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The holidays are a daunting time for anyone, particularly when you’re newly separated or divorced and your children are on a new visiting schedule that never existed before. 

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My wife, Karen, and I have had the pleasure of raising two daughters.  When they were younger, it was easy to have them dress up in costumes on Halloween and take them out in the neighborhood to go trick-or-treating.  But as they grew older (generally between the ages of 12 and 15) going trick-or-treating was no longer "cool" or the thing to do.  Generally, about this age is when tweens and teens no longer want to go house to house gathering candy but, want to spend time engaging in activities with their peers. Parents want to make sure that our children are safe while spending time with their friends.  Often the best way to do so is to sponsor a party at your house.  By doing so, you can ensure their safety by monitoring their activity, therefore giving you piece of mind.   Among the activities suggested are Halloween/Harvest Festivals:

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The overwhelming majority of divorces result in parties agreeing to shared parental decision-making subsequent to their divorce.  Shared parental decision-making is defined as parents discussing and agreeing upon major issues in their children's lives including, but not limited to education, non‑emergency healthcare (for example orthodontics/braces), and extracurricular activities which would occur on both parents' (both parents' timesharing/visitation).

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