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Story and photos courtesy of Barbara Bowman

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Six individuals who have helped make the black bass America’s most popular game fish have been selected for induction into the Bass Fishing Hall of Fame, the Hall’s board of directors announced today.

The Class of 2018, which will be inducted in ceremonies at Johnny Morris’ Wonders of Wildlife Museum and Aquarium in Springfield on September 27, 2-018, includes two stars of professional bass fishing — Kevin VanDam of Kalamazoo, Mich., and Gary Klein of Mingus, Texas — and four leaders from the sportfishing industry and its media.

Also being inducted are Tommy Sanders of Little Rock, Ark., a veteran outdoor television host; Helen Sevier of Montgomery, Ala., former CEO of B.A.S.S.; Berkley Bedell of Naples, Fla., founder of Berkley and Co.; and Dr. James Henshall, a 19th Century author who is considered the father of bass fishing.

The inductees were nominated by members of the Hall of Fame and elected by a 30-member panel of sportfishing industry leaders, members of the outdoor media, professional anglers and members of the Hall of Fame.

“We on the board of directors are grateful for the efforts of the Selection Committee in identifying this year’s induction class,” said John Mazurkiewicz, vice president of the Hall of Fame Board and Nomination Committee chair. “The new selection process, which went into effect this year, helps ensure that we are again inducting some of the great pioneers in bass fishing.”

The six will be enshrined in the Hall of Fame museum, which opened last November within the Wonders of Wildlife complex at the flagship Bass Pro Shops store in Springfield. The Bass Fishing Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring anglers, manufacturers, innovators and media who have furthered the sport of bass fishing. On display in the museum are artifacts, photos and biographical information about 71 members of the Hall of Fame who have been inducted since 2001.

“Our first Induction Banquet and the grand opening of the new Hall of Fame facility at Wonders of Wildlife was incredibly successful, attracting both pioneers and current leaders of our sport as well as anglers and fans who are passionate about bass fishing,” said Donald Howell, BFHOF
Board president. “We are expecting a sell-out crowd on Sept. 27 as we honor the newest members of the Hall of Fame.”

Tickets to the banquet and information about the Hall of Fame and its mission are available at Bassfishinghof.com.

About The Class Of 2018
Berkley Bedell — Born in Spirit Lake, Iowa, March 5, 1921, “Berk” Bedell began tying flies with dog hair and selling them to trout fishermen as a source of Depression-era income while he was still in high school. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Bedell began to expand his Berkley & Co., positioning it to become one of the largest fishing tackle companies in the world. The company launched Trilene fishing lines and added or acquired numerous other brands over the years. Bedell was elected to Congress in 1977 and served five terms. His son, Tom, served as CEO of the company, which became known as Pure Fishing in 1979.

Dr. James A. Henshall — Henshall (1836-1925) was the author of the first book on bass fishing, Book of the Black Bass in 1881, and was the sport’s earliest advocate of note. A surgeon by trade, he designed the most popular rod and reel of his day, though he chose to patent neither because he believed his creations should be available to all manufacturers and anglers. He was also an innovator in hatchery management during his time with the U.S. Fish Commission. Henshall predicted the decline of trout fishing and habitat as well as the rise of the bass in sportsmen’s eyes. Though he wrote extensively for several outdoor publications even to the end of his long life, he is probably best remembered for a single line in bass book: “I consider him, inch for inch and pound for pound, the gamest fish that swims.” It is still the greatest comment on the greatest of game fish.

Tommy Sanders — When one thinks of bass fishing television, Tommy Sanders rises to the top. The smooth, witty announcer has been the face of B.A.S.S. on television since 2000. Sanders is synonymous with outdoors TV, gracing ESPN Outdoors for more than a quarter century. Jerry McKinnis, a model of longevity with 44 years of The Fishin’ Hole, said he believes Sanders holds the distinction of appearing on the network more than any of the thousands of other personalities. Besides starting FLW coverage, Sanders has hosted Stihl Timbersports, the Great Outdoor Games and the wraparound segments for the ESPN Outdoors block. But he’s mainly known as the host of The Bassmasters, where he has earned numerous awards. Recently inducted into the Arkansas Outdoor Hall of Fame, Sanders is also known for his recent work as host of “Bassmaster LIVE” and “The Livewell.”

Helen Sevier — Sevier devoted three decades of service to the fishing industry, first as executive vice president and, from 1986-2001, CEO of B.A.S.S., Inc. Under her leadership,
B.A.S.S. grew to 600,000 members worldwide and conducted the world’s most prestigious fishing tournament circuit. She worked tirelessly to promote sport fishing and conservation, creating the Bassmaster Casting Kids program, which has introduced millions of youngsters to fishing, in 1991. Sevier helped found the American Sportfishing Association and served on numerous industry boards and councils. Among her awards: the William E. Ricker Resources Conservation Award by the American Fisheries Society (1987), the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Conservation Service Award (1997), and the Norville Prosser Lifetime Achievement Award from the ASA (2002). She was inducted into the National Freshwater Hall of Fame in 2004.

Gary Klein – He has been involved in the bass fishing industry at the highest levels for almost 40 years. During that time, Klein has fished in more than 400 Bassmaster tournaments, helped create the Major League Fishing television show, won two B.A.S.S Angler of the Year awards, made 30 Classic appearances and recorded eight victories in B.A.S.S. tournaments alone. Klein has won the U.S. Open and a gold medal in the ESPN Great Outdoor Games. He has known no other job except as a professional bass angler. While the idea of young anglers leaving college and becoming a full-time professional is commonplace today, Klein was the first to make professional angling his first career when he started fishing at the age of 19. After four decades of competition, he is considered one of the top anglers in the world.

Kevin VanDam – VanDam is one of the most recognized names in bass fishing as the all-time money winner with B.A.S.S. (more than $6 million). His initials are the most-feared in bass fishing as KVD has won four of the 27 Bassmaster Classics in which he’s competed, has a record 25 B.A.S.S. wins and has seven Bassmaster Angler of the Year titles. He was the first-ever winner of ESPN’s “Outdoorsman of the Year” ESPY trophy. During only four years with the FLW Tour, he finished in the top 10 nearly 30 percent of the time, pocketed more than $370,000 in winnings and appeared in four Forrest Wood Cups. In addition to his fishing accomplishments, VanDam is a philanthropist through his KVD Foundation as well as contributions in the KVD Charity Classics with the Detroit Lions, Michigan hospitals, March of Dimes and the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

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Story and photo courtesy of Alan McGuckin

Mike Iaconelli sat eating his traditional sausage, egg and cheese croissant in the dawn’s early light of Day 1 at the Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest to benefit Texas Parks and Wildlife Department showing off a Molix spinnerbait and a swimbait he hoped would lead to a fast limit of bass during the early morning shad spawn, and then a chance to upgrade his weight throughout the day.

Iaconelli is a grinder. Always believing that even amid a stellar career that includes a Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year title and a Bassmaster Classic Championship that he has to work harder than a lot of pros in order to stay competitive. So the over-the-top 14 hour practice days he logged in the 90-degree Central Texas heat this week comes as no surprise.

It’s also no surprise that amid bites of breakfast sandwich and the obvious stress that arises from contemplating the day’s challenges – like bright 96 degree sunshine over Lake Travis’ clear water – that Iaconelli’s thoughts always seem to center on getting more kids involved in fishing.

Along with the love he has for his wife Becky, his four children, old school hip hop music, collecting antique glass bottles, and Philadelphia sports teams – is an absolute passion for introducing youth anglers to the sport he loves.  

“Lake Travis is a fun lake. It’d be the perfect place to take kids bass fishing, because there’s so many bass swimming here, you know they’d get a bite,” says “Ike” with excitement. “One day of practice here at Travis, I caught 120 bass. Now look, only 10% of those were keepers. But still, 120 bass in one day! That’s phenomenal!”

Speaking of numbers, two days before traveling to Texas, “Ike” hosted over 250 kids at Haddon Lake near his New Jersey home as part of the Ike Foundation Hook ‘Em Early Kids Event.

“It was awesome, man. We stocked bass, catfish and bluegill, and gave every kid a free Flambeau tackle box, plus a free Abu Ike Dude rod and reel combo. And every fish they caught counted, because we awarded prizes for total inches of fish caught in three age divisions,” he reflected. “And the best part … roughly 40% of the kids who attended had never been fishing before!”

Iaconelli’s passion couldn’t have been expressed on a more fitting morning, because the very focus of Texas Fest is to raise money that is ultimately funneled to fund Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s youth fishing initiatives in 11 major metro areas.

The effort is estimated to introduce roughly 50,000 new anglers per year to the sport Iaconelli and everybody within sight of the giant American flag hanging over Jones Brothers Park Boat Ramp on Lake Travis Thursday morning loves so soulfully.

“My hope is that we can take our Ike Foundation tournaments to a lot more locations, and use them as an opportunity to do supplemental stocking in those small lakes. That way the kids that come to our events catch lots of fish, have a great experience, and become anglers for life. Plus we leave those lakes in better condition than we found them,” he concluded with passion and purpose.

The same exact passion and purpose shared by all those involved with Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest to benefit Texas Parks and Wildlife Department this week on Lake Travis.

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Story and photo courtesy of Alan McGuckin

Two of professional bass fishing’s classiest guys, Matt Lee, who is getting married in 16 days, and Kevin VanDam who has been married for 26 years, gladly took a break from the 95-degree sunshine in Central Texas to sit in the shade and answer a few questions about this week’s Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest to Benefit Texas Parks and Wildlife Department that starts Thursday on Lake Travis.

Q: Lake Travis is super healthy and full of fish. What’s the most number of bass you caught in a single practice day here this week?
Matt Lee: 30
KVD: 75

Q: Name two lures we’ll see Elite Series pros slinging on Lake Travis to try to catch a big fish that will go a long way in separating themselves from the pack?
Matt Lee: Topwater and a swimbait
KVD: Swimbait and a big creature bait

Q: There’s a lot of clear water on Lake Travis. Will the front deck of your boat be more full of Quantum spinning reels, or baitcasting reels?
Matt Lee: An equal mix
KVD: Just about even.

Q: When the scales stop spinning after Day 1 – how much weight would you guess the guy sitting in 20th place will have?
Matt Lee: 16 pounds
KVD: 16 pounds

Q: The hilarious and talented B.A.S.S. photographer, James Overstreet wants to know, if you could only eat one species of fish, what would it be?
Matt Lee: walleye
KVD: yellow perch from the Great Lakes region

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Story and photo courtesy of Alan McGuckin

Tuesday morning marked the start of the second very long hot practice day on Lake Travis for the Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest benefiting Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Two of pro fishing’s most likeable, accomplished, and even-keeled veteran anglers, Mike McClelland and Kevin VanDam, launched next to one another in the humid predawn air, and say this gorgeous reservoir in the Texas Hill Country is very new to them, but also one they’re liking a lot, and feeling right at home on.

“Yesterday was the first time I’ve ever fished here, and I like it a lot. It reminds me a lot of Table Rock in terms of the rocky terrain and all the rocky shoreline transitions,” says VanDam.

“Yep, Kevin’s exactly right. It reminds me a ton of Table Rock too, as well as places like Bull Shoals and other Ozark reservoirs,” agrees McClelland. “Before I saw this place I envisioned it looking like Choke Canyon, maybe with vegetation like a lot of the great Texas fisheries we’ve been to, but it’s really more like Table Rock, or even a miniature Amistad.”

“Fans can expect to see us use just about every lure imaginable this week – from soft plastics of every shape and kind, to crankbaits, spinnerbaits, swimbaits -- you name it – this event is one in which you’ll see ‘em all used,” says McClelland.  

While both pros were their typically gracious selves, both were also jittery to start casting, knowing the early morning shad spawn was taking place as the sun began to rise over Travis’ clean waters that are currently about 78-degrees on the surface.

“It’s that time of year, shad are spawning all over the southern half of the country right now, including here. So it’s time to get out there. I only practiced 13 hours yesterday,” winked VanDam, as he idled out for another long day of doing a job he’s loved for 28 remarkable seasons as a pro.

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Story and photo courtesy of Alan McGuckin

You never know what you’re gonna see when you look inside Terry “Big Show” Scroggins’ Triton bass boat. Sometimes it’s two or three pairs of cheap reading glasses tossed among a pile of discarded lures.

Another time it was a jar of pickles, because Scroggins claims drinking pickle juice makes his muscle cramps disappear.

These days, it’s 2-pounds of Planters Honey Roasted Peanuts that ride in a plastic jar on the carpeted floor of the hilarious and kind-hearted food lover’s boat.

No matter when one glances inside Scroggins’ boat this Elite Series season – there sits the large plastic jar of peanuts.

“They’re probably not the best thing a guy can eat. I mean look, they have 160 calories per ounce, but they’re handy to get ahold of when you’re running down the lake. Plus they’re self-contained in this plastic jar that won’t break. And they stay fresh and dry whether it’s cold and rainy like it was at Lake Martin, or 90 degrees and sunny like here at Lake Travis,” explains the always practical and comical Carhartt pro.

And so while his buddy Gerald Swindle will compliment Lulu’s sandwiches with Famous Dave’s pickles on Lake Travis, and Quantum pro Casey Ashley insists on a fruit cup of diced peaches with today’s tuna salad – for Scroggins, it’ll be a black forest ham and smoked gouda cheese sandwich, dark chocolate cookies, and yes, Planters Honey Roasted Peanuts.

“Gotta be honey roasted, not just regular,” insist Scroggins. “And the best part is, once you eat ‘em all, you can use the jar to store your spare coins.”

Hopefully, the ‘peanut pattern’ leads to $100,000 worth of spare coins for Scroggins on the final day of Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest Benefiting Texas Parks and Wildlife Department here on Lake Travis. 

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Story and photo courtesy of Alan McGuckin

Gerald Swindle has no history with Lake Travis. He’d never seen the gorgeous 18,000 acre reservoir along the Colorado River in the Texas Hill Country until arriving for practice on Mother’s Day.

But after another long 12-hour day of practice, he likes what he sees.

“Well, I just saw a woman swim across the cove with her Larbradoodle, that was interesting. And they dang sure like to party on this lake, even on a Monday,” says the hilarious Team Toyota pro.

“It’s also full of fish. I think it’s gonna surprise people what we catch here this week. There’s a ton of bass swimming here. The challenge will be getting that big bite or two to separate yourself from the pack,” he explains.

Water temps are ranging 77 to 80. It’s full post-spawn mode, and how you choose to catch them is up to you. Swindle says most of the baitfish he saw on Lake Travis  were super tiny shoreline minnows.

“You name it – we’ll be throwing it this week,” says Swindle. “Drop shot, Ned Rig, a casting jig, Shaky head, spinnerbaits, swimbaits, deep cranking -- it’s all in play this week.”

Swindle piloted his Tundra roughly 14 hours to get to Austin after saying a brutally tough, heartbreaking goodbye to his dog Myrick, but Lake Travis has been reason to smile again for the highly accomplished Quantum pro.

“Grand Lake and Kentucky Lake, where we just came from, were places I’d been many times before, but bites were tough to come by,” says Swindle.

“We weighed-in big bags, but bites were real tough to get. Coming here to Travis was a long drive, but kind of cool like getting a Christmas present. You’re excited to unwrap it, and see what you got, and so far, I like what we’ve got here.”

“I think one of the reasons Lake Travis is good is because there’s not a lot of fishing pressure. Now look, there’s party pressure – if the bass bit Bud Light cans here they’d be in trouble, because these locals know how to party - especially with the weather being so hot this week – like hotter than Miranda Lambert in yoga pants,” he concluded.

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Story and photo courtesy of J.D. Blackburn

PAULS VALLEY, OK  – Today Covercraft announced a partnership with Bassmaster Elite SeriesTM angler Bradley Roy. The nine-year pro from Lancaster, KY is currently leading the Angler of the Year points race.

“We are thrilled to partner with a true professional like Bradley Roy,” said Covercraft Director of Marketing Jeff Jegelewicz. “Not only is he passionate about the outdoors, he’s dedicated to giving back to the community through his various charitable events and programs. This speaks volumes about his character, and we feel he will represent the Covercraft brand exceptionally well.”

Roy was first introduced to Covercraft through his camouflage sponsor Prym1.  Covercraft licensed their patterns and last year sent Roy two sets of fully-custom seat covers for his tow vehicle and hunting truck.  “I loved the seat covers and was really pleased with both the ease of installation and how well they fit and protected my seats.  Once they were installed I wished they had been on there years ago,” said Roy.

“Everyone is talking about how much rain we’ve had this year and every time I hear that I’m thankful to have those seat covers on my truck,” Roy laughed. “I jump in the truck soaking wet without a second thought!”

In addition to competing on the most-prestigious bass fishing trail in the world, Roy is also known for giving back.  He’s hosted the annual Bradley Roy High School Open in the commonwealth of Kentucky for four years.  Aspiring anglers from his home state compete each year for two spots in the Bassmaster High SchoolTM National Championship.  

Through a partnership with Louisville-based USA Cares (www.usacares.org), Roy has hosted four benefit tournaments to assist the organization with its efforts to provide financial and advocacy assistance to post-9/11 active duty US military service personnel, veterans and their families.  Two more tournaments are scheduled for 2018.

Covercraft will immediately become involved with both of those initiatives and join Roy’s current sponsors helping him give back to his community.

Roy is also a dedicated hunter and guides in the fall for Whitetail Heaven Outfitters based in Nicholasville, Kentucky.  “As helpful as the seat covers are for fishing they’re every bit or more useful for hunters.  Whether it’s getting dirty hunting deer or chasing turkeys hunting season can do a number on our trucks.  Floor  mats and seat covers from Covercraft really come in handy then,” said Roy.

Covercraft offers an extensive line of functional and stylish vehicle accessories for trucks, cars, SUV, etc.  “I’ve had fun surfing around the Covercraft website picking out more products to outfit my vehicles,” said Roy. “It’s almost (not quite) as fun as shopping for fishing tackle online. I’ve got floor mats, sunscreens, dash covers, gear webs, hood protectors, and more either now on my truck or at the house waiting to be installed.”  

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Story and photo courtesy of B.A.S.S. Communications

CORNELIUS, N.C. — On Monday, while other contestants in the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Open at Lake Norman, North Carolina, were enjoying their first day of official practice, Wesley Strader was putting the finishing touches on his first Elite Series victory in the Berkley Bassmaster Elite at Kentucky Lake presented by Abu Garcia. Six days later, Strader added the second of his back-to-back B.A.S.S. victories by winning the Eastern Open at Norman.

He joins a select group of B.A.S.S. tournament anglers who have won two or more consecutive events. The feat has not been accomplished since Kevin VanDam, of Kalamazoo, Mich., won the 2016 Bassmaster Elite at Cayuga Lake followed by the 2016 Bassmaster Elite Series Classic Bracket on the Niagara River.

“The last two weeks have been unbelievable,” Strader said. “At the beginning of the year I was not sure if I had made the right decision to switch (tournament organizations).
 
“What I want to tell everyone is if your gut tells you to do something, do it.”
 
Strader did that. Though he was two bass short of a five-bass tournament limit on the final day, with only 8 pounds, 13 ounces, it provided him with a three-day total of 40-0. This was enough to give Strader his third B.A.S.S. victory.
 
“People talk about ‘fishing in the moment,’ and I did that. I don’t know how to describe it,” Strader said. “I have picked up the right bait, at the right time, in the right situations these last two weeks.
 
“I hope I can ride that lightning bolt the rest of the season,” he said. “But you can only ride these (streaks) out until they quit, and hope for another one.”
 
Unusually high, muddy water, below the Lookout Shoals Dam, allowed Strader to employ a tactic that he has used his entire life — fishing a dam’s tailrace with a spinnerbait and swimbait.
 
“I was super surprised to see that the water was as muddy as it was,” Strader said. “I fished current seams, just like I have for years on the Tennessee River.
 
“After catching a 6-pound bass there in practice, I knew that’s where I was going, all three days.”
 
Strader primarily used his signature series Stan Sloan’s Zorro Bait Company 5/8-ounce Bango Blade spinnerbait in “the exact color and blade combination,” along with a Zoom Bait Company White Split Tail trailer for his last two B.A.S.S. triumphs. He noted that he caught two key bass, of the 13 bass he weighed, on a Hitch colored Zoom Swimmer swimbait with a Trokar 1/4-ounce weighted swimbait hook.  
 
Along with the first place prize of a Triton TrX 19 powered by a Mercury 200 Pro XS, Strader won the Power-Pole Captain’s Cash Award of $500 for being the highest-placing angler who is registered and eligible and uses a client-approved product on his boat. He also qualified for the 2018 Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Opens Championship, Oct. 18-20, at a location to be announced later.
 
Fellow Elite Series angler Jared Lintner, of Arroyo Grande, Calif., finished second. He brought in five bass for 10-5, giving him a cumulative weight of 36-6 — 3 pounds, 10 ounces behind Strader.
 
“If I would’ve known how tough the fishing was today — on everyone — I may have finessed some of the larger bass that I was able to see,” said Lintner. “The fish I targeted this week were not on beds, and they weren’t on specific structure, they were just swimming … where I could see them.”
 
Lintner used a Jackall Mikey wakebait early in the morning and a discontinued “large” S-Flat swimbait by Evergreen Lures as a search bait.
 
“(The swimbait) would draw the fish away from the docks or whatever structure the bass were holding to,” Lintner said. “If they didn’t eat it, I would turn around with a Jackall 5.8 inch Neko Flick worm in Prism Gill color, wacky-style, and try to catch them.”
 
Lintner also caught key fish on a Zoom Baits Super Fluke (bubblegum).
 
In third place Sam George of Athens, Ala., weighed 10-12 during the final round. His final day limit gave him a total of 35-0.
 
“With the lead Strader had going into today, I knew I had to catch them,” George said. “So, I went and got a limit of spotted bass early, so I could settle in and run new water.”
 
George caught his early limit of spotted bass in a brushpile that postspawn spotted bass were “moving to.” He fished for largemouth around spawning bluegill the remainder of the day.
 
George’s main setup was a Yamamoto Senko (green pumpkin), rigged weightless, on a 7’1” Medium-Heavy Powell Spinning Rod paired with a Shimano 2500 reel, 15-pound braid and a fluorocarbon leader.
 
Will Evans of Winter Haven, Fla., finished fourth with 34-7, and Garrett Paquette of Canton, Mich., finished in fifth place with 33-9.
 
After finishing in the Top 12 seven of the previous nine B.A.S.S. events, Chad Smith of Minnetonka, Minn., won the co-angler division by catching a three-bass limit of 5-9 to finish with 19-5. Smith won a Triton TrX 179 powered by a Mercury 115ELPT Four Stroke motor valued at $27,000.
 
The Phoenix Boats Big Bass Award of $750 on the pro side went to Allen Brooks of Canton, Ga., with a 6-4 largemouth caught during the semifinal round of competition. Paul Coburn of Pewaukee, Wis., and Austin Bonjour of Templeton Calif., tied with a pair of 5-5 largemouth to split the Phoenix Boats Big Bass Award of $250 on the co-angler side.

The eight winners from each tournament in the Eastern and Central Opens divisions will qualify for the Opens Championship. The Top 10 anglers in the point standings from each division will also compete in the championship.

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Story and photo courtesy of FLW Communications

LAKEPORT, Calif. – Pro Wayne Breazeale of Kelseyville, California, won the Costa FLW Series at Clear Lake presented by Evinrude Saturday after bringing a limit of bass weighing 14 pounds, 6 ounces to the scale. Breazeale’s three-day total of 15 bass weighing 60-7 gave him the win by a 2-pound, 15-ounce margin and earned him the top prize of $82,338, including a brand new Ranger Z518C boat with a 200-horsepower Evinrude or Mercury outboard.

“This is the biggest win of my career,” Breazeale said about his first career victory in FLW competition. “I live on the lake and have been fishing it for 40 years. I had to pull a few tricks out of my hat this week, but I had a phenomenal tournament and I really needed this win.”

Breazeale estimated that he caught around 100 keepers throughout the week, with the majority coming on Thursday and Friday and around 20 keepers on Saturday. He targeted docks and the thick tule shorelines on the south end of the lake with a Margarita Mutilator-colored Roboworm on a drop-shot rig, a wacky-rigged watermelon and purple flake-colored Yamamoto Senko and a white Yamamoto Grub on a dart head jig.

“About half of my fish came from the tules, half from the docks,” Breazeale said. “I was catching a couple of sight fish as well – I caught two on each of the first two days and one on Saturday on the Senko.

“I really think that there were two keys to my win this week,” Breazeale went on to say. “First was my experience on the lake. I had to try some tricks – real light line. The 6-pound (Seaguar InvisX) fluorocarbon was key. Also, I was fishing the new Powell Endurance rods along with the Max 3D series and they were crucial to feeling those light bites and keeping them buttoned up.”

The top 10 pros on Clear Lake finished:
1st: Wayne Breazeale, Kelseyville, Calif., 15 bass, 60-7, $82,338
2nd: Nick Nourot, Benicia, Calif., 15 bass, 57-8, $13,810
3rd: Joe Uribe Jr., Surprise, Ariz., 15 bass, 56-8, $10,792
4th: Richard Dobyns, Marysville, Calif., 15 bass, 51-14, $9,158
5th: Benjamin Byrd, Moab, Utah, 15 bass, 51-14, $8,019
6th: Scott MacKenzie, Hercules, Calif., 15 bass, 51-0, $7,128
7th: Vince Hurtado, Turlock, Calif., 15 bass, 49-3, $6,237
8th: Matt Dal Porto, Sutter, Calif., 15 bass, 45-12, $5,346
9th: Paul Bailey, Kelseyville, Calif., 15 bass, 45-2, $4,455
10th: Stephen Tosh Jr., Modesto, Calif., 15 bass, 43-2, $3,564

Full results for the entire field can be found at FLWFishing.com.

Dobyns caught an 8-pound, 7-ounce bass Friday – the biggest of the tournament – and earned the day’s Boater Big Bass award of $248.

Rick Grover of Trabuco Canyon, California, won the Co-angler Division and a Ranger Z175 with a 90-horsepower outboard motor and a $5,000 Ranger Cup bonus with a three-day total of 15 bass weighing 42 pounds, 1 ounce. Geoff Peterson of Huntington Beach, California, finished runner-up with 15 bass weighing 41-6, good for $4,532.

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Story and photo courtesy of Kurt Dove

Hayabusa U.S.A., Inc., the Headquarter Hayabusa Fishing Hooks Co., Ltd. (“Hayabusa”) in Japan, is excited to announce an additional member to their U.S.A. National Pro Staff.  Hayabusa U.S.A. has signed a multi-year agreement with FLW Tour and BASS Professional Angler Carl Jocumsen.

Carl Jocumsen joins current Hayabusa U.S.A. national promotional staff anglers Cliff Pirch, Casey Scanlon, Fred Roumbanis, Matt Herren, Bryan Schmitt, Pete Ponds and Skylar Hamilton.

Hayabusa is the #1 selling bass fishing hook in Japan and is also known for their popular saltwater line, including the world renown SABIKI product.

“I only use the highest quality fishing tackle available. I began using Hayabusa products in 2017 after hearing good reports from highly qualified anglers.” said Carl Jocumsen. “I am super impressed and love the range of hooks they have available. The sharpness and super slick coating are factors that I believe are superior.” Carl continued to say, “I look forward to building and growing with this brand as it becomes one of the top selling hooks in the U.S.A.

Kurt Dove, Hayabusa U.S.A., Inc, General Manager, stated “Hayabusa branding and exposure is growing rapidly in the USA. We believe Carl will assist us greatly moving forward in our growth.  Carl is a tackle guru and for him to see the benefits of using Hayabusa’s high quality product continues to validate our belief that we will become a household name here in the U.S.A. bass fishing market.

Yumi Shida is President of Hayabusa U.S.A., Inc. and the company is based in Ontario, California.

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