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It’s this summer’s biggest architectural ideas competition, and it is heading towards an exciting conclusion The First Annual One Drawing Challenge is inviting entries until midnight on August 9th, and we invite anyone with a eye for architectural drawing to get involved.

The brief is a simple one: Tell a powerful story about architecture with a single drawing.

Enter the 2019 One Drawing Challenge

Entrants are challenged to create one drawing that powerfully communicates your architectural proposal and the experience of those that would inhabit it. It can be located anywhere in the world and be at any scale. It can take the form of a plan, section, elevation, perspective or sketch. As long as it portrays part or all of a building or group of buildings, it is eligible. This should be accompanied by a short description of your proposal, no more than 150 words.

Now you know the task at hand, the next question is likely to be — how do I win? The answers lies in the criteria by which the Finalist drawings will be judged by our expert panel of architects and influencers.

Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by OMA / REX

The judging process for the One Drawing Challenge is designed to reflect the multi-faceted qualities of architectural drawings. Our outstanding cast of jurors will be asked to select winning entries based on their communicative and aesthetic qualities, as well as their impact and ability to “go viral” on social media. Entries that stand out in one or more of the following categories stand a great chance of being a Winner.

The Jury will evaluate drawings based on the following criteria:

Communication

Unlike a piece of pure art, the most important quality of an architectural drawing is its ability to communicate the design intent behind an architectural proposal. Further to this, a good drawing can tell the story of a building and those that might inhabit it in a single snapshot. The image can communicate many different things and focus on one or more of the following aspects: Spatial layout, technical details, materials, connections between architectural elements, relationship to context, the transition between spaces, and more.

Aesthetics

A beautiful drawing is undeniably appealing, but at their best, the aesthetics of a drawing are about more than just beauty. They convey the essence of the architecture they are portraying, and the atmosphere of a space. A well considered drawing can portray a specific architectural language that speaks to the author’s wider design philosophy. Aesthetics may also concern the portrayal of an untidy, chaotic or even “ugly” brand of architecture to paint a powerful picture of certain environments.

Impact

When communication and aesthetics are perfectly combined, they can produce an impactful image that is eagerly shared among a huge design-oriented community. Virality is not an exact science, but Instagram experts understand the bold qualities that make an image memorable and shareable. The ingredients of an impactful architectural drawing include but are not limited to: Bold geometry, unusual angles, rich color combinations, sharp contrasts, rhythmic patterns and strong legibility.

Architectural drawings via Horia Creanga on Behance

So, there you have it: The 3 key ingredients to a winning entry in the One Drawing Challenge. Now, it’s your time to shine: Submit your best architectural drawing(s) before midnight on August 9th and show us what you can do.

Check out the FAQ section for common questions about the competition. If you don’t find the answer to your question there, please email us at competitions@architizer.com and we’ll be glad to help.

We can’t wait to see your drawing and read your story. Good luck from the whole team at Architizer!

Enter the 2019 One Drawing Challenge

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The post How to Win the One Drawing Challenge: 3 Key Ingredients to Consider appeared first on Journal.

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Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

Historically, religious architecture across Japan has often possessed imported styles from other East Asian countries such as China and South Korea. However, the temples of Japan have rarely been a direct translation of their Asian counterparts due to large variations in climate, leading architects to incorporate many different materials. With no strong roots in a historical context, the aesthetic language of Japanese temples has continually evolved over the centuries.

Today, many architects designing temples in the country are beginning to focus on the future. When conceiving temples for both rural and urban settings, architects acknowledge the Japanese culture of innovation and experimentation, all the while embracing the age-old values of peaceful introspection and simplicity. This is executed by finding a nuanced balance between contrasting elements: modern materials and natural materials, light and darkness, and open and enclosed spaces.

The following seven projects showcase a truly diverse range of architectural styles for the same programming and intentions. These structures illustrate that temple architecture in Japan continues to evolve, but continues to evoke an atmosphere that chimes with the timeless values of the country.

Ekoin Nenbutsudo by Yutaka Kawahara Design Studio, Tokyo, Japan

Modern frames and materials take into consideration the temple’s urban context, while a green terrace shrouds the building on all sides to incorporate a natural element.

White Temple by Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates, Kyoto, Japan

A single rectangular volume contrasts with the more traditional architecture of its surroundings, representing the value of looking to the future.

Koenji Temple by Schri Kakinuma, Fukuoka, Japan

Wood is the main material used for both the exterior and interior of this temple, but a wide range of types and shades of wood create different moods in different places.

Shinkoji Temple by MAMIYA SHINICHI DESIGN SUTUDIO, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

While the mass of the concrete exterior creates enclosed spaces for introspection, strategically placed glass openings throughout give this temple beautiful moments of light and openness.

Temple Harajuku by Ciel Rouge Creation, Tokyo, Japan

The repetition of six softly curved arches were not just designed for acoustics but also as a symbol of the sky.

Glass Temple by Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates, Kyoto, Japan

A truly abstract modern design, an exposed ground space composed of glass allows light to flood into the underground temple.

Myoenji Columbarium by Furumori Koichi architectural design studio, Fukuoka, Japan

Sunlight comes down from the skylight through a multiple-piled lattice timber roof, illuminating a room where randomly placed timber columns create a unique and impressive atmosphere.

Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

The post Modern Temples: How Religious Architecture Is Being Transformed Across Japan appeared first on Journal.

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Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

Traditional farmhouses have a certain timeless charm about them, reminding us of a simple, quiet country lifestyle that revolves around nature and the surrounding bucolic landscape. From the old pastoral estates of the English countryside to the hills of New Zealand, architects continue to develop and reinterpret the farmhouse archetype.

Some expand on existing structures, adding new extensions that blend in with — or loudly contrast — older rural homes. Newer farmhouses often pull from the traditional vernacular while satisfying a taste for more modern designs. Large porches and open views, pointed roofs, and designated space for animals are found in even the most progressive farmhouse designs.

Set in idyllic locations, the homes below strike an impressive balance between the charm of the countryside and a dynamic, modern style. These rural farmhouses are anything but rustic:

The Floating Farmhouse by givonehome, Eldret, New York, USA

Sitting on the edge of a creek and waterfall, this 1820 manor home has received a modern upgrade. The cantilevered porch adds space to the home and an immersive waterfront view. The curtain wall of skyscraper glass adds a contemporary edge to the traditional farmhouse archetype.

Farm House in Dutch Betuwe by reSET Architecture, Betuwe, Netherlands

Like the Floating Farmhouse, this Dutch rural home is a study in contrasts between modern aesthetics and the traditional farmhouse. Set in an idyllic apple orchard, this updated farmhouse is made up of two distinct parts in conversation with one another. The new extension’s large windows and loft-like open living plan give residents a wide view of the surrounding landscape, a far cry from the old house’s tiny peepholes.

Chapman Farm by PLANT Architect Inc, Creemore, Canada

The newly added two-story glass tower reveals a wide view of the surrounding Canadian countryside. The façade material is an extension of the original house, blending the two structures together. A large porch and floor-to-ceiling windows give the occupants plenty of opportunity to enjoy views of the rural landscape and nearby pond.

Badgers View Farm by Lewis & Hickey, The Chilterns, United Kingdom

Drastically different from the typical English farmhouse, the architects behind this rural home definitely achieved the intended wow-factor. Inspired by the White Cliffs of Dover, this farmhouse design takes a cue from the geology of the local landscape, with large windows providing open views of the stunning surrounding greenery.

New Farm House by Vibe Design Group, Brisbane, Australia

This Australian farmhouse successfully integrates the old and the new. The modern addition envelops the older design, creating a kind of harmony between the two styles.

Farmhouse by RTA Studio, Waikato, New Zealand

Situated in the hills of New Zealand, this rural retreat is the perfect escape from busy city life. The design evokes the local architectural vernacular in establishing three distinct pavilions, each with its own function. One houses the family’s sleeping quarters, another includes living rooms and communal spaces, and the third is for guests.

New House at Walk Barn Farm by Charles Barclay Architects, Suffolk, United Kingdom

Sitting on a pig farm in England’s Suffolk Coast, this modern home has three wings that protrude into the landscape. A stained black façade, polished concrete floors, and an unconventional roof silhouette give this farmhouse a contemporary edge.

Home Farm by De Matos Ryan Architects, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom

This 16th-century country house estate, after many years of neglect, has received a major 21st-century update. A glass pavilion links together two parts of the estate, and adds an additional kitchen to the home. The original exposed stonework has been restored, its rural aesthetic mirrored in the pavilion’s timber facade.

Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

The post Country Living: 8 Idyllic Farmhouses With a Modern Edge appeared first on Journal.

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Developing a rendering for a project is a daunting task given the complexities of the numerous architectural software. Prominent programs, such as Revit, 3ds Max and Rhino can help designers develop beautiful visualizations. However, obtaining the skillset to deliver quality drawing sets and renderings requires extensive amounts of time and practice.

The countless tools, shortcuts and techniques required to efficiently use these software can be overwhelming for beginners. Thankfully, there are tons of helpful guides offering comprehensive overviews of specific applications that can be useful to both novice and experienced users. The following 10 software guides for architects cover the most prominent design software, each serving as helpful resources for all modeling and visualization preferences:

Design Integration Using Autodesk Revit 2019  by Daniel John Stine
Best Revit Guide for Architects

Design Integration Using Autodesk Revit 2019 provides a comprehensive guide to Autodesk Revit tools and techniques covering all three disciplines of the Revit platform. It provides a broad overview of the Building Information Modeling (BIM) process.

The topics cover the design integration of most of the building disciplines including: Architectural, Interior Design, Structural, Mechanical, Plumbing, and Electrical. Throughout the book you develop a two story law office starting from floor plans and ending with photo-realistic renderings. The book also includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials to help you achieve mastery.

See more info and buy>

Mastering AutoCAD 2019 and AutoCAD LT 2019 by George Omura and Brian C. Benton
Best Revit Guide for Architects

This book is the ultimate guide to AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT for professional designers, students, and hobbyists, alike. This new edition has been fully updated to align with the software’s 2019 update offering step-by-step walkthroughs, concise explanations, examples, and many hands-on projects.

You will learn essential AutoCAD skills by working directly with the necessary tools and will be provided a deeper exploration of more complex capabilities. This book is the gold-standard certification preparation material, and it will have you producing work at the highest levels of technical proficiency.

See more info and buy>

The SketchUp Workflow for Architecture (2nd Edition) by Michael Brightman
Best SketchUp Guide for Architects

The SketchUp Workflow for Architecture will help you go beyond the basics of the SketchUp 3D modeling software through a flexible and in-depth workflow. Ranging from preliminary schematics to construction documentation, this book delivers helpful techniques, smart tips and best practices that will make the design process easier, whether you’re an architect, designer, or engineer. It also provides special coverage of the lightly documented Layout tool, accompanied by video tutorials on more advanced methods and components.

See more info and buy>

ArchiCAD 19 – The Definitive Guide by Scott H. MacKenzie and Adam Rendek
Best ArchiCAD Guide for Architects

This definitive guide ensures that readers are well equipped with the knowledge and skill set required to undergo any construction project. The book guides users through the creation of two complete projects from scratch, which includes a residential and a healthcare building.

Readers will go through the design of the buildings, the output of all drawings, and associated construction documents. The step-by-step tutorials cover all of the basic modeling and drafting tools, which leads into an overview of more advanced tools and features of ArchiCAD. No previous ArchiCAD experience is required making this the perfect resource for anyone yearning to develop their rendering skills. 

See more info and buy>

Vectorworks Essentials Tutorial Manual, Seventh Edition by Jonathan Pickup
Best Vectorworks Guide for Architects

The Vectorworks Essentials Tutorial Manual is a quality resource for all designers regardless of experience level. Written by expert Vectorworks trainer Jonathan Pickup, this guide is structured to provide readers with a comprehensive overview of the software from when you first launch the application to when you generate worksheets from your model. This hard copy workbook comes with a companion DVD containing exercise files and the entire manual in PDF format.

See more info and buy>

Digital Media Series: Rhinoceros by Jinmo Rhee and Eddy Man Kim
Best Rhino Guide for Architects

This book functions to alleviate the challenges beginners face when learning how to use Rhinoceros 3D. Through an overview of best practices in modeling habits, rationales, and tips this guide strives to help users build skills in critically analyzing the modeling process, determining the best possible method for a given task, and realizing desired 3D models.

This book is not necessarily intended to provide a complete, comprehensive overview of Rhino, but rather it is designed to help users use Rhino as efficiently as possible.

See more info and buy>

AAD Algorithms-Aided Design: Parametric Strategies using Grasshopper by Arturo Tedeschi
Best Grasshopper Guide for Architects

Algorithms-Aided Design presents design methods based on the use of Grasshopper 3D. The book provides computational techniques to develop and control complex geometries and covers parametric modeling, digital fabrication techniques, form-finding strategies, environmental analysis, and structural optimization. It also includes case studies and contributions by researchers and designers from the world’s most influential universities and leading architecture firms.

See more info and buy>

Photography & Rendering with V-Ray by Ciro Sanmino
Best V-Ray Guide for Architects

While a few years old now, Photography & Rendering with V-Ray remains a vital book for any V-Ray user. It is based on an educational format comprised of five simple steps for creating photorealistic renderings in the field of previsualization for architecture, mechanics, and design. The phases of Framing, Light Balance, Materials, Final Settings and Post-production come together to form a simple and schematic guide for the creation of any kind of rendering. The focus of this book is to get the reader familiar with the process of designing through V-Ray. Various exercises and videos accompanying the book are provided to help achieve this.

See more info and buy>

3ds Max 2020 Complete Reference Guide by Kelly L. Murdock
Best 3ds Max Guide for Architects

Kelly L. Murdock’s 3ds Max guides are extremely popular due to their simple and detailed explanations coupled with over tutorials that focus on specific topics and practical applications. This combination allows for readers to effectively grasp difficult concepts across all aspects of the software.

The brand new 2020 edition is a great resource for all 3ds Max experience levels, in which beginners can jump in through the getting started section and experienced users can examine the advanced coverage of features, such as crowd simulation, particle systems, radiosity, MAXScript and more.

See more info and buy>

Adobe Photoshop CC Classroom in a Book (2019 Release) by Andrew Faulkner and Conrad Chavez
Best Photoshop Guide for Architects

This guide provides a quick, simple, and comprehensive way to learn and master the latest version of Adobe Photoshop CC. 15 project-based lessons show key step-by-step techniques, including how to correct, enhance, and distort digital images, create image composites, and prepare images for print and the web.

This new edition also covers new features, such as the new Frame tool, designing reflected and radial art with Paint Symmetry, and more simplified editing and transformation techniques, to name a few. All buyers of the book get full access to the web edition, which is enhanced with video and multiple choice quizzes.

See more info and buy>

Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

The post The 10 Best Software Guides for Architects (NEW for 2019) appeared first on Journal.

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Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

The Japanese design giant Muji has long pioneered a simple, modern aesthetic. Their home goods have become synonymous with a kind of generic, anti-brand philosophy, the unassuming and yet delightful tools of everyday. Muji products often take on an archetypal quality, parsed down to their most functional elements, and yet never divorced from the delight and elegance found in simple solutions.

In recent years, Muji and its lead designers began applying this philosophy to architecture. Much like its products, Muji’s buildings are simple, unadorned vessels for human activity. Using low-cost materials and construction methods, these homes are accessible and adaptable, made with open-floor plans that each resident can adapt to their different needs. And yet there is an undeniable rigor to Muji’s approach to architecture, taking seriously the project of making buildings accessible, sustainable and most importantly feel like home.

Below, we showcase eight of the company’s most elegant design solutions, each of which possess a balance between the practicalities of prefabrication and the refined aesthetic language of Japanese Minimalism:

Window House by Muji, Japan

Window House is a prefabricated house that has been sold in Japan for many years now. It gets its name from the fact that customers can choose where the windows are put on the house, acknowledging the vital importance of the site-specific relationship between interior and exterior.

Rice Field Office by Muji and Atelier Bow-wow, House Vision 2016 Tokyo, Japan

This structure is a collaboration between Muji and Atelier Bow-wow for the House Vision 2016 exhibition in Tokyo. It encourages visitors to connect with the geography and history of rice cultivation, acting as a “rural office” for city dwellers.

Muji Village by Muji and Mitsubishi Estate, Chiba Prefecture, Japan

Muji Village is a housing development done in collaboration with one of the largest developers in Japan, Mitsubishi Estate. It seeks to rethink housing in Japan, proposing an alternative model based on the principles of “Green, Plain, and Community.” Each apartment is elegantly simple, designed to be both flexible and efficient, embedding storage into the walls and seating, allowing each resident to adapt the space to their changing needs.

Prefab Vertical House by Muji, Tokyo, Japan

Designed for the dense urbanism of Tokyo, the Vertical House pushes the boundaries of the open floor plan by forgoing any interior walls or doors, with a central staircase dividing each floor. Muji’s subtle minimalism can be seen at play in the combination of raw wood and clean white interiors.

Grcic’s Muji Hut by Muji and Konstantin Grcic, Tokyo Design Week 2015, Tokyo, Japan

Konstantin Grcic’s hut for Muji is intended as a retreat cabin, designed to the exact specifications to not require a building permit in Japan. The rugged aluminum exterior makes it an ideal prefabricated structure for any terrain or environment.

Morrison’s Muji Hut by Muji and Jasper Morrison, Tokyo Design Week 2015, Tokyo, Japan

A rural refuge for escaping the city, Jasper Morrison’s cabin is a simple “weekend retreat” that intends to alleviate the difficulty of building a home from scratch. Morrison reflects, “Whenever I think about going to the country for the weekend, I start imagining a small house with everything needed for a short stay: a place to cook, a place to eat, a place to wash, and a place to sleep.”

Fukasawa’s Muji Hut by Muji and Naoto Fukasawa, Tokyo Design Week 2015, Tokyo, Japan

Fukasawa’s hut has a refined simplicity to it. Fukasawa reflects, “There is a certain charm when you hear the word ‘hut’… Not quite a holiday house, yet not as simple as going camping. If there is a small hut, there is a feeling that one could slip into nature any time. I thought that living small in the smallest of structures is a Muji kind of living.”

Muji Hut by Muji

The design of the newest Muji Hut features a full-height façade of sliding glass doors and a small window in the back of the house that brings ample natural light inside the living space. The interior walls are made of untreated cypress plywood, while the mortar floor finish is strong and easy to clean. Each client can personalize the living space to their liking thanks to the flexibility of the tiny home.

Architects: Showcase your work and find inspiration for your next project through Architizer, or enter the One Drawing Challenge for a chance to win $2,500!

The post How Muji Smashed the Preconceived Limits of Prefabricated Architecture appeared first on Journal.

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Turkey has become a global cultural epicenter. Combining a diverse and rich history with new development, the country is known for its eclectic and historic styles situated side-by-side. Home to one of the fastest growing metropolitan economies in the world in Istanbul, new modern architecture is being built across the country. Going beyond orthogonal and pragmatic designs, these projects are made with novel building envelopes, open public spaces, and diverse relationships to the landscape.

Drawn from across Istanbul and Turkey, each of the following eight projects take inspiration from their larger contexts. Showcasing the country’s contemporary architecture, they represent new construction methods and formal explorations. Designed with diverse programs across a range of scales, they include private and public projects alike. As these projects are built, they begin to establish new connections to the surrounding urban fabrics and the history of each site.

Garanti Bank Technology Campus by ERA Architects, Istanbul, Turkey

This project transforms an old industrial chemical factory land into a technology company campus for one of the most dynamic Turkish banks. Inspired by the natural topography around the site and the desire of creating a clear contrast to the surroundings’ urban fabric, the project takes the form of a crystal volume over several artificial hills sheltering various functions. These include two 600 and 200 seats auditoriums, educational meeting spaces, cafeterias, lounges on bridges, data center and many other functions. With approximately 142,000 sqm total built area and 51,000 sqm site area, the campus program is configured into three major sections: 53,500 sqm of open offices, a 16,000 sqm auditorium, educational spaces and cafeterias, a 72,500 sqm for parking, a Tier 4 data center, a sport center, common spaces, archives and service areas.

Yesilvadi Mosque by Adnan Kazmaoğlu Mimarlık Araştırma Merkezi, Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey

Built as a center for education, information and a place to dispute settlements, this mosque provides an area for Muslims to come together for prayer. Gold leaf was used in the design to symbolize endurance, abstract existence and both Kufic calligraphy. The Yesil Vadi Mosque is designed from emphasized function and identifying components. Bearing in mind, all of the traditional, spatial, semantic criteria this mosque takes the concept of communal memory to heart. The mosque consists of a 350 person prayer area, 250 person meeting hall, library, social activity units, courtyard and square. All of these components combined together to form a social complex.

Raif Dinçkök Cultural Center by EAA – Emre Arolat Architecture, Yalova, Turkey

Yalova is located in northwestern Turkey near the Sea of Marmara. A city of about 100,000 residents, it is known for its industry but also its arboretums and rich variety of endemic plants. This project features perforated weather-resistant steel with a rusty surface that was chosen for exterior surfaces. It is a kind of homage to industry and to the resilient forces of nature. A multi-purpose room with a capacity of 600 persons, a workshop for up to 150 people, wedding and exhibition rooms and an office and cafeteria are part of the scheme within specific volumes that are disconnected from the building façade. These functional volumes are connected to each other by a ramp that forms a sheltered inner street. Recreational and service areas are situated between the functional volumes.

Antalya Aquarium by Bahadır Kul Architects, Antalya, Turkey

The Antalya Aquarium in Turkey was made to be in harmony with its surrounding landscape. Combining a public area with interior program, the design includes a wavy, curvaceous shell that helps protect from the wind. The Antalya Aquarium design process was centered on creating a vanishing silhouette and harmony with the surrounding topography. At the back of the ground floor, a shaded public area was created to protect visitors from the wind and allow them to enjoy the sun. This area is a point of approach, gather and diffusion for the project.

Selcuk Ecza HQ by Tabanlioglu Architects, İstanbul, Turkey

The Selcuk Ecza HQ was designed around the client’s desire for spatial organization, aesthetics, and scales to be intimate and relatable in nature. Taking inspiration from Istanbul’s waterside mansions, the headquarters combines multiple volumes under hipped roof forms. Like a small county settlement, the juxtaposition of seven house-like volumes form the campus. These individual ‘houses’ integrate to each other either through gardens, roof gardens, upper or lower patios and paths and atriums. In turn, the brown color of the exterior creates a the soft wood effect and unifies the structure.

The Farm Of 38° 30° by Slash Architects, Tazlar Köyü, Turkey

The Farm 38° 30° is an iconic boutique dairy factory that derives its name from the coordinates of the site it is located in, the “Valley of Art” in the village of Tazlar village in Central Turkey. Located at the entrance of the valley, this dairy factory offers degustation for visitors, all the while exhibiting the production process of the dairy products of the farm. While ensuring maximum efficiency for the production line as in a “classical” cheese factory building, the boutique factory adopts a more contemporary attitude via its monumental form. The factory typology is upgraded from the status of a simple production space to that of a cheese showroom. The building wraps around an inner green courtyard and opens itself to the exterior via its large welcoming canopy.

Sur Yapi Offices by tago architects, İstanbul, Turkey

Operating as an office to promote a nearby high-rise residential complex, the Sur Yapi offices combine space for administration, sales, and exhibition. Designed as an unique, prismatic mass, the projects includes geometric wooden panels that create a striking expression as seen from the street. The solid-void relationship also helps control sunlight within the building interior. It is primarily a sales office of the high-rise residential complex which is located next to it. Later on, building is going to be the head office of the construction company.

Vakko Fashion Center by REX, Istanbul, Turkey

Restructuring an unfinished, abandoned hotel, the Vakko Fashion Center was designed as a dynamic headquarters and renovation project. With a demanding construction schedule, the building was created with speed as the design’s most significant parameter. A dramatic interior space known as the “Showcase” combines offices with a mirror-glass clad envelope to form a mirage-like exterior around a unique spatial experience. Program adjacencies and code/exiting requirements dictated the final stacking of the boxes.  The slopes of the auditorium, showrooms, and meeting rooms create a circulation path that winds from bottom to top of the Showcase.  The Showcase is clad in mirror-glass, cloaking the steel boxes and enlivening the building’s interior to kaleidoscopic effect.

Find all your architectural inspiration through Architizer: Click here to sign up now. Are you a manufacturer looking to connect with architects? Click here.

The post Travel Guide: Exploring the Modern Architecture of Turkey appeared first on Journal.

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“Unpaid internships in architecture are illegal and clearly serve to protect the exclusivity and elite status of the avant-garde, simultaneously undermining the values which architecture seeks to represent and uphold.”

There is a storm brewing around the issue of unpaid internships, and Young Architect founder Michael Riscica is leading the way. His words, quoted above, speak to a core issue holding back the profession from a healthier, more successful future. Many firms continue to offer positions without compensation, perpetuating a vicious cycle of elitism across the profession.

Those defending unpaid internships offer up the value of work experience in place of wages, but it’s been proven that paid internships are more likely to lead to a job offer than their unpaid counterparts. This flimsy argument also ignores a crucial point: Only those that can afford to go without pay for three months or more are able to take up unpaid positions.

By closing the door on those less well-off, these firms are preventing millions of talented designers from gaining the experience they need to begin their professional, fairly-paid careers.

Infographic via the Daily Californian

Questions have long been raised about the logic behind firms recruiting unpaid employees to work on fee-earning projects. If the commissions are coming in at such a rate that more resources are needed by a firm, surely they have the budget to pay the staff that delivers on these commissions? Riscica and others have argued that, if a firm does not have the income to fund paid internships, they should look into fixing their business strategy and cash-flow problems before hiring more staff.

Regardless of context, unpaid internships are a blight on the industry that just won’t go away. There is now a broad consensus that everyone should be paid for their work at a fair rate for their experience level. However, some firm principals still won’t accept this new status quo. They continue to argue that gaining professional experience is a privilege that students should be grateful for, demanding that they sacrifice themselves for the cause. Despite the mounting arguments against this logic, some architects are still not willing to pay even the minimum wage for their interns.

Now, people throughout the industry are sitting up and taking notice. An Instagram account called Archishame has been gaining traction, posting screenshots of emails from firms offering unpaid positions to students and recent graduates. The account is gaining followers every day, and many comments left show a strong desire for change.

“Is this what we want our profession to be like? This is not us. This is not the picture we want to portray,” commented Inés Hemmings of What Architecture School Does Not Teach You. “Each and every student coming out of university has the basic human right to be paid and treated fairly by their employer. I really hope that more and more graduates wake up, collectively rise up against this mistreatment, and change the loop.”

One reason behind this ongoing injustice is a misplaced perception of emerging generations in the eyes of older professionals. Younger architects often get tarred with the same brush by firms — they see new graduates as inexperienced, with raw skills that requiring continued honing. They highlight a lack of project management expertise and construction knowledge. This is all true, of course, to a certain extent — but it is no excuse for offering unpaid internships. The next generation of architects has much more to offer than these firms realize.

A sample email from an unnamed Japanese firm; via Archishame

New graduates have a level of technological knowledge that surpasses that of almost every architect that came before them. These skills, which often include advanced 3D modeling, BIM expertise and even coding skills, give them an outsized value despite their relative inexperience in professional practice.

Besides this, the inherent qualities of architecture students remain clear. As previous generations should know only too well, the persistence and hard work required to get through architecture school is extraordinary. It’s even more challenging to tackle the Architect Registration Exams or their international equivalent. It’s not getting easier to become an architect — on the contrary, the rigor with which aspiring professionals are tested has reached new levels. This is a good thing for the profession; it means a higher-quality generation of architects will emerge. Their value should be better recognized.

The good news for emerging architects is this: Thanks to the internet, there has never been a greater awareness of employees’ rights, and a natural appetite for activism in the architectural profession. Social media now allows young architects to make their voices heard, expressing their opinions on the future of the profession and highlighting unfair treatment from employers.

Platforms like “Archishame” may appear negative on the surface, but if they provoke change, their long-term impact will be undoubtedly positive. The “shaming” posts have sparked numerous debates on the subject of pay, with things getting pretty heated at times. That said, if an argument is what it takes to rid the industry of unpaid internships for good, then I say: Bring it on.

The post Architecture’s Ugliest Habit: Unpaid Internships appeared first on Journal.

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Architects: Showcase your work and find the perfect materials for your next project through Architizer. Manufacturers: To connect with the world’s largest architecture firms, sign up now.

Our travel series aims to guide you through a great day out in iconic cities around the globe — with an architectural twist. These tours offer the chance to experience contemporary design away from the traditional tourist hotspots, offering an alternative angle on the world’s metropolises. Up this week: New York City!

Wake up at: The Standard, High Line by Ennead Architects

Why simply walk with the rest of the tourists when you can drink your morning coffee far above them? Ennead’s 18-story hotel straddles one of Manhattan’s most successful urban regeneration projects, the High Line park by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The building’s bold, tapering stilts support a concrete and glass structure that harks back to the golden days of midcentury modernism, offering spectacular views north and south along the Hudson River.

View art at: David Zwirner 20th Street by Selldorf Architects

After you’ve enjoyed an espresso over a copy of the New York Times, head down the High Line to a gallery containing extraordinary exhibitions of contemporary art — all hidden behind a concrete and teak façade that emanates an air of sheer sophistication. Inside, a restrained palette of white render, steel balustrades, and warm timber floors allow the art to take center stage. Fans of minimalism will enjoy a slow walk up the main staircase, which ascends an atrium wrapped with cool, board-formed concrete.

Gaze up at: Hearst Tower by Foster + Partners

It’s not a skyscraper that every tourist frequents, primarily because it is a commercial structure where public access is limited to the entrance lobby. However, it is well worth strolling along West 57th to check out Norman Foster’s first tower in New York City, which forms a bold vertical extension above Joseph Urban’s original Art Deco building. The sleek, high-tech design illustrates why the British architect has become globally renowned, and more work by ‘BIG’ name architects can be found just up the road: take a peek at Bjarke Ingels’ striking pyramidal apartment block, just a few blocks west.

Grab lunch at: Baked by Fjord Architecture

Originally a trendy Brooklyn haunt, Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito’s Baked café spawned a stylish new branch in Tribeca last year decked out with natural finishes and a dash of contemporary flair by Fjord Architecture. The modern interiors are sleek yet comfortable, and the menu offers a wealth of unusual treats including toast topped with zucchini butter and coconut curry-spiced chocolate cookies, no less.

Take a peek at: 170 Amsterdam by Handel Architects, LLP

Fans of structural expressionism can find a hidden gem a couple of blocks west of Central Park in the form of Handel Architects’ 170 Amsterdam, a condominium with an unusual concrete exoskeleton. The lattice of tubular elements was designed to maximize floor space for the units within the long, narrow site, and the concrete was mixed with a special aggregate that gives it the appearance of limestone, a nod to the surrounding neighborhood.

Catch a performance at: Alice Tully Hall by Diller Scofidio Renfro

Of course, there are countless world-class venues on Broadway to view opera or a theater performance, but few possess as much architectural allure as the recently renovated Alice Tully Hall. Diller Scofidio Renfro’s intervention forms a radical yet respectful adaption of Pietro Belluschi’s brutalist Juilliard Building with some seriously atmospheric lighting design, as the architects note: “Illumination emerges from the wood skin much the way a bioluminescent marine organism exudes an internal glow.”

Enjoy dinner at: Pio Pio by Sebastian Mariscal Studio

Situated in Hell’s Kitchen, this restaurant was conceived as “a finely crafted wooden box” inserted into an existing building on 10th Avenue. Textured concrete elements echo the board-formed surfaces of the aforementioned David Zwirner gallery, while further walls and ceilings are clad with slender wooden sticks. Collectively, this melting pot of natural materials provides as big a treat for architects as the hearty Latin American cuisine on offer.

Rest your head at: Hotel Americano by TEN Arquitectos

Returning along the High Line in the evening, Hotel Americano provides a fitting end to a day of architectural decadence. TEN Arquitectors’ interiors are wrapped with exposed concrete and illuminated by moody lighting, making common spaces appear more like a contemporary art gallery than a hotel. By night, the ambience is suitably sensual, which the architects themselves allude to in their description of the building’s veiled façade: “a metal mesh curtain creates an alluring play between in and out, seducing but not showing all, like sexy silk stockings.”

Find all your architectural inspiration through Architizer: Click here to sign up now. Are you a manufacturer looking to connect with architects? Click here.

The post Travel Guide: The Lesser-Known Architectural Gems of New York City appeared first on Journal.

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Architizer’s inaugural drawing competition — the One Drawing Challenge — is well underway, with many stunning entries already submitted. We’re thrilled at the engagement the competition has sparked, so we want to invite even more creativity from you, dear drawer!

Enter the 2019 One Drawing Challenge

Today, we’re excited to announce a new offer for all participants: If you submit additional drawings, you’ll receive half off the initial entry fee! That’s right —  you can double (or treble, or even quadruple!) your chances of winning the $2,500 grand prize. The One Drawing Challenge entry fee structure until midnight on August 9th is now as follows:

  • First entry: $50 for students, $80 for non-students
  • Second entry: $25 for students, $40 for non-students (50% off!)
  • Any additional entry: $25 for students, $40 for non-students (50% off!)

Every entrant that has already submitted a drawing (either in the early entry period or the regular entry period) is entitled to this offer as well — you’ll get half off your entry fee for every additional submission. If you are yet to submit a drawing, you are still eligible to this discount after you’ve paid for your first entry at the regular price shown above.

Rayan Itani by Alicia Jones

Remember, your task is simple: Create a drawing that tells a powerful story about architecture, either built or unbuilt. Two top winners will receive:

  • $2,500 prize money
  • iPad Pro (12.9-inch, 256GB)
  • Apple Pencil (2nd Generation)
  • Procreate Software Package
  • Sakura and Copic luxury drawing sets

10 Runners-Up will also receive a prize package full of analog and digital drawing tools, while the top 100 entries will feature in the first “One Drawing” eBook, to be shared with millions.

Architectural drawing by Duy Tran

For more information on the One Drawing Challenge, check out the following pages:

If you have further questions not answered by these pages, please don’t hesitate to contact us at competitions@architizer.com. We can’t wait to see your submission — good luck from everyone at Architizer!

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at competitions@architizer.com. Good luck to all entrants from every at Architizer!

Enter the 2019 One Drawing Challenge

In partnership with

Top image: A perspective section by Andy Lim

The post The One Drawing Challenge: Double Your Chances of Winning $2,500! appeared first on Journal.

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Architects: Showcase your work and find the perfect materials for your next project through Architizer. Manufacturers: To connect with the world’s largest architecture firms, sign up now.

Architecture is one of the most multidisciplinary fields out there, integrating landscape design, interior design, urban planning, history and philosophy, to name just a few. There is no one way to develop a completely comprehensive architectural education. The good news is, this allows one the freedom to form understanding through a diverse array of educational resources. Offering varying perspectives through varying written formats, architecture-related books are incredibly diverse in nature. The breadth of these books provides value for all learners regardless of expertise. 

Below is a collection of some of the most noteworthy architectural books that have proven to be incredibly useful introductory resources for students and professionals alike. From ideological works from the industry’s most influential individuals to encyclopedic reference books, this list is sure to contain books that will inform, captivate and inspire you:

Towards a New Architecture by Le Corbusier

This book offers a collection of essays by famed architect and city planner Le Corbusier, who expresses his technical and aesthetic theories, views on industry and mass-production, economics, the relation between form and function, and everything in between. Each of these subjects come together to advocate and explore the concept of a then burgeoning modern architecture. Towards a New Architecture is illustrated with over 200 line drawings and photographs of Corbusier’s own work and structures he deemed significant. This piece will prove to be an indispensable source of intrigue and inspiration towards unique ways of approaching architecture.

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101 Things I Learned in Architecture School by Matthew Frederick

As you might have already guessed, this book provides 101 concise lessons in architectural drawing, design, and presentation ranging from the basics of how to draw a line to the complexities of color theory. It is organized in a unique two-page format that contains simple and clear explanations and illustrations. 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School will prove to be a valuable resource and guide for both practicing architects and students, alike.

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Architecture: Form, Space, & Order by Francis D.K. Ching

This updated and revised fourth edition provides a classic introduction to the basic vocabulary of architecture accompanied by information on emerging trends and new developments. It explains form and space in relation to light, view, openings, and enclosures and explores the organization of space. The book is effective in taking complex and abstract design concepts and conveying them in a clear and coherent way. Detailed illustrations help demonstrate the concepts throughout.

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Design Like You Give a Damn 2: Building Change from the Ground Up by Cameron Sinclair, Architecture for Humanity

Edited by Architecture for Humanity, a relief organization dedicated to promoting architectural and design solutions to global, social, and humanitarian issues, Design Like You Give a Damn 2 gathers innovative projects developed by architects and designers that serve to improve lives. It is the first book to provide the best in humanitarian architecture and design with its presentation of more than 100 contemporary solutions to needs including, basic shelter, health care, education, and access to basic amenities.

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Yes is More. An Archicomic on Architectural Evolution by Bjarke Ingels

BIG’s Yes is More is definitely the most unconventional book on this list with its comic book style and format to express its agenda for contemporary architecture. It is the first comprehensive documentation of BIG’s radical practice that never fails to redefine and question convention. This book, therefore, embodies BIG’s philosophy using one of the most widely known mediums to convey its mission of creating socially, economically, and environmentally perfect places.

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S,M,L,XL by Rem Koolhaas, Bruce Mau, and Hans Werlemann

S,M,L,XL presents a selection of the noteworthy design work produced by the Dutch firm Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its founder, Rem Koolhaas, from the twenty years prior to its publication. The collective minds of Koolhaas and designer Bruce Mau produce an amalgam of architectural projects, photos, sketches, diary excerpts, poetic writings, personal travelogues, and critical essays on contemporary architecture and society. The book’s title is it’s framework, in which projects and essays are arranged according to scale: small, medium, large, and extra-large.

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A Field Guide to American Houses (Revised): The Definitive Guide to Identifying and Understanding America’s Domestic Architecture by Virginia Savage McAlester

This guide chronologically and stylistically captures almost every significant domestic architectural style within America. It essentially serves as a dictionary indexing the language spoken by this country’s built environment. A much overlooked historical context is, thus, acquired breeding character and meaning into the structures that comprise the American landscape. This revised edition includes a section on neighborhoods, new categories of house styles, an appendix on “Approaches to Construction in the 20th and 21st Centuries”, and 600 new photographs and line drawings.

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A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction by Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa, Murray Silverstein, Max Jacobson, Ingrid Fiksdahl-King, and Shlomo Angel

A Pattern Language is intended to provide both the professional and the average person a framework by which to design, construct, and improve lived spaces whether they be a neighborhood, residence, or office. The book presents what the authors call a pattern language. 253 patterns, forming the language, are given consisting of a problem statement, a discussion of the problem with an illustration, and a solution. Altogether, the pattern language seeks to enable anyone to create a design for any kind of structure or aspect of the built environment.

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The Architecture Reference & Specification Book: Everything Architects Need to Know Every Day by Julia McMorrough

This architectural standards reference contains essential information for planning and executing architectural projects at all scales in a format that is very practical and useful. Providing many graphics and charts, the information is easily referable laying bare the most pertinent architectural information. The Architecture Reference & Specification Book would be a valuable addition to any architect’s library looking for convenient, fundamental knowledge.

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The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book: Everything Interior Designers Need to Know Every Day by Chris Grimley and Mimi Love

The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book provides an easy to use collection of information fundamental to planning and developing interior projects of all scopes. Topics covered in the book include fundamentals, space, surface, environments, elements and resources. This new, revised edition also presents interviews with the industry’s leading practitioners allowing for a comprehensive guide to the field of interior design.

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Find all your architectural inspiration through Architizer: Click here to sign up now. Are you a manufacturer looking to connect with architects? Click here.

The post 10 Essential Books for Architecture Students appeared first on Journal.

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