Loading...

Follow Alzheimer's Association of Houston and Sout.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The Death Valley Race – An Interview with Brian Hill for the Alzheimer’s Association. 

Guest Blogger, Dominique Peterson, recently had the opportunity to interview Fort Worth Resident, Brian Hill while he’s preparing for his second Badwater Ultra Marathon through Death Valley.

This 135 mile Marathon has earned the title of “The World’s Toughest Foot Race” because of the extreme heat and distance. I asked Brian how he prepared for such a strenuous race, and aside from running, he says, “Every portion of the race is planned and prepared for because the margins for error in an event this demanding are extremely small. Nutrition and hydration, for example, play a huge role in success and failure, and learning what your body can tolerate comes with experimenting and seeing what works. Success is also dependent on working through issues as they arise, because problems WILL come up over 135 miles. Having a crew of four people to keep me going when I want to stop will be extremely helpful. This event definitely requires a team effort.”

Running the “World’s Toughest Foot Race” for Dad with Dementia

While he didn’t grow up running, he says, “I started with my first marathon about ten years ago to support Lymphoma. My father, Dr. John P. Hill, is a lymphoma survivor.”  After Brian ran the first marathon, he thought, “What now? What’s next?” His father was a huge supporter of his running. Throughout the years, he was there to support, even for the overnight races, his father was there in the dark cheering him on. “He was the best dad, that’s all I can say.” 

“He was the best dad, that’s all I can say.” 

After beating Lymphoma, his father’s Dementia diagnosis followed. “I’ve watched as his memory has slowly started to fail, and his ability to complete daily functions has become more of a challenge.” He started doing marathons to advance the care, support, and research efforts of the Alzheimer’s Association in his continued effort to honor his father, John. The team name for the Death Valley race is “RunALZover.” His teammates were behind the name, as they all have a connection in some way to this disease.

John loves Callie, and although he doesn’t ask many questions anymore, John always asks about Callie, even when he can’t remember her name.

His father, John, lives in a reminiscence facility in Utah. Brian went to visit him recently, with his running buddy, his dog, Callie. John loves Callie, and although he doesn’t ask many questions anymore, John always asks about Callie, even when he can’t remember her name. A Frustrated Brian wanted to take Callie with him to the facility, but she was dirty, and the groomer nearby was unable to take him. His sister recommended that he take Callie to a self-wash and bring their father along to help. The photos were taken during that moment.

Brian says, “All we were doing was sitting there washing the dog, but we found total peace at that moment.  Having that memory with something initially frustrating and making it a beautiful shared moment with him was something so powerful to me. It was a mundane task, but it turned into a beautiful moment. It was a thrill for him to get out of the facility, and you end up cherishing these simple kinds of moments, just being together doing something simple. “

After sharing this sweet story, I asked what he would say to anyone else who wanted to follow in his steps to support the Alzheimer’s cause. He said, “They should find a purpose to get behind because it makes it less about you, and it will hold you accountable. Whether you’re doing a super long or short event, when you’re struggling and hurting, you think about the cause. You’re fundraising for the people you’re running for, and it feels like it makes the pain more tolerable. It puts life into perspective. I’d say, start small and build. I didn’t get to this point in a day. Most people participating in these marathons are doing it for a cause. They aren’t blessed physically with God-given talent; it’s all about the mental aspect of it. We are ordinary people who can do the extraordinary, and most people have that potential, and they don’t see it. “

Brian is also dedicating this race to any other friends or family that have been affected by Alzheimer’s and or dementia. He would love to honor them by adding their name to the shirts that he and his team will be wearing during the race. He is also asking for your financial support, which will go directly to supporting their efforts. You can donate at the link below:

http://act.alz.org/site/TR/LongestDay2019/TheLongestDay?px=15955209&pg=personal&fr_id=11896

The post Running the “World’s Toughest Foot Race” for the “World’s Best Dad” appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Join The Longest Day teams as they raise funds and awareness while standing up to the darkness of Alzheimer’s disease! April 2019
  • Bingo Bash Benefit on Tuesday, April 23rd at the Conservatory at Alden Bridge. Enjoy an exciting afternoon of bingo with a chance to win over 40 prizes and indulge in appetizers, wine, beer, and merriment. RSVP Today!
  • Celebrating a Commitment on Thursday, April 25th at Marriott Courtyard Brookhollow. You’re invited to share an inspirational piece to read or come listen to other caregivers share their favorite poems and stories. Contact Raul for more information at raularredondo279@yahoo.com .
May 2019 June 2019
  • Basel’s Flips for Alzheimer’s Awareness on Friday, June 21st at Basel’s Gymnastics. Wear purple and come out to their open gym to play, jump, run, swing, climb and flip!!
  • Houston Fiber Fest from Friday, June 21st through Sunday, June 23rd at the Berry Center in Cypress, TX. Come for the shopping! Come for the classes! Come for the yarn!
  • Knitting Party on Friday, June 21st at the Yarn Store Boutique. Visit the store between 10am-6pm to help knit Twiddle Muffs to donate to a local Alzheimer’s Care Unit.
September 2019
  • Cure the Mind Gala on Saturday, September 21st. Attend the silent auction gala in honor of two amazing women.
Past Events
  • FSP Trainer Olympics on Saturday, November 10th at Fairchild Sports Performance. Come out and watch the FSP Trainers as they participate in 9 different training events.
  • Rev For A Reason on Saturday, November 10th at DEFINE Fitness Bellaire. Join Stephanie as she honors her grandmother who suffered from dementia in a 60 min rev ride.

To learn more or register, visit www.alz.org/TheLongestDay??

or

contact Samantha at sduffy@gmail.com | 713-314-1340

The post Join Us for The Longest Day 2019: Find Public Events Now! appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Unpaid Non-Profit Internship, Houston, TX
Marketing/Communications/PR/Social Media
Southeast Texas Houston Marketing Communications Intern Opportunity

The Alzheimer’s Association Houston & Southeast Texas Chapter is seeking an enthusiastic, ready and willing Marketing and Communications Intern to assist with social media calendars, campaigns and outreach. Join our Communications Team and be responsible for assisting in the creation and implementation of marketing strategies to help increase awareness about the Alzheimer’s Association.

Candidate must be able to complete the internship (15-20 hours per week)

Core Responsibilities:

  • Establish relationships with PR professionals, media contacts and other community influencers.
  • Learn to write successful press releases and media pitches for upcoming events, support services and community stories.
  • Support Marketing Team with branding and messaging to increase followers on social media platforms and advise communication best practices within identified populations.
  • Track social and web analytics for improved messaging.
  • Create and implement an email system for use in pitches to identified media outlets.
  • Assist in print and online communication projects including copy-writing, editing and promotion.
  • Find and enter educational workshops, support groups and events on community and news websites and calendars.
  • Other Marketing / Communication projects as needed.

Qualifications & Requirements

  • Student must be actively enrolled in an accredited college or university in the fields of communication, nonprofit management, business, marketing or related field.
  • Self-motivated, highly organized and detail oriented, ability to work independently
  • Ability to manage multiple projects at once
  • Excellent ability to communicate in person, print, and electronically to variable audiences
  • Knowledge of Associated Press (AP) style
  • Willing to do public speaking (will be coached)
  • Strong knowledge of social media platforms
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office applications (especially Word & Excel) and Google Apps
  • Experience with Adobe Suite a plus
  • Experience with Photography and Videography a plus
  • Desire to learn more about a culture of philanthropy
JOIN US! Send cover letter and resume to JJ Lassberg at jjlassberg@alz.org.

The post Non-Profit Marketing / Communication Intern Opportunity appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

At this year’s Houston Walk to End Alzheimer’s we hosted a successful community art piece representing a Promise Garden. It was incredible to have so many people engaged and excited about the cause. The participants all got to paint flowers representing their role in the fight to end Alzheimer’s. Everyone has their own reason for being involved: whether they have Alzheimer’s themselves, are caretakers, have loved ones with the diagnosis, or just simply want to help. If you look closely at the painting (pictured below), there are so many different styles: some flowers have curved petals, others have sharp petals, and some have lines for petals. In addition, some people decided to paint outside of the box and put entirely different subject matters (such as dogs). It’s inspiring to see how so many people think differently than I do.

Promise Garden Mural painted at the 2018 Houston Walk to End Alzheimer’s

I’m so excited to channel the artistic energy garnered from the Walk into Creating Art Together, the program I created to provide free community art classes for people with early-stage memory loss and their care partners. Art can be a solitary or a social activity, and I want to give people a space for it to be social. It’s fun making art with other people because you get to see how creative everyone can be. Every person’s brush strokes, color choices, and subject matter is a product of their unique personality.

Join us for Creating Art Together!
Our next class on December 9, 2018 will be holiday-themed, and hosted at Central Market from 10 AM – 1 PM. Please join us to create cards and a small seasonal gift—we’d love to have you! For more information, call 800-272-3900 or email earlystagehouston@alz.org.

Please be on the lookout for future classes:

  • Jan 26, 2019: West U Senior Services
  • Jan 27, 2019: Central Market
  • Feb 23, 2019: West U Senior Services
  • Feb 24, 2019: Central Market
  • March 23, 2019: West U Senior Services
  • March 24, 2019: Central Market
  • April 27, 2019: West U Senior Services
  • April 28, 2019: Central Market
This blog post was written by Brina Bui, a medical student at McGovern Medical School. She is partnering with the Alzheimer’s Association for her fellowship project to create an art program for people living with early-stage memory loss.

The post Creating Art Together: Walk to End Alzheimer’s & Beyond appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The holidays are just around the corner and families are gathering for Christmas, Hanukah, and Kwanza, sharing laughter and happy memories. For families coping with Alzheimer’s, the holidays can be bittersweet, and at times filled with stress and frustration. Festivities can agitate, confuse, and over stimulate persons with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. At the same time, caregivers can feel anxious, frustrated, and lonely – leading to stress and depression. When balancing the holidays and Alzheimer’s disease, with some advance planning and dialog within the family, holidays can be focused on connection, fun and love.

Tips to the Holidays and Alzheimer’s Here at the Alzheimer’s Association we want you to know that when Alzheimer’s touches your life we are here for you any time, day or night, call 800.272.3900 for reliable information and support.

For all those families out there balancing the holidays and Alzheimer’s we have…

10 Tips to Holidays and Alzheimer’s

Tip 1: Planning can avoid holiday stress
Families and individuals with Alzheimer’s who experience the most difficulty with the holiday season are those who have given little thought to the challenges they will encounter. Consider ahead of time what may be expected of you, both socially and emotionally.

Tip 2: Take care of yourself (caregiver)
Remember, the holidays are opportunities to share time with people you love. Try to make these celebrations easy on yourself and the person with Alzheimer’s disease so that you may concentrate on enjoying your time together.

  • Set limits by telling family and friends that you intend to control the stress of the holidays and Alzheimer’s.
  • Maintain a positive mental attitude.
  • Ask for assistance for you and your loved one.
  • Attend an Alzheimer’s Association support group that will allow you discuss ways to overcome holiday stress.
  • Prepare to deal with post-holiday letdown. Arrange for in-home care (respite care) so you can enjoy a movie or lunch with a friend and reduce post-holiday stress.

Tip 3: Prepare the person with Alzheimer’s for the family gathering
Preparing your loved one for the upcoming holiday events can allow both of you to enjoy the warmth of the season.

  • Talk about and show photos of family members and friends who will be visiting.
  • Have a “quiet” room in case things get too hectic.
  • Play familiar music and serve favorite traditional holiday foods.
  • Schedule naps, especially if the person usually takes naps.
  • Schedule family and friends visit times

Tip 4: Prepare family members and friends
Preparing families and friends with an honest appraisal of the person’s condition can help avoid uncomfortable or harmful situations.

  • Familiarize family members and friends with behaviors and condition changes.
  • Recommend practical and useful gifts. (See Tip 7)
  • Remind family and friends the best way to communicate with a person with dementia. (See Tip 6)
During the Holidays, involve persons with Alzheimer’s with pictures of family.

Tip 5: Involve everyone when selecting activities
Involve everyone in holiday activities including the person with dementia.

  • Consider taking walks, icing cookies, telling stories, doing chores, making a memory book or family tree, or keeping a journal. A person with Alzheimer’s or other dementia doesn’t have to give up the activities that he or she loves. Many activities can be modified to the person’s ability. In addition to enhancing quality of life, activities can reduce behaviors like wandering or agitation.
  • To encourage conversation, place magazines, scrapbooks, or photo albums in reach; play music to prompt dancing or other kinds of exercise.
  • Encourage young family members to participate in simple and familiar activities with the person.

Tip 6: Communicate with success
Alzheimer’s can diminish a person’s ability to communicate. These tips may help you understand each other.

  • Be calm and supportive if the person has trouble communicating.
  • Speak slowly with a relaxed tone.
  • Avoid criticism. For example, when someone forgets a recent conversation, avoid saying, “Don’t you remember?”
  • Address the person by name.
  • Be patient, flexible, and do not argue with the person with Alzheimer’s

Tip 7: Smart gift giving

  • Encourage family and friends to give useful, practical gifts for the person such as identification bracelet (available through Medic Alert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return®). Other gifts may include comfortable easy-to-remove clothing, audiotapes of favorite music, videos, and photo albums.
  • Advise others not to give gifts such as dangerous tools or instruments, utensils, challenging board games, complicated electronic equipment, or pets.
  • If possible, involve the person in giving gifts. For example, someone who once enjoyed cooking may enjoy baking cookies, or buy the gift and allow the person to wrap it.

Tip 8: Safe environment in the home

Persons with dementia may experience changes in judgment. This behavior may lead to confusion, frustration, or wandering. Consider these tips to reduce the risk of injury and situations that could be confusing to someone with dementia.

  • Assign a “buddy” to watch out for the person to ensure their comfort.
  • Arrange ample space for walking side-by-side, for wheelchairs, and walkers. Keep walking areas clear.
  • Consider seating options so the person with Alzheimer’s can best focus on conversation and be least distracted.
  • Don’t serve alcohol, which may lead to inappropriate behavior or interactions with medications.
  • Accommodate changes in vision. Place contrasting-color rugs in front of doors or steps.  Avoid dark-colored rugs that may appear to be “holes.”
  • Limit access to places where injuries occur, such as a kitchen or stairwell. Check temperature of water and food.
  • Create even level of lighting; avoid blinking lights.
  • Keep decorations simple; avoid using candies, artificial fruits/vegetables, or other edibles as decorations.
  • Supervise in taking medicine.
  • Keep emergency phone numbers and a list of medications handy.

Tip 9: Travel wisely
The following suggestions may ensure a positive traveling experience:

Tip 10: Reliable sources of support

The Alzheimer’s Association Helpline operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in over 200 languages. Our staff is highly trained and knowledgeable about all aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. Call us if you have questions about Alzheimer’s disease, Dementia, Caregiving, or for emotional support. We know that living with Alzheimer’s can be overwhelming. Remember, we are here for you –– all day, every day.

Caregivers for Alzheimer’s and Dementia Face Special Challenges

You are not alone. Whether you need information about early-stage caregiving, middle-stage caregiving, or late-stage caregiving, the Alzheimer’s Association is here to help.

Families can call the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24-hour Helpline at  1-800-272-3900 to answer questions about warning signs and to assist persons with dementia and caregivers.
The Helpline will be open all Christmas day and News Year day, as well as year round.

The post 10 Tips to Survive the Holidays & Alzheimer’s appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
ALZ Star Penny Garcia will run the Chevron Houston Marathon in honor of her father. The Chevron Houston Marathon is less than three months away, but you can still register today through the Alzheimer’s Association ALZ Star Team!

The Chevron Houston Marathon Run for a Reason Program connects passionate runners with the Alzheimer’s Association and other meaningful causes here in Houston.  Runners who join the ALZ Star team can raise funds and awareness for our mission to end Alzheimer’s disease while also participating in the largest-single day sporting event in Houston.

Penny Garcia has been running as an ALZ Star for three years in honor of her father Sonny Jackson, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009.

“I was devastated when the doctor gave me the news. I was heartbroken knowing the uncertainty of the future my dad was facing. Filled with questions of how my sisters and I were going to take care of him. I am now facing the same thing with my mom who is exhibiting the same behaviors and memory problems my dad began with years ago.”

After runner 4 marathons and more than 25 half marathons, Penny has great tips for running and for fundraising.

  “My biggest running tip is rest! Rest is important. You have got to get that rest in to be able to recover from long runs and to prep for them as well. This year if I reach my goal I am going to dye my hair purple for the marathon! I am literally “going purple to EndAlz”! And a final thing I do is to ask donors to comment with the name of somebody they would like for me to run for in honor or memory. I make note of those names and write them on my ALZ Stars shirt to wear on race day.”

Join Penny and turn your fitness goal into something more by becoming an Alzheimer’s Association ALZ Star runner! Learn more and register at: Chevron Houston Marathon ALZ Star Page

For more information on how to get involved, contact Samantha Duffy at sduffy@alz.org or at 713-314-1349.

Penny says, “If you have a loved one with Alzheimer’s, always treasure your moments with them. Good times and bad, show them you love them. Don’t be afraid. Through this awful disease I have become closer to my dad. I’m stronger than I thought and I’m more compassionate.”

The post Join Penny and Become an Alzheimer’s Association ALZ Star! appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Moody Gardens “Growing Together” Early-Stage Program

Happy Tanksgiving!
Feast your eyes on our enormous 1,000-gallon Caribbean exhibit in this exciting program during a presentation given by one of our very own knowledgeable fish staff! Learn about all of the different species of beautifully colored fish and sharks that call these warm temperature waters home. Seeing these majestic fish up close is mesmerizing and learning about their different adaptations, characteristics and how they all make our ecosystem work is a once in a lifetime experience.

After the presentation, we will walk “underwater” through our breathtakingly beautiful Caribbean tunnel to search for these brightly colored fish and sharks with our fish biologist and volunteers close by to answer any questions. There will be a diver in the water on the other side! We will provide a sheet with the fish listed on it for you to mark which fish you have found. The first person done with their list will win a special prize for two!

Where: Moody Gardens Visitor Center
Upon your arrival, please meet us inside the entrance of the Visitors Center. We will have staff members and volunteers present to escort you to Check-In.

When: Tuesday, November 6th , 2018 from 10:00am-12:00pm

Parking: Please park in the Central Parking lot nearest to the Aquarium and Visitors Center. Transportation will be provided back to the parking lot after the program.

Fee: $5.00- This fee allows you to enter the Aquarium Caribbean Tunnel and enjoy the entire Aquarium on your own time after the program.

Itinerary

  • 10:00am-10:30am: Check-In/Coffee and Conversation- Located in the Macadamia Room at the Moody Gardens Visitor’s Center
  • 10:30am-11:00am: We will board one of our transportation buses to take us to the Aquarium Pyramid for the presentation and Caribbean tunnel activity
  • 11:00am-12:00pm: Presentation and Caribbean tunnel activity will be taking place at this time. There will be staff members and volunteers present to answer questions and assist with the activity. Transportation will be provided back to the Central Parking lot.

To Register: Call 800.272.3900 or email earlystagehouston@alz.org.

The post “Growing Together” at Moody Gardens: Happy Tanksgiving! appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Art doesn’t fit inside one generic box, and neither does this community.

A quick snippet about myself: I’m Brina Bui, a medical student at McGovern Medical School. I’m an Albert Schweitzer Fellow for the 2018-2019 school year. For my fellowship project, I’m partnering with the Alzheimer’s Association to create an art program for people living with early-stage memory loss.

Art means so many things to different people: from doodles made while chatting on the phone to the Mona Lisa hanging in the Louvre. People use it to express themselves in a way that transcends words, or simply just to relax. At the end of the day, you can utilize art in an infinite amount of ways to enrich your life. The idea behind this art program is to have a free space for people living with early-stage memory loss to create art and feel connected to their community. My goal is for people to escape the world of medical diagnoses and losses for a few hours and instead focus on how meaningful their lives still are.

I recently held a focus group at the Alzheimer’s Association to see what the community wants from this art program instead of imposing what I think they want on them. From that meeting, I learned that they key to running a successful art program is to be flexible and offer the participants options that they can choose from. Some people want to paint on pre-made canvases while others prefer a blank one. Art doesn’t fit inside one generic box, and neither does this community.

I’m really excited for what this year has to offer—please join me on my journey~

The post Creating Art Together appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Yoga can be great for overall health. A form of mind-body fitness that combines muscular activity with a mindful focus on breathing, energy and self, yoga has been shown to improve flexibility, sleep, and digestion.  It may also be a useful tool for strengthening our brains.

Here are 5 Benefits Of Yoga for you to consider when thinking about what sort of exercise to do: 1.) Reduced Anxiety and Depression

Yogis, people who regularly practice yoga, often report a sense of serenity and well-being from taking part in a yoga class.  Recent, controlled studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of yoga in reducing stress and anxiety. Through the process of holding positions and focusing on breathing, people learn to better cope with psychological stress.  Lowering stress levels seems to help reduce the risk of depression.

The British Journal of Psychiatry published a meta-analysis of 23 studies that followed nearly 50,000 older adults over a median of five years. Researchers found that depressed adults over the age of 50 were more than twice as likely to develop vascular dementia, and 65 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than similarly aged people who were not depressed.  Regardless, reducing stress and depression have obvious benefits in improving quality of life. Yoga can help.

2.) Memory Support

A research study conducted at UCLA and published in International Psychogeriatrics found that yoga can help improve memory. Researchers recruited 81 participants, age 55 and above, with mild memory complaints, such as forgetting names or misplacing items. Volunteers were randomly assigned to either 12 weeks of memory enhancement training or yoga, and were followed over a six-month period. The memory training group participated in weekly, one-hour sessions with daily, 15-minute homework assignments. Trainers taught techniques such as the use of stories to remember to-do lists or grocery lists. The yoga group had weekly, one-hour sessions in Kundalini yoga, a form of yoga that focuses on breath and is appropriate for adults with physical limitations. They also received handouts and CDs for daily, 12-minute, at-home meditation practice using a yoga singing exercise known as Kirtan Kriya, which uses sound and finger movements to promote focus and concentration.

At 12 and 24 weeks of follow up, both groups showed significant, comparable memory improvement when given the task of remembering a list of words after a short delay. In measures of executive functioning and symptoms of depression, anxiety and psychological resilience, however, only the yoga group showed significant improvement. Because the study group was small , the findings will need to be confirmed in larger clinical trials in the future, the researchers said.  In a subsample of this same study, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging to document brain connectivity, structure, and chemical brain changes associated with the two forms of training over 12 weeks.

The study included 14 participants in the yoga group and 11 in the memory training group. In the paper, published in the May 2016 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers reported finding that yoga was as effective as memory training in improving connections between brain regions involved with verbal memory performance.

3.) Reduced Chronic Pain

Chronic pain is a growing problem affecting older adults who live on their own, as well as up to 85% of those in care facilities.  A recent article in Cognitive Vitality explored the interesting question of whether chronic pain can increase the risk of dementia.

The article quotes from a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine that noted that people with chronic pain had a more rapid memory decline and a faster increase in dementia probability compared to those without such chronic pain. However, it isn’t clear whether the pain itself impacts cognitive function or whether the impact is related to the source of the pain or how it is treated matters. What we can safely say is that chronic pain is linked to depression, anxiety, and impaired cognitive function.

In this context new research offers encouraging news, suggesting that practicing yoga may be an effective, non-pharmacological treatment for pain. Researchers found that chronic pain can be prevented or reversed through mind-body practices, such as yoga or meditation, that reduce pain perception and offset the effects of age-related decreases in gray matter volume while helping maintain white matter integrity.

4.) Increased Brain Plasticity and Physical Flexibility

The brain and nervous system are continuously regenerating as we gain new knowledge and experience.  Practices that combine concentration and movement, such as yoga, are powerful tools for increasing neuro-plasticity, the brain’s ability to change, create neural pathways and reorganize itself.

It is generally accepted that parts of your brain become larger and stronger the more they are used, while unused regions become weaker and atrophy. Habitual thoughts, behaviors and reactive patterns fortify neural networks, for better or worse. Yoga creates new, positive patterns and provides a tool for releasing old, negative patterns through breath and movement.

Yoga postures can also help with physical flexibility, balance and coordination. A number of recent studies suggest that balance and coordination exercises that keep you physically nimble may help keep you mentally nimble as well. Louisa Sylvia, PhD, Director of Psychology at the Bipolar Clinic and Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, points out that maintaining balance and following through with smooth movement is a dynamic process that involves perceiving changes in the environment and initiating innumerable, unconscious shifts in position and posture.

“As with many other mental abilities, these brain functions can deteriorate with age and physical inactivity, contributing not only to cognitive decline, but also to greater risk for falls. Fortunately, research suggests that both balance and coordination can improve with practice,” she said. Yoga is one such practice.

5.)  Enhanced Sense of Empowerment

Caregivers, especially women, have been shown to overestimate their flaws and underestimate their strengths.  Failing to see yourself as a unique, capable person has negative consequences, taking a toll on mental and physical wellness.  It also prevents us from feeling a sense of potential, hope, and joy. Yoga practice, especially in communal or group settings, has the ability to help us refocus on the positive, and this is empowering.

There are many different kinds of yoga, including gentle and therapeutic yoga for those with physical limitations or problems with other forms of exercise.

Find the one that is best for you – and find a teacher to help guide you to breath and mindfulness.

Then, put your hands to your heart and chant OM.

You’re on the path to a practice that can benefit you for a lifetime.

The post Five Ways Yoga and Meditation Can Promote Brain Health appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Moody Gardens “Growing Together” “Pumpkins for Playtime!”
What:
Halloween is right around the corner—what better way to start your Halloween festivities than by painting pumpkins? See first hand how we provide our animals with fun and exciting objects that stimulate their minds and give them something to explore in order to enhance their everyday lives. After finishing your works of pumpkin art, watch as our biologists place your colorful Halloween pumpkins in our animal enclosures to see how they interact with their new edible decorations! (Paint used in this activity is non-toxic and safe for our animals.)

Where: Moody Gardens Visitor Center
Upon your arrival, please meet us inside the entrance of the Visitors Center. We will have staff members and volunteers present to escort you to Check-In.

When: Tuesday, October 2nd , 2018 from 10:00am-12:00pm

Parking: Please park in the Central Parking lot nearest to the Aquarium and Visitors Center. Transportation will be provided back to the parking lot after the program.

Itinerary

  • 10:00am-10:30am: Check-In/Coffee and Conversation- located in the Macadamia Room at the Moody Gardens Visitor’s Center
  • 10:30am-11:00am: We will board one of our transportation buses to take us to the Learning Place building for the presentation and activity
  • 11:00am-12:00pm: Presentation, finishing pumpkin creations and watching our exotic animals play with them! There will be staff members and volunteers present to answer questions and assist with the craft. Transportation will be provided back to the Central Parking lot.

To Register: Call 800.272.3900 or email earlystagehouston@alz.org.

early-stage-programming-at-moody-gardens

The post Moody Gardens Early Stage Program: October “Pumpkins for Playtime!” appeared first on blog.alztex.org.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview