a good idea, as is stuffing it, especially if you want a very stylized and cartoony look. Batting would be a better option than foam for this, since it can more easily conform to the poof of the legs (and create the bit of heaviness seen at the bottom of the pants) without needing to go all the way up to the waistband, and without too much added thickness that isn’t as compressible. Another option, especially if you want more poofiness towards the bottom of the pant, is to gather long strips of tulle and sew them into the bottom hemline, between the shell and the lining. This is a technique often used to keep large puff sleeves poofy, and may help you here.

For the lining, I would recommend making it with a straighter leg than the outer pant, and then sewing the two together at the bottom. This will require shaping the outer pant leg so that it is a bit bulbous at the bottom, but then tapers quickly to match the lining. This will allow there to be some space between the shell and the lining, creating not only space for your stuffing, but will help the outer pants stay a bit poofy all on their own (and will allow for the visual heaviness of the more bulbous bottom of the pant). Try a few mockups at ½ scale, then scale it up to a full-sized mockup once you have a pattern that seems to work, and tweak from there to fit a human form.

As for attaching the zipper, it shouldn’t be much different from any other fly front pants, only you are going to insert the lining into the seam with the fly underlap on one side, and insert the zipper between the lining and shell on the other side. Here are a few tutorials to give you some ideas on how it can go together: 1 (button fly, but you would sub a zipper) 2 3 (needs a subscription, but you can get a free trial if you don’t have one).

Be sure that whatever you choose for your outer fabric, that it has enough structure on its own to help hold that shape.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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