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The CloserIQ Weekly Roundup features a list of the best content we’ve been reading recently. We’ve compiled some of our favorite reads to help you advance in your sales career and build top sales teams.

Featured Article 8 Common Sales Objections and How to Handle Them

A sales pitch, no matter how perfect, can quickly be ruined by poor objection handling afterward. Everyone has questions, no matter the industry, no matter the product. It’s a rare day when you pitch someone and they simply submit and ask where to sign. Read more >

This and more of our favorite reads this week…
What You Need to Do to Start Social Selling (Mai Le of Salesforce)

“Though sale tactics are probably as vast as the stars in the sky, one that has gained traction over the last decade is social selling. Not surprisingly, its ascent is tied to the increased usage of social media in all aspects of our personal and professional lives.”

The Perfect Networking Followup Email Strategy (Sujan Patel of Mailshake)

“Rather than letting great networking leads fall through the cracks, put a networking follow-up strategy in place to ensure you get the maximum value out of every new contact.”

11 Career Goals to Achieve in Your First Year as an SDR (James Meincke of CloserIQ)

“Year one as an SDR is full of excitement and possibility—but it can also provoke anxiety. Unfortunately, there’s usually no how-to guide that tells new SDRs exactly what they should be doing during each stage of that first year. As a result, too many SDRs flail around and fail to achieve their potential. ”

Importance of Sales 101: Lessons Learned from a Career in Sales (Amy Guarino of Kyndi)

“My first experience in selling something came when I decided to start a book club in second grade. Unsurprisingly, it didn’t go over well. A book club is too nerdy even for second graders.”

20 Critical Skills to Include in Your Resume (For All Types of Jobs) (Vicky Oliver of Execuchick Press )

“A resume describes your critical skills in a way that compels a hiring manager to want to meet you. That is a resume’s sole purpose. And make no mistake: Writing a resume is an art.”

50+ Candidates Sourcing Statistics for Recruiters (Molly Clarke of ZoomInfo)

“The standard hiring process involves posting a job description and waiting for qualified candidates to apply. While this works in some cases, candidate sourcing can be a more effective way to attract new talent.”

The 38 Software Recruiting Tools of 2019 (Olivia Folick of Ideal)

“While exciting, the potential of these new technologies can become overwhelming. In November 2018, Josh Bersin, industry analyst and founder of Bersin by Deloitte, revealed he is currently tracking “more than 1400 HR technology companies.””

Your Approach to Hiring Is All Wrong (Peter Capelli of Wharton School )

“Today’s approach couldn’t be more different. Census data shows, for example, that the majority of people who took a new job last year weren’t searching for one: Somebody came and got them.”

Building Sales Teams: How, When and Who (Jason Lemkin of SaaStr)

“As a sales manager, you’re told to downsize your sales team. You have to choose between 2 salespeople. One underperforms, but is well-liked and honest. The other is a top producer, but with questionable ethics? Which do you fire?”

Breaking Down Sales Velocity (John Byrne of Rekener)

“Sales Velocity is a powerful diagnostic tool for sales leaders because it captures the three metrics managers value most when evaluating reps on bottom-of-the-funnel KPIs.”

If you know any articles that you think we should feature in our next week’s roundup, feel free to reach out to us: content@closeriq.com.

Click here to subscribe to our weekly newsletter

The post Weekly Roundup – June 26, 2019 appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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You’ve spent the past years — and countless hours and resources — working on optimizing how you attract and recruit Millennials. You’ve got a strong handle on it now. The thing is, there’s a new generation entering the workforce: Generation Z. It’s time to make way!

Although sources tend to vary, most agree that people belonging to Gen Z were born in the space of time between 1996 and 2012. Some other names include “Digital Natives”, “Gen Wii”, and “iGeneration.” For some quick context, here are the 3 previous generations by time span:

  • Millennials: 1981-1996
  • Gen X: 1965-1980
  • Baby Boomers: 1946-1964

When you do the math, Gen Z are between 7 and 22 years old — which means they’re starting to enter the workforce. And unlike their predecessors, the Millennials, who they watched struggle with immense college debt, Generation Z is looking at different ways they can make a living.

One such way is by forgoing traditional college and entering the workforce sooner — and many Gen Z’ers are seriously considering doing just that.

What that means for you is that you’ll be confronted with younger, incredibly digitally-savvy candidates looking for employment with companies that provide on-demand training, rather than fresh college graduates. Waiting until the traditional 20 or 21 years old may be already too late to start recruiting gen Z candidates.

This means it’s a whole new ballgame for recruiting. Here’s what you need to know.

5 things to know about recruiting Gen Z 1. Start recruiting Gen Z early

In a global survey by Universum, a research and advisory firm, 47% of the 50,000 respondents reported they might join the workforce straight out of high school. 60% reported they would welcome employers offering education in the field more than a college degree.

So employer branding needs to start sooner than traditional with this group and start targeting their new and unique needs.

2. Communicate value and meaning

For Generation Z, work-life balance is critical. They’d prefer to work part-time than work longer hours and make more money. 51% of North American respondents to the Universum survey mentioned above, selected “flexible” work as their most important career goal.

What does that mean for you? Target meaning and value in your messaging. What kind of long-term career growth can they expect? How will it make an impact? More so than salary and financial security, Gen Z is concerned about the positive impact on society that your company has — and that message needs to be shown in your branding.

3. Target their entrepreneurial spirit

Gen Z grew up with the answer to just about any question which can be answered immediately using the internet. That means they may well become the most independent generation ever. So Generation Z will be looking for independence in their roles, entrepreneurial-type opportunities, and purpose from their employers.

Offering flexible work schedules and virtual teams can help; but even more so, Gen Z will look for employers that provide the chance to voice their opinions and quickly climb the ladder.

4. Keep it visual

Unlike other generations, Gen Z doesn’t like to be reached out to on their social media. At least — not direct job-related contact. Instead, engage them with personal content: employee stories about working at the company, profiles, etc. Keep them short and use emojis and other visual content — get the message across as fast as possible.

As another note, Generation Z actually prefers face-to-face interactions, whether they be across FaceTime, Skype, or other platforms. To them, it’s about a personal connection and being able to see who’s on the other end.

5. Provide clear growth paths

A study by Robert Half found that the #1 priority for 64% of Generation Z candidates in their job search was the opportunity for career growth. So showing a clear developmental path from entry-level to the next career level needs to be a must. Developing in-house mentorship programs will save you in the long run by helping to retain Gen Z employees.

Pro tips for attracting Gen Z candidates 1. Focus on an exceptional candidate experience

Gen Z candidates are much less likely than previous generations to do business with a company that they have a poor candidate experience at. Since the candidate experience starts on your website, removing friction from anything as seemingly trivial as non-mobile-friendly career pages and slow communication times are musts.

Using innovative new tech like AI to automate identifying and recruiting candidates, chatbots to provide quick communication, and other tools that smooth the process from resume to interview scheduling can give you a competitive edge when recruiting Gen Z. Adam Robinson discusses using predictive hiring tools in an excellent podcast with Ryan Jenkins here.

2. Understand their priorities for choosing roles

Unlike previous generations, stability is not Gen Z’ers first priority when they apply to and remain in a role. What they’re looking for are roles they can create around themselves, rather than fit themselves into a role. Given the candidate driven market that is a current reality, to choose (and retain) the best, your company needs to be the best. So except when a very specific skill is required, select a candidate whose personality fits the role, rather than their ability — they’ll fit the job and step up.

3. Speak their language

Generation Z is unique: they’re the very first group to be born into a completely digital world. Not only can their brains absorb an immense amount of information, but they can take it instantaneously. As the world gets soaked with more and more information, it needs Gen Z to be able to keep up.

One way you can attract Gen Z candidates is by speaking their language. They want a positive work environment that offers creativity, personal growth, and social connection. As mentioned briefly earlier (tip #2), use social media to showcase your workplace’s culture and to spark discussions. Engage in conversation to actively show that your company offers employees opportunities for meaningful innovation, creativity, connection, and growth.

4. Give them someone/something to relate to

Gen Z candidates don’t relate to Jerry in accounting who’s been there for 25 years — they can’t imagine being with one company that long. Rather than long-term stability, they want work-life balance. You can provide Generation Z candidates with someone to relate to by bringing in Gen Z employees, or have an internship or co-op program to attract them in — and snag them after they graduate.

Start recruiting now

Generation Z is just starting to enter the workforce — but it won’t be that way for long. Soon there’ll be a constant influx of candidates belonging to the Gen Z cohort. You don’t have to — and can’t — change your recruiting strategy overnight, but you can start testing now to see what works. For example, many older workers are on LinkedIn, but younger candidates are more likely to be on Instagram. Test to see where they are and what works — you’ll only wind up more prepared than you would be otherwise, and better off than your competition.
Click here to download our free “Sales Hiring Interview Rubric”

The post 10 Tips for Recruiting Gen Z Candidates appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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The San Francisco Bay area is home to hundreds of startups. In fact, Silicon Valley is still on the leading edge of the tech industry. Thanks to a mature infrastructure, talented professionals, and a strong engineering tradition. That is why, it’s a great place for tech startups to make a name for themselves – including health technology companies.

Rapid and proprietary technological advancements have made these types of companies exciting places to work. Therefore, whether it is connecting patients to the right doctor for them, creating communities for those with chronic conditions to support each other, or even just helping people and employers identify insurance they can afford.

Consequently, if you’ve ever wanted to move into the healthcare tech space, or you just find it interesting to follow – these are the San Francisco companies to check out in 2019.

10 best San Francisco Healthcare tech companies 1. Collective Health

501-1,000 employees
See job openings

Collective Health is the first integrated solution that allows self-funded employers to administer healthcare plans to their employees. According to the Collective’s website, only 4% of Americans understand common health insurance terms. That is why, the organization clarifies things, helping members find a doctor, ask questions about care, check coverage “on the go” with an app, and more.

On the tech side of things, Collective Health analyzes employers’ programs, identifies which specific members would benefit from which programs, and provides those insights. Besides, Collective Health is hiring for a variety of sales roles.

2. Grand Rounds

201-500 employees
See job openings

Grand Rounds also presides in the healthcare insurance tech sector. For this purpose, they use a data-driven “matching engine”. In fact, Grand pinpoints doctors in the customer’s network who are best equipped – in both experience and geography – to address their needs. Afterward, in-house experts double-check that recommendations are the best for you, and like Collective Health, help you to understand the ins and outs of your healthcare experience.

Grand Rounds is currently hiring for an enterprise sales director and several sales operations roles.

3. Hinge Health

51-200 employees
See job openings

Hinge Health helps people who have musculoskeletal (body) pain. With this in mind, they believe that 80% of patients don’t get evidence-based care. Also, that  2/3 of surgeries are avoidable, and opioids aren’t effective for chronic pain – bold claims. Instead of prescribing opioids or surgery to correct chronic pain, Hinge Health uses a 3-tiered approach combining technology with exercise.

To begin with, customers are given wearable sensors that provide real-time feedback on how well you’re doing an exercise and a tablet with the Hinge Health app and a digital program installed. After that, when wearing the sensors, customers are taken through a 15-minute exercise program. In addition, They’re educated on their condition and given behavioral health coaching – all through the program and sensors.

Hinge Health boasts a 60% reduction in pain and is hiring for several director positions in San Francisco.

4. Ginger.io

51-100 employees
See job openings

Ginger.io is an app to help employees get the mental health support they need – on demand. To that end, it includes behavioral health coaching, teletherapy, telepsychiatry, and guided self-care. Using data science and virtual care, Ginger.io, consequently, helps people get much-needed mental health support without having to find time to commute to an office.

Ginger.io was developed by collecting billions of points of data from people’s interactions with their mobile phones.  Those same points of data now power “the world’s most advanced behavioral health system, empowering a team of high-quality coaches, therapists, and psychiatrists.”

Ginger is currently hiring for a regional sales director position.

5. Arterys

51-200 employees
See job openings

Arterys is the world’s first online medical imaging platform. In fact, they’re FDA-cleared, powered by Artificial Intelligence, and 100% web-based. It allows physicians to upload medical imaging – MRIs, CT scans, etc. – to one cloud supercomputer, with AI-assistance helping accelerate clinical workflows.

Arterys’ solutions help physicians analyze, share, collaborate, and consult on medical imaging, particularly for cardiac (heart), liver, lung, and breast tissue imaging.

They are currently hiring for several sales manager positions.

6. Lively

11-50 employees
See job openings

Lively provides a free, FDIC-insured Health Savings Account (HSA). Using proprietary payroll syncing capabilities, they connect with all the major online payroll systems that employers use. Besides, Lively makes HSA management seamless, automated, and 100% online – no paper here. This helps automate the manual and tedious tasks of running employee HSA administration.

Lively is hiring for strategic and business development roles.

7. Glow

11-50 employees
See job openings

Glow offers fertility products. Their flagship is a fertility tracker app that helps women track their natural cycles and get pregnant – and it increases those odds by 40%. However, they also offer a management platform (PAAS) for fertility clinics. By assisting with analytics, conversion rates, patient support, etc, it streamlines manual processes.

Glow also provides many other fertility programs, plans, and solutions to help customers save money and achieve their pregnancy goals. Besides, Glow is hiring across a range of sales positions.

8. Augmedix

501-1,000 employees
See job openings

Augmedix is powered by Google Glass and provides a remote scribe service. To this end, doctors simply wear the glasses and assess their patients, while Augmedix provides a team of real-time, quality-controlled, customized remote scribes to take care of patient charting and many other administrative tasks.

Since Augmedix can take over documentation and administrative tasks, this allows clinicians to focus on the patient, not the paperwork. Therefore, patients get more time with doctors, and doctors have the time to spare. They’re currently looking for an enterprise sales manager.

9. Verana Health

11-50 employees
See job openings

Verana Health is a platform that assembles all the largest clinical databases in medicine together in one place. By doing so, they make it easier for life science companies to speed up medical research, identify trial patients, and gain a deeper understanding of patient experience. By making so much research easier to reach, they also empower physicians with data-driven insights into patient conditions and treatment options.

Verana is currently looking for a director of sales operations.

10. Remedly

11-50 employees
See job openings

Remedly is an integrated software solution for doctors: dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and med spas. In short, it puts everything in one place. Things such as electronic health records, patient portal, analytics, revenue cycle, and marketing. As a result, this helps healthcare providers to better manage their practices, improving patient care, productivity, and revenue – all while staying HIPAA compliant and being able to access it from anywhere.

Remedly is currently hiring SDRs in San Francisco.  
Discover the best sales career opportunities. 100% free and confidential.

The post Top San Francisco Healthcare Tech Companies appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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The CloserIQ Weekly Roundup features a list of the best content we’ve been reading recently. We’ve compiled some of our favorite reads to help you advance in your sales career and build top sales teams.

Featured Article Why Recruiting Is a Great Place to Start Your Sales Career

So you want to start a career in sales: Great – sales wants you. Working in sales offers a high degree of autonomy and performance-based monetary rewards, so it can be highly satisfying and fulfilling. But sometimes it can feel tough to get into if you don’t have any experience. So one way you can jumpstart your career in sales is by starting out in recruiting. Read more >

This and more of our favorite reads this week…
Tips to Leave Sales Voicemails That Get Callbacks (Megan Seamans of LevelEleven)

“The days of cold calling have been left behind, and leaving a sales call voicemail? Not a chance. Although technology has opened new channels of communication, don’t forget about the power of phone calls and voicemails.”

Digital Sales Data: The Real Secret of Moving Deals from Prospect to Closed (Neha Varshneya of Dooly)

“You know it’s important to capture high-quality data to help you conduct QBRs, analyze your account health, review handover processes, report on your opportunity pipeline, and forecast win rates at your organization. Every (good) manager knows this.”

10 Sales Prospecting Techniques That Work Like a Charm Today (Chris Orlob of Gong)

“No pipeline, no quota attainment. Prospecting is a vital aspect of sales success. Interestingly, there’s a bold shift away from a fundamental aspect of B2B pipeline generation: Cold calling.”

5 Things You Need for a Successful Second Interview (Eileen Hoenigman Meyer of Glassdoor )

“While many mentoring relationships grow organically, you can speed up the process by asking someone you trust to help you find a mentor.”

How to Be a Great Mentee (Hint: It’s Not All About You) (Deborah Liu of Facebook )

“Sales is the ultimate meritocracy. You will succeed if you work hard and put the time in. Sure, there’ll be ups and downs, but if you respect the job and respect your prospects by doing your due diligence day in and day out, you’ll find a home in the sales world.”

Candidate Experience: Engaging Job Seekers During The Silent Period (Sharlyn Lauby of HR Bartender)

“I recently heard an interesting workplace term regarding the candidate experience – the silent period. Think of it as the period of “radio silence” between the company and the job candidate. I can see it happening a couple of times during the hiring process.”

How to Correctly Diagnose 5 Common Talent Problems (James Ellis of Universum)

“Say you have a nagging cold. One doctor may tell you to drink more fluids and rest. But maybe they dive deeper and ask a few more questions, leading them to decide to take a blood test to see if you have diabetes. Both conditions are manageable — but if you treat diabetes like a cold, it will only get worse.”

BDR Reporting, Simplified (Taice Perrotti of Spiro)

“As the exec responsible for ensuring our BDR team hits our pipeline requirements, I look at a variety of reports daily to benchmark my team against industry standards, make sure they are measuring up to internal assumptions and inform my decisions on where we could improve.”

The 6 Elements of Employee Motivation (Divya Parameswaran of Zoho Cliq)

“If an organization were to lose one of its important employees due to the lack of motivation, it could take a long time—sometimes even years—to fill that position with another employee matching their caliber. Organizations should motivate their employees, which will let them work contentedly for years to come.”

If you know any articles that you think we should feature in our next week’s roundup, feel free to reach out to us: content@closeriq.com.

Click here to subscribe to our weekly newsletter

The post Weekly Roundup – June 19, 2019 appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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So you want to start a career in sales: Great – sales wants you. Working in sales offers a high degree of autonomy and performance-based monetary rewards, so it can be highly satisfying and fulfilling. But sometimes it can feel tough to get into if you don’t have any experience. So one way you can jumpstart your career in sales is by starting out in recruiting.

Why? First, recruiting is sales. And second, many of the same skills translate over if or when you cross over into a sales role.

But, aside from that, there are several advantages to starting your sales career in recruiting.

Benefits of working in recruiting

Depending on who you talk to, you’ll get differing opinions on what recruiting is like. Generally, most people in recruiting find it highly fulfilling and rewarding. Here are a few of the benefits of working in recruiting:

  • Highly rewarding – both financially and emotionally.
  • Build highly-applicable skills – that are sought after and have a high degree of market-crossover.
  • Help people achieve their goals – working through the entire recruitment process from sourcing to briefing, to coaching through the interview and beyond, you get to help people achieve what they want.
  • Variety – few days are the same.

You’ll find that many of these qualities lead to a huge crossover into sales. In fact, many successful sales leaders started in a recruiting role. Here’s what they have to say:

“Recruiting has helped me tremendously in my sales career. I had to learn creative ways to connect with people while they were working. I usually did not try to find a specific person for a specific job where I was recruiting. Rather, I tried to find the best people who were experts in their field who were ready to make a change. This prepared me for sales when I would take those candidates to market. If they weren’t the right fit, it would open a conversation about who was the right fit. Timing is everything and taking the time to consult the client about what their particular needs are will win every time.” 

Justin Groves, Client Solutions @ iLab

Aside from the opportunity to practice and improve soft skills that are essential in sales, working in recruiting will help you build and expand your network in various industries.

“When I started as a recruiter straight out of college I had no idea that 25 years later I would still be leveraging what I learned. One particular benefit is the diverse company knowledge I have. All those hours on the phone speaking with hiring managers and potential placements were hours of learning about companies, thousands of companies in dozens of different industries. This knowledge served me well as I began my sales career. A shared experience with a company was often the first connection I made with prospects.”

John Booth, VP of Marketing @ Cipher

So without further ado, here are our reasons to go into recruiting first:

10 Reasons recruiting is a great place to start 1. Recruiting is sales

It doesn’t matter if you’re an internal recruiter, a contract recruiter, part of an agency, or independent – you’re selling. But rather than a product or service, it’s your job to sell the company, company’s culture, the position, and more.

Unlike in “normal” sales, recruiting requires you to “double sell”: first, the candidate to the hiring manager; then the company and position to the candidate. This means your selling chops will become developed – possibly even faster than if you started directly in a sales role. So when you transition over, you’ll be ahead of your peers.

2. You develop essential sales skills

Again, if you approach recruiting as sales, you’ll develop many skills that a salesperson usually has. That’s because selling is a fundamental business skill, especially in recruiting. As a recruiter, you need to communicate well. Talking to candidates and hiring managers will definitely hone your communication and active listening skills. Qualification questioning is also needed in recruiting, especially when you’re screening candidates.

3. You learn how to communicate with diverse people

In recruitment, it’s all about people – it’s the name of the game. Working with diverse candidates, clients, and colleagues spread across different departments, offices, and even countries leads to you spending a lot of your day communicating with others. Whether it’s on the phone or in person, this volume of communication means you learn how to build rapport quickly, and have meaningful conversations with senior business leaders.

Plus, you also build your professional network, which is invaluable in any career.

4. You develop great time management skills

Recruiting is fast-paced and every day will be packed with important tasks, meetings, and other activities. To succeed, you need to be able to handle them all, often quickly. As such, you’ll learn to manage your time well. Prioritizing and staying organized are essential skills for sales, too, so the crossover is clear.

5. You learn to solve problems effectively

The world of recruiting, as it deals with people, can be unpredictable and difficult. So, faced with unexpected situations and unforeseen issues, you’ll learn to think on your feet and come up with good solutions. Problem-solving skills come in hand in every industry, and if you make the jump over to sales, you’ll be well-prepared to think on your feet with clients.

6. You become target-driven

To stay on track and focused, you’ll set sales targets and KPIs. Using these and other targets, you’ll be able to track what works and build and nurture relationships with candidates and clients. In sales, it’s not much different, and you’ll be used to hitting and exceeding these targets, so it’ll be nothing new.

7. You learn resiliency

Success doesn’t happen overnight, and highs and lows abound in sales. Starting in recruiting, you’ll face rejection, people will let you down, change their minds, or otherwise do something you didn’t want them to. Learning to be patient and persistent and not take these things personally when recruiting will help you handle rejection from clients in sales without falling apart or becoming despondent.

8. No experience necessary

In many places, you don’t need any experience to apply to and get into a recruitment job. Simply demonstrate your willingness to learn, an adeptness with people, and determination to beat your goals. While entry-level sales jobs may abound, they won’t pay as well as a recruiting role. And once you have experience in recruiting, you can easily make the transition by demonstrating the skills and results you’ve gotten in recruiting and how they transfer.

9. Climbing the ranks goes quicker

Many people who get into HR prefer to go into other fields, like training, development, and OD – more predictable areas. That means recruiting has a high “pass-through rate.” Stick with recruiting for even a little while, and it’ll take you less time to reach a managerial or senior status than in other areas. Having clearly demonstrated leadership skills and a job title to match look good and can be leveraged.

10. You’ll quickly find out if you’re any good

Unlike in other fields, it doesn’t take years of practice to become competent at recruiting. That means you can quickly find out if you’re likely to be successful. And with many skills and qualities shared with sales, you can use recruiting as a means to see if you’re going to like sales, if you have what it takes, and what you need to work on if you’re determined to make a go of it.

Conclusion

Recruiting has a lot of things in common with sales – that’s indisputable. But being able to quickly enter, learn, and grow skills that have a high crossover – while earning a competitive salary and making a difference – can help you jumpstart your sales career faster and better than accepting an entry-level sales job instead.

Interested in a career in sales recruiting? Check out our openings.

The post Why Recruiting is a Great Place to Start your Sales Career appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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Boston is often an underestimated player in the startup scene, but the city’s tech sector is flourishing. A 2016 study ranked it first among 25 startup hubs in America, and the trend looks to be continuing for the near future.

Additionally, selling points for Boston as a center for tech startups include a large talent pool, access to venture capital, and an enduring spirit of innovation. So this creates the perfect recipe for marketing tech companies to flourish in an increasingly digital world.

Reasons to Invest in Marketing Tech Startups

Marketing technology, or simply martech, is a fast-growing industry that utilizes new methods to power effective outreach campaigns. Worldwide martech expenditure reached $32 billion in 2018, up from $22 billion in 2015. In fact, those numbers are expected to continue rising as data collection methods grow more sophisticated.

Businesses need powerful analytics to make sense of the information they collect. With this in mind, traditional methods often fail under the strain of the sheer amount of data they must process. However, with martech startups such as the ones listed below, teams can make sense of this information and use it to more precisely target their demographics for increased sales, improved customer satisfaction, and an incredible ROI.

Several financial analysts have put martech high on the must-invest list in recent years, and for good reason, too. The reason for that is that martech represents one of the most sound investments in the field. Over 5,000 software platforms of marketing tech startups are currently in use across the industry. Moreover, businesses of all sizes are finding that integrating marketing technology solutions into their workflow is easier than expected.

Martech is expected to explode in popularity over the next few years, so investing early is a good idea.

High-Growth Marketing tech Startups in Boston

As Boston embraces the tech scene, marketing tech startups are turning to the northeastern city to take advantage of all it has to offer. The companies below are some of the most promising martech business in the country, and they’re growing at a rapid pace.

1. Celtra

101-250 employees
See open roles

Celtra is a creative management platform that makes it easy for marketing teams to improve the quality of their digital advertising at scale. Celtra leverages creative production to boost impact on sales lift, all while reducing operational complexities and costs. Furthermore, the company excels at streamlining creative production to deliver a more dynamic creative product, all while boosting the relevancy of each outreach program.

2. Hassium Partners

501-1000 employees
See open roles

Hassium Partners, formerly High Street Partners, is a well-established company that supports back-office requirements for a variety of international partners. Chiefly, the team works with global payroll, finance issues, setting up in-country entities, working with overseas suppliers. Additionally, the team works on growth through improving inbound efficiencies, especially when it comes to foreign teams looking to expand into the U.S.

3. Infinata

51-100 employees
See open roles

Infinata creates solutions for organizations by combining disparate data with proprietary content and interpreting it for its various clients. Surely, data scientists, reporters, industry experts, developers, and others contribute to these efforts. Consequently, allowing Infinata to provide unique marketing insights not delivered by other teams.

4. InsightSquared

51-200 employees
See open roles

InsightSquared delivers revenue answers on demand. The team provides sales and marketing data services that turn information into quality reports and insightful visuals. In fact, the group’s revenue intelligence software aims to be a one-stop operating system for its clients’ revenue engines. InsightSquared is highly innovative yet operates with its feet rooted firmly in the ground. This creates a fascinating blend of cutting-edge ideas with reliable, traditional insights.

5. Jebbit

51-100 employees
See open roles

Jebbit wants to redefine how the world thinks about data. The digital revolution has brought with it massive amounts of information, so much that major brands are struggling to interpret it and put it to good use. For this reason, Jebbit was founded on the principle of revolutionizing the advertising status quo and delivering an assumption-free experience by asking the right questions and understanding the answers on a deep level.

6. Klaviyo

101-250 employees
See open roles

Klaviyo aims to put businesses in control of their data with powerful segmentation. Customers share an impressive amount of information, as do B2B interactions. Besides, these e-mails and clicks go largely unutilized, which is a missed opportunity for precise segmentation. In fact, Klaviyo combines this data with marketing software to deliver better insights into a brand’s core information, no matter how large or small the company might be.

7. Promoboxx

1-10 employees
See open roles

Promoboxx is a retail-focused business that provides marketing support to independents. Indeed, by aligning a client’s goals with local retailers, their purpose is to increase awareness and drive sales daily. Besides, they want to make a difference in the retail space, and they aim to do it without sacrificing their core values.

8. SnapApp

51-200 employees
See open roles

SnapApp helps marketers get leads for the sales team by using unique questions-based interactions that uncover customer intent. It’s not about what the buyer is doing, however, it’s about what they want. In short, SnapApp helps find that and deliver valuable leads as early in the game as possible.

9. True Fit

51-100 employees
See open roles

True Fit aims to personalize every touch point in the customer journey by personalizing the interaction stack with APIs, software, and intelligence powered by the world’s best data set for fashion. Moreover, retailers can use this valuable information to make every impression and every interaction count. The Boston Globe also featured True Fit as one of the top places to work in 2018.

10. Zaius

51-100 employees
See open roles

Zaius exists to help marketers with the intelligence they need to design and deliver a bold customer-first experience. The team brings together trusted B2C CRM with a full view of customer data, analyzes and visualizes behavioral segments, then deploying multi-channel campaigns, all from within the company’s intuitive framework.

Conclusion

Boston is a flourishing town that has begun attracting countless innovative new startups. Similarly, The marketing technology scene is bustling with activity, making for an incredibly diverse and productive relationship.

Discover the best sales career opportunities. 100% free and confidential.

The post 10 High-Growth Marketing Tech Startups in Boston appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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The CloserIQ Weekly Roundup features a list of the best content we’ve been reading recently. We’ve compiled some of our favorite reads to help you advance in your sales career and build top sales teams.

Featured Article 4 Steps to Creating Buyer Personas for a Personalized Sales Approach

Buyer personas, also known as marketing personas, help businesses to visualize their customers. It also helps clients to build marketing campaigns that will resonate with them. You need to understand who you want to sell to before you sell to them. Read more >

This and more of our favorite reads this week…
How to Close a Deal When You Have Bad Reviews (Steli Efti of Close)

“Whether your company actually has a terrible reputation or they just read a single bad review doesn’t matter. You have to overcome their negative view of the company and make the sale.”

Starting a Conversation in Sales with Trish Bertuzzi (Jeremy Donovan of SalesLoft)

“Pick a niche, establish your benchmark, cross the chasm and expand. Because we get so excited when we start, we’re like, ‘oh, I’m a horizontal play. I can sell to anyone.’ ”

How to Develop an Action Plan for Sales Success (Mike Schultz of Rain)

“You need to come up with a precise roadmap of how you’ll achieve your goals. Once you’ve identified them, here are four steps you must take to reach those milestones.”

These 5 Resume Tips Could Mean Thousands More in Salary a Year (Jill Cornfield of CNBC)

“A study from TopResume, a resume writing service, says using a pro gives job candidates a definite edge in the hunt — and it could mean more than the offer itself. According to TopResume, 150 recruiters assessed the professionally written resumes as deserving a bump in salary.”

How to Take Ownership of Your Sales Career (Alexandra Adamson of Women In Sales)

“Sales is the ultimate meritocracy. You will succeed if you work hard and put the time in. Sure, there’ll be ups and downs, but if you respect the job and respect your prospects by doing your due diligence day in and day out, you’ll find a home in the sales world.”

Why Your Sales Contest Is Demotivating Your Sales Team (Susan Enns of B2bSalesConnections)

“Before you jump in with your checkbook wide open, understand this: Not all sales contests motivate, and not all are profitable. In fact, if not designed properly, contests can do more harm than good.”

The Top 8 Questions to Ask Candidates for Head of Customer Success (Jason Lemkin of SaaStr)

“My Top 3, plus 5 more than will really tease out what type of candidate they are, what they know, and what they really do that good.”

8 Recruitment Trends for 2019 (James Meincke of CloserIQ)

“Every new year brings fresh trends for every industry — and recruitment is no different. Trends can help inform you of what the future will likely bring. This helps you in adjusting your recruiting process to better fit the needs of the market. And when it comes to the recruiting market nowadays, much has changed.”

9 Free Sales Tracker Activity Templates (Meredith Hart of Hubspot)

“A sales activity tracker helps salespeople manage things like contacts, deals, quotas, etc. If you’re a sales leader, it’s important to determine the key metrics your sales team will be evaluated on. From there, you can reverse engineer your sales process to set sales goals. Then, monitor performance using sales activity tracking tools.”

Upcoming Events Women in Sales – San Francisco: Taking Ownership of Your Career in Sales
Tuesday, June 25, 6:00 pm

Join us in our next San Francisco event to learn tactical ways to advance in your career. Get your discounted tickets now! RSVP >

If you know any articles that you think we should feature in our next week’s roundup, feel free to reach out to us: content@closeriq.com.

Click here to subscribe to our weekly newsletter

The post Weekly Roundup – June 12, 2019 appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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Every new year brings fresh trends for every industry — and recruitment is no different. Trends can help inform you of what the future will likely bring. This helps you in adjusting your recruiting process to better fit the needs of the market. And when it comes to the recruiting market nowadays, much has changed.

It’s a candidate-driven market. Just a few years ago, there were more unemployed persons than there were jobs — now, it’s the opposite. Research suggests that the current job market is as much as 90% candidate driven. That means that candidates have more power. Consequently, attracting and successfully hiring the best talent is more expensive, time-consuming, and difficult.

With this tremendous power shift comes new buzzwords and trends — and ways to take advantage of them. Here are 8 of the most important recruitment trends for 2019:

1) Recruitment marketing

What’s recruitment marketing? It’s a strategy based on implementing marketing tactics into recruiting — i.e. attracting talent to your organization using traditional marketing methods. Because of the current nature of the job market, the power is more in the candidate’s hands; so, recruiters need to adopt marketing practices to sell their organization to these talented individuals, much like selling a product or service.

2) Quality candidate experience

The term “candidate experience” refers to a candidate’s overall perception — past, present, and potential future — of your company’s recruiting process. The general expectation is that the recruiting process should be fast, efficient, easy, and mobile-friendly. A candidate who has a positive experience during recruiting will more likely accept a job offer.

Conversely, if that candidate has a negative recruiting experience, you may lose more than just good talent — you may lose money. Virgin Media, a British cable and mobile service provider, calculated that a negative candidate experience costs them $5.4 million every year.

3) Employer Branding

Employer branding means an organization’s reputation and popularity as an employer, as well as its employee value proposition (a different thing entirely from a company’s brand reputation and value proposition to customers). Essentially: how positive of an experience is it for employees to work at your company? How do the rewards and benefits balance out against performance? What do you offer them that’s different from elsewhere?

LinkedIn research has shown that 75% of job seekers do their own research on employer brand and reputation before even applying. That means if you have a bad reputation, your company will likely struggle. Not only to attract candidates (especially top talent) but also to retain employees. Improving your employee branding is a must in 2019.

4) AI/automation tools

Recruiting is full of often-tedious tasks. Many recruiters face challenges like dealing with more job requisitions (without an increase in staff). In addition to that, the candidate-driven market, and trying to engage job seekers quickly before they lose interest. Some of the more low-level tasks can be taken on by Artificial Intelligence or automation tools.

For example, Hilton uses end-to-end recruiting tool AllyO to help guide candidates into the right role for them, follow-up interviews for some positions and scheduling final offer-extension calls — just to name a few ways. ThredUp likes texting candidates, so they use AI to do everything from scheduling a phone screening interview to providing directions for new hires of their first on-site day.

And while AI is becoming more embraced, automation tools are nothing new — they’re starting to go beyond HRIS, ATS, and recruitment marketing software. Much of the automation tools are moving toward 2-in-1 ATS + recruitment marketing solutions to consolidate things onto one platform.

5) Video + VR/gaming for interviewing

52% of respondents to LinkedIn’s Global Recruiting Trends said that innovations in interviewing were at least very important to the future of hiring. Using video and even virtual reality are two such innovations that are gaining ground. Companies that incorporated either video or VR platforms into their interviewing process found they were able to better assess skills, engage candidates more, increase efficiency and improve talent pool diversity, and encountered less unconscious bias.

Car-design company Jaguar employed a free mixed-reality app to test and teach candidates about the nuances of electric vehicles. Jaguar’s press release reported that these games “test their curiosity, persistence, lateral thinking and problem-solving skills.”

Jet.com uses VR to show its relaxed and collaborative company culture, showcasing sitting in on meetings with the CEO, the company’s happy hour and company band, as well as games.

6) Social recruiting

This one’s got a simple definition: using social media channels for recruiting. But rather than just posting job ads on your company’s social network accounts, it means using social media to proactively search for, build relationships with, and encourage potential candidates to apply.

Do this right, and it helps with your employer brand, too. In fact, in the 2018 Jobvite Recruiter Nation Survey, social media ranked as the top investment (47%) for companies growing their employer brand.

7) Contract/contingent employees

The “Gig Economy” has changed and will continue to change the workforce. 65% of employees surveyed in the research said they would pursue contract work if they were given the opportunity. 68% of candidates reported in another study that the ability to work remotely impacted their decision to accept a job offer.

The entire workforce will likely not be replaced by contract work rather than traditional jobs. Nonetheless, the popularization of non-traditional roles has changed employee expectations.

8) Data-driven recruiting

Data-driven recruiting is used to discuss recruiting methods that are based on data and analytics insights from HR tech. For instance, Applicants Tracking Systems and Recruitment Marketing platforms. By determining exactly what has an effect where what worked well, and what can be improved in hard numbers, you can improve the most important hiring metrics — i.e. time to hire, cost to hire, and quality of hire.

Conclusion

HR and recruiting is constantly changing and evolving — there’s no denying it. As you face newer and younger workforces, these changes are only going to become starker. If you want to remain competitive, you’ll need to stay on top of the latest trends that will affect the recruiting industry this year — and evolve with them throughout 2019 and into the future.
Click here for our free guide to interviewing salespeople

The post 8 Recruitment Trends for 2019 appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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There’s no doubt that small businesses know their customers. As a small business, you probably have specific types of people in mind when you consider your ideal and potential buyers. When you take the time to describe these customers—profiling them on a demographic, firmographic, and psychographic level—that’s called creating buyer personas.  

Buyer personas, also known as marketing personas, help businesses visualize their customers. It also helps clients to build marketing campaigns that will resonate with them. You need to understand who you want to sell to before you sell to them.  

Even if you have a general idea of who you’re trying to capture, buyer personas at their best contain a wealth of information.  You can use this information across your organization to make highly targeted and effective business decisions.

Let’s review why your small business needs to create actual buyer personas, how to do so, and what your finished product should look like.

Why create buyer personas?

At their core, buyer personas are marketing tools. Your description of your clients—based on data you cull from interviews, surveys, social media, and other sources—helps you attract more clients just like them, since you’ll have a better understanding of what they want and need.  

Buyer “personas” are different from the outright profiles of existing clients. They are fictionalized versions of the clients you’ve already come across. Most personas use alliterative names like Prosperous Perry or Desperate Dana.

Now, you may want to sell your services to both Prosperous Perry and Desperate Dana. But would you market your services to them in the same way? Probably not, because the campaign that draws in Perry might not appeal to Dana.

Using the information you collect on your customers, you can create a document that reflects who your customers generally are, where they’re coming from, what they’re thinking and feeling, what problems they’re trying to solve, and how your business might be of use to them.

How to create buyer personas

Creating buyer personas can take a variety of forms. You can create as many or as few as you deem necessary. A good place to start is three to five personas.

You may have some basic data from clients, but for a full-fledged picture of who they are and what they need, you’ll need to go deeper. Here’s how to start building buyer personas.

Step 1: Gather information 

The first step is to gather as much information as possible about your current customers. Besides, you can gather information about future prospects and people found via referral and third-party networks.

Start by looking through your database. Make a list of your current clients, including any basic information you have on them and how they found you.

Once you have a framework, reach out to those clients in a variety of ways. This will help you to better understand their background, their feelings about working with you. Besides, why they were driven to contact you in the first place.

Use the following methods:
  • Interviews: Contact your clients and prospects by phone and let them know you’re conducting research so you can improve operations and better serve them. Armed with an incentive of some kind (gift cards or a small discount on services), find a mutually agreeable time for you to delve into what makes this customer who they are.
  • Surveys: Send out surveys via an email newsletter. it should cover a lot of the same ground as your phone call would. Your response rate will likely be lower this way, but you’ll reach some clients who wouldn’t otherwise be bothered to take the time to jump on a call.
  • Social insights: Some social media platforms and search engines come equipped with tools to tell you about your followers and customers. Facebook Audience Insights, for example, can provide businesses with anonymous, aggregate information about geography, demographics, purchase behavior, and other factors.
  • Forms on your site: Without disrupting the user-experience, place forms on your site with basic questions that can help you gain a firmer understanding of that client—and open the door to future contact on this topic.

Repeat these steps for potential clients found through peers, existing clients, and connections through social media. This will help you to get the perspective of your prospective clients.

What exactly should you ask a client during an interview or survey? It depends on your business, industry, and goals. If your small business provides digital marketing tools to other firms, your questions should get to the heart of who they are personally (What’s your background? Where do you live?), what kind of business they run (What industry are you in? How many employees do you have?) and what they’re thinking (What are your business aspirations? Why do you use our tools?).

Step 2: Break your data down by category

Your buyer personas are based on three categories of information, which build on each other to provide a complete look at who they are.

Demographics

A customer’s demographics are their statistical characteristics, including age, location, education level, and personality type.

Firmographics

Their firmographics are descriptive attributes of their business. That includes the name of their business, industry, time in business, number of employees, revenue, and overall health of the business.

Psychographics

Their psychographics are their classification based on attitudes and aspirations. Questions that reveal psychographics include:

  • What motivates you?
  • What drove you to buy this product or service?
  • How do you define success?
  • What would you do if our business disappeared tomorrow?
  • What would drive you to stop using our service?

With this information in hand, you can now start identifying patterns in client responses. Afterward, group them by similar demographic, firmographic, and psychographics. Though it’s up to you how many personas you need, remember that narrower personas make it easier to deliver targeted content; but too narrow means extra work without a higher ROI at a certain point.

Step 3: Personalize each persona

Group your personas into a few distinct personalities. These fictionalized versions of your clients are based on real people. When you give them human characteristics, it will help you put yourself in their shoes.

For example, Prosperous Perry might be a long-time marketing executive who isn’t tech-savvy. However, she is gregarious and knows when she needs expert help. On the other hand, Desperate Dana could be a young, college-educated woman up on the latest social media platforms and trends. However, she is frantic and frustrated now that she realizes she can’t convert that knowledge into sales. Not everyone will fit neatly into these boxes, but they’ll be close enough that your messaging to each one will still resonate.

Buyer personas can take a variety of formats. Some businesses compile their personas in a Google doc, while others use a spreadsheet to more easily break down personas by demographic, firmographic, and psychographics. You can also use a visual tool like HubSpot’s Make My Persona Tool.

The most important thing about your buyer personas is that you have them. You can always tweak and improve the formatting as your business grows.  

Step 4: Craft messaging

Your messaging to each persona may take many forms. Let’s examine a two-pronged approach: Marketing and Sales.

Marketing

Your digital marketing messaging that can be customized to appeal to different buyer personas is somewhat limited. Most businesses are not going to create entirely different websites that appeal to specific customers, for example.

That being said, there are a few main ways that you can customize content to appeal to individual personas, so they’ll be more likely to convert once they enter the sales funnel:

  • Content marketing: Writing blog posts that appeal to the issues, trends, obstacles, and goals of each persona. For Prosperous Perry, write posts explaining how an investment in marketing will deliver a return-on-investment in the long-term. For Desperate Dana, posts about inexpensive marketing tools and strategies, or how to find new customers, may be more compelling.
  • Email newsletter marketing: You can A/B test your email newsletters, changing the copy, links to blog posts, and included media to better appeal to each persona. The newsletter that encourages Perry to click through likely won’t look the same as the one that induces engagement from Dana.
  • Social media marketing: Your social media channels likely already appeal to different demographics—Facebook, for example, has a different audience than Snapchat. Match your content to both the platform and your desired persona audiences for higher engagement.  
Sales

Sales and marketing are intertwined, of course. But if you have a sales team that interacts directly with customers and potential customers, keep in mind that your buyer personas can help the sales team deal more effectively with new customers who fit into your existing personas.

  • Sales pitches: A pitch to a new customer who fits the mold of a Perry will differ from the pitch to a Dana. These customers may end up using some of the same tools you offer, but for markedly different reasons. Make sure the language in your scripts reflects the issues and obstacles these people face.
  • Landing pages: You can create custom landing pages on your website that appeal directly to each persona you have as well. This will ensure they see messaging that resonates with them, making them more likely to convert.

When crafting your messaging, keep in mind some of the following questions: How would you describe your service to each persona? What would your elevator pitch be? Which deals or offers specific to them would you be willing to offer? What channels will you use to find and engage them?

These questions will help guide you in presenting the story of your company—from the content itself to where that content lives—and how it intertwines with the story of their company, for a compelling fit.

Conclusion

Your clients aren’t just nameless, faceless people. Each person has a distinct backstory and reason for approaching you in the first place. That being said, it’s true that many people that become your clients will have similar reasons for doing so. That’s what makes buyer personas so helpful: They can accurately claim to represent wide swaths of your customer base.

Use these representations to start making better decisions about your content, lead generation strategies, and overall marketing and sales techniques. By better understanding your current clients, you’ll already have a head start on your future ones.
Click here for your free Sales Playbook Template

The post 4 Steps to Creating Buyer Personas for a Personalized Sales Approach appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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The CloserIQ Weekly Roundup features a list of the best content we’ve been reading recently. We’ve compiled some of our favorite reads to help you advance in your sales career and build top sales teams.

Featured Article 8 Ways CRM Data Can Boost Your Sales Strategy

CRM has a wealth of information that can guide you and aid in increasing your sales strategy effectiveness. As the popular adage goes ‘you need to hit the iron when it is hot’. CRM data helps you in identifying opportunities and spotting risks in real-time. Read more >

This and more of our favorite reads this week…
Meeting Post-Sales Expectations: Because Selling Doesn’t End at Closing (Team Yesware)

“In our increasingly customer-centric society, developing deep customer relationships is more important than ever. That’s why when a salesperson makes that hand-off to an Account Manager, they want to know they’re customer will be as enthusiastic post-sale as they were during the courting process. ”

How to Build Your Professional Brand in Sales (Sahil Mansouri of Bravado)

“Buyers no longer need to talk to you. Instead, you must convince them to choose to work with you. This is why building your personal brand is necessary to succeed in 2019.”

Here’s What You Need to Sell Your SaaS Product to Enterprise Customers (Anna Talerico of OpenView)

“It’s hard to parse what enterprise SaaS buyers want, versus what they actually require. And making decisions about how far you should go to support the enterprise can be gut-wrenching. ”

5 References That Should Be on Your List to Land the Job (Heather Huhman of Come Recommended)

“For each new job opportunity, you should make sure your list of references is the right fit. Think about your relationship with each person. How closely did you work with them? How recently did you work together? How will they explain your qualities to the hiring manager?”

14 Proven Ways to Speed Up a Slow Sales Cycle (Bethany Fagan of Pandadoc)

“A slow sales cycle is kryptonite to good sales teams. It hinders accurate forecasting, hurts team morale, and slows growth. That last point is especially important. In today’s highly competitive business environment, it’s the fastest-growing technology companies that end up dominating the market.”

Sales Manager Tips for Hiring Sales Superstars (Deb Calvert of People First Productivity Solutions)

“Is hiring sellers like rolling the dice in your organization? You can do better and increase your odds of getting sales superstars with a solid sales selection process.”

6 Tips for Conducting Sales Performance Review (James Meincke of CloserIQ)

“The very idea of a performance review can strike fear into the hearts of sales representatives. Many managers also don’t love performance reviews. After all, preparation is labor-intensive, and giving negative feedback isn’t exactly an enjoyable task.”

Why Sales Pipeline Metrics Are Meaningless–When Numbers Mislead Salespeople (Steli Efti of Close)

“What if I then told you that I started with 10 sales, and I’m now up to 20? That doesn’t sound nearly as good. That’s why sharing numbers without context is problematic.”

Settling Workplace Disputes (Alexandra Adamson of Women in Sales)

“Dealing with workplace disputes isn’t fun for anyone. But disputes happen, and as a leader, it’s vital to create a workplace where everyone feels supported. When left unchecked, even minor workplace disputes can snowball to create a toxic environment.”

Essential Tech Reads Where Are All the Fintech IPOs (PitchBook)

“This banner year for venture-backed tech IPOs has been impossible to miss—and it’s far from over. With major public listings like Slack and WeWork also on the horizon, 2019 is all but assured of smashing records for VC exit value.”

SaaS Stocks Stumbles Over Down Market, Drop 5% in Single Session (CrunchBase)

“Tech stocks struggled on Monday amidst a broader selloff. The tech-heavy Nasdaq index slipped 1.6 percent to 7,333. The index entered correction territory, closing the day sharply under its 52 week high of 8,176.”

Upcoming Events Women in Sales – San Francisco: Taking Ownership of Your Career in Sales
Tuesday, June 25, 6:00 pm

Join us in our next San Francisco event to learn tactical ways to advance in your career. Get your discounted tickets now! RSVP >

If you know any articles that you think we should feature in our next week’s roundup, feel free to reach out to us: content@closeriq.com.

Click here to subscribe to our weekly newsletter

The post Weekly Roundup – June 6, 2019 appeared first on CloserIQ Blog.

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