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Does somebody you work with have a problem with alcohol or drugs? It’s fairly common, new research shows us. A recent survey from DrugAbuse.com found that 23 percent of respondents admit they used drugs or alcohol while at work, with nearly 6 in 10 say they have used alcohol at work during the regular day. (Not during an office party or special event.)  Almost 23 percent of survey takers admitted they’ve smoked pot on the job. Many of these people likely have a substance use disorder.

Addiction doesn’t discriminate, and there are people in almost every industry that struggle with substance use. Nurses and doctors, for example, have access to addictive drugs and may abuse drugs to sleep, stay awake, or cope with a bad day. Trcuk drivers have been caught taking stimulants so they can get to their destinations more quickly, without sleep. Silicon Valley has a culture of working late and drinking beer, and in recent years, entrepreneurs have admitted to taking “micro doses” of LSD and experimenting with “smart drugs”.

Getting Help for Drug and Alcohol Problems

Your coworkers are often your friends as well as the people you see everyday. If you’re reading this article, it’s probably because you’re worried about somebody you care about.

You may see signs of addiction such as tardiness, a disheveled appearance, poor workplace performance or chronic absences. A person who is addicted to a substance often has problems being motivated or focused on work. They may nod out or have trouble staying coherent if they come to work high.

Intervening and Detox

An intervention may be the best approach to take with your coworkers. Consider hiring an interventionalist or speaking with family or friends to help coordinate something similar.

Once a person seeks help, they may want to take time off from work using the Family Medical Leave Act. Addiction is covered as a disability according to the law, so when your coworker is seeking help or treatment, they can’t be fired for missing work.

No matter what drug a person is addicted to, going to a detox program to rid themselves of toxins is a good first step before long-term treatment.

Recovery is Possible

Many people from all walks of life have been able to embrace recovery and reclaim their lives! Life gets better the longer you’ve been clean and sober. Give yourself a chance and call us at 1-877-228-2401. We’re happy to answer any questions you have.

The post Does Your Coworker Have a Substance Use Disorder? appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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When you were using drugs, did you talk to your using friends about your deepest secrets or problems? Or did you just “shut down” and get high?

Most likely, you chose the latter option. After all, most people who use drugs or alcohol to excess are using drugs to relax or “feel good”. Most people who have a substance use disorder can point to times where they were unhappy or upset. But the coping mechanism that they chose to deal with these emotions was simply using more of their favorite substance. Using drugs and alcohol is a way to escape negative emotions, but it’s not a way to cope with them or make them go away in the long-term.

Sharing Your Feelings

In recovery, a lot of time is spent on sharing. Whether you’re in a therapy group or on the phone with your sponsor, being open about how you feel and exploring why you feel that way is a big part of the journey.

Sharing is important because when you were using drugs and alcohol, you kept many secrets and you probably kept your emotions to yourself. Addiction is lonely and painful. Recovery is about having a support network that accepts you no matter where you are in the journey to wellness. Learning to trust others will help you also learn to trust yourself again, when you’re ready.

Sharing may be uncomfortable to you at first. This is why you’re usually told to just listen when you start going to 12-step meetings. By focusing on listening, you can start to identify with other people and their emotions or struggles. You’ll also hear stories of triumph and recovery to help inspire you.

When you first are called on in a group or meeting, you may feel like you have nothing to share with anyone. Stick with your “gut” feelings, and ask for help if you need it. You don’t have to share your whole life in a meeting, but sharing where you’re at and your current struggles can help people get to know you and help you start to open up to others.

Sharing Your Secrets

As stated before, you’re not going to have to share your entire life story in meetings or groups. Some stories are not for a wide audience but your secrets may be a cause of distress for you. This is why it’s so important to find a sponsor to help you work the steps and create a new way of life.

Sharing your secrets can be scary at first. You may have done things that make you ashamed of yourself, such as stealing from friends or hurting people you love. If you’re not comfortable sharing these thoughts or feelings with a group, you don’t have to. But sharing them with a sponsor or therapist when they come up can help you lessen your burden. When you’re ready, you’ll write a lot of these secrets down in your fourth step and share them with your sponsor. But the important thing is that you don’t have to share your secrets today. All things will come in good time as long as you continue to stay sober.

Getting Help for Addiction

Addiction is an insidious disease that can play tricks on you. You don’t have to fight it alone and you don’t have to face it alone. Learn to surrender to recovery in a healing, professional environment. Give us a call today at 1-877-228-2401 to start the journey to recovery. We’re here for you!

The post Why Is Sharing Important in Recovery? appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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Many people choose to get clean and sober by going to drug and alcohol treatment. There are many options that are available, from outpatient treatment to long-term residential. Many people who choose residential treatment prefer to go out-of-state for their program. But how do you know if treatment in another location is the best move for you?

Home is Where the Heart Is, But….

Many people will cling to the idea of staying in the same areas as their old using grounds for treatment. This can be a bad idea for many reasons. For one thing, it’s easy to leave such a program and go home on impulse. If you get mad, sad, or just want to get high again, it’s easy for you to make that decision without really thinking or planning. 

If you stay at a local treatment center, you may also encounter more triggers to use. The location of the treatment center may be in a neighborhood where you used to score drugs or get high. Or, you might have to pass through those neighborhoods to get to outpatient groups. You might even run into one of your old using friends when you’re out and about during free time.

All of these can be serious obstacles in early recovery. Of course, you can overcome them if you want, but it can be a difficult road to recovery with all of the distractions.

A Home Away From Home

Most treatment centers are filled with a tight-knit community of people just like you. Some of the people you meet may have been clean and sober for a longer period of time. You’ll probably also find that there are staff members who are in recovery.

Treatment is a unique community. While you’re in treatment, you’ll learn to take care of yourself, and how to trust others. When you share in groups and in therapy, it brings you closer to your peers. Many people describe their treatment centers as a safe place that functions as a “home away from home”.

Choosing a locality that is in a different location can also expose you to a setting of peace and tranquility. A treatment center near the beach can help you tap into nature spiritually and learn more about yourself as you learn new skills. Many people who go to treatment centers in nature-type settings feel that they have had a more spiritual experience because of it.

Getting Help

No matter what location you choose for treatment, inpatient programs help you learn to live with your struggles in life without the use of substances. Make the commitment to yourself to get clean and sober and reclaim your life. The first step is reaching out and learning about your options, please call us at  1-877-228-2401.

The post Is Out-of-State Treatment Right for You? appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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Many people who are able to get and stay clean and sober are grateful for the ne chance at life. It’s not uncommon to want to jump into life headfirst, but it’s recommended that you take it slow. Too many people make the mistake of thinking they can work the twelve steps on their own and fix everything that’s wrong overnight. In the early days and months of recovery, your mind and your body are still adjusting to your decision to stay sober. These are all good things. But you can still find ways to give back in recovery, even if you’re still new to recovery.

Why Give Back?

Many people in recovery want to give back because they’re grateful. Paradoxically, giving back can also help you become grateful. Doing things that take you out of yourself and help you connect with other humans is healthy. Some people also find that giving back to others helps them connect with their higher power or practice self-forgiveness. Giving back makes you feel less ashamed about your past and more positive about your future.

How to Give Back While in Recovery

Helping set up and take down chairs at 12-step or therapy meetings is always appreciated by others. One of the easiest ways to give back in recovery is to get what is referred to as a “service position” in a meeting. This means you may help set up or otherwise help the meeting function. The position of coffeemaker is relatively easy and it also helps you make a commitment to a specific meeting and group of people.   You may also want to be the person who gives out anniversary coins (for newcomers, 30 days and so on…) Ask people at your favorite meeting if there is a position available.

You can also give back to the world by volunteering in other capacities, such as at soup kitchens or local charities. If you are involved in a religious institution, you can always ask around for ways you can help others in that capacity.

And while you’re at it, make sure to do your part at home and with your family. Clean up after meals, offer to run errands, and do the things you missed out on while you were using.

Just remember: if you’re giving back to others, you must also take care of yourself. Your life and your recovery should always be a priority. Don’t make dangerous choices or spread yourself thin.

Getting Help for An Addiction

Do you or somebody you love have a problem with substances? There is a way out of the darkness of addiction. Reclaim your self and your life in a safe, welcoming environment focused on real change. Give us a call to find out more about how we can help you start the journey to recovery. 1-877-228-2401

The post Ways to Give Back in Early Recovery appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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When recovering from addiction, you learn that you can’t do it all on your own. If you’ve been to drug and alcohol treatment, you probably have already realized this. It’s just not possible to work through issues affecting your addiction on your own. A 12-step program sponsor can help you work the steps as well as help you learn to live daily without the use of drugs.

While the term “sponsor” may sound intimidating, you won’t be working with an authority figure who bosses you around. (Although, if you choose, you can ask somebody with these traits to be your sponsor.) The sponsor you select will be somebody who has been through many experiences, both when they were sober and in active addiction.

Why Choose a Sponsor?

Your sponsor has been through the pain of addiction, just like you. They have been in recovery at least a few years, and they have completed the 12 steps at least once. They have a lot of experience to share with you, should you choose to listen.

Think of it like this: There’s a hole in the road, and you can’t see it at night because it’s dark. You try to traverse this road, time and time again, but you keep falling in. You get banged up and miserable every time you fall down the hole. Crawling out is painful and dangerous. One day, you find a sponsor, and they go down the road with you. Instead of falling down the hole, you can walk around it. The road is still bumpy and dark, so you need a flashlight. Your sponsor shows you how to work the flashlight and other tools and points you in the right direction. You don’t ever have to fall down the hole again.

A sponsor can give you tools, and let you know what has worked for them in recovery when they’ve reached roadblocks. You can call them when you’re distressed, and they will also help you work the 12 steps. You’re not alone anymore, but it’s still up to you to do the work. A sponsor offers support and guidance, but they cannot go on the journey in your place. It’s still your journey.

Choosing a Sponsor

At any 12-step meeting, there are suitable people to help you as a sponsor. Anyone who has finished all 12 steps and been sober at least a year is a good prospect. Usually, it’s best to choose a sponsor who has been sober for multiple years.

It’s highly recommended that you choose somebody with the same gender as yourself so that the relationship doesn’t have any dynamics that can cause harm or confusion. Women and men with addiction in their past tend to enter recovery with unhealthy relationship patterns that involve manipulation, etc. You may not even realize that you’re doing such things because they’re so ingrained… Of course, exceptions can be made to this, for example, if you’re gender is nonbinary (or fluid), or you are trans, you may want to choose somebody who understands these issues better. There are many LGBT meetings that can help you explore your options.

Choose a sponsor that is living what you consider a “good life.” It’s often said in recovery circles that “If you want what we have, do what we do.” This saying is an excellent guidepost for choosing a sponsor. Who do you admire? What qualities are you looking for, aside from a strong recovery program?

Watch at meetings carefully for people who have these qualities. You can ask them to be your sponsor at a meeting, or ask them for their phone number to get to know them first. If you’re ever worried the sponsor you chose isn’t right for you, you can always change sponsors. Recovery is about wellbeing! Do what’s right to help you on the path to healing.

Getting Help for Addiction

As stated before, it’s tough to get clean and sober without help. Recovery is possible, and detox (then treatment) is often the first leg of this incredible and healing journey. Please get in touch at 1-877-228-2401 to learn more about your options.

The post How Can a Sponsor Help Your Recovery? appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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Do you ever wonder if you have mental health disorder as well as a substance use disorder? While it’s true that many people have co-occurring disorders, not everyone who has a substance use disorder has a mental health disorder as well. Mental illness is common in today’s world, and we have a good understanding of how substance users use drugs to self-medicate.

The Ties Between Mental Illness and Substance Use

Many people with mental health issues find themselves self-soothing with drugs or alcohol. When you’re struggling with an undiagnosed anxiety disorder, you may discover alcohol helps you to “feel safe” and “break out of your shell” at a young age. Later on, you may need this same alcohol to simply “feel normal.” As the body adjusts to more amounts of the substance, you need more of it to function without physically uncomfortable side effects such as tremors, sweats, etc. – also known as withdrawal.

It’s an easy pattern to fall into, and many people don’t realize they’re in full-blown addiction until it’s too late.

Common Mental Health Disorders

There are many different kinds of mental illness that people can have, but some of the most common disorders that co-occur with a substance use disorder are bipolar disorder, anxiety, depression, PTSD and eating disorders.

  1. Do you have trouble getting out of bed in the morning due to feelings of extreme sadness or anxiety?
  2. Do you feel “flat” or numb sometimes and have a desire to use drugs or alcohol to “feel something”?
  3. Do you experience mood changes, such as being elated for a few days, then seriously “down” for a few days or more?
  4. Do you obsess about your eating or exercise habits?
  5. Does your mind race so much you can’t sleep or forget to eat?
  6. Do you have trouble relaxing?
  7. Have you had nightmares about past things that have happened to you, or feel preoccupied with thoughts of trauma you’ve experienced?
  8. Do you feel detached from people and situations, even when you’re in the same room or conversations with them?
  9. Have you ever harmed yourself on purpose?
  10. Do you have suicidal thoughts?
  11. Do you feel hopeless, exhausted, and unmotivated?
  12. Do you feel like you hate yourself or that the world would be better off without you?

The above questions are not exhaustive, but if you’re experiencing anything described above, it’s time to meet with a mental health professional. Mental illness can cause a lot of inner turmoil that is hard to cope with on your own. To get healthy, you need to allow yourself the chance to heal. Quitting drugs and alcohol is only part of the equation.

Mental illness is a common problem in today’s world, and learning to cope with the symptoms of your disorder can help you live a better, stronger, fuller life in recovery. If you’re sick, and you don’t seek help, you probably won’t get well. Living in recovery with the confusion of an untreated mental health disorder can be painful and discouraging.

If you ever have emotions that seem to occupy your waking hours, distract from your goals, or overwhelm you, speak to somebody in recovery about them. Reaching out to a treatment professional or somebody that you trust who also has a mental health disorder can point you towards the direction of help and healing.

Getting Help for Substance Abuse

Do you or somebody you love have a problem with alcohol or drugs? Help is available. Even if you have a co-occurring order such as PTSD or depression, you can get clean, recover, and reclaim your life. Please reach out to us at 1-877-228-2401 to learn more about our services.

The post What Does Mental Illness Have to Do With Addiction? appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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Life in recovery can be exciting and sometimes scary. You’ll learn a lot about yourself and start to change and grow. As you learn more about yourself and the way your brain works, you’ll also begin to focus on the future. The past in the past and you’ll make amends for it when you’re ready for that step. For now, it’s time to work on regaining your trust and becoming a productive member of society. It’s time to start taking responsibility for your life.

What Does Taking Responsibility Mean?

If you’re in recovery, you have already taken the first step toward responsibility. You’ve decided you have an addiction, and you need help. Treatment will give you the time and space you need to learn about your addiction and how to recover. If being responsible feels scary, remember that you have taken responsibility for your addiction.

For many people, being responsible means getting and keeping employment, taking care of health needs, going to 12-step meetings and meeting financial and family obligations. You’re also responsible for your own actions and reaction in life. If you do something wrong, you should do your best to make it right.

As you begin to work the steps, you’ll learn more about how addiction has affected others. The twelve steps will help you be responsible for the things you’ve done in the past. But what about the things that require responsibility right now?

Being Responsible in the Daily World

Taking responsibility in early recovery means taking small steps. Go to meetings, talk with your sponsor, and do the things you say you’re going to do.

You may have a job you’re starting or returning to, and this means practicing principles of honesty, hard work, and responsibility in your work life. You don’t have to tell anyone you are in recovery if you don’t want to, but you should do your best to act in a way that reflects well on people with a substance use disorder.

Paying bills or working out payment plans will also be a part of becoming responsible again. Don’t let others do the hard work for you – this is enabling, and it’s not helping you grow and change into a citizen of the world.

When you tell family or friends you’re going to show up and do something, such as help with a birthday party or giving your child a ride to work, make sure you do it. It’s a good idea to start giving family commitments priority if you’re trying to heal relationships. These little steps offer significant returns. People appreciate these gestures and you will help build trust in the long term.

Taking Your Time

Recovery doesn’t happen overnight, and in recovery, no one is perfect. Make sure to take time out for self-care, which is also a way of being responsible. If you can’t function because you’ve spread yourself too thin, you can’t be accountable or make decisions that help your recovery.

Do you or somebody you know need help with an addiction? Get help and begin the path to healing. Give us a call at 1-877-228-2401 to learn more about our programs and what they can offer. You deserve to live a happy and full life, but you can’t do it while under the influence of a substance use disorder.

The post Being Responsible in Recovery appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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Drug and alcohol abuse is a significant problem in America at almost any age. While many people start abusing their drug of choice in their teens, others become dependent later in life, especially during retirement. However, drug and alcohol abuse among older populations is often ignored, misdiagnosed or misunderstood, leaving many people without help or hope for treatment.

Addiction among people 65 and up is often underestimated and under-diagnosed, which can prevent them from getting the help they need. Some people in older age begin to use drugs or alcohol to curb feelings of loneliness or grief, while others have used drugs and alcohol their whole lives and now feel trapped in a lifestyle they think they should have outgrown.

Regardless of how old you are or when your addiction started, there is help and hope for you when you’re ready.

Why Do Older People Use Drugs/Alcohol?

Many people abuse substances later in life. Some of them may become addicted to painkillers they once took for a legitimate medical purpose, while some people may be using substances to cope with circumstances such as the death of a loved one. Others may abuse alcohol or drugs out of boredom.

Many different triggers can cause a person to abuse substances in older age. Financial problems, trouble sleeping, moving to a nursing home, dissatisfaction with retirement or coping with health problems are often enough to cause somebody to use drugs or alcohol to “feel better.”

The Dangers of Substance Abuse

Alcohol and drug abuse can cause physical problems no matter what age you are, but seniors are more susceptible to serious side effects.

At an older age, humans have a decreased ability to metabolize drugs or alcohol simply due to our organs aging. Older brains are also more sensitive to alcohol and drugs, which can make it more dangerous for them to abuse substances. Drugs like opioids and benzodiazepine drugs can slow a person’s breathing and when combined with other drugs can be downright dangerous or deadly.

Addiction and Seniors

Many families have a senior that uses drugs or alcohol in a way they are not meant to be used. This is especially true of opioid painkillers and anti-anxiety drugs, which can cause euphoria or a feeling of intense relaxation when taken in a way not prescribed.

Many people feel uncomfortable talking to family members about substance abuse, but without proper treatment, an older person may cause life-changing severe damage to their heart or other organs by misusing drugs or alcohol.

Many people mistake drug abuse in seniors for symptoms of aging. Confusion, incoherence, depression, “nodding out,” slurred words and slowed thought processes are all symptoms of substance abuse that need to be addressed, even in seniors.

Speaking with a doctor and the person you are concerned about can help clear up any worries about their substance use. Some people may not be taking their medications correctly due to the combination of aging and “brain fog” that some drugs cause.

If you see any symptoms of substance abuse in an aging family member, try to assess the situation objectively. Ask to look at their medications and find out how often and how much they usually take. It’s also important to take them for a visit to the doctor. A doctor can help you decide if any medications are being misused and screen your loved one for depression, dementia, and other causes for their symptoms.

Getting Help

If you or somebody you love is struggling with a substance use disorder, help is available. We can help you get started. Please give us a call at 1-877-450-1880 to learn more about your treatment options.

The post Drug and Alcohol Abuse in Seniors appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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In early recovery, you might feel anxiety. Whether it’s a little or a lot, it’s something you’re going to need to learn to cope with in the future.

Anxiety is normal for people in recovery for a couple of reasons. For one thing, your body is adjusting to a “new you” that is substance-free. (Withdrawing from drugs or alcohol can cause mood swings as you adapt.) You’re also in a new period of life, which is also bound to cause some fears. It’s been a while since you were drug and alcohol-free, and facing life may feel like a challenge.

Many people used drugs or alcohol to cope with the effects of anxiousness in their daily life. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 20% of people with substance abuse disorders also have an anxiety or mood disorder.

Here are five tips to help you learn how to cope:

  1. Learn relaxation techniques. Mindfulness is one method of relaxation that helps you live in the moment. Breathing exercises can help you learn to breathe more slowly and deeply. Videos teaching these are easy to find online. There are also phone apps that can teach you mindfulness as well as relaxation.
  2. Get some exercise. Research has proven that exercise helps release endorphins, the feel-good chemicals that help give us a sense of happiness and well-being. Regular exercise will also help you sleep better.
  3. Do something you find soothing. This may mean surfing, reading a good book, playing guitar, cooking, or streaming your favorite show.
  4. See a therapist. While 12-step meetings might help you with your addiction, there is nothing wrong with seeing a professional to help you with mental health issues.
  5. Get out of thinking mode. Anxiety can cause you to obsess, which in turn can cause more distress. Call somebody on the phone that you trust. Make sure you also ask that person how they are doing and listen to the answers. You can also go to a meeting and consider going out with others afterward. Don’t isolate when you’re feeling anxious.

Anxiety isn’t the end of the world, although it can seem like an enormous task to overcome it when you’re in the midst of it. Take your journey with anxiety one day at a time, just like your recovery. If you’re working on it, you’ll make progress. Living in the moment can help you get through your anxiety and move on to new things.

Getting Help for an Addiction

Addiction and anxiety go hand-in-hand, but you can’t conquer anxiety when you’re getting high or drunk. Give yourself a chance. Call us at 877-228-2401 to learn more about your options. Recovery is possible!

The post Five Tips for Coping With Anxiety appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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How can a positive attitude help you in recovery? When something bad happens in life, whether it’s a minor convenience or a full-on disaster, most people react instinctively. For people in recovery, life is about changing our reactions. Actions and reactions are one of the few things you can control when you first get clean and sober new to recovery. Becoming more positive or optimistic will take some active work.

Many people with substance abuse disorders are filled with negativity and stress. Once you are addicted, it’s hard to control your state of mind. But when you get clean, you get more control over your life in general. It’s time to work on yourself. And the change always begins from the inside.

Here are five things to try that can help you become more positive and optimistic.

  1. Don’t expect everything in life to be positive. Life isn’t always rosy, and if you expect it to be, you’re going to be let down. Be realistic and realize that without the pain it would be hard to recognize the joy. Nothing in this world is “perfect,” and everyone on this earth has problems.
  2. Be aware of your thoughts. When you stop to listen to your thoughts, you become more aware of them. Recognizing negative thought patterns is essential when you want to change the way you think. When you find yourself drifting towards negative thinking, tell yourself to stop and try again. Practice doing this a few times a day.
  3. Replace your self-talk. Self-talk refers to the type of thoughts that you have about yourself. Usually, they will come out when you’re upset. If you have ever thought to yourself, “I didn’t get a good grade because I’m stupid” or “No one will ever love me because I’m ugly”, you probably spend a lot of time engaged in negative self-talk. Self-talk is what powers our self-esteem. Instead of calling yourself names, recognize that you are feeding yourself negativity. Instead of calling yourself stupid, concentrate on studying hard. Calling yourself ugly is also a way that you can prevent yourself from getting close to people. Focus on your personality instead of your looks.
  4. Practice self-care. Give yourself time to recuperate from hurt feelings or a rough day. Meditate, draw, or go for a nature stroll. Choose something that you find relaxing or soothing. Self-care is a great way to reduce your anxiety as well as stress.
  5. Try to find a new perspective. In recovery, you’ll find that life has changed. Some things are clearer to you than others, while in some cases, you may still have the blinders on. It’s sometimes hard to find the source of problems when you’re new to recovery. Denial can be a powerful thing. If you keep seeing yourself with the same issues, and things don’t seem to be changing, it’s time to get help from others. By inviting other people in recovery into your life, you welcome new perspectives. Don’t be afraid to ask for opinions. You don’t have to agree with every view, either.

Positive thoughts often follow positive actions. Commit to taking action on these items, and you’ll find that things get better every day. Taking action that makes you more positive about yourself and your life is very rewarding.

Recovery is Life

Life can be very rewarding when you’re clean and sober, and if you haven’t gotten there yet, you’re welcome to join us in recovery. Give us a call to learn more about how we can help you get and stay clean at 1-877-228-2401.

Photo by i love simple beyond from Pexels

The post Five Ways to Help Yourself Become More Positive appeared first on Beach City Treatment.

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