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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Eakins' The Gross Clinic

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AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase)

Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Caravaggio's Sick Bacchus

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS

The Great Courses

AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase)

Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50)

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In this bonus episode, we’re revisiting one of our favorite weirdos—Weegee!— whom we featured in Episode 5, alongside Andy Warhol. Today, Weegee gets his full due with a deep dive into his life and work.

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Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase

Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial

AllModern (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 10% off your first purchase)

Soraa Radiant (use promo code ARTCURIOUS for 15% any purchase over $50)

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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven't listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

 

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Shout-out to Art and Object

Zola  - get $50 off your registry and your free wedding website

Perfect Keto - use promo code "art" at checkout for 30% off sitewide

 

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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

 

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus —for a free 30-day trial

Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase

Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial

SimpleHealth —Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your first prescription free

Shout-out to Art and Object

 

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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 10, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven’t already listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy!

The inaugural episode of the ArtCurious Podcast explores the world's most famous work of art: Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. It is iconic, incredible, and unforgettable-- but is the work on view in Paris's Louvre Museum today the real deal? Host Jennifer Dasal uncovers the story of the Mona Lisa from its creation in the 16th century through its 1911 theft and to its current status as untouchable superstar, breaking down the strange stories and rumors swirling around it.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Poshmark (use invite code ARTCURIOUS)

Zola

Perfect Keto (use promo code ART at checkout)

Shout-out to Art and Object

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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 10, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy!

The inaugural episode of the ArtCurious Podcast explores the world's most famous work of art: Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. It is iconic, incredible, and unforgettable-- but is the work on view in Paris's Louvre Museum today the real deal? Host Jennifer Dasal uncovers the story of the Mona Lisa from its creation in the 16th century through its 1911 theft and to its current status as untouchable superstar, breaking down the strange stories and rumors swirling around it.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Poshmark: use invite code ARTCURIOUS for $5 off your first purchase

Kaboonki

Shout-out to Art and Object

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

Sponsors

Art and Object

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

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Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: a snapshot at the discovery of the city of Pompeii.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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Sponsors

Art and Object

BetterHelp

 

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Michelangelo's The Last Judgment.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Audible

Shout out to Art and Object

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