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Sorry for the late publication. It’s been a pretty exhausting 24 hours involving cancelled flights, lost laptops, and a very late arrival at home for me following an otherwise extraordinary visit to Newfoundland. I’ll keep all this short and sweet. Continuing rarities include the Slate-throated Redstart (ABA Code 4) in Texas, the Red-footed Booby (4) in California and Little Egret (4) in Maine.

The easy highlight of the week was the ABA’s 2nd record of Antillean Palm Swift on Grassy Key in Monroe, Florida. The first continental record of this tiny Caribbean swift came from 1972, also in mid-July, interestingly enough. Generally considered to be non-migratory, this species is an expected vagrant despite being very common just over the Straits of Florida in Cuba.

The swift was exciting, but it was the passage of Hurricane Barry from the Gulf of Mexico into the interior of the continent which say a great many hurricane waifs pushed northward. The epicenter of this phenomenon was Tennessee, which saw it’s 1st record of American Flamingo in Lake in the days ahead of the storm. There has been some suggestion that this individual was the same one that had spent several weeks at St. Marks NWR on the Florida panhandle.

And once the storm had passed, several birds were left in its wake, including another state 1st for Tennessee, Sandwich Tern, Seen at the same lake as the state’s 5th Magnificent Frigatebird 7th Royal Tern, and 6th Black Skimmer. Over towards Memphis, a Great Shearwater as well.

That wasn’t the only Barry bird to make waves. Kentucky’s 2nd record of Great Shearwater was seen in Marshall. 

What might be Manitoba’s 1st provincial record of Ash-throated Flycatcher was photographed in Winnipeg this week.

Ohio’s 3rd Limpkin, and the third seen this month, was seen at Magee Marsh in Lucas.  

South Dakota had a Black-chinned Hummingbird at a feeder in Pennington.

In Ontario, a Ferruginous Hawk was reported at Moosonee.

Massachusetts had a Red-necked Stint (3) in Essex, leading off stint season in the ABA Area.

North Carolina’s 3rd record of Sharp-tailed Sandpiper was seen in Dare this week. Also a handful of Purple Gallinules were notable in Currituck. 

Texas had a Rufous-backed Robin (3) in the Davis Mountains.

Arizona’s first Plain-capped Starthroat (4) of the season was seen in Hereford.

Always a tough identification in California, Townsend’s Storm Petrels (3) were seen this week off Ventura Island, and a Parakeet Auklet has returned to San Francisco

In British Columbia, the province’s 2nd Common Ringed Plover was seen in Tsawwassen.

And in Alaska, a Costa’s Hummingbird turned up at a feeder in Juneau.

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

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The adult male, or “drake,” hooded merganser, Lophodotyes cucullatus, has got to be just about the most ridiculously photogenic bird in the ABA Area. No matter how often I see one—the species has been expanding its range and increasing in number for several decades now—I can’t help myself. I have to take a picture. Like this guy, whom I saw at a pond by my house in the Denver suburbs back on Feb. 24 of this year:

Boulder County, Colorado; Feb. 24, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

Now where did I put that black neck gaiter of mine?

I saw hooded mergansers—dazzling drakes and demure hens and demoniac immature males—off and on for the rest of the winter and early spring until they moved out of the region around the end of April. Then, on the evening of May 31, breezy with distant rumbles of thunder, I saw this drake at the pond by my house:

Boulder County, Colorado; May 31, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

As drake “hoodies” go, this one seemed rather average, but I snapped a photo, all the same. That’s because hooded mergansers are eBird rarities in Colorado this late in the season. They’re supposed to be gone by the end of May, and they require some measure of proof for the ever-vigilant eBird reviewers.

The bird continued at the pond, and I got this photo on June 10:

Boulder County, Colorado; June 10, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

If the bird looked average on May 31, it’s downright mediocre in this June 10 image. The crest is flattened, and you can see a few dark flecks among the white feathering on the crown. The breast is blurry and smudgy, a far cry from the semaphoric sharpness of a drake in late winter or early spring. Our merganser is beginning its summer molt. Scarcely a week later, on June 19, the bird looked like this:

Boulder County, Colorado; June 19, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

Talk about a bad hair day.

And five days after that, on June 24:

Boulder County, Colorado; June 24, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

If there’s one constant with hooded mergansers, it’s their addiction to crayfish. The only contrast remaining on our merganser involves the wing feathers, as I think you’ll see more clearly on this next image, only 24 hours later, on June 25:

Boulder County, Colorado; June 25, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

Those dark feathers, long and pointed, with the white center stripes, are technically the tertials, the name given to the innermost flight feathers. They’re held over, or “retained,” from the bird’s brilliant winter plumage, but almost every other feather on this bird is one of its new summer plumes.

I had a bit of travel in late June and early July, and couldn’t get back to the pond until July 8. The bird was still there, and it looked like this:

Boulder County, Colorado; July 8, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

Except for details of its body structure, this adult male hooded merganser could pass as a female brown-headed cowbird. Even the tertials have dropped. In less than a month, the bird has gone from a basically normal, if somewhat muted, drake merganser to something very few of us have ever laid eyes on.

Encounters with hooded mergansers in their full-on summer plumage are rare indeed. Eons ago—back around 1990, as I recall—renowned Pennsylvania field ornithologist Paul Hess and I were discussing the dearth of records of male common mergansers, Mergus merganser, in mid-summer, and Paul conjectured that the males “literally go into hiding.” Without perhaps fully realizing it, Paul was effectively proposing that mergansers perform a molt migration.

Just a couple weeks ago, molt expert Peter Pyle and I were corresponding about hooded mergansers in summer, and Peter was more declarative about the matter. “They molt-migrate somewhere!” he proclaimed in an email to me. “Perhaps in remote boreal bogs?” he wondered.

As it turns out, Peter and his birding buds out in San Francisco have access to a male hooded merganser, a bird like mine, that is spending the summer in the “wrong” location. And I hope they’re getting a series of photos like mine. Check that: I hope their photos are better than mine, taken with a point-and-shoot camera, typically in low light in the evenings after work.

I suspect the sequence of images in this blog post constitute the first published documentation of the progression of the summer molt of the hooded merganser. On the one hand, that seems borderline preposterous: The species is, as I said at the outset, beloved by photographers. On the other hand, photos of males in mid-summer are rare, and dedicated photographic study of a known individual in its summer molt must be rarer still. As far as I am aware, it’s never been attempted until now.

This is yet another one of those examples of how new and emerging technologies are affecting the way we engage and understand nature. The phenomenon of molt migration was formally announced by Finn Salomonsen in a technical journal out of Europe in 1968, but I think it’s fair to say that the idea was slow to catch on over here on this side of The Pond. Digital photography is changing that.

The sort of study I’ve presented here could, in theory, have been conducted by anybody with a film camera in 1968. But in practice? Not a chance. Who would “waste” all that precious film on something as “boring” as a messed-up molting merganser? And Peter tells me that the same neglect evidently applied to the museum collectors of yesteryear: In the 20+ museums he’s visited, Peter’s never come across a summer specimen of a male hoodie.

Fast forward to 2019. All of us—well, a great many of us, anyhow—head out to our local patches toting a small but serviceable digital camera. We see a merganser and we know we won’t get it past the eBird reviewer without a confirmatory photo. Next thing you know, we’ve contributed importantly to understanding the summer molt of the hooded merganser. And you can’t conduct this sort of study with museum specimens, I hasten to note. With a dead bird in a museum tray, you get one shot, literally, and that, as they say, is that. A very fundamental question—namely, how fast do individual birds molt in the wild?—was essentially unanswerable until the recent proliferation of inexpensive and easy-to-use digital cameras.

A final thought. It’s not just that I understand merganser molt in ways I couldn’t have in my pre-digital days. I think I appreciate and marvel at birds, at some deep down level, more and better than ever before. Without my camera and without this laptop and without this blog and without eBird and without Google (“molt” + “migration” + “merganser”), that merganser—if I even notice it at all—is just a passing comment in my field notebook, a “continuing male.” And, if I’m honest with myself, not even that. Would I have sought that bird, day after day on buggy evenings during the summer doldrums, all for the opportunity to document its molt?

It’s funny, I still hear it said that eBird and blogs and such are ruining birding. Okay, but if you’ll excuse me now, I need to get those darned kids off my lawn.

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Many noteworthy ABA Area rarities look like they’re sticking it in for the summer, including the Slate-throated Redstart (ABA Code 4) in Texas, Red-footed Booby (4) in California , and Falcated Duck (4) in Alaska. Little Egrets (4) are still being seen in Maine, and the Common Crane (4) i northern Arizona is also evidently staying put.

This summer has been exception for many southern species in the north, and few species have illustrated this phenomenon like Limpkins. North Carolina, South Carolin, and Alabama, have records, and Georgia has already had more than usual. It seemed inevitable one would show out out of the southeast, and a Limpkin in Wayne, Ohio, this week cracked the seal. This is the state’s 1st record.

That was the only first for the week that was, but not the most noteworthy continental rarity. That distinction goes to the ABA’s 4th record of Common Redshank (5), a thus far one-day wonder seen on the Avalon Peninsula in eastern Newfoundland this week. All previous records of this Eurasian shorebird come from Newfoundland.

In Nova Scotia, a Brown Booby (3) was seen in Sydney Harbour.

Pennsylvania also had a Brown Booby (3), in Snyder. 

North Carolina hosted a pair of European shorebirds this week, a sharp male Ruff (3) in Hyde and the state’s 3rd record of Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (3) in Dare. 

In South Carolina, a Shiny Cowbird (3) showed up at a feeder in Charleston. 

Florida had another Bahama Mockingbird (4) this week, this one in Miami-Dade. 

Brown Booby is not a bird typically found well inland, though a number of bizarre records exist. One in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this week is one of those odd few.

Noteworthy birds in Colorado this week include a Common Gallinule in Larimer and a Lucy’s Warbler in Mesa. 

Oregon’s 3rd record of Red-headed Woodpecker was seen near Florence this week.

In British Columbia, a Black Phoebe was seen in Coquitlam and an Acorn Woodpecker in Saanich.

And in Alaska, a Long-billed Murrelet (3) was spotted in Kachemak Bay.

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

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The ABA’s summer camps have long been an avenue for young birders to take in some excellent birding opportunities, to network with other young birders, and to learn about career opportunities in birding and ornithology. So many young people who have gone on to become influential in our community have come through ABA camps and other young birder camps, and many more consider it a seminal experience in their birding lives. Jennie Duberstein, ABA’s long-time Director of Camp Colorado and the Coordinator of the Sonoran Joint Venture bird conservation partnership and Robert Buckert, a young birder and recent Camp Colorado attendee from Rochester, New York, join me to talk about the camp experience both as a counselor and as a camper.

Also, Piping Plovers in Chicago threaten to derail a music festival and some thoughts on playback.

Thanks to the 2019 Hawai’i Island Festival of Birds for sponsoring this episode of the American Birding Podcast.

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For the last few years, we at the ABA made the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, known far and wide as the Duck Stamp, available through our own store. We hoped this would give birders an opportunity to vote, as it were, for how they want their voices to be heard as consumers of Wildlife Refuges in the US.

This is money from birders that goes directly into the coffers of those who seek to make NWRs better places for wildlife. And we’re doing it again in 2019.

This is not a fund-raiser for the ABA. We are not seeking to make any money doing this. We continue to promote the purchase of Duck Stamps through the ABA as an accounting of birders, in a way. Not just in numbers but in dollars and cents. And we know from countless members and friends that this is what birders want, too.

Duck Stamps officially went on sale late last month, and once again you can purchase at our shop. Don’t just feel like you need to stop at one, either. Duck stamps make fantastic gifts for birders, young and old. You can use them as birthday or holiday gifts or bird clubs can sell them during their monthly meetings. Consider them for end-of-year appreciation gifts for bird club field trip leaders or awards for birders who go above and beyond. The possibilities are nearly endless.

We hope that you will help us. In doing so, you will not only help the birds that use National Wildlife Refuges, but we birders who care to have a voice about them.

So purchase a Duck Stamp through the ABA. Be counted.

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Duck genetics are a real mess, as any park pond will quickly make clear, and even birds we consider to be “good” species are closer than we imagine, as Jente Ottenburghs at Avian Hybrids explains.

Philip Lavrestsky and his colleagues sequenced the DNA of five members from the Mallard complex that occur in North America: the Mallard (obviously), the American Black Duck, the Mexican Duck (A. diazi), the Florida Mottled Duck and the West Gulf Coast Mottled Duck (for more information about population structure in the Mottled Duck you can read this blog post). Although these species are morphologically clearly distinct, it has been proven difficult – if not impossible – to distinguish between them genetically.

Jason Ward’s Birds of North America was released to great reviews earlier this year, but its popularity inspired a low-rent doppelganger from a surprising source, as reported by Cara Buckley in the New York Times. 

Ward, 32, has birded in Prospect Park with the comedian Wyatt Cenac, near Brooklyn Bridge with the Feminist Bird Club, and in Cape May, N.J., with his mentor, J. Drew Lanham, a wildlife biologist and fellow birder of color. Birders of color are pretty rare, which is why the program exists: to show that they do, too.

So Ward and his producers were shocked earlier this week when Rolling Stone unveiled a new bird-watching web series that shared uncanny similarities with Ward’s show.

In addition to being a vagrant hotspot, St. Paul Island in Alaska’s Pribilofs is home to one of the continent’s largest populations of breeding seabirds, so the arrival of a single rat on the island required an all hands on deck response, as reported by Emily Heber at Island Conservation. 

Last fall, an unwelcome hitchhiker—an individual invasive rat—made its way onto St. Paul Island, Alaska, one of the Pribilof Islands.

The Pribilof Islands are home to more than 3 million nesting birds and are considered one of the most important seabird nesting sites in the Bering Sea. The introduction of one invasive rat might not sound concerning, but if that rat were to be a pregnant female, it could quickly escalate into a major threat. Lauren Divine, director of the Ecosystem Conservation Office at Aleut Community of St. Paul Island explained:

Rats have such a potential to invade and change the ecosystem in a way we’d never recover from.”

Corporate sponsorship of wild bird common names? Is it an idea whose time has come? Carrie Laben imagines what that world would look like at 10,000 Birds. 

I’d learned a lot since the last time I sat in a meeting room even close to this fancy. Mostly, don’t steal breath mints. I’m still full of good ideas, though. And the faces around this table – faces you might recognize, and names, if I hadn’t signed an NDA that I’m pretty sure allows me to be shot into space if I tell you who was present – were doing a pretty good job of acting like they wanted to hear them.

I can’t tell you exactly how I brokered this meeting between these titans of industry and a team from the AOS, either. Of course it involved subterfuge, and bribery, and Jonathan Franzen at a crossroads at midnight. But the details must remain nebulous.

The Double-crested Cormorant is no one’s idea of a flashy bird, but it hides its most colorful feature on the inside of its mouth, as revealed by Mia McPherson of On the Wing Photography. 

During the breeding season adult Double-crested Cormorants are a bit more striking than they are during the nonbreeding season because of the changes in their plumage and inside their mouths.

Wait. What? Inside their mouths?

Yes. During the breeding season even the inside of the mouths of Double-crested Cormorants show changes, the lining inside their mouths turns into a deep, electric or cobalt blue.

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This past June was recently designated as the warmest ever in recorded history. This past month also had an extraordinary irruption of southern species into northern parts of the ABA Area. It probably oversimplifies the mechanisms that lead to bird vagrancy to lay that entirely at the feet of climate change, but the two phenomena are undoubtedly related. Birds, especially those species already prone to vagrancy, will follow familiar climate envelopes, leading to their presence in unlikely places. I think there can be no doubt that this is at work this summer more than most.

Anyway, a number of familiar birds continue into this week, including the ABA’s 3rd record of Red-legged Thrush (ABA Code 5) in Florida, one or more little Little Egrets (4) in Maine, and the Slate-throated Redstart (4) in Texas. A Red-footed Booby (4) is still being seen in California, as is the Common Crane (4) in Arizona, and the Falcated Duck (4) in Alaska.

A slightly late record, but yet another one indicative of this southern birds north pattern we’ve been seeing, came in late May, where a Dickcissel in Hay River, Northwest Territory, represents a territorial 1st, and an opportunity to highlight a place we don’t get to mention often in this space.

That wasn’t the only 1st record in the western part of the continent, this week. In Colorado, a Yellow-green Vireo singing in Baca would represent a 1st for that state.

And in Washington, a Crested Auklet seen from shore at Discovery Park, in Seattle, is a 1st for that state as well.

A pair of noteworthy birds more common in the Bering Sea were seen on the Alaskan mainland this week. A Common Snipe (3) and an Olive-backed Pipit (3) were seen near Utquiakvik (formerly Barrow). Also, the state’s 4th record of Yellow-billed Cuckoo was seen in Anchorage.

Good for British Columbia was a Northern Parula at Fort Hardy.

Michigan gets on the board with a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck in Oakland, the latest of an overwhelming influx of this species north and east this year.

Notable for Pennsylvania was a Western Meadowlark in Mifflin.

In Newfoundland, a Summer Tanager was seen at St. George’s.

And in Quebec, a Tricolored Heron in La Côte-de-Beaupré and an Orchard Oriole at Montérégie were both good for the province.

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

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I was leading a field trip a couple weeks ago, and our group came across this bird:

Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado; June 16, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

One of the trip participants needed Hammond’s flycatcher for his county list, and we were at a good elevation—and a good part of the state—for that long-winged, small-billed, and generally dumpy empid. Was it a Hammond’s? Well, it never hurts to get a second look:

Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado; June 16, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

Hm. Now it’s got that small-headed, long-billed look, dull and low-contrast overall. Could it, weirdly, be a gray flycatcher? One doesn’t normally confuse Hammond’s and gray flycatchers. Let’s take one last look:

Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado; June 16, 2019. Photo by © Ted Floyd.

This isn’t a flycatcher of any sort. It’s a bird in an entirely different suborder. It’s a ruby-crowned kinglet, Regulus calendula, in the ginormous oscine suborder, featuring everything from ravens to nuthatches to oropendolas to tapaculos. And, yes, kinglets. Ruby-crowns are usually easy to ID, especially when they flash their red crown as here. So I did I commit this blunder?

The fact that we’d just been talking about the Hammond’s flycatcher—remember, one of the tour participants needed it—no doubt affected my thinking. But the bigger problem, I think, is that I knew too much. I knew that kinglets rarely visit aspens and never perch upright for extended periods of time.

I totally get the value—I’ll even elevate it to the birderly virtue—of knowing what to expect. I’ve gone off from time to time, in this forum and elsewhere, on the critical importance of knowing when and where to look for birds.

On the flip side, there’s a danger in relying too much on expectation. Doing so can desensitize us to novelty and aberration. If we “know” that kinglets “never” perch upright like flycatchers, we are led seriously astray. But take heart! Expectation and open-mindedness are, or ought to be, two sides of the same coin. Together, they add up to experience, which might, just might, be the greatest virtue of all when it comes to identifying—and, more to the point, understanding and enjoying—wild birds.

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What’s the deal with feeding jelly to birds? Is it harmful? Laura Erickson has the answers.

In 2004, when I had exceptionally high numbers of orioles, Cape May Warblers, and catbirds coming to my grape jelly, people were finding dead orioles and warblers in the woods—there simply wasn’t enough natural food to support the large numbers of migrants that arrived just before the cold snap. Some birds almost definitely survived specifically thanks to jelly.

Shorebirds are on their arctic tundra breeding grounds these days, and researchers like Stephan Brown are busy doing their work in this short arctic breeding season. He explains part of it at Shorebird Science. 

To find out how many shorebirds use habitats of different types across the tundra, we first categorize the many different types of tundra into classes, mostly related to how wet or dry they are. Habitats that are wetter are generally better for both shorebirds and waterfowl, but we have to visit all types to figure out how many birds are using the entire landscape. So we randomly select plots that are representative of different habitat types and visit them all during the course of our survey.

At Conde Nast Traveler, photographer Sidra Monreal explains her path to slowly becoming a birder.

As the tour went on, I reaped the benefits of the couple’s hobby, photographing all kinds of birds that my untrained eyes would never have noticed. The breadth of colors and shapes present in Namibia’s bird life was astonishing, and with every stop we saw behaviors unique to that species and sometimes, even more narrowly, to their sex and age. “Would you like to borrow our bird book?” the woman asked. I flipped casually through the pages, not knowing where to start, and handed it back to her after only two minutes, overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of birds it contained.

Population booms and busts are part of the history of the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker, but despite all this population turmoil, their genetics have remained remarkably stable, according to Jente Ottenburghs at Avian Hybrids. 

Mark Miller and his colleagues compared the genetic variation of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers from three time periods: before 1970, 1992-1995 and 2010-2014. The analyses showed that several mitochondrial variants (so-called haplotypes) have been lost over time. However, these variants did not represent distinct evolutionary lineages. It mainly concerned small offshoots of the most common variants. All in all, not much mitochondrial variation was lost.

The early ornithologists we “honor” in our birds’ names are not always a congenial bunch, and modern sensibilities have made their legacies rather complicated. Writing at 10,000 Birds, Zach Schwartz-Weinstein argues that we should just go ahead and change them.

The ornithological practice of naming species after dead white people — almost universally dead white men, with the exceptions of Lucy’s, Grace’s, Virginia’s, and Blackburnian Warblers, (which are named for dead white women) is fundamentally an index of ornithology’s complicity with the history of European imperialism and settler colonialism.  This is the same history of conquest and despoliation which now puts many of these very species in danger of extinction. We should stop naming birds, especially non-European birds, after European and Euroamerican naturalists and scientists, especially if we are committed to making the worlds of birds and birding accessible to more people than the demographics that produced the Audubons, Wilsons, Stellers, and MacGillivrays.

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Attendees of the annual American Ornithological Society conference, held this year in Anchorage, Alaska, have been appreciating the continuing Falcated Duck (ABA Code 4) in Alaska. The Slate-throated Redstart (4) in Texas and one or more Little Egrets (4) in Maine also continue into the past week.  Both the Zenaida Dove (5) in Florida and the long-staying Common Crane in northern Arizona are still being seen, as is a Red-footed Booby (4) in California.

For the second time this year, and the 3rd time in the ABA Area, a Red-legged Thrush (5) was seen in Florida. A bird in Miami-Dade has already outstripped previous individuals in terms of accomodation, being present for two days so far instead of the one-day wonders of the past. And it may stick it out a little bit longer too, as reports suggest that it is building a nest in a nearby ornamental tree, though it’s unlikely it will find a partner.

There were no 1st records to report this time around, but we do have a 2nd. A Virginia’s Warbler in Jefferson, Montana, has ony been recorded once before in that state.

Good finds in Alaska this week include a Bobolink near Homer and a Common Rosefinch (4) in St Paul Island.

In California, a White-eyed Vireo was seen in Humboldt. 

In Maricopa, Arizona, an apparent Yellow Grosbeak (4) was photographed on a bird feeder and reported to iNaturalist.

Texas had a Thick-billed Kingbird in Jeff Davis. 

Noteworthy for South Dakota, and indeed anywhere in the Lower 48, a Yellow-billed Loon is present near Pierre.

Minnesota’s 13th record of Black-bellled Whistling Duck, a small flock of them, was in Grant this week.

Quebec also had Black-bellied Whistling Ducks this week, in Lanaudière.

Maine’s 3rd record of Brown Booby was photographed on a buoy just offshore in Knox. 

More Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks to report, this time in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

And in New Jersey, a Fork-tailed Flycatcher (3) turned up in Ocean. 

—=====—

Omissions and errors are not intended, but if you find any please message blog AT aba.org and I will try to fix them as soon as possible. This post is meant to be an account of the most recently reported birds. Continuing birds not mentioned are likely included in previous editions listed here. Place names written in italics refer to counties/parishes.

Readers should note that none of these reports has yet been vetted by a records committee. All birders are urged to submit documentation of rare sightings to the appropriate state or provincial committees. For full analysis of these and other bird observations, subscribe to North American Birds, the richly illustrated journal of ornithological record published by the ABA.

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