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As part of the 1st International Conference of Wheat Landraces for Healthy Food Systems, the local host is planning a field day that would showcase a variety of wheat landraces, including those sent in by conference participants.

Another nice idea.

Hen Gymro "old Welsh" landrace wheat on a trip to Italy for #ICWL18 #IWLC18 #landraces #anciengrains https://t.co/rdpRffavN9 for @Brockwell_Bake & @WelshGrain , Andrew @scotlandbread & Eyal @e5bakehouse checking how it has travelled, looking good. pic.twitter.com/kFEniNFqIr

— Brockwell Bake (@Brockwell_Bake) June 15, 2018

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If you’re at all into cassava, you’re probably at the IVth International Cassava Conference. If you can’t make it, you can of course follow on Twitter, and probably lots of other ways too. James Legg is, as usual, particularly active.

Buzz in the house changes to a hush as the Global Cassava Partnership for the 21st century 2018 (GCP21) gets underway at the Marina Hotel, Cotonou. An exciting programme on Global cassava research ahead for the coming week @IITA_CGIAR @benin #GCP21benin2018 pic.twitter.com/8f4ionpONc

— James Legg (@jamesplegg) June 11, 2018

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We have this beautiful wheat in our collection, received from Sharon Rempel. However, we cannot trace it coming from the NLD. Utrecht area was not a wheatgrowing area. In the early 1900s durum and emmer was not grown in NLD. If any one knows its origin, please let us know!

— CGN Wageningen (@CGN_Wageningen) June 12, 2018

Can you help our friends at CGN? There is a wheat of this name in Genesys whose origin is given as Canada, but I can find no Utrecht in that country.

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So, thanks to an invitation from graduate students, I was able to give a lecture in the University of Cambridge Botany School (as was) auditorium about 35 years after last listening to one there. A somewhat emotional experience. Here’s the talk, minus a cute though entirely superfluous Google Earth zoom into the Svalbard Vault because that made it too big for SlideShare.

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Readers who were excited by the announcement of a new Plant Hardiness Zone Map from USDA will probably like the interactive version we’ve just been pointed to. Have fun!

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Hard on the heels of the 99 per cent Invisible podcast on Svalbard comes another once-over-lightly on NI Vavilov. A book by photographer Mario del Curto documents the genebank in St Petersburg and the legacy of its founder. A review of the book is mostly fine and dandy, although I do take issue with this image.

The caption reads “Sunflower plant at the Kuban research station (from Seeds of the Earth: The Vavilov Institute, © Mario Del Curto)”.

Can that possibly be correct?

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Agricultural Biodiversity by Luigi Guarino - 2w ago

Svalbard is a remote Norwegian archipelago with reindeer, Arctic foxes and only around 2,500 humans — but it is also home to a vault containing seeds for virtually every edible plant one can imagine. The mountainside Crop Trust facility has thousands of varieties of corn, rice and more, serving as a seed backup for humanity. For each crop, there’s an envelope with 500 seeds.

Nice podcast, as ever, and glad they removed the reference to coconuts in the text, in there with rice and corn.

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