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This week Dr Chris White from White labs joins me to discuss the yeast life cycle and fermentation in beer.

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The Yeast Life Cycle with Chris White - BeerSmith Podcast #190 - YouTube
Topics in This Week’s Episode (51:39)
  • This week my guest is Dr Chris White, President and CEO of White Labs, a premiere provider of yeast for home brewers and Craft breweries. He is also the author of Yeast (Amazon link) the definitive book on beer brewing yeast.
  • We discuss some of Chris’ recent travels.
  • Chris provides his advice on yeast preparation for both dry and liquid yeasts.
  • We begin discussing the yeast life cycle starting with the lag phase which occurs immediately after pitching the yeast into wort.
  • Chris tells us why oxygen is so important for the lag phase of fermentation.
  • We talk about the next phase which is rapid growth. This is also the phase where alcohol, CO2 and most of the flavors associated with yeast are produced.
  • He explains the third stage which is the “stationary” phase where maturation and flocculation of the yeast takes place.
  • We briefly discuss off flavors as well as the importance of completing maturation before rushing to cold crash or filter your beer.
  • Chris gives his closing advice on fermentation as well as discusses some of the new projects ongoing at White labs.
Sponsors

Thanks to Chris White for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

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This week I’ll give you my picks for top home brewing books. As you might expect I have a pretty extensive library of brewing books, and I also know many of the top authors well.

I’ve included Amazon associate links for each book which you can use if you want to support this site. Many of these books are also available in your local brew shop or book store.

1. How to Brew – Everything You Need to Know to Brew Great Beer Every Time

This substantial book by my friend John Palmer is considered by many to be “the book” for home brewing. Updated in 2017 to its 4th edition, and weighing in at 582 pages this in-depth book covers almost every possible brewing topic. It is a more technical read than some other brewing books, and can be a bit overwhelming at first read if you don’t have a technical background.

Nevertheless John does walk you through everything from basic brewing to more advanced topics like brewing at altitude or managing your mash pH. There is a reason you will find this book in just about every serious home brewer’s library.

2. Mastering Homebrew – The Complete Guide to Brewing Delicious Beer

Though not as popular or well known as Palmer’s How to Brew, this book by graphic artist and brewer Randy Mosher is lavishly illustrated and very approachable even for a first time brewer. It is not quite as technical as Palmer’s book, but it does an amazing job of covering the vast majority of brewing techniques, terminology and equipment used by home brewers. I also like how Randy approaches beer from a flavor perspective rather than simply looking at it as a technical endeavor.

Even as an experienced brewer, I found Randy’s insights into topics like “harsh zone malts” and flavors of various ingredients to be both unique and valuable and they gave me further insight that has helped me improve my own recipes.

3. Designing Great Beers – The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles

An older book by Ray Daniels who now runs the Cicerone program. This book walks you through a number of classic beer styles and attempts to analyze the ingredients used in award winning recipes for each style. I found this book very useful early in my brewing career as it gave me a reasonable place to start when building my own recipes for many of my favorite styles.

While I don’t often directly use the book these days, the methodology of dissecting and comparing the ingredients used in top beer recipes for a particular style is something I do extensively to this day. In fact I usually start the development of a new beer recipe by first looking up related recipes.

The book can be criticized because it has not been updated to reflect newer beer styles, or new brewing techniques and it only contains a limited number of styles. However I feel the content is solid and the technique can be carried over to newer recipes and styles with ease once you understand the book’s approach to recipe design.

4. Radical Brewing: Recipes, Tales and World-Altering Meditations in a Glass

Randy Mosher has a second book in my top five list, again in no small part because of his artistic approach to beer. What I like most about Radical Brewing is that it gets you thinking in new and unique ways. Randy goes well beyond the traditional four brewing ingredients and conventional techniques to explore the sublime.

While Palmer’s How to Brew provides an in depth technical approach to brewing, Randy’s Radical Brewing dives deep into the artistic side. The book is packed with ideas and examples of brewing outside the box to create beer with unique flavor combinations. If you need inspiration or a way to expand your brewing horizons I do recommend Radical Brewing.

While those are my four personal favorites, I want to also mention the Brewer’s Association series on ingredients. This four book series consists of the books: Yeast, Water, Malt and Hops (Amazon links) and each one is written by an expert in the series. These four books are excellent if you want to do an in-depth dive into brewing ingredients.

Leave a comment blow if you have other books you have enjoyed. Thank you for joining me this week on the BeersSmith blog – please subscribe to the newsletter or listen to my video podcast for more great material on homebrewing.

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This week I take a close look at the effects of Dry Hop Creep in highly hopped beer styles like IPAs and what can be done to limit the problem.

For some time now, brewers of IPAs using very high levels of dry hopping have been aware of stability issues with their finished beer including diacetyl, over attenuation and even carbonation issues.

However not until 2018 were researchers able to explain the problem in some detail. Oregon State University published a paper in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry and also presentations were made by Caolan Vaughan at Brewcon 2018 in Sydney and another was done at the Oregon Beer Summit.

The term “Hop Creep” or “Dry Hop Creep” was coined to describe the problem which occurs when high levels of dry hops are used. Ironically, the problem was described by Brown and Morris way back in 1893 including the cause, but that knowledge was largely lost over the last 126 years.

What is Hop Creep

At its core, hop creep is continued fermentation in the bottle or keg after the finished beer has been packaged for distribution. Symptoms include overcarbonation of bottles and kegs, over-attenuation of packaged beer, and diacetyl off flavors. It can occur in any unpasteurized or unfiltered packaged beer. Warm storage of the packaged beer can make the situation worse.

The root cause of hop creep is high levels of dry hopping. Hops actually contain trace amounts of both alpha and beta amylase as well as limit dextrinase enzymes. After dry hopping these enzymes can continue to convert a small amount of starch into sugars even at room temperature. If yeast is still present the sugars will ferment, lowering the final gravity of the beer and also creating carbonation.

The net effect can be as much as a 1-2 Plato drop in final gravity over a period of 40 days, which leads to a 5% increase in carbonation levels and 1.3% increase in alcohol (Kirkpatrick and Shellhammer). There tests were done at 20 C, and higher storage temperatures can result in even more attenuation. This means the bottles and kegs will be overcarbonated, and the increased attenuation can also affect the malt-hop balance and body of the finished beer – big problems for commercial breweries.

In addition the fermentation will raise the diacetyl levels of the beer, and there will likely not be enough yeast to clean that diacetyl up resulting in a buttery off flavor in the finished beer.

Preventing Hop Creep

There are a variety of techniques that may reduce the effects of hop creep though they may not completely eliminate it. Some of these also have limited hard experimental data behind them:

  • Filter or Pasteurize the Finished Beer – Really the only way to completely eliminate hop creep, filtering or pasteurizing will remove live yeast from the equation, stopping further fermentation.
  • Reduce Dry Hop Levels – Shift some dry hops to the whirlpool (before fermentation) where they are less likely to create enzyme problems.
  • Cold Store you Beer – Hop creep is temperature dependent, and if you can ensure that the finished beer is stored cold, it will significantly reduce the enzyme and fermentation activity.
  • Design “Creep” into the Recipe/Process – Some brewers purposely under-attenuate and also under-carbonate their beers, assuming hop creep will occur in finished bottles/kegs. While this won’t solve potential diacetyl issues, it can help with over-carbonated/over-attenuated beers. It can be difficult to determine how much “creep” to expect however.
  • Dry Hop Earlier – Though not much reasearch has been done on this, some brewers believe dry hopping closer to fermentation will give the hop enzymes and yeast time to act before the beer is packaged, reducing the scope of the hop creep problem.
  • Use Sulfites/Sulfates to Reduce Yeast Activity – While not an option for naturally conditioned bottles, you can consider adding potassium metabisulfite (and possibly potassium sorbate) to kegs to inhibit further fermentation. These additives are widely used in the wine/mead industry as a preservative and also to inhibit further fermentation.

I hope you enjoyed this week’s article on hop creep. Thank you for joining me this week on the BeersSmith blog – please subscribe to the newsletter or listen to my video podcast for more great material on homebrewing.

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Stan Hieronymus joins me to discuss cutting edge hop research, hop creep, New England IPAs and unique farmhouse ales.

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Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Hops and IPAs with Stan Hieronymus - BeerSmith Podcast #189 - YouTube
Topics in This Week’s Episode (51:39)
  • Brad had a slight cold today – I apologize if my voice sounds a bit scratchy.
  • Today my guest is Stan Hieronymus. Stan is the author of For the Love of Hops, Brewing Local and Brew Like a Monk (Amazon affiliate links).
  • Stan shares some of the recent research done on hazy IPAs including the New England IPA style.
  • We discuss where the haze comes from as well as new findings about extensive dry hopping and active fermentation hopping.
  • We discuss Thiols and the role they play in hopping. We also covered this topic earlier in Episode #172.
  • Stan introduces the problem of “Hop Creep” and how excessive dry hopping can lead to diacetyl and also carbonation issues in finished beer.
  • We discuss some possible solutions to “Hop Creep”
  • Stan provides his advice for the best hop schedule for a New England IPA.
  • Stan talks about his recent travels to meet Lars Gershol as well as the new book Lars is writing for the Brewer’s Association.
  • He talks briefly about some of the unique “farmhouse” techniques and yeast strains Lars has been exploring.
Sponsors

Thanks to Stan Hieronymus for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

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I often get emails from BeerSmith 3 users and companies asking how to create an add-on for BeerSmith. It turns out it is relatively easy to create your own ingredients or profiles and export them to a BSMX file for use as an add-on.

Add-ons in BeerSmith 3

The add-on feature lets you download specific sets of additional ingredients or profiles to use in the program. Literally thousands of hops, malts, equipment profiles, even styles are available as addons. The add-on dialog was updated in BeerSmith 3 to make it easier to tell which add-ons are available

Add-ons are stored online on a BeerSmith server, but can be easily accessed from File->Add-ons from the desktop or the main Add-ons button near the bottom of the mobile version. The desktop version also lets you organize them by type so you can display a list of just hop add-ons using the drop down at the top of the dialog. To install or uninstall an add-on you simply click on it and click the Install or Uninstall button. After installation the new ingredients or profiles will show up in the respective list.

Creating or Updating an Add-on

If no add-on exists for a particular malster or equipment setup (for instance) you can create your own. The first step is to go to the Ingredients or Profiles view and enter the data.

For example if I’m creating a new add-on for a particular craft malt house, I would go to Ingredients->Malt and enter the new items there. Wherever possible, use the specific data from the malt house web site such as color, dry grain fine yield, moisture, etc…to fill in the ingredient dialog.

If updating an existing add-on you would follow the same process except you would want to download the add-on first, then update or add new items as needed before exporting.

The final step is to export the items needed for the add-on. You can do this by individually selecting all of the items. The easiest way to do this is to use the search bar (top right area) first to find all of the items first, then select them using either Ctrl+click or Shift-Click.

Once all of your ingredients are selected, use the File->Export Selected command to export the selected items to a separate BSMX file. You can then go to File->Open to open the file you just selected and verify that it is complete and has all of the items you intended.

While the example above was for malt, you can do the same for any ingredient type including yeast, water profiles, etc or for any profile type such as equipment profiles, carbonation or aging profiles.

There is one special consideration when creating beer style add-ons. After creating the first entry for your style guide, you need to go to Options->Brewing and set the style guides to be displayed. Unless you select the new style guide you are adding (after the first entry was added) you won’t see the new styles listed.

Submitting an Add-on

Once you have the exported BSMX file containing your add-on data, simply use the contact-us page on BeerSmith.com to contact me and include the fact that you have a new add-on. I will send an email in reply and you can then attach the new BSMX file in response.

Once I’ve reviewed the BSMX file for completeness I will post it on the main add-on server for anyone using BeerSmith to use. I typically do this a few times each month to keep items up to date.

That is the basic process for creating an add-on if you either work with a smaller supplier or want to contribute to the BeerSmith community. Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.

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John Palmer, the author of the book How to Brew joins me this week to discuss beer recipe design

Subscribe on iTunes to Audio version or Video version or on Google Play

Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Designing Beer with John Palmer - BeerSmith Podcast #188 - YouTube
Topics in This Week’s Episode (51:14)
  • Today my guest is John Palmer. John is the author of the top selling home brew book in the world How to Brew as well as Water and Brewing Classic Styles (Amazon affiliate links for books). He has an extensive web site on brewing at HowToBrew.com
  • John tells us his starting point when he is designing a new beer recipe.
  • He shares how to determine the right mix of grains for a recipe and also how to avoid overdoing it with specialty grains.
  • We talk about some of the flavor characteristics of different grains.
  • John explains the harsh zone malts and why they must be used sparingly.
  • We talk about malt balance and how you achieve a beer that is greater than the sum of its parts.
  • John discusses the bitterness ratio and why it is important to achieve the right hop-malt balance for a given style.
  • We also talk about why every beer should not be brewed as an IPA.
  • John shares his thoughts on a variety of hop groups and the types of flavors those groups share.
  • We discuss the extensive use of whirlpool and dry hopping in beer to preserve hop aroma and also how this can affect the balance of the finished beer.
  • John tells us about some considerations that come into play when working with water including overall mineral content, mash pH and the sulfite/chloride ratio.
  • John shares thoughts on yeast and how to choose the appropriate yeast for a given style.
  • We briefly discuss carbonation and packaging, and John provides his closing thoughts.
  • We also talk briefly about the upcoming BYO bootcamp in Asheville NC where John and I will both be presenting all day seminars. There are still a few slots left if you would like to attend in March.
Sponsors

Thanks to John Palmer for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

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This week I present a short video tutorial on how to use the new cloud folder and move/copy features in BeerSmith 3 software for beer brewing, mead, wine and cider making.

Using the Cloud Folder Feature in BeerSmith 3 - YouTube

You can find additional tutorials on the main tutorial page and download a free trial copy of BeerSmith from BeerSmith.com.

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.

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Rick Theiner, maker of the Eco-Logic series of cleaners joins me this week to discuss cleaning and sanitation for beer brewing.

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Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As to download this mp3 file

Cleaning and Sanitation with Rick Theiner - BeerSmith Podcast #187 - YouTube
Topics in This Week’s Episode (47:41)
  • Today my guest is Rick Theiner. Rick is the President of Logic, Inc, makers of the Eco-logic line of cleaning and sanitation products including One-step, Straight-A and San-Step.
  • Rick explains the difference between cleaning and sanitation and why they are separate steps using different chemicals. He also explains the more stringent disinfecting and sterilizing terms.
  • We discuss the cleaning process which removes dirt and biofilms and how the material/surface being cleaned makes a big difference.
  • Rick tells us why the soil/biofilm types also matter and it often takes a different combination of chemicals and action to remove them all.
  • We discuss the four basic elements of cleaning: Time, temperature, mechanical action and chemical action.
  • Rick also explains the many different phsio-chemical reactions going on when we clean a surface.
  • We talk about sanitizing agents and why they are different from cleaning agents.
  • Rick provides his basic rules for cleaning for home brewers.
  • Rick tells us why household cleaners may not be a great substitute for cleaners and sanitizers designed for home brewing.
  • He walks us through the products his company offers including Straight-A, One-Step and San-Step NS and how each are best used.
Sponsors

Thanks to Rick Theiner for appearing on the show and also to you for listening!
iTunes Announcements: I launched a new video channel for the BeerSmith podcast on iTunes, so subscribe now! At the moment it will only feature the new widescreen episodes (#75 and up). Older episodes are available on my revamped Youtube channel. Also all of my audio episodes are on iTunes now – so grab the older episodes if you missed any.

Thoughts on the Podcast?

Leave me a comment below or visit our discussion forum to leave a comment in the podcast section there.

Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes or BeerSmith Radio

You can listen to all of my podcast episodes streaming live around the clock on our BeerSmith Radio online radio station! You can also subscribe to the audio or video using the iTunes links below, or the feed address

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the blog and my newsletter (or use the links in the sidebar) – to get free weekly articles on home brewing.

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This week I take a look at various types of imbalances in beer as well as how to correct them. Imbalances are flavor, appearance and carbonation flaws in your beer not explicitly defined as an off-flavor.

A few weeks ago I covered the 17 major off-flavors in beer as well as their main causes. These are the identifiable off flavors defined on the BJCP score sheet, used for rating beers in competition. However there is another category of flaws in your beer that do not have defined off-flavor labels, and this is what I’ll cover this week.

What are Imbalances?

Imbalances are flaws in your beer that are not tied to a specific defined off-flavor. Examples include problems with color, appearance, clarity, malt-hop balance, or even just the incorrect flavor balance in the finished beer. If you submit a beer to a competition for judging, these flaws will often appear in the overall impression, appearance or notes section on the score sheet rather than checking a specific off-flavor box on the score sheet.

Imbalances include:

  • Wrong Hop-Malt Balance – While recent trends have been towards ever-hoppy beers, for most beer styles the hop and malt flavor balance is critical. If you have issues with hop-malt balance you may want to consider learning more about the bitterness ratio as well as review your hop and malt selections to make sure they are appropriate to the style.
  • Improper Carbonation Level – Carbonation actually plays a key role in the flavor perception of the beer. A flat beer will appear lackluster and dull in flavor while an over-carbonated beer can be sharp or difficult to enjoy. Fortunately this is one area that is easy to correct in subsequent batches by adjusting your carbonation sugar or keg pressure levels.
  • Poor Clarity – Clarity is a significant factor in the appearance of lighter color beers. While haze does not generally impact the flavor of the beer, it can ruin an otherwise perfect beer. If you have problems with clarity you might want to take a look at my in depth series on how to improve clarity in beer.
  • The Wrong Color – The color of the beer should be appropriate for the style. A pale ale should not be opaque, stouts should not be light brown, etc… Fortunately this is an area that is relatively easy to correct by adjusting the malt bill slightly. Software can also help you in estimating the color of the beer in advance.
  • Flavor Imbalances – You can get the color, clarity, carbonation and hop balance right and still have a beer that does not taste right. Usually this comes down to your selection of ingredients. Either you picked some ingredients that are not appropriate for the style or used them in the wrong proportions. Some examples might be using an English ale yeast to make a light continental ale, or using an excess of malts near the harsh zone, or using the wrong hop variety for the style. If you run into this type of issue, go back and take a close look at your recipe and how it compares with recipes from the same or similar style of beer.
  • Improper Technique – Brewing techniques have an impact as well. Using the wrong mash schedule, hop techniques, fermentation temperatures or other process issues can have a significant impact on your beer. For example you probably should not be dry hopping your Bavarian Weiss beer, or fermenting your lager at room temperature, or rushing to bottle your barley wine after just a few weeks of aging.

This is by no means a comprehensive list, but it may give you a good starting point to correct flaws not specifically identified as a named “off flavor” in your beer. Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.

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While the cloud features in BeerSmith are great for sharing data, there are times when you want to send some recipes, ingredients or profiles to a person via email or on a thumb drive. The BSMX file format in BeerSmith makes this easy to do.

Some web sites also provide BSMX files as downloads for their recipes, ingredients and profiles and the below tutorial will explain how to work with these.

Creating a BeerSmith BSMX File

Fortunately it is very easy to export recipes, ingredients or profiles in BeerSmith. I’ll start with a recipe. From My Recipes view, simply select the recipe, folders or recipes you want to export. You can hold down the Control (Cmd on Mac) key while clicking to select multiple items, or if you hold down the shift key you can select a range of items. You can also go to Edit->Select All to select everything.

Once you have the recipes selected, go to File->Export Selected which will bring up the familiar save dialog so you can give the BSMX file a name and save it to a location on your drive. This BSMX file is the one you want to mail or put on a thumb drive to share or import the data on another computer. You can also select the File->Export All command if you want to save evertying in the current view.

While I used the My Recipes view as an example above, you can actually export ingredients and profiles as BSMX files as well. The process is the same, except you need to start from one of the Ingredients or Profile views and select the ingredients or profiles you want exported. These also get saved as BSMX files and can be imported into the respective Ingredient or Profile view on another computer.

Importing a BSMX file in BeerSmith

After you’ve transferred the BSMX file you exported above to another computer either via email, a thumb drive or network, you need to open it in BeerSmith and save the data for further use.

To open a BSMX file in BeerSmith, go to File->Open File and navigate to the file you want to import. When you open the file, it will open in a separate tab within BeerSmith with the name of the file shown on the tab. Within that open file tab you can view and edit the data, but if you save changes they will only affect the BSMX file.

In most cases you want to copy the recipe or other data into BeerSmith for later use. To do this, navigate to the open tab with the name of the file on it. Next select the folders or recipes you want to copy from that tab and use the Copy button to copy the data to the clipboard.

Next navigate to your own personal My Recipes view and Paste the data. This will create a permanent copy of the recipes you just imported. Once you have copied the data over you can close the BSMX file tab. BeerSmith will ask if you want to save the data back to the BSMX file, which you rarely need to do unless you are trying to edit the BSMX file itself.

The same process works for importing Profiles and Ingredient BSMX files. Simply open the file, select the data you want to retain, and copy it to the appropriate Ingredient or Profile view for that data type. So if I was importing a BSMX file containing hops data, I would want to open the file, select the hops I want to keep in that file tab, and then Copy/Paste the data to my Ingredients->Hops view which would store it permanently for future use.

Directly Editing a BSMX file

Though rarely needed, you can actually open a BSMX file in a separate tab and start editing items in that tab. So, for example, I could open a BSMX file (using File->Open) and then copy/paste another recipe I forgot into it. Keep in mind that changes made in an open file tab will only be saved to that BSMX file. Also when you close the file tab you do need to tell BeerSmith to save the data back to the BSMX file (it will prompt you) or it will be lost.

I hope the above tutorial gives you additional options for sharing your BeerSmith data. I also encourage you to read this article on cloud sharing which is a simpler way to share data with other BeerSmith users via the BeerSmith cloud.

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.


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