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Job Title: Social Media & Digital Fundraising Coordinator

Job Status: Full-time (2 day remote, 3 day at Grass Valley location)

Job Description: Implement a coordinated digital fundraising plan that includes expanding online giving program and donor engagement and nurturing. Aid education department in the promotion of Animal Place’s mission of veganism through writing, tours, tabling, corporate giving, and other outreach efforts. To expand and maintain a thriving social media presence.

Qualifications

  • A strong commitment to Animal Place’s mission of veganism and animal rights.
  • Familiarity with Pardot, Salesforce,  Classy, and WordPress strongly encouraged.
  • At least two years experience working in non-profit and specifically with online marketing and/or digital fundraising.
  • A work history that shows a progressively challenging work experience.
  • Ability to work independently and remotely in a fashion that maintains strong and open lines of communication with supervisor and colleagues.
  • Demonstrate strong knowledge of current fundraising trends, social media, mobile, and pertinent digital acquisition trends.
  • Experience managing social media platforms effectively
  • Familiarity with social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, Tumblr
  • Strong and proven ability to communicate effectively and tactfully online
  • Experience publishing on blogs, photo/video sharing sites, social networking with a good online reputation
  • Experience and familiarity with Google Docs, HootSuite, WordPress, etc.
  • Strong writing skills, with 2-3 samples of varied styles of writing.
  • Flexible schedule and comfort traveling to Grass Valley sanctuary 1 time a week and whenever needed.
  • Proven organizational skills and attention to detail.
  • Design experience suggested but not required.
  • Project management experience in digital material and marketing required.
  • Able to meet deadlines, under pressure.
  • Familiarity with farmed animal issues and veganism.
  • Vegan

Job Duties

  • Develop and implementation of digital fundraising programs including e-newsletters, e-mail acquisition, online content monetization, digital fundraising via website, e-mail, mobile, and social media.
  • Manage engagement and cultivation of leads acquired through online fundraising, and create ways to foster higher giving levels.
  • Assist in email marketing to expand re-curring gift program (monthly donors), sponsorship program (animal foster sponsor), and other online donor acquisition ideas.
  • Assist with social media coordinator to foster member cultivation on social media, web, mobile, and developing platforms.
  • Create digital fundraising and membership procedures to ensure digital donors receive a structured, appropriate online and digital giving opportunities.
  • Work with the education director to set benchmarks across all digital fundraising channels.
  • Evaluate and reports monthly on project accomplishments and budgets. Analyze data and make recommendations.
  • Improve response rates and increase online donor retention.
  • Promote the work of the sanctuary through online media.
  • Assist with online and offline fundraising efforts.

Social Media Responsibilities and Duties:

  • Assist with the management of social media for the organization included but not limited to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Blog, Pinterest, YouTube
  • Expand online presence
  • Write articles/blogs related to Animal Place’s mission
  • Create content related to Animal Place and its mission for social media channels
  • Assist in the update and maintenance of website
  • Coordinate the weekly e-alert to subscribers
  • Stay informed on news and media related to social media and animal rights
  • Perform any other duties assigned by the Education Director
  • Work directly with Education department on effective use of social tools to promote our message, content, and campaigns
  • Assist in the integration of social and mobile media into organization’s platform and messaging
  • Manage potential advertising in social media
  • Track analytic data with certain social media platforms and track effectiveness

Salary: TBD

Benefits: Health insurance, vacation package

How to Apply: Send cover letter, resume, and 3-5 professional references to humanresources@animalplace.org with Social Media & Digital Fundraising Coordinator in subject line.

About Animal Place: Animal Place is a nonprofit sanctuary for farmed animals and an education/advocacy organization. It operates several facilities: a 600-acre permanent sanctuary in Grass Valley, CA; a 60-acre farmed animal adoption center in Vacaville, CA; a brick and mortar vegan store in Berkeley, CA; a 15-acre residential internship property in Grass Valley; and a 7-acre onsite Guest House and educational site in Grass Valley, CA (next door to the sanctuary).

Please visit our website prior to applying: www.animalplace.org

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Animal Place by Savannah Verdon - 1M ago

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Digital Fundraising & Education Coordinator

Sacramento

Organization Description: Animal Place is an animal rights organization promoting the complete protection of farmed animals and a vegan lifestyle. There are three facilities: a 600-acre sanctuary in Grass Valley, CA that serves as a permanent safe haven for farmed animals as well as education center, the 60-acre Rescue Ranch adoption facility in Vacaville, CA, and our brick-and-mortar vegan store the Vegan Republic. Rescue Ranch provides temporary home for adoptable farmed animals, with a special emphasis on chickens from the egg industry. Animal Place’s Vegan Republic is located in Berkeley, CA and delivers vegan food and merchandise to customers with all profits benefiting the sanctuary. If you are unfamiliar with Animal Place, visit our website at www.animalplace.org before considering applying.

Job Title: Digital Fundraising & Education Coordinator

Job Status: Part-time, contract

Region Specific Location (Sacramento): Remote position, must be within 1 hour driving distance to Grass Valley office, able to come into Grass Valley office once a week.

Job Description: Implement a coordinated digital fundraising plan that includes expanding online giving program and donor engagement and nurturing. Aid education department in the promotion of Animal Place’s mission of veganism through writing, tours, tabling, corporate giving, and other outreach efforts.

Qualifications

  • A strong commitment to Animal Place’s mission of veganism and animal rights.
  • Familiarity with Pardot, Salesforce,  Classy, and WordPress strongly encouraged.
  • At least two years experience working in non-profit and specifically with online marketing and/or digital fundraising.
  • A work history that shows a progressively challenging work experience.
  • Ability to work independently and remotely in a fashion that maintains strong and open lines of communication with supervisor and colleagues.
  • Demonstrate strong knowledge of current fundraising trends, social media, mobile, and pertinent digital acquisition trends.
  • Strong writing skills, with 2-3 samples of varied styles of writing.
  • Flexible schedule and comfort traveling to Grass Valley sanctuary 1 time a week and whenever needed.
  • Proven organizational skills and attention to detail.
  • Design experience suggested but not required.
  • Project management experience in digital material and marketing required.
  • Able to meet deadlines, under pressure.
  • Familiarity with farmed animal issues and veganism.
  • Vegan

Job Duties

  • Develop and implementation of digital fundraising programs including e-newsletters, e-mail acquisition, online content monetization, digital fundraising via website, e-mail, mobile, and social media.
  • Manage engagement and cultivation of leads acquired through online fundraising, and create ways to foster higher giving levels.
  • Assist in email marketing to expand re-curring gift program (monthly donors), sponsorship program (animal foster sponsor), and other online donor acquisition ideas.
  • Assist with social media coordinator to foster member cultivation on social media, web, mobile, and developing platforms.
  • Create digital fundraising and membership procedures to ensure digital donors receive a structured, appropriate online and digital giving opportunities.
  • Work with the education director to set benchmarks across all digital fundraising channels.
  • Evaluate and reports monthly on project accomplishments and budgets. Analyze data and make recommendations.
  • Improve response rates and increase online donor retention.
  • Promote the work of the sanctuary through online media.
  • Assist with online and offline fundraising efforts.

Salary: TBD

How to Apply: Send cover letter, resume, and 3-5 professional references to humanresources@animalplace.org with

About Animal Place: Animal Place is a nonprofit sanctuary for farmed animals and an education/advocacy organization. It operates several facilities: a 600-acre permanent sanctuary in Grass Valley, CA; a 60-acre farmed animal adoption center in Vacaville, CA; a brick and mortar vegan store in Berkeley, CA; a 15-acre residential internship property in Grass Valley; and a 7-acre onsite Guest House and educational site in Grass Valley, CA (next door to the sanctuary).

Please visit our website prior to applying: www.animalplace.org

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Animal Place by Savannah Verdon - 2M ago
Can you give me background on the case?

You can read the initial rescue story here.

Are charges being filed against the prior owner of the birds?

Yes, the owner of the feed store has been charged with felony animal cruelty. The investigation is ongoing.

What are the diseases the birds need to be tested for?

The two medically important diseases are infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). If any bird tests positive for ILTV, they would enter our isolated, biosecure flock, space permitting. If a bird tests positive for IBV, a common avian illness, they would be candidates for integration into our main flock as virtually all chickens have been exposed to IBV.

If a bird tests negative for both ILTV and IBV, we would consider them adoption candidates.

Aren’t there cheaper tests?

There are! After consulting with poultry pathologists, we learned that the less expensive tests do not diagnose an active infection, which is necessary information. The more expensive tests ensure the birds are 100% free of active infection and disease.

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Meet a survivor who benefited from the Rescue Medical Fund this year. See how your support of compassion will make a difference for equally needy animals in 2018.

This is Vincent.

Horrific bite wounds covered his body. One of his ears had been violently torn off, while punctures could be found on his face, neck, and torso.

He was found in the middle of the road and rushed to Animal Place. He had likely been mauled by dogs or coyotes.

Our veterinarian examined him, removing what was left of his mangled right ear and suturing several open wounds.

We named him Vincent Van Goat.

Unless you get up close to Vincent (and notice his missing ear), you would never know the trauma he endured before coming to the sanctuary. All of his wounds are fully healed, and he has found safe haven with other goats. His good friend is Verna, the smallest of the goats.

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Animal Place by Animal Place - 3M ago

Neglected Piglet Saves 360 Lives

In late October, Animal Place staff received a distressing call about a young piglet being neglected at Simply Country feedstore. We immediately investigated the call and found an underweight piglet with severely damaged ears and multiple bite wounds across her body, caused by being placed in an overcrowded pen with larger piglets. The piglet had not received any appropriate veterinary care and portions of her ears were falling off.

Attempts were made to convince the feedstore to relinquish custody to Animal Place, but they were refused. While at the feedstore, we noticed a large number of ill chickens, exhibiting signs of severe respiratory distress.

A local neighbor, concerned about the piglet, purchased her and brought her to Animal Place.  Our veterinarian ended up partially amputating both ears and treating the piglet, now named Cleo, for puncture wounds.

Disturbed by the scene at the feedstore, we contacted Nevada County Animal Control and requested a welfare check on the chickens.

Two days later, animal control investigated Simply Country feed store and were horrified by what they saw. In the back of the feed store (away from public access) they found 58 dead birds, along with hundreds of other birds in various stages of neglect.

Working closely with Nevada County Animal Control, Animal Place staff aided in the confiscation of 360 birds located at a local business in the 10000 block of Harvest Lane in Rough & Ready (town adjacent to Grass Valley).

All of the birds were brought to Animal Place sanctuary where they will be housed until test results are returned to determine if the birds can be adopted. Unfortunately, these birds may be too ill to be saved and it is possible euthanasia will be the only option.

More than 95% of the birds are severely malnourished, despite being housed at a feed store. At least half of the population has some form of respiratory illness that was left untreated. Over the course of four days, 31 birds have passed away or have been euthanized.

Criminal charges will be filed with the Nevada County District Attorney’s Office.

We are incredibly grateful to the Nevada County Animal Control Department for taking cruelty to chickens as seriously as dogs and cats. Farmed animals are protected by California’s state anti-cruelty laws, yet few agencies enforce them.

Photos:

One of the dozens of birds with clearly untreated respiratory illness.

Another bird with respiratory illness. She is also severely malnourished.

This bird died in our arms, from malnutrition and sudden collapse.

A portion of the dead birds found onsite. There was such little food that live birds were eating dead birds.

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February 17, 2016

 

Op-ed: 1,500 Hens Rescued From California Egg Factory

Kim Sturla

This week, a team from Animal Place saved 1,500 hens from an egg production facility, where they had lived their lives in cages so small they could not spread their wings.

A rescue of this magnitude is intense and detailed. For Operation Love-a-Hen, 22 trained volunteers staffed the rescue, and another team of 13 stayed at the sanctuary to receive all the incoming animals. Marji Beach, our education director, coordinates all the rescues. Ciara Fiack, Animal Place animal care director, assists with all the new arrivals. Jan Galeazzi, animal care manager at Animal Place’s Rescue Ranch shelter, cares for all the birds until they are healthy and happy, then adoption coordinator Jacinda Virgin finds them forever homes. Dozens more employees, volunteers, and interns play key roles.

It takes a village to manage a rescue like this, and Animal Place is the only sanctuary in the country doing it. In the four years since we began large-scale rescues, we have saved more than 17,500 lives – and here’s how we do it.

Hens from factory-scale facilities are bred for their laying prowess, but once their egg production slows down, around 12-24 months, producers typically kill them and replace them with new ones – even though they have many years of life ahead of them. After arrangements are made with the facility, the planning begins. Volunteers are contacted and scheduled, transport vehicles and a bank of hotel rooms reserved, rescue supplies inventoried, equipment collected, and a timeline developed.

Our convoy of seven transport vehicles is loaded with empty poultry crates, enough to handle 1,500 birds. Commercial crates are the safest way to transport a large number of hens since they have adequate ventilation and prevent the birds from climbing on top of one another.

The rescue will take us at least two full days and one night. We leave in the morning and head south for several hours. We check into an inexpensive roadside motel near the facility. In anticipation of our 4:30 a.m. departure, we hit the sack early.

It’s still dark out when we wake up. We’re tired but eager as Marji gives the team of rescuers our final directions and instructions. We caravan to the facility. The stench alerts us that we are near. We see a row of sheds with dim lights in the distance.

We pull in and identify the shed with the birds that will go home with us. There is a stunned silence as everyone peeks inside the sheds and sees thousands of birds in rusty, cramped cages above a pile of feces three feet high. The team must remember to focus on those we can save.

The 150 transport crates are unloaded from the vehicles and staged near the shed. Each crate can carry 10 chickens.

And now the work everybody has been waiting for begins.

The stench of the facility is almost unbearable. More than a year’s worth of manure is piled up beneath the cages, oozing toxic fumes into our lungs. It is hard to fathom how these hens endured more than a year trapped in this prison.

Volunteers are showed how to gently, but quickly, remove birds from the cages. The cage door opening is only eight inches wide, making it difficult to reach both hands inside. We bang and bruise our arms from scraping against the metal, but the birds are battered worse, suffering from lost feathers, abrasions, and wounds.

Working in teams, one person reaches inside the cage and cups their palms over each bird’s back to make sure her wings are protected. The hen is handed over to another volunteer who places the newly liberated bird into a transport crate.

The birds are scared and vocalize loudly while we catch them. Some attempt to hang onto the cage with their overgrown nails. They don’t know we are the rescuers, not the people working at the neighboring shed, who pull the birds out by their legs to be gassed and then trashed.

And then there are the dead and dying. One of our interns comes up to me, sobbing. In her arms is a dead bird. She apologizes for her tears as she hands the bird over – not knowing what else to do with the body – only that she does not want to leave her inside the cage.

After all 1,500 birds are rescued and secured in transport crates, we load them into our vehicles to make the long drive to Animal Place’s rescue, rehabilitation, and adoption site in Vacaville, CA.

A new team of volunteers welcomes the hens’ arrival. Each vehicle is directed to a different barn, crates are unloaded, and carried to the appropriate stall. The crates are then opened, welcoming these freshly liberated hens to a new world.

Some birds jump out, flapping their wings for the first time in their lives. Others try to jump out but do not have the strength, as their muscles have atrophied from lack of use. Some are too frightened to explore. As their feet touch the ground, you see their surprise at the sensation – earth and straw instead of wire. A few actually try to take a dust bath in the straw. Many of them peck and scratch their feet on the ground – something they have never done before.

While we all want to relax and watch the birds discover their new liberation, we still have hours of work ahead of us. The vehicles and crates have to be power-sprayed and scrubbed clean before they can be returned. More importantly, we have to identify those birds in a weakened state – those needing special attention who we isolate inside a smaller enclosure for observation and treatment.

When the rescue crew leaves, the evening crew takes over the work of declumping. Declumping is grueling.

Hens from cages have spent their entire lives crammed inside small wire cages, and hens from cage-free facilities have been stuffed into overcrowded sheds. Space is confusing and frightening to them, and the birds are physically weak and unable to perch. Recently rescued hens tend to go to the barn corners, and pile up on top of one another. Those on the bottom of the pile can suffocate.

Declumping entails removing the birds under the pile until the flock issues a beautiful bedtime call – a song repeated by hundreds of hens to “go to sleep.”

Going to farms and rescuing is physical and emotionally draining work, but it doesn’t end after the birds are saved. For the first month, it will take 10-15 volunteers and staff 90 minutes each night to declump, protecting the hens from themselves. Also during the first month, all the birds will be health checked, treated for parasites, their overgrown nails will be trimmed, and other signs of neglect will be smoothed away by love and care as they acclimate to a life of freedom and enjoy many “firsts.” First time off a wire floor. First time experiencing fresh air, spreading wings, running, pecking the ground, going into a nest box, and perching.

Once the hens have completed their rehabilitation, they will be made available for adoption and placed into screened forever homes.

These hens have known nothing but cruelty, and now they will know kindness. We see these hens as unique individuals, not as commodities. We hope their story inspires you to do the same. To apply to adopt, volunteer, or donate, please visit www.henrescuers.org or www.animalplace.org.

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September 28, 2016

Contact:

Gary Smith

Evolotus PR

www.evolotuspr.com

818-783-0569 office

818-618-3777 mobile

New Guest House at Animal Place Offers Lodging, Retreats, and More

GRASS VALLEY, Calif. – Animal Place, California’s oldest and largest sanctuary for farmed animals, now offers overnight accommodations at its new Guest House, a picturesque country home that sleeps up to 12 adults. All Guest House proceeds support the 200 rescued farmed animals at Animal Place sanctuary.

Guests receive a tour of the sanctuary, where they can cuddle with cows, rub pigs’ bellies, feed treats to chickens, and enjoy the scenery and recreation in California’s beautiful Sierra Nevada foothills. Also included are vegan continental breakfasts, access to a shared, fully equipped kitchen, parking, WiFi, television with DVD player, board games, badminton, volleyball, horseshoes, and more.

Animal Place’s Guest House is located adjacent to the 600-acre sanctuary, 6.5 miles from downtown Grass Valley, about 55 miles from Sacramento, and about 130 miles from the Bay Area.

“Our new Guest House is a comfortable, affordable spot for visitors who want to relax and unplug, spend time with animals, or go on outdoor adventures,” said Animal Place executive director Kim Sturla. “Now we have a refuge for humans who need to get away from their daily grind, in addition to a safe haven for more than 250 rescued farmed animals.”

A shared room starts at a $75 donation per night. The entire three-bedroom, two-bath house is available for a $750 donation per night.

The Guest House is also available for private events, such as business or organizational retreats. Discounts are available for stays longer than four nights, or groups of six or more. All guests must be 18 or older.

In addition to lodging, Animal Place’s Guest House hosts themed retreats, adult camps, and other educational experiences. Upcoming weekend retreats include yoga, holiday cooking, and nutrition. Weekend retreats include two nights, continental vegan breakfasts, a vegan dinner, socializing with the animals, volunteer experiences, opportunities to enjoy the sanctuary, plus scheduled programs and materials. For more details see the calendar here.

For booking information visit http://animalplace.org/animal-places-guest-house, or contact Jacinda Virgin, 530-477-1757 x 207 or jacinda@animalplace.org.

About Animal Place

Animal Place, founded in 1989, is one of the oldest and largest animal sanctuaries in the nation, operating a 600-acre sanctuary in Grass Valley, California, a 60-acre animal shelter in Vacaville, California, and an all-vegan market in Berkeley, California. Animal Place’s California animal shelters fill a much-needed niche of farm animal rescue, sanctuary, education, and adoption. Animals arrive from small and large farms, slaughterhouses, research facilities, and neglect or cruelty cases. Nestled between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe, its Grass Valley location offers tours, cooking classes, and workshops at the sanctuary as well as volunteer and internship opportunities. In 2010, Animal Place began rescuing animals directly from California egg farms, and since then has saved more than 24,000 hens. At its Vacaville location, these hens, as well as many other animals, are rehabilitated and placed in permanent adoptive homes. Animal Place – named best farm sanctuary in the country by Best in Shelter – is a nonprofit 501c3 organization funded by private donors. For more information, visit www.animalplace.org.

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Contact

Marji Beach

Animal Place

530-798-5114

marji@animalplace.org

 

Animal Place Named ‘Best Sanctuary’ by Best In Shelter

GRASS VALLEY, Calif. – Animal Place, California’s oldest and largest sanctuary for farmed animals, was named best sanctuary by Washington, D.C.-based Best in Shelter (www.bestinshelter.org), a nonprofit organization aimed at raising the public’s awareness of animal shelters and sanctuaries. The public cast more than 29,000 votes for seven sanctuaries around the country.

Founded by bestselling mystery author Martha Grimes as a sort of antidote to “best in show” competitions for purebred dogs, Best in Shelter has raised awareness of the plight of shelter animals since 2012. This year, for the first time, Best in Shelter expanded its focus to celebrate sanctuaries and feature rescued farmed animals.

“Sanctuaries expend enormous amounts of effort and time in rescue and rehabilitation of animals, some that quite literally drop off the backs of trucks headed for the slaughterhouse,” said Grimes. “They save them from killer auctions, slaughterhouses, stockyards, and factory farms; they save them from abuse, disease and often a hideous death. Sanctuaries offer these animals a lifetime home of shelter, food, and care. Farm sanctuaries and the people who run them are to me the unsung heroes of the animal world.”

No sanctuary in the country has saved as many farmed animal lives as Animal Place. In the past five years, Animal Place has rescued nearly 18,000 hens from egg farms throughout California. At least 200 animals – cows, pigs, goats, sheep, turkeys, chickens, rabbits, and donkeys – have a permanent home at Animal Place. Animals arrive from small and large farms, slaughterhouses, research facilities, student agriculture programs, hoarding cases, cruelty cases, and more. Animal Place also leads protests, campaigns, legal and legislative efforts on behalf of animals, and through their sanctuary tours, adoption events, and educational programs, they show farm animals not as commodities but as the individuals they truly are.

“Receiving this recognition from Best in Shelter is so touching and gratifying considering the enormity of the issues we confront,” said Kim Sturla, Animal Place executive director. “Every day, Animal Place receives calls about animals in need, every day there’s another poignant reminder of the terrible apathy we humans feel towards other species, and every day there are more victims of factory farming, which takes the lives of 10 billion land animals a year in the United States alone.”

Best in Shelter awarded Animal Place a $50,000 prize, which will be used as a reserve fund for rescuing more farmed animals in need.

For more information about Best in Shelter, visit www.bestinshelter.org/competition.

(Strikethroughs in the following boilerplate to be deleted before finalizing to avoid redundancy.)

About Animal Place

Founded in 1989, Animal Place is one of the largest and oldest animal sanctuaries in the nation, operating a 600-acre sanctuary in Grass Valley, California, and a 60-acre animal shelter in Vacaville, California. Animal Place’s California animal shelters fill a much-needed niche of farm animal rescue, sanctuary, education, and adoption. Animals arrive from small and large farms, slaughterhouses, research facilities, and neglect or cruelty cases. Nestled between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe, its Grass Valley location offers tours, cooking classes and workshops at the sanctuary as well as volunteer and internship opportunities. At its Vacaville location, Rescue Ranch, needy farm animals including chickens from egg production facilities are rehabilitated and placed in permanent homes. Animal Place – recognized as best farm sanctuary in the country by Best in Shelter – is a nonprofit 501c3 organization funded by private donors. For more information visit www.http://animalplace.org.

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March 11, 2015

Contact:

Gary Smith

Evolotus PR

www.evolotuspr.com

818-783-0569 office

818-618-3777 mobile

Animal Activists Bring Human-Sized Battery Chicken Cage to Capitol

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Animal Place, California’s oldest and largest sanctuary for farmed animals, will hold an eye-opening demonstration March 20 on the Capitol steps as it invites people to “brave the cage” – a human-sized battery cage typical of those found at egg production facilities.

Date: Friday, March 20, 2015

Time: 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Location: L Street (North) Side of the State Capitol in Sacramento

After state voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 2 in 2008, new laws took effect this past January 1 that address how eggs are produced for California breakfast tables. Unbeknownst to most consumers, however, hens used by the egg industry are typically still confined in small cages.

To show people what life is like for 95 percent of the approximately 18 million hens on California’s egg farms, Animal Place will challenge the public to step inside the life-sized cage.

A photo of the cage is available at https://app.box.com/s/9honmhem66vjt89qeif7ac3zn2sskup9

Volunteers will also offer samples of vegan treats to prove how easy and delicious it is to avoid eggs – at Easter and throughout the year.

“Chickens are social animals with rich emotional lives and distinct personalities, just like the cats and dogs we cherish as companion animals,” said Animal Place education director Marji Beach. “Easter is a celebration of rebirth and renewal, and what better way to celebrate than by adopting an animal-friendly diet and avoiding holiday traditions that support an abusive industry mistreating and exploiting hens.”

In the past three years, Animal Place has rescued more than 16,000 hens from egg facilities throughout California. Even though they have many years of life ahead of them, once their production slows down, at 12-24 months, hens in industrial egg facilities are typically killed and replaced with new ones.

Crowded, unsanitary conditions are not limited to caged facilities; in cage-free environments, thousands of hens may be confined in filthy, toxic sheds. Whether caged or cage-free or free-range, in industrial egg production, mutilations like de-beaking are common, and hatcheries kill all male chicks because they have no value to the egg industry – 150-200 million baby chicks per year.

Because of selective breeding, hens today produce three to five times what would be considered natural or normal. Such high production takes a toll, drains their bodies of calcium, causes ovarian cancer, osteoporosis, deadly infections, and injuries such as eggs lodging in their reproductive tracts and uterine prolapses. Still, egg producers use artificial lighting, set for prolonged periods, and forced moulting through starvation to encourage hens to lay more.

To view photos from Animal Place’s rescue of 3,000 hens from a typical battery-cage facility, please see https://app.box.com/s/5hzo34enr89mb6nrashw

About Animal Place

Animal Place, founded in 1989, is one of the oldest and largest animal sanctuaries in the nation, operating a 600-acre sanctuary in Grass Valley, California, a 60-acre animal shelter in Vacaville, California, and an all-vegan market in Berkeley, California. Animal Place’s California animal shelters fill a much-needed niche of farm animal rescue, sanctuary, education, and adoption. Animals arrive from small and large farms, slaughterhouses, research facilities, and neglect or cruelty cases. Nestled between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe, its Grass Valley location offers tours, cooking classes, and workshops at the sanctuary as well as volunteer and internship opportunities. In 2010, Animal Place began rescuing animals directly from California egg farms, and since then has saved more than 24,000 hens. At its Vacaville location, these hens, as well as many other animals, are rehabilitated and placed in permanent adoptive homes. Animal Place – named best farm sanctuary in the country by Best in Shelter – is a nonprofit 501c3 organization funded by private donors. For more information, visit www.animalplace.org.

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