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Chicago painter, public artist, and creative placemaker Lynn Basa joins the show today. She discusses making the art you want to make and the varied ways that artists are intersecting with public life. Lynn, author of The Artist’s Guide to Public Art, also talks about the legacy she is creating with The Corner Project and how public art has changed over the years.

 

 

In this interview, you will hear Lynn talk about:

  • Her background as a studio artist and how it led to her interest in public art.

  • Her time at the Seattle Arts Commission.

  • The big jump of having her tapestries fabricated as rugs in Nepal, to then selling art to private collections, to finally teaching herself the business of finding customers.

  • How the accessibility of art and availability of selling it online has changed the industry over recent years.

  • What creative placemaking is, why it has gotten a bad rap, and how it is different from public art.

  • Why she felt the need to go back to school in 2016 and get an MFA.

  • What The Corner Project is, who funds it, the main mission of the space, and why she was inspired to start it.

  • Some of the obstacles Lynn faced to build a coalition and organize a community in The Corner Project.

  • What a typical meeting at The Corner Project looks like, her biggest challenges in running it, and what she wishes she would have known before starting it.

  • Why an artist would be interested in creative placemaking, and who isn’t cut out for it.

  • How her personal art has developed over time.

  • The Chicago art scene and the way her community supports other artists.

  • Her upcoming book, the second edition of The Artist’s Guide to Public Art.

  • Getting better results by truly listening rather than by imposing your ideas — especially in local politics.

  • How she learned how to pace herself and manage her time more effectively.

  • Inspiration for artists on how they can be catalysts in their communities.

 

Resources:

The Artists Guide to Public Art

Lynn Basa

The Corner Project

Id Rather Be in the Studio

 

Quotes:

“Art is a billion dollar business, and someone has to do it.”

“There is so much demand for art of all kinds.”

“Buying art isn’t a rich person’s hobby anymore.”

“I do think artists have a holistic way of looking at the world, and we need to recognize that.”

“Look around you, there are more resources than you think. “

 

*** This episode of the Art Biz Podcast is sponsored by our Art Career Success System, a year-long business training program for committed artists. See http://ArtCareerSuccessSystem.com ***

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Missy Graff Ballone, artist and founder of Wellness for Makers, joins the show to discuss the importance of taking care of your most precious asset for making art: your body. She shares her own background as an artist, massage therapist and yoga instructor, and why she saw a need to provide resources that help artists take care of their bodies so they can make more art, and in turn, run their businesses. She also gives tools artists can use to get started in their new journey towards better health.

 

In this interview, you will Missy hear talk about:

  • Her background as an artist, massage therapist, and yoga instructor, and how all three are instrumental in her career today.

  • How she blended her artistry and love of the body to motivate and empower artists through education, mindful living, and movement.

  • Why she felt it important to teach artists accessible self-care to improve the longevity of their bodies, and ultimately their career.

  • How it’s never too late to invest in yourself and focus on the key assets — your body and health!

  • The importance of creating extra variety in your movements in the studio.

  • How we can become more consciously aware of the patterns we create within our body, and the most common ailments artists typically endure.

  • Some gentle techniques and tools that she finds important and effective.

  • The theme of resilience and how it relates to wellness for artists.

 

Resources:

Wellness for Makers

Complete Wellness Kit

4 Weeks of Resilience

 

Quotes:

  • “We can’t make art without a healthy body.”

  • “An artist’s number one asset in their business isn’t their mailing list, it’s their body.”

  • “Our body is our most important tool.”

  • “Learning about the body is really empowering.”

  • “I love the idea of resilience in the body.”

 

 

*** This episode of the Art Biz Podcast is sponsored by our Art Biz Mastermind Workshops, where we can accomplish more in two days than if you spent 6 months trying to figure it out yourself. See http://ArtBizMastermind.com***

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Gwen Fox, a professional artist, instructor, and coach, joins the show to talk about building confidence. We discuss the difference between a belief and a truth, silencing our inner critic, how to overcome setbacks and deal gracefully with unwanted commentary. Gwen shares some of her own affirmations and gives specific ways in which we can use goal setting and visualization to create a life we may have never even dreamt was possible.

 

In this interview, you will Gwen hear talk about:

  • What you can do when your confidence is dashed, and how perfectionism and negative self-talk doesn’t help.

  • Why some people appear more confident than others, and where confidence doesn’t come from.

  • Why it’s crucial to surround yourself with those that give you confidence.

  • Gwen’s personal experience of an authority figure questioning her intellectual capabilities, and how she finally shed the belief of not being “smart enough” that plagued her for years.

  • The difference between beliefs and truths, and how to acknowledge and then silence your inner critic.

  • Why so many artists suffer from the imposter syndrome, and how to combat it.

  • How the words you choose to describe yourself shape the entire creative process.

  • Examples of affirmations that Gwen herself uses for success and confidence.

  • How Gwen looks at failure and mistakes as learning lessons and highways to success.

  • The two best words you could ever ask yourself: “what if”.

  • The importance of using visualization, affirmations, and goal setting as tools to shape confidence and release your artistic voice into the world.

  • Why Gwen fully believes we produce better art when we are kind to ourselves.

 

Resources:

Gwen Fox

 

Quotes:

  • “Confidence is a mindset.”

  • “Creating comes from your soul, and it’s where you reveal the deep, intimate side of yourself.”

  • “Your creativity is what is so important. No one has your voice.”

  • “What we feed ourselves mentally is what we bring about.”

  • “The most important real estate in the world is the 6 inches between your ears.”

  • “Know that failure is an event, it is not personal.”

 

 

*** This episode is brought to you by the Art Biz Inner Circle. This is a group of unapologetically ambitious artists that my team and I worked with for a year. We help our members with goals, mindset, business strategies, and focus. See – http://artbizinnercircle.com ***

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One artist’s journey is never the same as another’s. Not only do you have to be creative in what you make, but also in how you get it out there, connect with the right people and situations, and create a sustainable living. There is no perfect blueprint on how to make money or create a sustainable career, but for Jan R. Carson, the focus is on the quality of the work. In this episode, she talks about her own journey from a production artist since 1999 making over 7,000 silk and stainless steel wire mobiles, to her decision to leave behind what had been a safe income to go after the art and life she wants for herself. She discusses the balance of both worlds and how she has made it work successfully over the years, the selection process for the shows she enters, the vulnerable side of transitioning to a fine artist, and advice for artists looking to take a risk and leave what is safe.

 

In this interview, you will hear Jan talk about:

 

  • The non-linear career path of professional artists, and why determination and vulnerability are two key characteristics.

  • Her personal transition from a production artist to a fine artist over the last 10 years.

  • More about Jan’s Moon-Lily Silk Mobiles, and what is involved with production and filling orders.

  • The many hats she wears in navigating the construction of the mobiles, along with marketing, accounting, etc.

  • Why she found it easier to retain and train people as employees rather than interns.

  • What led her into production work and the retail business, and how it showed her that it was possible to make a living as a fine artist.

  • Why she feels as though production art is tough for artists that want to explore and grow the different facets of their art.

  • The point at which Jan knew she needed to begin shifting towards making her own art, and the steps she is taking towards balancing both production work and creation.

  • Her commitment to letting her body make the work, and keeping her mind out of it.

  • How she got the confidence in herself and her artwork to exhibit it, and what it felt like to put it out into the world.

  • The important question artists need to ask themselves: What do I need to make? Not: How do I sell my art?

  • The challenges of textile art, and connecting with the right people that will lead to sustainable income.

  • The social component of being an artist, and how Jan navigates the world as a self-proclaimed shy homebody, to integrate her personal confidence more into her art.

  • The importance of listening, connection, and staying open and present as an artist.

 

Resources:

Moon-Lily Mobiles

Five Years Out

Cherry Creek Arts Festival

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Many artists have a desire to open their own gallery, but few know how much work and thought actually goes into it. In today’s episode, artist and gallerist Tracy Miller shares her experience of running the Tracy Miller Gallery for the last 7 years. Tracy discusses the journey from Fine Artist, to working in a Gallery, then opening her own gallery in Manitou Springs, Colorado. She talks about what type of artists she chose to work with, why she chose the specific location of Manitou Springs, the style of Art of the New West, challenges she overcame when running the business, how to still paint and have time for your own art when running a business, and advice she would give to others looking to open their own gallery. Tracy also talks about her decision to close down her gallery and focus more on her own work as an artist.

In this interview, you will hear Tracy talk about:

  • Her background as a fine artist, and how her experience with wholesale helped her later with becoming well versed in retail.

  • Her experience working 5 years at an art gallery in downtown Denver, and why she feels working at a gallery before opening one is crucial.

  • How Tracy Miller Fine Art came to be in 1994, and then evolved into Tracy Miller Gallery in 2011.

  • Why Tracy chose Manitou Springs, Colorado as the gallery location, and how the mix of tourists and locals was a smart choice for her business.

  • Why 70% of her sales ship out of state, and the importance of running a good virtual business on social media and your website.

  • The importance of maintaining studio hours when you are an artist-gallerist.

  • What Art of the New West means stylistically, and how the wildlife, landscape and Western themes are brought to life in a contemporary and colorful manner.

  • The vision that Tracy brought to curating a cohesive gallery that some say fits perfectly together like a jigsaw puzzle.

  • How Tracy chose specific artists for her gallery, and why she recommends working with artists that have tested their art before, engage with their clients and fans, and are active in their own business.

  • Why gallery owners should know the price points of not only the art in their region, but the city or community as a whole. Crunch the numbers, and know the numbers.

  • The success principles of “acting as if” and getting involved with your local community to network.

  • How the internet has changed the way gallerists and artists interact as a collaborative effort rather than separate entities.

  • Overcoming major business challenges, including two fires, floods and road construction projects around her gallery.

  • Why Tracy has decided to close the gallery.

  • Why her profit margin was at least 10% higher than a normal profit margin for retail.

  • The different types of galleries that artists can open, and the choice they have to feature only their work, or create a space featuring both themselves and others.

 

Resources:

Tracy Miller Fine Art

Tracy Miller Gallery - Facebook

Tracy Miller Fine Art - Instagram

Comment on this podcast

Quotes:

  • “I wanted to bring the finest in this genre that I could to our region.”

  • “Little did my artists know how long I stalked them!”

  • “If you want to be financially successful and sell art, I knew I would have to pick people that had a following and a track record already.”

  • “It’s a long term career, not a fast overnight career.”

  • “Do your research and know your market.”

  • “It comes down to a lot of organization and discipline to paint while you run a gallery.”

  • “Never turn down the opportunity to promote yourself and meet new people.”

  

*** This episode is brought to you by the Art Biz Inner Circle. This is a group of unapologetically ambitious artists that my team and I worked with for a year. We help our members with goals, mindset, business strategies, and focus. See ArtBizInnerCircle.com ***

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Artist Meg Black doesn’t wait for things to happen, she makes them happen. She has recently installed a major commission in the new edition of the town hall in Topsfield, MA, and is here to tell us all about the process from vision to reality. Meg shares with us how she got involved in the project, the research that went into it, and the hurdles she had to overcome in able to get it done both perfectly and on schedule. She now is a local celebrity due to her talent, and care for the community.

 

Meg’s commissioned pieces are wins for the community, as they employ local vendors, and simultaneously showcase the beauty and romance of Topsfield.

 

In this interview, you will hear Meg talk about:

 

  • The pivotal experience 20 years back where Meg was commissioned to do a painting for the Topsfield town library.

  • The story behind the special preserved and protected road that was recommended by locals to Meg as a great subject to paint. Meg called upon her “galaxy of artists” and decided to leave some of the windy road landscape to the viewer’s imagination.

  • How Meg’s idea of the Topsfield Town Hall addition project presented a challenge with no patron and no donor, and how she enlisted the perfect patron for this project.

  • The “10 Million Dollar” problem of the town hall project, and the feeling that Meg had of not wanting the beauty of the piece to become tainted by community politics.

  • The homework Meg did to fully understand and articulate the process of tax exemption when writing a letter to her potential donor.

  • The interesting release schedule Meg activated for her installation, which kept the town aware of the work but not completely in the know about who the donor was.

  • Meg’s dedication to seeing that the entirety of this project was kept local, including the printer, photographer, and the framer.

  • How the sales of the prints are divided up both in labor and earnings.

  • Why networking on LinkedIn is important for any artist looking for the next commercial opportunity.

  • What we can expect next from Meg, and a peek into the new commission she is very excited about.

 

 

Resources:

ArtBizSuccess.com

Meg Black

 

Quotes:

  • “I was afraid someone else would beat me to making the art. That’s what did it and got myself out there.” - Meg

  • “We need to speak the language of lay people, especially when we ask them for big sums of money.” - Meg

  • “When you find a donor for your artwork, the entity has to take care of that work and agree to take it on.” - Alyson

  • “I probably put about 500 hours for that painting. I was waking up at 3:30am every day.” - Meg

  • “Everything was in town.” - Meg

 

 

 

*** This episode is brought to you by the Art Biz Inner Circle. This is a group of unapologetically ambitious artists that my team and I work with for a year. We help our members with goals, mindset, business strategies, and focus. See ArtBizInnerCircle.com ***

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Mary Erickson’s art sales have paid for her lifestyle, which is comfortable and adventurous, but far from extravagant. She is a savvy investor and wise with her finances. 

 

Mary says she paints so that she can buy real estate so that she can collect art - paintings by other artists. You’ll hear all about it in this episode. You’ll also hear about: 

 

  • How she started selling and why she believes being involved in your community is key to an artist’s success.
  • How she keeps up with the 8 different galleries that represent her.
  • Mary’s legacy project: High Ridge Gardens, a bird sanctuary and artist retreat on her property, which  she will leave with a funded endowment.

 

I hope Mary’s story inspires you to become wise with your finances.

 

See Mary’s art at MaryEricksonArt.com 

 

*** This episode is brought to you by the Art Career Success System: a step-by-step system to implement for growth no matter where you are in your art business. See ArtCareerSuccessSystem.com***

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Artists are so generous and I love to see them supporting one another. I’m blessed that I get to be the person who introduces them to one another in the groups I lead.

After witnessing artist groups from the outside and within over nearly 3 decades, I’ve been thinking a lot about artist group dynamics. In this podcast, I share with you my thoughts on this topic. It’s just me talking, so it’s shorter than most of my episodes. 

Here’s what I share:

  • Four primary reasons to be part of an organized and well-run artist group.
  • Four attributes to look for in an artist group that will match your goals and ambition.

Take notes because this could save you a lot of frustration when you’re trying to find your tribe. 

*** This episode is brought to you by the Art Biz Inner Circle. This is a group of unapologetically ambitious artists that my team and I work with for a year. We help our members with goals, mindset, business strategies, and focus. See ArtBizInnerCircle.com ***

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When you find yourself making excuses as to why you can’t get into the studio or why you don’t have time to write that newsletter or blog post, think of this conversation with Annie Salness. Almost 10 years ago, Annie had a stroke and, among other challenges, had to relearn how to paint with her non-dominant hand. 

 

While many artists would have given up when faced with the trials Annie had, she met the challenge and continues to challenge herself.

 

This is the story of a true artist - an artist who has something to say and is committed to making sure her voice is heard … her art seen.

 

 

See Annie’s art at AnnieSalness.com 

 

*** This episode is brought to you by Art Biz Coach mastermind workshops that occur in various parts of the U.S. throughout the year. See ArtBizMastermind.com***

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Ten years ago, Helen Hiebert didn’t think of her art as a business. Her shift of mindset changed everything and she now makes her living as a working artist. Rather than feeling icky about having a “business,” she embraced it and learned to channel some of her creativity into making money from her talents. 

 

In this episode of the Art Biz Podcast, Helen and I discuss:

  • Her 5 income streams, and the percentage of income she receives from each
  • How she approaches online content creation
  • How her blog - The Sunday Paper - and podcast - Paper Talk - grew naturally from her life’s work to that point

 

See Helen’s art at HelenHiebertStudio.com and subscribe to her podcast, Paper Talk.

 

See images of what was discussed on the podcast and leave a comment at https://artbizblog.com/hh-income-streams-podcast

 

*** This episode is brought to you by Art Biz Coach mastermind workshops that occur in various parts of the U.S. throughout the year. See ArtBizMastermind.com***

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