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Helen Granier turned 105 on Friday and she has no idea why she’s lived so long, because for years she indulged in bad habits. Turns out the secret to her long life is partying hard.

 “I never expected to live this long,” Helen Granier of Palm Harbor told WTSP. “No one in my family ever did. I don’t know what the secret is.”

Helen celebrated her birthday at Coral Oaks Independent Living Facility last week, where she has lived for the past nine years.

She reminisced about her life and how she went against the grain in her younger days.

“I used to drink beer and I smoked and everything,” she told WTSP. “I stayed out late, you know, dancing, and then I would go to work.”

She loved to dance, but her husband prevented her from going to Las Vegas to test her luck.

“My husband wouldn’t take me to Vegas, because he knew I liked to gamble. Oh, I loved to play the slot machines,” she said. “So I went to Las Vegas after he passed.”

Some memories are clear, as if they happened yesterday, she said. Helen was only five when World War I ended, but she said she still remembered it. She does not recall getting her driver’s license, though.

“I don’t even remember when I started to drive,” she laughed.

Sources:

The Week Magazine.  June 29, 2018


 

 

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Hi Readers,
One of the questions I am asked most often is, “How can I age successfully and retain my independence?”  Although “success” is a relative term, everyone wants to attain optimum aging regardless of income, socioeconomic status, or limitations.  Is successful aging possible regardless of your circumstances?  YES! While there is no magic formula for retaining optimum health, strategies begin with living healthy and taking responsibility for making wise decisions about eating, lifestyle, social activity, and physical activity.

The Spring 2018 edition of AFA Care Quarterly included “10 Steps for Healthy Aging,” a strategy for retaining a healthy mind and body:

1.    Eat well – Although the article included guidance on fruits, meats, and vegetables, I recommend that all people age 65+ [unless directed otherwise by a physician] follow the eating guidelines detailed in the Tufts Food Pyramid. Eating well means maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding frailty, overweight, or obesity.  Eating well includes staying hydrated with at least 8 cups [64 oz.] of water daily.  Vital organs including the brain cannot work effectively when the body is dehydrated and dehydration in older adults mimics dementia.  http://globalag.igc.org/health/us/2007/pyramid.pdf

2.    Stay active-  Walking, aerobics, and weight training are included on the AFA list.  I also recommend Silver Sneakers and Sit and Be Fit, as both programs include low-impact activity for people with physical challenges and limitations.

3.    Learn new things – Research shows that people who retain their curiosity throughout life and engage in new activities give their brains a good workout.  Remember that language is also needed to keep the brain working! 

4.    Get enough sleep – Sleep deprivation mimics dementia, a condition known as psudodementia and may lead to memory problems, falls, and driving accidents.  Daytime napping is the number one cause of insomnia.

5.    Take your medication – No one likes taking medication but the average older adult takes five prescription medications daily.  Please take your medications as prescribed and speak with your primary care physician before taking over-the-counter products.

6.    Stop smoking and limit alcohol consumption – Cigarette smoking causes disease consequences including lung cancer, but COPD, cardiovascular disease,  and other chronic conditions.  Studies show that second-hand smoke impacts the health of others around you.  Alcohol may have protective factors but studies are contradictory.  Best to limit alcohol to moderate consumption.

7.    Social connectedness – Social isolation not only impairs cognitive health, but language is needed to keep the brain firing.  Retain your network of friends and stay in touch.  Talk to people and engage in conversation. 

8.    Check your blood pressure – I recommend keeping a log and check it around the same time every day.  If your physician has prescribed medication for HBP, take it!  I have encountered too many older adults who quit taking it due to negative side effects and some of them had strokes as a result.  The negative side effects typically diminish over time.

9.    Get your checkups – This includes being proactive and getting annual vaccines for flu and pneumonia.  Health screenings and diagnostic tests are now covered by Medicare.  Examples are PSA testing, mammograms, pap tests, sugar levels, and colonoscopies.  Here is a link to Medicare.gov showing types of preventive screenings and services. https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/preventive-and-screening-services.html

 

10. Get a memory screening – This is also covered now by Medicare.  If your primary care physician does not offer it, then ask for it.  These are typically administered by a social worker or case manager trained in interpreting the results.  I have administered hundreds of cognitive screenings and these are private, non-invasive assessments.  They are NOT “tests” for Alzheimer’s Disease.  As my readers know, AD cannot be diagnosed by the family physician.  The diagnosis is a result of brain imaging and other tests administered by specialists.  The overwhelming majority of older adults do NOT have AD. 

I recommend accessing or subscribing to the AFA Quarterly, published by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.  Their website is www.alzfdn.org

 

 
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Hi Readers, beginning this month, older adults will receive their NEW Medicare cards.  The purpose of replacing the old ones is simple: The new ones do not have the social security number.  The National Council on Aging [NCOA] recently sent this information to me and I hope you find it useful.  I have also included some resources from Medicare.gov including the mailing schedule for the new cards.  AgeDoc

New Medicare Cards: 5 Things You Need to Know Before They Arrive

 

by: The My Medicare Matters Team at NCOA

Beginning April 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will be sending new Medicare cards to beneficiaries. The new cards are being sent to decrease Medicare beneficiaries’ vulnerability to identity theft by removing the Social Security-based number from their Medicare identification cards and replacing it with a new unique Medicare Number.

Here’s what you need to know before they arrive.

  1. Medicare cards will be sent between April 2018 and April 2019. Make sure your address is up to date because Medicare will be sending it to the location associated with your Social Security account. To update your address information contact Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 or go online. https://www.ssa.gov/site/signin/en/
  2. Your new card will no longer include your Social Security number. It will include your name, new Medicare number, and the dates your Medicare Part A and Part B coverage started.
  3. Start using your new Medicare card once you receive it. Destroy the old one immediately, since it contains your Social Security number. If you happen to lose or misplace your card you can get a replacement, but you can also can access your new Medicare number on a Medicare Summary Notice or through Medicare.
  4. Keep your Medicare AdvantagePart D prescription, and/or Medigap. Continue using your health or drug plan’s card when you get health care or fill a prescription, but know you will also get the new Original Medicare card.
  5. The Railroad Retirement Board will issue new cards to Railroad Retirement beneficiaries.

These are just a few quick tips to keep in mind as new Medicare cards are issued. You can find additional information on the release of Medicare’s new card on Medicare.gov.

New Medicare card mailing schedule:


More resources and details:


 


Watch out for scams
Medicare will never call you uninvited and ask you to give us personal or private information to get your new Medicare Number and card. Scam artists may try to get personal information (like your current Medicare Number) by contacting you about your new card. If someone asks you for your information, for money, or threatens to cancel your health benefits if you don’t share your personal information, hang up and call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).  

 

 
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American Society on Aging [ASA] Board Chair Bob Blancato, Chair-Elect Karyne Jones, and CEO Bob Stein today condemned remarks offered by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke during testimony to the Senate Energy and National Resources Committee on Tuesday.

As reported in The Hill, Zinke said “When you give discounted or free passes to elderly, fourth graders, veterans, disabled, and you do it by the carload, there's not a whole lot of people who actually pay at our front door. So, we're looking at ways to make sure we have more revenue in the front door of our parks themselves.”

ASA leaders responded by saying “On behalf of the older and disabled Americans and veterans in our membership we take offense at the comments of the Interior Secretary about all of these groups not continuing to enjoy free access to national parks. It is especially disingenuous coming from a Cabinet Secretary who according to published reports spent almost $140,000 in taxpayer funds to fix doors leading into his office. This proposal to impose these new fees should be shown the door.”

ASA will continue to support policies that provide preferential access to public resources for older Americans, youth, the disabled and the veteran community.

Reference:
Gstalter, M. (2018, March 13).  Zinke: Too many people enter national parks for free. The Hill.   Retrieved from http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/378220-zinke-too-many-people-can-enter-national-parks-for-free


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Hi Readers, her is some fantastic news from my friends at the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America:

 

AFA's National Toll-Free Helpline is
Now Open 7 Days a Week!

 

Effective 4 February 2018, AFA's National Toll-Free Helpline will be available to provide support, assistance and referrals to families affected by Alzheimer's disease seven days a week.
 
The new helpline hours are:
 
Monday-Friday: 9 am to 9 pm (ET)
Saturday: 9 am to 1 pm (ET)
Sunday: 9 am to 1 pm (ET)
 
Call 866-232-8484 to speak with one of AFA's licensed social workers if you have questions or need help!

 


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Hi Readers,

Globally, older adults are the most targeted group for scammers.  To approach this issue using a proactive stance, I have attached this guide developed by internet experts. 

https://www.attinternetservice.com/resources/senior-citizens-guide/

It was sent to me by the ATT community outreach manager, Gary Bell.  I hope you find it useful.  If you do, download and forward the booklet or pass along the link. 

 
 

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According to Marci Phillips, Director of Public Policy and Advocacy at the National Council on Aging [NCOA], several programs impacting seniors have been included in the FY19 budget.  As she stated on the NCOA website, these are proposed changes that will wrap up on March 23. I suggest following this issue on the NCOA link below and make your voices heard: 

https://www.ncoa.org/blog/straight-talk-seniors-administrations-fy19-budget-request-means-seniors/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=02212018_NCOAWeek

Ms. Phillips also included another article about the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, passed on February 9.  While there are some positive changes for older adults, there are also cuts to some important programs, as shown below:

https://www.ncoa.org/blog/bipartisan-budget-act-2018/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=02212018_NCOAWeek
 
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Marcus Tullius Cicero 106-43 BC

THE VIRTUES OF AGE

"Those… who allege that old age is devoid of useful activity… are like those who would say that the pilot does nothing in the sailing of his ship, because, while others are climbing the masts, or running about the gangways, or working at the pumps, he sits quietly in the stern and simply holds the tiller.  He may not be doing what younger members of the crew are doing, but what he does is better and much more important. It is not by muscle, speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgment; in these qualities old age is usually not … poorer, but is even richer."

From "Cicero, On Old Age."

Cicero's De Senectute (on Old Age), translated with introduction and notes by Andrew P. Peabody  (Leopold Classic Library, 2015).

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Hi Readers,

Although scientists are working to find the cause of Alzheimer’s Disease and eventually a cure and/or preventive strategy, there is little focus on taking proactive measures to protect our brains.  At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in August, Dr. Lon Schneider, professor at the Keck School of Medicine at USC, urged a proactive approach, as one-third of dementias can be prevented through lifestyle changes.  Here are some of the recommendations:

1.     Take care of your health.  The brain is connected to the rest of the body! Maintain a healthy weight, get diagnostics on time, adhere to eating nutritious food by making every calorie count, maintain oral health, take medicines as prescribed, and get lots of sleep. 

2.     Sitting.  I covered this topic here in the AgeDoc blog in March of 2015.  Studies show that too much sitting is actually dangerous.  Not only does it compress vital organs, but it impairs circulation.  What is “too much?”  Sitting for 8-12 hours is harmful, and the recommended maximum amount daily is about 4-5 hours.  Avoid a sedentary lifestyle, exercise regularly, and take frequent walking or standing breaks. 

3.     Avoid Social Isolation.  Recent studies found that social isolation is as damaging to health as smoking 15 cigarettes per day! Social isolation increases inflammation and brain imaging showed that loneliness “causes a reaction in the same area of the brain as physical pain” (IlluminAge, 2017, p. 2). 

4.     Sleep. Older adults need about 7-9 hours of sleep.  During sleep, the brain logs memories and experiences from the previous day and the brain is cleaned of toxins.  Sleep deprivation may be a fall hazard and can lead to accidents.  For more information on the importance of sleep, see these articles here in the blog: Sleeping Position and Brain Waste Removal, 10/18/13; Sleep and Obesity Prevention, 8/19/13; Older Adults and Sleep Deprivation, 1/2/16.

5.     Air pollution.  According to the American Heart Association, people living in geographical regions with poor air quality score lower on thinking and memory assessments.  In areas with high pollution, avoid exposure on days when the levels are high.  Even if you reside in an area without any pollution, take precautions when in heavy traffic to avoid exhaust from cars by using the “recirculate” function.  As I reported here in the blog on 11/5/2010, Environmental Threats to Health Aging, Mexico City is one of the most polluted cities in the world.  There, autopsies of children showed plaques and tangles in their brains.  I have since learned that in Mexico City, plaques and tangles have been identified in the brains of dogs, adolescents, and young adults as well.  While this does not prove cause/effect, it suggests a link to pollution and brain health.

The five listed in this posting were acquired from the September-October 2017 Aging in Stride, a publication from IlluminAge Corporation.  For the entire list of the twelve enemies of brain health, please access this informative article:


 

 
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U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging:
Chairman Susan M. Collins, R-Maine
Ranking Member Bob Casey, D-PA
Frauds that made the Senate aging committee's 2017 rankings include:
•    Sweepstakes scams, run by perpetrators who contact victims by phone, tell them they have won a financial prize, and then require advance payment of a fee to collect the purported winnings.
•    Robocalls, using advanced electronic technology that enable would-be scammers to maximize the number of potential victims reached.
•    Computer scams a fraud in which callers impersonate representatives of well-known technology companies and convince victims to allow remote access to their home computers to check for problems. The scammers then charge fees to remove purported electronic viruses.
•    Elder financial abuse, in some cases involving relatives or friends who gain access to victims' identification data, bank accounts or other records.
•    Grandparent scams, a con game in which fraudsters phone with phony claims that a grandchild is in trouble and needs help paying a hospital bill, returning home from overseas or gaining release from jail.
FBI, Scams and Safety
In fact, seniors lose billions of dollars a year to home repair scams, investment scams, IRS scams and various other cons targeting older people. The FBI’s Common Fraud Schemes webpage provides tips on how you can protect yourself and your family from fraud. Senior citizens especially should be aware of fraud schemes for the following reasons: 

·       Senior citizens are most likely to have a “nest egg,” to own their home, and/or to have excellent credit—all of which make them attractive to con artists.     People who grew up in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s were generally raised to be polite and trusting. Con artists exploit these traits, knowing that it's hard or impossible for these individuals to say “no” or just hang up the telephone.

·       Older Americans are less likely to report a fraud because they do not know whom to report it to, are too ashamed at having been scammed, or don’t know they have been scammed. Senior victims may not report crimes, for example, because they are concerned that relatives may think the victims no longer have the mental capacity to take care of their financial affairs.

·       When an older victim does report the crime, they often make poor witnesses. Con artists know the effects of age on memory, and they are counting on older victims not being able to supply enough detailed information to investigators. Also, the victims’ realization that they have been swindled may take weeks—or more likely, months—after contact with the fraudster. This extended time frame makes it even harder to remember details from the events.

·       Senior citizens are more interested in and susceptible to products promising increased cognitive function, virility, physical conditioning, anti-cancer properties, and so on. In a country where new cures and vaccinations for old diseases have given every American hope for a long and fruitful life, it is not so unbelievable that the con artists’ products can do what they claim.

NCOA [National Council on Aging]
Financial scams targeting seniors have become so prevalent that they are now considered “the crime of the 21st century.” Why? Because seniors are thought to have a significant amount of money sitting in their accounts.

Financial scams also often go unreported or can be difficult to prosecute, so they are considered a “low-risk” crime. However, they are devastating to many older adults and can leave them in a very vulnerable position with little time to recoup their losses.

It is not just wealthy seniors who are targeted. Low-income older adults are also at risk of financial abuse. Moreover, it is not always strangers who perpetrate these crimes. Over 90% of all reported elder abuse is committed by an older person’s family members, most often their adult children, followed by grandchildren, nieces and nephews, and others.

1.    Medicare/Health insurance scams
Every U.S. citizen or permanent resident over age 65 qualifies for Medicare, so there is rarely any need for a scam artist to research what private health insurance company older people have to scam them out of some money.
In these types of scams, perpetrators may pose as a Medicare representative to get older people to give them their personal information, or they will provide bogus services for older adults at makeshift mobile clinics, then use the personal information they provide to bill Medicare and pocket the money.
2.    Counterfeit prescription drugs
Most commonly, counterfeit drug scams operate on the Internet, where seniors increasingly go to find better prices on specialized medications. This scam is growing in popularity—since 2000, the FDA has investigated an average of 20 such cases per year, up from five a year in the 1990s.  The danger is that besides paying money for something that will not help a person’s medical condition, victims may purchase unsafe substances that can inflict even more harm. This scam can be as hard on the body as it is on the wallet.
3.    Funeral and Cemetery scams
The FBI warns about two types of funeral and cemetery fraud perpetrated on seniors.
In one approach, scammers read obituaries and call or attend the funeral service of a complete stranger to take advantage of the grieving widow or widower. Claiming the deceased had an outstanding debt with them, scammers will try to extort money from relatives to settle the fake debts.

Another tactic of disreputable funeral homes is to capitalize on family members’ unfamiliarity with the considerable cost of funeral services to add unnecessary charges to the bill. In one common scam of this type, funeral directors will insist that a casket, usually one of the most expensive parts of funeral services, is necessary even when performing a direct cremation, which can be accomplished with a cardboard casket rather than an expensive display or burial casket.

In early 2017, NCOA warned of three new scams that were prevalent:
Mass mailing fraud: The U.S. Department of Justice has seen a spike in mass mailing fraud targeted at the senior citizens. This scam involves personalized, sometimes “registered” letters in your mailbox that appears to indicate you have won a sizable prize and just need to pay a small processing fee for it to be sent to you.

Older Americans have lost millions of dollars in this scam, and unfortunately, responding to such a letter targets the person for future fraudulent mailings.

Tax Scheme  
Two types of IRS scams have been making the rounds in the past year:
•    Fake notices that claim you owe money as a result of the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”). These are especially tricky, says the Federal Trade Commission, because their design mimics the real IRS notices.
•    Automated calls from the IRS claiming that you owe back taxes, and requesting you pay via gift card. Sometimes these fake IRS calls are not automated, but rather a live person calling from a Washington, DC area code (202) using high-pressure scare tactics to get your money (for example, saying the police are coming to arrest you for not paying your taxes). There are several red flags and tips to know whether you are dealing with the real IRS vs. a scammer:
o    The IRS never initiates contact with you via phone call, email, or through social media.
o    The IRS cannot threaten to have you arrested or deported for not paying.
o    You will never be asked to pay using a gift card, pre-paid debit card, or wire transfer; the IRS also never takes credit/debit card information over the phone.
o    If you owe the IRS back taxes, you will always have the opportunity to question or appeal the amount.
o    Dubbed by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration as the most pervasive impersonation fraud in IRS history, the swindle involves suspected scammers based in the U.S. and India who telephone Americans and threaten arrests unless purported tax debts are not paid immediately. At least 1.97 million people have been targeted, with as many as 200 victimized per week during the scam's peak last year, according to the inspector general.

Back or Knee Brace Post Card:
You receive a colorful postcard stating that the sender has been trying to contact you about ordering a Medicare-covered back or knee brace. All they need is for you to send your Medicare information. What’s to lose? This scam is particularly insidious, because you may actually receive something in the mail, usually a Velcro-style band for your back or knee. The scammer then bills Medicare for a device worth hundreds or thousands of dollars more than the one you received. Moreover, armed with your Medicare information, they can continue to bill Medicare for services not rendered. Medicare has strict coverage rules for its services and supplies, and it pays to keep these tips in mind:

•    Never respond to open solicitations for Medicare-covered supplies/services.
•    Only provide your Medicare number to health care providers or facilities at the time you are actively seeking service.
•    Carefully monitor your Medicare statements for any claims for services or supplies billed to you which you did not receive. You can set up an account at MyMedicare.gov and access your claim information online anytime.

Resources:



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