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I met Sara Holcombe while giving a talk at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta last year. I’m so glad to be sharing her work with you, too. –Ann

About 8 months ago when I first started working with the Department of Global Health and Protection (DGHP), I was given a brief for an infographic about different plagues and outbreaks that have reached the US since the Spanish Flu in the 1800s and how they’ve affected our population and economy. The gist is that because our world is insanely interconnected and we can travel pretty much anywhere in a day or two, it puts us at risk for a huge pandemic that we need to be prepared for.

Here’s how I developed the infographic over time.

The left column below was the content and outline I was given to start with. The first thing I did was sketch out a few ideas in Photoshop (right column). I normally do this by hand in my sketch book but I was full of ideas and really wanted to see them in a more concrete way, on the screen. I “sketched” these concepts in order to figure out the best way to display this timeline.

I usually lay out the sketches that are working best without the pressure of thinking about design. This helps me focus on whether or not the graphic makes sense to most viewers. I rely heavily on the “mom test” where I take the infographic to people who are not designers, give them time to look at it and ask for them to tell me what the infographic is about. This is usually a great way to figure out what’s working and what’s not.

To me, it’s super important that most people (given a pretty good attention span) can understand the graphic I’m making. The way it looks should aid in telling the story without getting in the way.

I wanted this infographic to be more playful and relevant, in the hopes that it would reach a larger audience. I added vintage photos from the CDC photo library and I generally tried to keep the design funky and bright with the skull icons, tinted black and white photos and the punchy green gradient.

Here’s more progression:

Before I started working with DGHP, I’d say I borderline hated the color purple. But because purple doesn’t have a particular association with it (green = healthy and red = alarm), it leaves us with an advantage in branding our work.

The outline I was given was word-heavy. I made the quotes more visual by adding photos of the authors. I also pushed for less text on this piece. I wanted the economic graph to stand out and the amount of deaths in red to read immediately. Finally I added the red box around “The Next Flu” because I took Ann’s workshop and realized how important annotations are. The one thing I’d want a viewer to take away from this is the impact a flu could have on us now.

The infographic isn’t entirely finished yet. I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing the progression. Stay tuned to see a final version later on.

Sara Holcombe is a visual storyteller. She didn’t start out with graphic design, though. She studied photojournalism, then learned video and somewhere along the way while working for non-profits and science-based organizations, she picked up graphic design as well. Now she does her best to use all three, taking complex data and ideas and making that data understandable and interesting for visual learners like her. She’s like the middle (wo)man between the people making the data and the people who need to know about the stories that data tell. Currently she works in Atlanta for the CDC as a visual information specialist.

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Happy New Year from the Emerys! Here’s our attempt at a a family selfie. Anyone else have trouble getting their toddler to look at the camera?!

Last fall I was in beast mode and began planning, strategizing, scheming, and optimizing for 2018. What would my upcoming year look like?! I had so. many. ideas. But who cares what little ol’ Ann is up to? I reached out to my favorite dataviz rockstars to see what’s on their agenda for 2018. Here’s what they said:

Ben Collins, benlcollins.com

In 2018, my goal is to continue growing the online training arm of my business, by enrolling more students and launching 4 – 6 new online video courses, including courses on Google Data Studio (the new dataviz tool from Google), Google Apps Script and SQL. From a personal point of view, I want to further my technical knowledge, especially of Apps Script and data science topics, through regular weekly coding, case studies and writing in-depth tutorials on my website.

Jorge Camoes, excelcharts.com

Go a bit deeper into statistics and datavis integration. I’m having fun learning JMP, so I’m not sure if I’ll stick with or use it as a gateway into R.  Explore the design of structured visualizations (small multiples, panel charts, etc) and free-form visualizations (dashboards, infographics). Blog more, be a more active member of some communities, create more free and premium content, add examples to Andy Kirk’s Chartmaker Directory. And, the most challenging of all, leave my comfort zone and accept more invitations for public speaking.

Alberto Cairothefunctionalart.com

Write my next book.

Andy Cotgreavegravyanecdote.com

My resolution is to seek out things that knit the world of data together. I want to read more, and more widely. I’m really enthused about finding inspiration from all walks of life, and thinking how they relate to the world of data. It could be the neuroscience of magic, storytelling in board games, or the psychology of decision making. I’ll be sharing these ideas in my Sweet Spot column on LinkedIn. And if all goes to plan, there might even be a more exciting announcement!

Ann K. Emery, annkemery.com

Keep doing what I’m doing–a dual focus on speaking and design and a dual focus on analysis and visualization–and ignore the noise. Continue beefing up my ebook and turn it into a book book. Plan the curriculum for a series of online courses so that I’m ready to rock them in 2019!

Stephanie Evergreen, stephanieevergreen.com

My resolution this year is to reduce the environmental impact of my life on the road. I’m so good at this at home but once I’m on the road, it’s all water bottles and disposable crap. I’ve committed to traveling with a reusable water bottle and purchasing carbon offsets for my miles in the air. I’ll be looking for other ideas throughout the year too.

Andy Kirk, visualisingdata.com

The first goal for 2018 is I want to find a way to carve out more time to reflect, to learn, to read and to generally improve in a more organised and efficient way rather than trying to squeeze out random and often chaotic opportunities as I chase my to-do list and schedule of working commitments. I have so many books, articles and papers to read that I’ve only really skirted over. As 2018 will be the year when I return to book writing with the commencing of composing the second edition of my book, this should give me the opportunity I need. I also have a number of personal/passion projects that I hope to undertake that will enable me to flex different capabilities and, most likely, push me out of my normal comfort zone. That’s a good thing, especially for the low risk context of one’s own work, rather than a client’s. I have had a permanent resolution each year for the past decade that states how this year will be the year I learn x, y or z tool. I still have that very much in mind but I only have so many hours in the day and I suspect it will a major strand of development that will be necessary to nudge forward into 2019 – more likely to be achievable after my post book-writing period. Commercially, I will be very content to have more of the same type and quantity of opportunities to run training events and engage on design/consultancy projects. As a freelancer, one should never be complacent and certainly shouldn’t wish for less work but a continuation of 2017 will represent a nice balance to ensure continued growth without the cost of burnout.

Elissa Schloesser, myvisualvoice.com

Develop my voice. Take time to document and share my perspective. Make writing on my blog (www.myvisualsidekick.org) a priority.

Jon Schwabish, policyviz.com

As we get into 2018, there are a few things in the dataviz world that I want to think a bit more deeply about: How do we create effective dataviz for social media? What are some other issues with maps and geographic data to explore further? How can we better communicate uncertainty? How do we use data and data visualization to grab people’s attention and interest in complex, but inherently important, policy issues? I’m also looking forward to further developing some Excel tools to help people and organizations create stylized graphs more quickly and easily. And, of course, talking to more cool people for my podcast.

What’s your data-related resolution for 2018? Is there a particular book(s) you want to read? A skill you want to hone? A conference you want to explore for the first time? Let us know in the comments!

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As we were wrapping TechnoServe’s 2016 Impact Report, I also began consulting on TechnoServe’s Results Portal. The Results Portal is an interactive, web-based dashboard that’s embedded within TechnoServe’s website at http://www.technoserve.org/our-work/impact#portal.

For the first time, TechnoServe’s beneficiaries, partners, donors, and prospective donors can view key stats about TechnoServe’s projects. TechnoServe is offering their data to the public, not because they have to, but because they want to. What’s not to admire about an organization that’s committed to transparency and information-sharing?

The portal includes a map of the countries and regions where TechnoServe works…

…and results by country and by project.

There are three features that make TechnoServe’s Results Portal easy to navigate:

  • Consistent color-coding and icons by category;
  • Consistent navigation; and a
  • Consistent text hierarchy.

Consistent Color-Coding and Icons by Category

I like color-coding by category within a single document. I love color-coding across multiple documents and projects.

Remember TechnoServe’s 2016 Impact Report, which I showed you last time? They reported on three key variables: financial benefits, beneficiaries, and finance mobilized. Throughout the entire 16-page report, information about financial benefits was always displayed in green with the icon of the hand holding paper currency. Information about beneficiaries was always displayed in purple with an icon of several farmers standing together. And information about finance mobilized was always displayed in turquoise with the line graph icon.

We repeated the same colors and icons throughout the Results Portal, too. Can you spot the icons, terms, and definitions in the opening screen of the Results Portal? We added a fourth variable to this project, too. TechnoServe wanted to emphasize how many beneficiaries were female, so information about percent women was displayed in orange.

2016 Impact Report (left) and Results Portal (right)

We also worked on a third product, a series of Google Sheets dashboards that were designed for TechnoServe’s internal audiences. Those dashboards aren’t public. But yes, you guessed it, the internal dashboards follow the same color-coding. Financial benefits are green, beneficiaries are purple, percent women is orange, and finance mobilized is turquoise.

Consistent Navigation

Tableau allows you to insert drill-down menus just about anywhere: in the upper left, upper right, lower left, lower right, or middle of the page.

In earlier drafts, our lists of countries and projects that viewers could explore were in different places on different screens. We placed the lists wherever we found blank space and could squeeze them in.

In the final version, we intentionally placed the lists in the upper left corners. In Western cultures, we read beginning in the upper left corner and then read across and down in a z-shaped pattern. That’s why we placed the country and project lists in the upper left corner—because it’s the most valuable real estate on the page.

Our goal was to make navigation seamless. We wanted viewers to focus on interpreting the data, not on interpreting the dashboard.

Consistent Text Hierarchy

Do you really need font in size 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18?

Sometimes, software programs give you too many different font sizes. You insert a chart and there are different sizes for the title, subtitle, axis labels, numeric labels, and category labels.

Other times, dashboard designers create too many different font sizes. We’re not sure what our final product will look like. We experiment. We try a graph title in size 12 on one screen and a graph title in size 13 on another screen. We try a body font in black on one screen and dark gray on another screen. We try a page title in bold on one screen and italic on another screen.

In the final version of the Results Portal, we paid careful attention to fonts, sizes, colors, and styles. We built a consistent text hierarchy. A text hierarchy tells your viewers which information is at the top of the food chain. The most important information is largest, the information that’s of medium importance is a medium size, and the regular ol’ body font is the smallest size.

Consistent text hierarchies across screens make you look polished and professional. More importantly, text hierarchies make your viewers’ job of interpreting the information faster and easier.

Has your organization built a public-facing dashboard like TechnoServe yet? Link to your websites here!

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When TechnoServe’s Kate Scaife Diaz reached out to see if I could consult on their 2016 Impact Report, I jumped at the opportunity. This report went through dozens of drafts, some of which you may see in future posts. There are several things to love about the final product.

Consistent Color-Coding and Icons by Category

TechnoServe reported on three categories: financial benefits, beneficiaries, and finance mobilized. We introduced these terms, definitions, colors, and icons on the first spread. Then, the terms, colors, and icons are repeated consistently throughout the report. For example, you’ll never see financial benefits in purple or turquoise, or with any other icon.

These colors come from TechnoServe’s style guide, but they do more than just reinforce the organization’s branding. Colors are used intentionally to guide new readers through their terminology so that the content doesn’t feel overwhelming.

Graph-to-Paragraph Ratio

Not so long ago, the monitoring and evaluation field was plagued by hundred-page narrative reports. I’m a big fan of TechnoServe’s commitment to designing shorter reports that people can actually read.

Here’s the wordiest spread of the document, which isn’t even that wordy. On the left page, there’s an introduction (two short paragraphs) followed by a five-word diagram that explains Return on TechnoServe Investment calculations. Even the diagram contains icons. On the bottom of the left page, you’ll find a call-out box for the nerds (me!) who want to learn more. Since the call-out box has a light gray border, readers know that the content is different from the main narrative. It drills deeply into the topic, so readers can choose to read it or skip it.

On the right page, there’s an introduction followed by a dot plot. The introduction is just one sentence. You’re not aiming for zero words; you’re aiming for a sufficient number of words. In this section, one sentence was sufficient.

We strategically hid most of the text within semi-graphical elements, including the diagram, call-out box, and annotations. Graphical elements take up more than half of the spread.

A Variety of Graph Types

Throughout our discussions, we focused on including a variety of graph types. We knew that the only thing more boring than a hundred-page report was a hundred-bar-chart report. Within just 16 pages, we included:

  • Photographs
  • Icons
  • Maps
  • Diagrams
  • Donuts
  • Packed bubbles
  • Column charts
  • Stacked bar charts
  • Call-out boxes
  • Dot plots
  • Line charts

For example, here’s a diagram about TechnoServe’s agricultural work. A donut within the diagram shows that 34 percent of the farmers were women. On the right page, packed bubbles show the relative size of financial benefits across grains, livestock, coffee, cocoa, and other sectors.

We didn’t include variety for variety’s sake. We included graphs that showcased patterns that we wanted to showcase.

Titles That Tell a Story

One of the hardest leaps for me in my data design journey was transitioning from generic, jargon-filled titles to titles that tell a story. I spent every semester and summer break during college working in research centers within schools of law, public policy, psychology, and education. We churned out peer-reviewed journal articles. After graduation, I worked in three more research centers before transitioning into a government contracting position. I was steeped in journal jargon for years. It took years to un-learn those habits.

Check out these exemplar storytelling titles. The spread’s storytelling title, We Create Lasting Impact in People’s Lives, provides more information than a traditional title like Chapter 4: Impact in Participants’ Lives Over Time.

Both graphs have storytelling titles, too. Our Impact is Sustained Year After Year and Beneficiaries See Lasting Effects interpret the data in layperson language. And they’re short; we only needed four to seven words each.

Have you seen exemplary reports that use consistent color-coding and icons, strong graph-to-paragraph ratios, a variety of graph types, or titles that tell a story?

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Now you’ve got some fonts that aren’t basic, how about some custom colors? I really like matching my visualizations to my report, which is almost always based on the color scheme of the organization I’m working with. Let me tell you though, this can be a bit of a beast, so let’s get started.

First, identify the colors you want to use. I suggest Adobe Color, which will allow you to upload a photo and get HEX codes (along with complementary colors and other fun things). Of course, you might be lucky and already have your HEX codes available.

Next, you’ll need to determine whether you want to add a categorical, sequential, or diverging palette. I’ll show you categorical. You can add the others as needed using the same method.

With your HEX codes in hand, locate your Tableau Repository. Depending on where you installed this, it could take a minute. When you locate it, there will be a Preferences.tps you need to open in a text editing program.

Now, get started with code. You want to add the following before copying anything into the text edit.

You will need to copy the basic code down and insert your HEX codes. Tableau lists all the sets of you would possibly need here. Copy, paste, and customize.

HERE IS THE TRICKY PART…

Make sure you are using straight quotes. Anything else will cause all sorts of errors. I’ve included examples of a correct and incorrect repository. This is often not a matter of inserting quotes but changing the auto-correction in the program.

Save and close your text editor and open Tableau! To test your colors, open up a sample dataset. On a worksheet, drag a dimension onto the Color Mark. You’ll immediately see those basic default colors but don’t worry – we’re fixing that!

Select the Color Mark and click Edit Colors. You should see yours at the bottom!

Select your color and be sure to click Assign, otherwise nothing will change. Close the editor and check out your new colors!

SUCCESS!

If you followed along, you just completed some serious steps in customizing your Tableau visualizations. I call it a small but mighty change. You can go forth knowing that your visualizations are more customized and specific to your project!

Emery Analytics, LLC partners with the best and brightest designers, like Deven Wisner. By day, Deven manages human capital and business analytics for Global Registration Services, Inc., a legal services company in Tucson, AZ. By night, Deven is a consultant focused on data- and research-based decision making. He is a proud member of the American Evaluation Association and Board Member of the Arizona Evaluation Network.

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Whether you are using Tableau, Excel, or any other visualization tool, you will come across defaults. The problem with using something right out of the can is that it often does not speak directly to your audience. Your investment in a visualization speaks to your investment in conveying the story of your data.

By now, you may know tips and tricks to de-clutter and minimize the amount of ‘out-of-the-box’ stuff in your Excel charts, but I want to share how to tackle the same problem in Tableau. It doesn’t take long to spot a Tableau visualization. Is that a bad thing? It depends (does that give anyone else grad school flashbacks?). Instead of being recognized for the font (Tableau Book) and colors that Tableau pumps out, have your Tableau visualizations recognized for their utility and story.

I’m going to share how to customize your fonts and colors within Tableau. And, make your life a lot easier (i.e. not changing one component of the visualization at a time.). Repeat after me: “I am better than the defaults.”

Let’s start with fonts, the easier change of the two.

Instead of having to change your fonts as you go, you can change the entire workbook. If you enjoy clicking on every area of your chart and changing the fonts, go ahead… but, I bet you’d rather spend that time on something else. You will also miss one or two! This way the entire book is the same font. You can adjust sizing as needed!

First, open your workbook.

Go to Format in the top, right-hand corner and click Workbook.

On the right-hand side, you’ll have a formatting pane, which includes fonts, colors, and lines. Choose your font (I suggest a nice sans serif), and you’re ready to rumble!

Emery Analytics, LLC partners with the best and brightest designers, like Deven Wisner. By day, Deven manages human capital and business analytics for Global Registration Services, Inc., a legal services company in Tucson, AZ. By night, Deven is a consultant focused on data- and research-based decision making. He is a proud member of the American Evaluation Association and Board Member of the Arizona Evaluation Network.

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Ann's Blog by Ann K. Emery - 4M ago

Tableau, which according to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary means “a graphic description or representation,” is a powerful infographic tool with over 50,000 users. Although the user-base is nowhere near that of Excel (with 30,000,000 users), this tool has some perks depending on what you’re looking for in terms of dataviz. So maybe you’ve heard of Tableau or, if you haven’t, you have now.

My plan is to give you some background on the versions available, how to download it, and resources for getting started!

Which Version is Right for Me?

Options are great, but what’s the right choice?!?! Here is a simplified comparison.

Tableau Public

  • Basic version of Tableau.
  • Your visualizations must be stored in a global repository (the “catch”).
  • You can still do awesome things like Viz of the Day or #MakeoverMonday.

This is the perfect option for those who want to become familiar with Tableau.

Cost: FREE

Tableau Desktop Licenses

If you don’t want to share your client’s data with others, I’d suggest forking out the dough for this one. However, make sure you’ll use it before you buy it. A year goes by quick, and you’ll be sorry you spent the money if it sits on your desktop unused.

You can choose a personal or professional license. Both include a full license. All your workbooks (i.e., all your stuff) is stored locally). The personal license has limited data sources (e.g., Excel and Google Sheets). The professional license allows you to access data directly from its source (e.g., Microsoft SQL Server). You can also share data via Tableau Online/Server.

Cost: $420 (personal) or $840 (professional)

Tableau Student

Enrolled in classes at least part-time? Score a year’s license to Tableau Professional for FREE. No gimmicks besides a sales call or two from Tableau. You can do this for as long as you are in school.

Cost: FREE

All that said, if you aren’t in school, try Tableau Public. Why? Trying it takes no commitment. Play for a while, determine if it is right for your project, and make a decision.

Download Tableau!

Even if you plan on committing to a full-license, get a free 14-day trial first. That’s 14 days to get your act together and start using it.

You might also check the system requirements. Making your computer sound like a rocket ship = not good.

I Downloaded Tableau, Now What?

Okay, now that you have Tableau, it’s time to do things! Don’t let this giant program just sit on your computer unused. Open that bad boy and start playing with data. My advice: Stay away from the sample datasets. They’re “perfect” for all intents and purposes and that’s not a good way to learn. Instead, connect to your own dataset. Remember: depending on your version of Tableau, you will be limited to certain file types.

First, start utilizing the vast Tableau community. You can literally Google your problem and likely come up with an answer. You can also visit the official Tableau Community forums to ask questions and learn from other confused people. I do this on the regular.

Second, commit to at least one #MakeoverMonday per month. Challenge yourself, along with many other Tableau users, to recreate a visualization. In one revision of a viz, I learned THREE new things.

Third, find your local Tableau User Group (TUG). You’ll be able to connect with other users and work through visualizations together.

Now… go forth and continue your path to becoming a Tableau beast!

Emery Analytics, LLC partners with the best and brightest designers, like Deven Wisner. By day, Deven manages human capital and business analytics for Global Registration Services, Inc., a legal services company in Tucson, AZ. By night, Deven is a consultant focused on data- and research-based decision making. He is a proud member of the American Evaluation Association and Board Member of the Arizona Evaluation Network.

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Waffle charts display part-to-whole patterns. They’re kind of like square versions of pie charts. I introduced them in an earlier post about visualizing survey results. Look familiar?

Here’s how to make waffle charts within good ol’ Excel.

The first few steps are a little unexpected. We’ve got to fool Excel into making a 10×10 grid. You’ll have to trust me on this first step. It’ll look crazy at first, but it’ll make sense in a moment. Type a bunch of 1’s into your spreadsheet—10 across and 10 down.

Then, highlight your 1’s, go to the Insert tab, and select a 2D stacked bar chart. You can use a stacked bar chart (horizontal) or a stacked column chart (vertical). The end result will be the same either way. The waffle chart is there! Well, kind of. It’s hiding behind a bunch of clutter. Let’s adjust the scale and then delete, delete, delete.

Adjust the vertical axis so that it stretches from 0 to 10 (rather than 0 to 12). To adjust the axis’ scale, first click on any of the numbers. For instance, you could hold your cursor directly over the 6, the 8, or the 10. You’ll see a rectangle appear around the outside of the numbers. Then, right-click, and select the option at the very bottom of the pop-up window, which is called Format Axis. Adjust the maximum bound from 12 to 10.

Now, the vertical axis only goes to 10—good. (Otherwise, our final product would’ve had some weird white space.)

Delete the title, legend, and scales. Remove the border and grid lines.

Reduce the gap width all the way down to 0%. This is your computer’s funny name for the space between the columns or bars. Follow my tutorial if this technique is new for you. The result is a big blob.

Modernize your visual with light gray fills and white outlines. Can you see the waffle?!

Fill in a few shapes with your darker action color. For example, you would fill in 57 of the 100 squares to represent 57 percent of people.

Finally, make sure your graph is a square (not a rectangle). No eyeballing. Activate your graph by clicking on the outside border. Then, go to the Format tab and look for the Size section. In this example, I set my chart to be 3 inches by 3 inches. This is a nice size for Word documents. You could place two 3-by-3 waffle charts beside each other on the paper. You’ll need larger waffles for your slide deck of course.


Purchase the template ($5)

An alternate solution is to use conditional formatting instead of a stacked bar chart. I demo the process here:

 

Have you used these stacked-bars-disguised-as-waffles in your own work? If so, please link to your document in the comments.

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If you want to look polished, then you have no other choice but to customize your visualization’s color palette. Don’t worry–customizing your colors is an easy low-hanging-fruit edit. Locate your style guide, scroll down to the color section, and decode the jargon. If you don’t have a style guide, or can’t find it, identify your color codes with an eyedropper or with Paint.

Then, enter your color codes in Excel!

Build your graph. Here’s a histogram that displays how many people fell into each age range. The default graph has Microsoft’s blue.

Declutter that cluttered graph. Delete the border, grid lines, title, and vertical axis. Label the columns directly. Nudge the columns closer together.

Now it’s time to customize the color. Click on the bar, line, or pie wedge that you want to adjust. Can you see that the columns are selected?

Go to Chart Tools, then Format, and then Shape Outline (line graphs) or Shape Fill (all other types of graphs, like this one). Ignore the default colors! Go to the bottom where it says More Fill Colors.

On the pop-up window, click on the Custom tab.

Enter your RGB code. RGB stands for red, green, and blue. This is the recipe of reds, greens, and blues that get mixed together to produce your exact shade.

I used 120, 29, 125, which is the exact shade of purple from a client’s logo. Now I can quickly customize other pieces of the graph, like the numeric labels, because that purple is already stored under Recent Colors.

With just a few clicks, custom colors reinforce branding and make you look professional.


Purchase the histogram template ($5)

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Lots of my workshop participants are government employees who don’t have or can’t find style guides and/or they’re not allowed to download eyedropper tools to locate color codes. Microsoft Paint to the rescue!

Hi! I am Matt Feldmann with Goshen Education Consulting in Southwestern Illinois (near St. Louis). Ann asked me to write this guest blog post to show you how to look up specific RGB color codes with a program you likely have already pre-installed on your computer–Microsoft Paint. Ann has previously discussed how to use an Instant eyedropper program to look up these color codes and how to use those codes to change your color scheme in Excel. If you are like me, you don’t like to download new software…and you don’t need to if you use Microsoft Windows.

Take a Screenshot and Paste It Into Paint

  • I use shortcut keys. Press: ALT+PRTSCN
  • Open MS Paint.
  • Paste your screen shot using either CTRL+V, right clicking on your mouse and selecting PASTE, or selecting the PASTE button in MS Paint.

The following is a pasted screenshot from an upcoming conference:

Use Color Picker to Identify a Color

Color Picker looks like an eyedropper and it is in the Tools section. It is identified below with my red arrow:

Select the Desired Color with the Eyedropper and Select Edit Colors

  • I selected the green color with the eyedropper and it automatically switched Color 1 to green.
  • Edit Colors is on the far right.

Record the RGB Codes for Future Use

The following is the screen that pops up when you edit colors. The Red, Green, Blue colors are on the right.

But wait–isn’t Paint dead? Apparently not. However, if you want to use the newer MS Paint 3D program (which is preloaded with Windows 10), there also is an eyedropper that records your RGB codes. As a bonus, it will also give you a Hex code.

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