Loading...

Follow Beauty in Ruins on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, originally hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. Since Jill is no longer hosting it, I'm joining Can’t Wait Wednesday movement over at Wishful Endings.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir
Expected publication: September 10, 2019 by Tor.com

“Unlike anything I’ve ever read. ” ―V.E. Schwab

“Lesbian necromancers explore a haunted gothic palace in space!” ―Charles Stross

The Emperor needs necromancers.

The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman.

Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead nonsense.

Tamsyn Muir’s Gideon the Ninth unveils a solar system of swordplay, cut-throat politics, and lesbian necromancers. Her characters leap off the page, as skillfully animated as arcane revenants. The result is a heart-pounding epic science fantasy.

Brought up by unfriendly, ossifying nuns, ancient retainers, and countless skeletons, Gideon is ready to abandon a life of servitude and an afterlife as a reanimated corpse. She packs up her sword, her shoes, and her dirty magazines, and prepares to launch her daring escape. But her childhood nemesis won’t set her free without a service.

Harrowhark Nonagesimus, Reverend Daughter of the Ninth House and bone witch extraordinaire, has been summoned into action. The Emperor has invited the heirs to each of his loyal Houses to a deadly trial of wits and skill. If Harrowhark succeeds she will be become an immortal, all-powerful servant of the Resurrection, but no necromancer can ascend without their cavalier. Without Gideon’s sword, Harrow will fail, and the Ninth House will die.

Of course, some things are better left dead.


I've had an ARC of this in hand for months now, and while I did sneak a peek - and loved the first few chapters that I read - I've been trying hard to wait for closer to the release date. I suspect I'll give in and settle in for a read over vacation next week.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, originally hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. Since Jill is no longer hosting it, I'm joining Can’t Wait Wednesday movement over at Wishful Endings.

The Harp of Kings by Juliet Marillier
Expected publication: September 3rd 2019 by Ace

A young woman is both a bard—and a warrior—in this thrilling historical fantasy from the author of the Sevenwaters novels.

Eighteen-year-old Liobhan is a powerful singer and an expert whistle player. Her brother has a voice to melt the hardest heart, and is a rare talent on the harp. But Liobhan's burning ambition is to join the elite warrior band on Swan Island. She and her brother train there to compete for places, and find themselves joining a mission while still candidates. Their unusual blend of skills makes them ideal for this particular job, which requires going undercover as traveling minstrels. For Swan Island trains both warriors and spies.

Their mission: to find and retrieve a precious harp, an ancient symbol of kingship, which has gone missing. If the instrument is not played at the upcoming coronation, the candidate will not be accepted and the kingdom will be thrown into disarray. Faced with plotting courtiers and tight-lipped druids, an insightful storyteller, and a boorish Crown Prince, Liobhan soon realizes an Otherworld power may be meddling in the affairs of the kingdom. When ambition clashes with conscience, Liobhan must make a bold decision—and the consequences may break her heart.


Yes, a quest for an ancient symbol of kingship, plotting courtiers, tight-lipped druids, insightful storytellers, and Otherworld powers sound interesting, but what hooked me here was the talk of ambition clashing with conscience, bold decisions, and heart-breaking consequences.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, originally hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. Since Jill is no longer hosting it, I'm joining Can’t Wait Wednesday movement over at Wishful Endings.

Old Bones by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child
Expected publication: August 20th 2019 by Grand Central Publishing

#1 bestselling authors Preston & Child bring the true story of the ill-fated Donner Party to new life in a thrilling blend of archaeology, history, murder, and suspense.

Nora Kelly, a young curator at the Santa Fe Institute of Archaeology, is approached by historian Clive Benton with a once-in-a-lifetime proposal: to lead a team in search of the so-called "Lost Camp" of the tragic Donner Party. This was a group of pioneers who earned a terrible place in American history when they became snow-bound in the California mountains in 1847, their fate unknown until the first skeletonized survivors stumbled out of the wilderness, raving about starvation, murder-and cannibalism.

Benton tells Kelly he has stumbled upon an amazing find: the long-sought diary of one of the victims, which has an enigmatic description of the Lost Camp. Nora agrees to lead an expedition to locate and excavate it-to reveal its long-buried secrets.

Once in the mountains, however, they learn that discovering the camp is only they first step in a mounting journey of fear. For as they uncover old bones, they expose the real truth of what happened, one that is far more shocking and bizarre than mere cannibalism. And when those ancient horrors lead to present-day violence on a grand scale, rookie FBI agent Corrie Swanson is assigned the case...only to find that her first investigation might very well be her last.


Preston & Child delve into history and archaeology with Agent Pendergast's protege, Corrie Swanson, in what is slated to be the first of a new series. Count me in!
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Hawthorn Moon is the annual summer blog tour for Gail Z. Martin and Larry N. Martin, and features guest blog posts, giveaways, surprises, excerpts and more on blogs worldwide. Find the master list of posts and goodies at  LarryNMartin.com


Take a group of misfit heroes, combine them with a dodgy demigoddess and a tavern full of ruffians…and you have the kind of book that gave me a life-long love of epic fantasy. That’s why I wanted to write the sort of story that I loved back in the day, with a modern twist. It’s a portal fantasy not set in any gaming franchise, but very much in the heroic quest tradition.

In my new fantasy adventure novel, The Splintered Crown, a group of down-at-the-heels friends are sent by a demigoddess on a dangerous quest in hopes of making their fortune and being able to escape the hardships of their lives in the city.

The city of Kortufan is like a medieval Casablanca, where spies, assassins, mercenaries, arms dealers, rebels, smugglers, and informants do dirty deals dirt cheap.

Think of the Poxy Dragon as Rick’s Place, if Rick Blaine ran a biker bar on the wrong side of the tracks outside the worst part of the medieval Silk Road. It takes balls just to talk into the place, not only from the reputation but its rough clientele, questionable food, awful beer, and abysmal hygiene. Lots of taverns in Kortufan are home to dealmakers and illegal dealings, but the Poxy Dragon is the proving ground for heroes (with a cemetery out back for the ones who don’t make the cut).

Lady Leota, the resident demigoddess at the Poxy Dragon, sends would-be heroes to different realms on quests. Once committed, the only way to return is with your shield or on it.

For Kieron and his friends, getting by in Kortufan means working as guards for shady merchants or pulling off dangerous heists. Kieron, a former warrior, dreams of pulling off a score big enough that he and his found family of friends can pull up stakes, move to the country, and never be hungry again. Kane, an exiled half-elf, is a master thief who knows that her luck won’t last forever. Mitchell is a wolf shifter without a pack until he teams up with Kieron and creates a “pack” of his own with their misfit allies. Those friends include Declan, a mage whose abilities are as broken as his sanity after a battle gone wrong, and Malyn, a spirit medium and psychic who fled his noble background to pursue his magic. Alone, they’re nothing special. But together, with the chance to win big and change their lives, they’re a force to be reckoned with…assuming they survive the challenge.

Find The Splintered Crown in ebook and paperback wherever online books are sold, and watch for more adventures from The Poxy Dragon as the Tankards and Heroes series continues!

αωαωαωαωαωαωαω

About the Author

Larry N. Martin is the author of the new sci-fi adventure novel Salvage Rat and the quest adventure The Splintered Crown. He is the co-author (with Gail Z. Martin) of the Spells, Salt, and Steel: New Templar Knights series; the Steampunk series Iron & Blood; and a collection of short stories and novellas: The Storm & Fury Adventures set in the Iron & Blood universe. He is also the co-author of the upcoming Wasteland Marshals series and the Joe Mack - Cauldron: Shadow Council series.

Join our Shadow Alliance street team so you never miss a new release! Get all the scoop first + giveaways + fun stuff! Also where we get our beta readers and Launch Team! https://www.facebook.com/groups/435812789942761

Find me at @LNMartinAuthor, on www.Facebook.com/WinterKingdoms, and on our www.DisquietingVisions.com blog.

Never miss out on the news with our monthly newsletter http://eepurl.com/dd5XLj

αωαωαωαωαωαωαω

Read a copy of our Deadly Curiosities urban fantasy short story Catspaw for free: https://claims.prolificworks.com/free/UAjd6

 and check out our epic fantasy Ascendant Kingdoms short story Reconciling Memory here for free: https://claims.prolificworks.com/free/JQorl

Giveaway! Enter for a chance to win a copy of The Splintered Crown and Convicts and Exiles http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/9751c04221/?

© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Welcome to the wild and uninhibited world of Khymeera: a place where men, women, aliens, monsters, and mythological beings mingle in a way that would make the Greek Gods blush!

This is the first collection in the World of Khymeera Stories series, with three thrilling standalone tales which have already been published, and one novella—The Big Black Kock—making its debut here. The World of Khymeera stories perfectly complement the Karli Talbo novels with recurring themes, characters, locations, kinks, and plot threads that all tie together. Perfect for fans who enjoy naughty Easter eggs hunts. If you liked Kock Rider of Khymeera, you’ll love The 1st Khymeera Kollection!

These 8000—14,000 word erotic stories contain: gender-swapping, exhibitionism, voyeurism, futa-on-female, futa-on-male, male-on-male, male-on-female, harem, first time, lesbian, menage, BDSM, bondage, supernatural, aliens, tentacles, hu-cow, and much much more!



These sizzling tales are definitely not for the faint of heart!


I'm not sure what it was that first caught my eye with this series first. Okay, so, actually I do. It was the blurb for Kock Rider of Khymeera, the first full-length novel in the series, which had a definite Gor vibe to it - albeit one with a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor, some gender-bending, and a wealth of LGBT diversity (all thing sorely lacking from John Norman's work). I was intrigued, so I decided to sample Joanna Noor's world with her first Khymeera Kollection of short stories.

It was a good choice. I thoroughly enjoyed these stories, so much so that I've already ordered both novels in paperback to go with it.

STORMING THE BARBARIAN’S GATES reminded me of an old-fashioned sword-and-sorcery tale, something from the era of Howard, Leiber, and Moorock, but with a far more sexualized twist. At its heart, it's the story of an Amazon Queen turning the tables on the Barbarian King who dared abduct her. There is magic aplenty to the story, mostly of the illusionary, shape-shifting kind, which leads to an erotic (and amusing) sort of ironic justice. What immediately impressed me about this first story was three things - the world-building, which is introduced nicely here; the character development, which has surprising nuances for a short story; and the equal balance between the genres of fantasy and erotica.

DILDOR RAMPAGE! takes things in an entirely different direction, exploring the kind of companion comedy that sword-and-sorcery does so well, replacing Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser or Elric and Moonglum with Kamika and Nessa. It picks up on the classic trope of stranding the heroes in the wilderness, without weapons or mounts, and even confronts them with a helpful (but really not) stranger who is keen to offer outlandish advice from a distance. The Dildors of the title are akin to Velociraptors in heat and, let's be honest, the only way to make erotic sword-and-sorcery better is to add dinosaurs! Beneath all the sex, the story has something to say about friendships, relationships, and coming out, and does so tastefully (if with a healthy dose of kink).

THE WIZARD’S MAGICAL WOOD is the story that took me from entertained reader to hardcore fan. This is a dark tale, more pulp horror and sword-and-sorcery, dealing with lost love, dark magic, dangerous wishes, and supernatural betrayal. At first, I thought Noor had gone too far with her erotic rendition of the 'wound' in the enchanted tree, but once I realized where she was taking the story, and just how cleverly symbolic (and literal) Wrenn's obsession was, I became convinced. The way she guides the final scene through so many emotions, and the imagery she uses to do it, is just fantastic, but what I appreciated even more is the fact that there is no condemnation of the role and gender reversals within Wrenn's love for Aletyha.

THE BIG BLACK KOCK takes us back to sword-and-sorcery, and does so with a story that is probably the deepest and most socially conscious of the collection. It is here that we really come to understand that Khymeera has prejudices of its own, no matter how diverse its genders, and that it is just as prone to bullying and institutional abuse as our own world is. It is something of a coming-of-age tale, but more a coming-out tale, one where our heroine, Parkor (ninja in training) betrays everything she has ever known to rescue a slave, fulfill a prophecy, and claim her own ambition. A powerful tale, full of action, adventure, and eroticism, with genuine emotion throughout.

Hopefully, this first Khymeera Kollection will not be Noor's last, and I am equally hopeful that Kock Rider of Khymeera and Sukkubus of Khymeera are not the end of the story, but the first part of a trilogy, at the very least. It is a different take on the genre than Reed James' The Knight and the Acolyte series, but one that will site nicely on the shelf next to those books. Now, if somebody else can figure out the trick of erotic fantasy, maybe one day I can fill that shelf . . .



Paperback, 132 pages
Published July 31st, 2018


The WTF Weekend gang is group of readers and reviewers who enjoy Weird, Taboo, and Forbidden fiction that is most definitely NSFW. Join us every Saturday and Sunday for more twisted tales . . . and if you have a review to contribute, please contact us!
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Possession was an odd, yet oddly satisfying read for me. It started out strong, hooking my interest with talk of urban legends and historical mysteries. With Pierre's solo excursion to the stone walls, I felt it tipped its hat a little too soon as to what was really happening, which lost me for a good part of the book. Michael Rutger reeled me back in, though, with a final hundred or so pages of unrelenting claustrophobic horror and manic intensity.

There is a perfect, small-town sort of tension throughout the book, with secrets kept from both characters and readers. The mysterious man in the shadows, the odd happenings in the rooms, the cold shoulders of the locals, the weird warnings, and the ominous . . . well, call it reluctance to see the missing girl found alive. It all creates a fantastic setting, and without the quirky humor many authors feel necessary to soften the anxiety.

The stone walls themselves are so simple, and yet full of so much storytelling potential, the setting and characters could have failed completely, and still I would have kept reading, just to find the answers. I'm not completely sold on those answers, and I still have some questions, but mysteries like this are about the search for answers, not the answers themselves. As for the characters, they were decent, likable, and had just enough depth to keep it together.

While early reviewers seem to agree with my complaints about the mid-book lull, we disagree about the ending. I've seen a lot of comments about how the whole second half paled in comparison to the first, but I loved the way Rutger played with sci-fi and horror tropes. I hesitate to say too much, to call out some of the books and movies it reminded me of, but I thoroughly enjoyed the chase to the end.


Kindle Edition, 400 pages
Expected publication: July 2nd 2019 by Grand Central Publishing

Disclaimer: I received a complimentary ARC of this title from the publisher. This does not in any way affect the honesty or sincerity of my review.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, originally hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. Since Jill is no longer hosting it, I'm joining Can’t Wait Wednesday movement over at Wishful Endings.

Into the Planet: My Life as a Cave Diver by Jill Heinerth
Expected publication: August 27th 2019 by Ecco

From one of the world’s most renowned cave divers, a firsthand account of exploring the earth’s final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet

More people have died exploring underwater caves than climbing Mount Everest, and we know more about deep space than we do about the depths of our oceans. From one of the top cave divers working today—and one of the very few women in her field—Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of earth’s remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability.

Jill Heinerth—the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations—has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. She takes us into the harrowing split-second decisions that determine whether a diver makes it back to safety, the prejudices that prevent women from pursuing careers underwater, and her endeavor to recover a fallen friend’s body from the confines of a cave. But there’s beauty beyond the danger of diving, and while Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves.

Written with hair-raising intensity, Into the Planet is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission’s success balances between knowing one’s limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance.


While I wasn't successful in nabbing an ARC of this, I'm looking forward to it. Undersea exploration has always fascinated me, so this sounds like a fantastic read.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and is now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. It is a meme born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.


This week we're looking at our Most Anticipated Releases of the Second Half of 2019. It's hard to pick just 10 books, so I'm going with those upcoming releases I already have in-hand, waiting anxiously for their turn.

1. The Wolf's Call by Anthony Ryan [July 23rd]
A thrilling new story of razor-sharp action and epic adventure fueled by rumors of an army called the Steel Horde, led by a man who believes himself a god. Come on, that sounds cool!

2. The Gossamer Mage by Julie E. Czerneda [August 6th]
No, it's not the next book of her Night's Edge epic fantasy series (although there is a novella coming later this year), but how can you not get excited for a one mage standing alone against a Deathless Goddess who controls all magic?

3. The Mage-Fire War by L.E. Modesitt Jr. [August 13th]
A new Recluce novel is always cause to celebrate, but having a conclusion to the trilogy that began with The Mongrel Mage and Outcasts of Order is even better.

4. Old Bones by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child [August 20th]
Preston & Child delve into history and archaeology with Agent Pendergast's protege, Corrie Swanson, in what is slated to be the first of a new series. Count me in!

5. Turning Darkness Into Light by Marie Brennan [August 20th]
I'm a latecomer to the Natural History of Dragons, so having a standalone entry into Brennan's world is not just timely, but welcome.

6. The Harp of Kings by Juliet Marillier [September 3rd]
A quest for an ancient symbol of kingship, plotting courtiers, tight-lipped druids, insightful storytellers, and Otherworld powers sound interesting, but what hooked me here was the talk of ambition clashing with conscience and heart-breaking decisions.

7. Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir [September 10th]
The Emperor needs necromancers. The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman. Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead nonsense. Enough said!

8. The Name of All Things by Jenn Lyons [October 29th]
The Ruin of Kings was a surprise arrival in the mail earlier this year, and it absolutely blew me away. It was one of best epic fantasies of the year, and after that ending . . . well, I'm anxious to find out what the hell happens next!

9. Fate of the Fallen by Kel Kade [November 5th]
Not all stories have happy endings. The going gets rough and folks start to believe their best chance for survival is to surrender to the forces of evil, which isn’t how the prophecy goes. Those two lines, right there, make this a must-read.

10. A Queen in Hiding by Sarah Kozloff [January 21st]
Yes, I do know January does not count as the second half of this year, but I have a copy of this in hand, and I will read it in 2019, so it counts. A breathtaking and cinematic epic fantasy sounds interesting enough, but what really caught my eye is the plan to release all four books within a month of each other. Binge away!


I could, of course, do a whole other Top Ten list of books I want to read but don't have in-hand yet, but we'll save that for another day.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A solid epic fantasy that puts an exciting new spin on the classic "let's go slay the dragon" trope, Dragonslayer won me over with the first glimpse of Alpheratz. Duncan M. Hamilton humanizes dragons, gives them memories and purpose and emotion, and flips our sympathies from cheering on the deaths of monsters to mourning the loss of these magnificent beasts.

In fact, I'd liked Alpheratz far more than most of the humans, but there were two exceptions. Solène is a character I liked from the first moment we met her. She was strong, confident, and charismatic, her magic making her more than a match for a back-alley assault. The whole "she's a witch, burn her!" trope was handled nicely here, with Gil calling out the villagers, shaming them for their deeds, and raising a few philosophical questions in his rescue of the young woman. You might expect that scene to scar her, possibly even define her, but Solène shrugs it off to not only return the favor in saving Gil's life, but in demanding her place in his quest.

Now, as for Gil, he's a man I was prepared not to like. Mysteriously tragic backstory aside, we first meet him as a lazy drunk, too wrapped up in his own problems to do his job and care for his people. He's standoffish, rude, self-pitying, and has trouble sticking to his own vows to better himself. The problem is, he's entirely human, and as we begin to see glimpses of the man he once was and the man he could become, he grows on you. It's just a shame that his rival, Prince Bishop, doesn't experience the same growth, because his weakness as a character not only leaches a little tension from that enmity, it actually feels like it takes away from Gil's backstory.

The writing here was solid, with some nice turns of phrase, snappy dialogue, and well-managed points-of-view. In terms of pacing, beyond a necessary pause for introductions and character-building early on, it moves along nicely. World-building felt a little light, but that might owe something to the fact that I'm not familiar with his Wolf of the North saga, which is set in the same world. Then again, it may be because the wider world simply isn't important here, and this first chapter in a new saga is about one thing - man vs dragon. Perhaps the biggest issue I had with the book is that there are so many unanswered questions as to why things happen, and why characters do things. It's not just that motivations were unclear, but that logical implications of men and magic were simply set aside.

In the end, however, the positives of Dragonslayer far outweigh the negatives, and I am curious to see where the story goes next - even if it will be without a favorite character.


Paperback, 304 pages
Expected publication: July 2nd 2019 by Tor Books

Disclaimer: I received a complimentary ARC of this title from the publisher. This does not in any way affect the honesty or sincerity of my review.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, originally hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. Since Jill is no longer hosting it, I'm joining Can’t Wait Wednesday movement over at Wishful Endings.

Turning Darkness Into Light by Marie Brennan
Expected publication: August 20th 2019 by Tor Books

Marie Brennan's Turning Darkness Into Light is a delightful fantasy of manners, the heir to the award-winning Natural History of Dragons series, a perfect stepping stone into an alternate Victorian-esque fantasy landscape.

"Overwhelmingly fun."―io9 on The Tropic of Serpents 

As the renowned granddaughter of Isabella Camherst (Lady Trent, of the riveting and daring Draconic adventure memoirs) Audrey Camherst has always known she, too, would want to make her scholarly mark upon a chosen field of study.

When Lord Gleinheigh recruits Audrey to decipher a series of ancient tablets holding the secrets of the ancient Draconean civilization, she has no idea that her research will plunge her into an intricate conspiracy, one meant to incite rebellion and invoke war. Alongside dearest childhood friend and fellow archeologist Kudshayn, must find proof of the conspiracy before it’s too late.


I'm a latecomer to the Natural History of Dragons, so having a standalone entry into Brennan's world is not just timely, but welcome.
© 2018 Beauty in Ruins All Rights Reserved
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview