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Building a workplace that Millennials thrive in doesn't mean getting rid of everything that worked for previous generations.

As you can see from this extensive collection, they're very traditional in some senses - they want good compensation, fair benefits, friends in the office, the chance to grow and develop, and a few corporate perks thrown in to sweeten the deal.

But their unique circumstances and background have led them to approach companies with a different perspective.

For example, being raised in a layoff culture has led them to view loyalty in terms of months, not years. 

Also, their mobile technology-centric lifestyles have made them view the traditional, 9-5, cubicle-dwelling work arrangement as outdated.

To help you decipher and engage this generation for your company's success, we've compiled every relevant piece of data about Millennials in the workplace we can find.

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Taking a new job is strikingly similar to starting a new relationship

There's a lot of hope that this is The One. The sky is blue, hearts are aflutter, stars are in your eyes. This job is just meant to be!

Or even if it isn't true love, at least there's someone who wants you, and you can take solace in that. They're not perfect, but it's a paycheck, and that's comforting.

But then you get past that initial phase of infatuation and see things clearer. The job isn't what you expected it to be. Or maybe you just don't get along with your new coworkers.

Or maybe you do, and infatuation blossoms into a long-term relationship.

Most relationships don't result in 50+ years of marriage. Most new hires don't become long-term engaged employees.

What's the difference between relationships that last and those that don't?

We put together an infographic that takes a deep look at current data around employee turnover, and the specific reasons why some employees stay, and others leave.

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You know what it's like to experience financial issues.

There are cold sweats. Increased anxiety. Short tempers. Feelings of doubt and helplessness.

It doesn't have to be a dire situation where you wonder how you'll pay for the next meal. It can be just a shortage of funds from the holidays, or a looming college education for a kid.

Not having the resources to meet your needs or aspirations affects all that you do, every hour of the day.

For years, employers have contributed to employee financial well-being through compensation and retirement benefits.

Both are obviously important, but many companies are now realizing those aren't enough.

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"Hey, I know you're busy, but can I take a few minutes of your time to ask you some questions?"

Remember that? You'd be walking through the mall, knocking out some shopping and minding your own business, then someone would stop you and ask you to take a survey.

Surprisingly, most of us complied with that. It was usually just a few questions, and people really like it when they feel like their opinion matters.

Employees are the same. They like to be heard and to have a say in where things are going.

75% of employees would stay longer at an organization that listens to and addresses their concerns ( Ultimate Software )

Yet, most of us aren't data scientists. We're not sure how to break down statistical trends or build complex pivot tables.

We really just want to know if our employees are happy, and what they want to see happen with their workplace. That's all.

The good news: surveying employees doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, the simpler it is, the better.

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November and December are real pains for HR pros, but let's face it: they ROCK for the rest of the staff.

  • There are parties!
  • Lots of days off!
  • Crossing the finish line on those annual goals!
  • Overall holiday cheer!
  • Bonuses! Short days! Gifts!

Then January hits.

And it's really cold outside. 

The next day off feels like it's six months away.

There are no parties on the horizon.

No bonuses or gifts.

No finish lines to cross, either. Quite the opposite - January is when most employees are staring at their new annual goals, wondering how in the world they're going to get where they need to go.

And suddenly employees go from the highest of highs to "work sucks" again. 

In terms of importance, January is super valuable. You have to kick the year off strong and get people pointed in the right direction. 

Yet many of them show up on January 2 already worn out and deflated.

You can fix this.

Try these small changes that could have a big impact on employee engagement and productivity in the month-long hangover that is January.

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Now that the rush season is over and open enrollment is behind us, we’d like to take a few minutes to look back on Access Perks’ 2017.

Wait, you mean the rush season isn’t over yet? There are still enrollment audits, seasonal bonuses, and party planning to be done?

Okay, so maybe things never really slow down in HR and benefits.

To help accommodate those crazy schedules, we’re going to summarize the five big highlights from our year.

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Want to generate some real enthusiasm in your office to kick off the new year?

Stand up in front of all your employees, and tell them how the company is going to whip them into shape to save lots of money in the coming year.

Employees will be pumped to get off their rears and meet mandatory monthly steps and exercise mandates so that the benefits budget can be trimmed by a few hundred bucks!

We’re kidding of course. That’s how you can inspire a mutiny in your office!

Look, let’s be honest.

We all know the value of health and wellness benefits to a company. These efforts pay off through lower premiums as well as reduced absenteeism and increased productivity.

It’s a great investment!

It just so happens that none of those mean much to employees.

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To be honest, there were a couple years that we didn't pursue workplace awards too heavily.

We knew Access Development (parent company of Access Perks) was a great place to work and that our employees were an engaged and motivated group. We knew our benefits and perks were up to snuff and employees were given the tools necessary to achieve their best.

We just didn't want to bug them with surveys, or ask them to do interviews with researchers (as is required by some recognition programs). Some of these organizations ask for essays. Others want extensive demographic data.

In other words, these awards can be a lot to slog through just so someone else can tell you what you already know.

Why is it then that Access has won five such awards in the past year?

What changed our thinking?

What makes these awards valuable for companies like ours - and yours?

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People have a lot to be stressed out about in the final weeks of the year.

Holidays, finances, vacations, family drama, cold and flu season, work deadlines, cooking, cleaning, dealing with kids on breaks from school.

When people talk about work/life balance, they're usually talking about how to keep work life from taking over personal life.

This time of year, that's flipped. It's regular life that becomes too much to deal with.

Work has its own stresses, but this is an instance where it might be a refuge.

At least, it should be. You should want it to be.

Is it possible to reach your company's end of year goals while also creating a stress-free environment for employees?

We think so. 

Here's how to reduce holiday-related stress and distraction in your office, so your team remains engaged and productive during this busy and chaotic time.

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Full confession: when I came to work at Access Development nearly seven years ago, I was kind of a sad dude.

I was overweight, always tired, and constantly grumpy. My previous employer may not have been responsible for all of those, but they certainly weren’t doing anything to help.

At that job, we were expected to be in our seats for eight or more hours a day, with just a few minutes for lunch. Working late was expected, and people who brought lunch from home were considered weird since most everyone went out to fast food joints together.

In other words, “health and wellness” was something employees did on their own time. It wasn’t part of the corporate culture.

Back then, I thought that was okay. Yeah, work stunk, but my health and wellness is my responsibility.

That’s still 100% true for me and everyone else. Ultimately, it’s my own fault I was overweight and grumpy.

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