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A Forever Recovery by A Forever Recovery - 3d ago

The average drug addict will maintain only up to one year of substance abuse before their finances, friendships, and family dissolve leaving them with fewer means to obtain their drug of choice and harsher consequences that often lead to homelessness, injury and crime. Drug addiction turmoils are a severe form of physiological dependence that manifests in compulsive and repetitive behaviors regardless of the adverse side effects caused by those behaviors. Addiction can predispose itself to any habit and hobby; otherwise natural and healthy habits like eating, intercourse, and exercise can become dangerous repetitions for people who have predilections for addictive behaviors.

Drinking and gambling are common forms of addiction that leave people in financial ruin and dysfunctional lives, but perhaps the most dangerous kind of addiction is the compulsive use of drugs which are potent substances that are dangerous in moderation, and fatal in excess. The fact that so many drugs contain addictive substances complicates the situation, creating addictive behaviors in otherwise balanced physiologies and drawing hundreds of thousands more into the endless loop of addiction.

The statistics are alarming, netting millions of drug numbers in the United States alone:

  • In 2010, over 20 million people above the age of 12 needed treatment for substance abuse.
  • Almost 5 million emergency department visits a year are for drug-related problems.
  • Tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs have run up over $600 million in healthcare costs.
  • More than 60 million prescriptions for Valium were given out by American doctors, highlighting an increasing problem involving drug addictions to prescription medications.

Although recreational use of cocaine and heroin has been contained since the explosion during the 1970s and 80s, they are still widely circulated and illegally available from drug dealers whose businesses have increased their revenue thanks to the introduction of crystal methamphetamine, which has become a drug epidemic unto itself. The worldwide production of meth is estimated at 500 metric tons every year serving over 24 million users. In 2008, 13 million United States citizens used meth, with half a million addicts returning for repeat business. States like New Mexico, Arizona, and California have been ravaged by the drug, while populations in Hawaii report as much as 50% of addicts in rehabilitation centers citing meth as their primary addiction.

The preponderance of prescription opioids has resulted in millions addicted to painkillers. Prescription stimulants like Ritalin and Adderall have become the drugs of choice in many universities, and although they account for a small portion of new addictions, the rise in the popularity and accessibility of stimulants does not bode well for future generations. Depressants like Xanax and Valium are also responsible for a slice of the prescription drug market, prescribed to treat sleep disorders and anxiety problems but widely circulating through underground markets and independent suppliers courtesy of their addictive properties.

The Life and Death of a Drug Addict

Addiction is a dangerous compulsivity to have, and the lives of drug addicts are remarkably similar in their downward spiral and results. Whether addicts are abusing something as destructive and poisonous as crystal methamphetamine or a prescription of Xanax, their physical health will deteriorate in tandem with their addiction. Their financial situation will be compromised to continue their habits, and their relationships will be strained or broken by the person’s inability to quit their drug of choice with willpower alone. Those addicts who do not seek help, inpatient treatment or rehabilitation inevitably abuse their drug until it bankrupts them or kills them.

The reality of addiction is that it is a compulsion without an end, and drug addicts will continue to abuse prescription stimulants, depressants, meth, cocaine, and opioids until they are physically or feasibly no longer capable of maintaining their addiction. Unfortunately, most addicts do not stop when they have lost their friends and their finances but continue to find ways to sustain their habit until their bodies break down.

Questions of why a person would do this to themselves are beside the point. Addiction happens with or without a person’s conscious consent, and when it’s paired with substances that have their addictive properties, the chemical reactions are a proverbial death sentence.

Every manner of the drug comes packaged with its chemical euphoria, and this is the reason why many prescription drugs are handed out to patients by their doctors. Many drugs cause beneficial side effects if used in moderation, but moderation is a difficult thing to maintain for a person suffering from addiction.

  • Stimulants are prescribed to patients to help balance out dopamine and other chemicals, helping people who suffer from depression and other ‘low moods’ improve their energy levels and functionality in everyday life.
  • Depressants are prescribed to settle down detrimental flares of pain, anger and other chemical imbalances.
  • Many recreational drugs surge dopamine levels, giving people feelings of pleasure. Meth, heroin, and cocaine all fall into this category, and many times the spikes in pleasure are so intense that people without addictive dispositions find themselves at the mercy of repeating the cycle of drug abuse just to chase the feeling.
  • Medicinal drugs are frequently used by physicians and the medical community at large in treating chemical imbalances and diseases, lending some legitimacy to the positive side of drugs.

But even the best intentions and compounds can become detrimental to a person’s life when they fall into compulsive cycles of addiction. Drugs are also readily available chemical solutions to many people who suffer from personal problems like abuse, trauma or issues of depression and anxiety. A person’s genes, environment, upbringing, and culture can all contribute to their likelihood of substance abuse, and drugs hit the fastest and hardest in areas of extreme poverty, lifting people from the difficulty of their circumstances and creating a difficult situation to remedy with warnings alone.

The Light In The Dark

There is good news on the drug addiction front.

The propensity of drugs has created a vast accommodation of treatment centers that specialize in every type of drug under the sun, introducing addicts to addicted peers and counselors that try to curb the downward spiral. There is no arguing that drug addiction leads to ruin, but every addict has their own ‘bottom’ — the point in their addiction when they have lost everything and cannot continue to deny their present circumstances. Addiction puts jobs, relationships, and prospects in jeopardy, but the addiction itself is not put into jeopardy until the addict is removed from the environment that propagates the substance abuse, and that can be a long road to walk when every street corner is outfitted with dirt-cheap meth and off-label prescription drugs.

The world is more inundated with drugs than ever before, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Drug addicts are in the national spotlight, and with infamy comes coverage. The popularity of drugs has created a national discussion on the topic. Underground channels of crystal methamphetamine, opioids, Percocet, and oxycontin are no longer underground, with mainstream outlets acknowledging the problem and investing the causes, contributions, and contexts that have created a culture of drug addiction that reaches tens of millions of US citizens each year.

Treatment clinics and outreach programs are spreading just as quickly as the drugs themselves, while the over-prescription of addictive stimulants and depressants is being debated in Washington. The rose-colored glasses are off, and legislation is hard at work drafting up solutions to a statistically ineffective drug war that began nearly half a century ago under Richard Nixon. As marijuana wrestles with legalization, medical communities are taking a good long look at the addictive properties and implementing educational programs to teach the next generation of children about the substantial risks they will be facing in the years to come. Treatment clinics and cooperative psychiatrists have also taken great strides in understanding addiction as an illness and treating it accordingly.

Contact A Forever Recovery today for more information on drug addiction turmoils, and how you or a loved one can benefit from our treatment program.

The post The Turmoil of Drug Addiction appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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In the United States, the history of drug trafficking has dated back to the 19th century. Cocaine, along with a variety of other substances, has been illegally imported and distributed among people of all ages.  So, what influences or contributes to a person’s risk for cocaine abuse?

The result of these illegally trafficked drugs has to lead to devastating consequences for Americans with assorted ages, traits, financial status, or gender. Cocaine was once considered a drug mainly used by wealthy people. However, that is not presently the case. Any economic status or social standing can leave a person falling into the path of illicit drug use.

Nearly 1.5 million people in America will use cocaine at least once monthly. Although research has been conducted on cocaine usage, there is still a common question that arises; why do people use cocaine? The answer to this will be different from each who goes through a cocaine addiction. Your financial status can affect your risk for cocaine abuse. However, your personality will also play a vital role.

Financial Status and Cocaine Use

Since cocaine is illegal, expensive, and causes overdoses and addiction, why do people use cocaine? For those who aren’t used to taking drugs, it is often questioned why people do them in the first place. The initial drug use will be highly variable between individuals, but the reasoning for continued drug use may be similar to a good amount of people. Personality traits and illicit substance use go hand in hand much of the time.

Financial status also links to illicit drug use with either poor or wealthy status. With a drug like cocaine, the abuse by a wealthy person may link more to a disorganized or undisciplined personality. This may not be the only reason a wealthy person uses cocaine, but those living in poverty don’t always match up to those personality traits. A study entitled Personality Traits and Illicit Substances: The moderating role of poverty, conducted by Angelina Sutina, Michele Evans and Alan Zonderman, gave a peek into drug use and financial status. People with a personality which lacked discipline and those who performed actions before thinking were more prone to drug use. This conclusion of character traits in wealthier people who used drugs was unrelated to drug use among people living in poverty. This means that those using drugs in poverty had other reasonings for their usage.

With the complexity of drug use, a single factor for the reasoning of use is simply not fathomable. For those living in poverty, personality traits may be different than those holding more wealth. People living with any financial status can experience stress, troubles, and life-altering events. Many people may assume that the rich will participate in cocaine use for recreational purposes, as the poor will be using to cope with life struggles. This is sometimes the case, and sometimes not the case at all. With wealthy people, the purchasing of cocaine may be more attainable as they can afford the drug for regular use. They may use the drug because they believe it is the best for coping with stress.

People who use cocaine may have also begun to use the drug for recreational purposes, and then developed an addiction. This same explanation can go for a person living in poverty. Although it may be more difficult to afford a drug like cocaine, once anyone begins cocaine, there is a risk for cocaine abuse. People will find a way to obtain the drugs when going through addiction, regardless of financial status.

Other Things that Contribute to the Risk for Cocaine Abuse

The use of drugs on television, music videos, and movies creates a strong vision of acceptable behavior in the eyes of teens, adults and even children. The risk for cocaine abuse or addiction is real and affects those of many ages and circumstances. To diagnose cocaine dependence in an individual, you must first know the symptoms of a present addiction. According to the American Psychiatric Association, you don’t need more than three of the following symptoms to be diagnosed with the dependence.

  • Tolerance to euphoric effects of cocaine, needing more of the drug.
  • When cocaine is not being used, withdrawal symptoms like confusion, hallucinations, agitation, or depression can occur.
  • Cocaine is used excessively.
  • Cannot reduce the use of cocaine successfully.
  • Time is mainly spent on cocaine by obtaining and using it.
  • Isolation. Not being around friends or family.
  • Doing illegal things such as stealing, shoplifting, or burglary for money to use on cocaine.
  • Life absences from work, school, assignments, etc.
  • Despite knowing the consequences, still using the drug.

The effects of cocaine are detrimental to parts of the body that involve mood, appetite, and thinking. Although recreational use is intended for giving pleasurable feelings of euphoria, unpleasant sensations can follow the use of cocaine. Feelings of violence, suicide, confusion, paranoia, nervousness, and other uncomfortable feelings are often reported with people who use cocaine.

For those who do not have the personality traits of hostile, disorganized, undisciplined, and antagonistic, drug use may not be a likely event in your life. Unfortunately for many people, the choice has been made to start drug use from any reasoning initially. At any age, people who use cocaine are at risk for cocaine abuse or addiction. Drugs may even alter a person’s brain to change certain aspects of their personality. This is what makes addiction so dangerous and disabling a person’s life. Relationships, health, jobs, and family can all be ruined by a cocaine addiction.  

Functioning through daily life is an ultimate struggle for people who use cocaine. Rehabilitation programs can lead the way out of addiction, and on the path of a productive life again. Rehab programs administer proven methods of repairing emotional and spiritual damage from drug use. They can also help to build self-esteem, improve physical health, and learn coping skills. During rehabilitation, the causes of your addiction can also be looked into and addressed. Life is an endless opportunity, and gaining ahold of what you think you lost during addiction is attainable. Addiction specialists are here to help for a safe and efficient recovery to get you back into a drug-free lifestyle.

The post Can Your Financial Status Put You at Risk for Cocaine Abuse appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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As with our military, addicts, and people from all backgrounds, we experience trauma and low self-esteem. Times of thinking poorly of yourself is far more than common with every age, gender, or background. By not realizing what makes life happy and fulfilling, people can get addicted to drugs and substances that affect their health and lifestyle negatively. When an addiction is discovered, and acted upon by receiving treatment, the road to recovery opens. Admitting an addiction is present may seem hard enough, but some people find recovery itself to be even more of a challenge. So why does the thought of recovery bring ideas of fluffy clouds and pampering relief? Well, rehab facilities may be comfortable and may also include pampering aspects, but an easy way to recovery is not always the case.

Aspects of Recovery

Recovery can involve different programs and treatment designed to help the individual manage their addiction. There are treatment centers that offer luxury, have different price ranges, and require certain treatments for everyone, such as detox. Although a luxury treatment facility seems like the greatest choice for amenity purposes, it is not always the best. Research should always be done before choosing a rehab facility. In any rehab center, goals will be made for the patient to achieve while they are at the recovery center and for when they return home. Both short-term and long-term goals can be made with the help of doctors and counselors in the rehab center. With certain treatments, patients may begin to recognize situations that trigger drug abuse. Anything from physical, emotional, regular, and relationship-oriented situations can trigger this abuse. The skills will be learned to cope with these triggers, and most people will be able to apply these to life after rehab. For some, real life will play a strong part in a difficult recovery process that can seem impossible to accomplish.

Negative Recovery Experiences Do Happen

When a substance is refrained from, people go through this terribly emotional and physical time called withdrawal. At first, things may seem fine and dandy, with the consequences of the substance diminishing, such as fewer hangovers and more productivity. What people don’t think of is the part where coping skills come into play with the addiction. To re-learn how to live in sobriety catches a lot of people off guard when they attempt to quit on their own. With the last bit of self-control you have left, you may try to rid yourself of the abused substance. The addictive habits, however, are not controlled and cannot be self-taught without help. With this being said, people who go into rehab will not always experience results at the same pace as others. In fact, some people have negative experiences in recovery programs.

The reason for negativity varies from person to person, but this fact needs to be addressed because it could happen to anyone. Not only can traumatic and important events alter your decision making with substance use, but they can also affect your recovery efforts. Grief, injury, emotional stress, and other factors can attribute to a person’s negative recovery experience. Detoxification is a common beginning to programs at rehab facilities. This process will physically cleanse a person from the negative toxins and allow for sobriety to continue more programs. Detox can weigh heavily on a lot of people’s physical and emotional selves. This can also create a negative experience in recovery because no withdrawal is fun, or can be coped with without help. Rehab facilities provide the skills needed to cope with withdrawal symptoms the right way while refraining from substances.

It’s important to know that recovery is not being done wrong when a person experiences depression, sadness, anxiety, or uneasiness in treatment. Being human, we all can experience negativity with this challenging world.  To get through these challenges, certain rehab programs will approach the whole body differently than others. By using connection, psychotherapy, family counseling, exercise, health, mediation, and restorative approaches, recovery can be achievable with less negativity interfering. Group session counseling can even help you realize how many others are struggling with similar problems.  

This method can help boost self-esteem and the overall outlook of one’s situation. Self-worth can be achieved by the right guidance, communication, and connection. The confidence you once had before an addiction can be restored, creating a better lifestyle for you and your loved ones.

Negative experiences can happen, but can also be replaced with positive experiences with the right treatment.  

Getting The Help You Need

There are many different characteristics and qualities of various rehab facilities across the United States.

A Forever Recovery in Michigan state is one facility however that treats more than just the addiction itself. When self-worth and happiness are not in check with a person, addiction may seem more like a symptom of day-to-day life. Indeed addiction is more than a symptom, but it may feel this way to some individuals. This is why A Forever Recovery Michigan can approach addiction as well as self-esteem and other underlying problems.

A Forever Recovery in Battle Creek MI understands that each individual needs to be assessed differently. Healing is not a one-size-fits-all program at A Forever Recovery Battle Creek MI. Healing takes place with self-help, holistic approaches, cognitive treatment, indigenous tracks, and faith-based help. Aftercare treatment for continuing sobriety will also be provided at A Forever Recovery in Battle Creek MI. Drug addictions can negatively affect both the abuser and their families. Once a patient has access to love themselves, loved ones can help more. Sometimes the length of time in a rehab facility can stretch to several months with severe cases. This is not out of the ordinary, as everyone adjusts to rehab in a different manner. With continued treatments after being in the rehab facility, physical symptoms can be managed for long-term success. Patients may also choose to meet with a counselor and continue with an outpatient program to further their results.

It’s important to feel comfortable in your environment and stay in control of your choices. Planning your addiction treatment program will be easier with the help of professional counselors. To determine which rehab options will work best for you or a loved one, contact us today.

The post Negative Recovery Experiences: Why We Need to Talk About Them appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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In the United States, the history of drug trafficking has dated back to the 19th century. Cocaine, along with a variety of other substances, has been illegally imported and distributed among people of all ages.

The result of these illegally trafficked drugs have lead to devastating consequences for Americans with assorted ages, traits, financial status, or gender. Cocaine was once considered a drug mainly used by wealthy people, however, that is not presently the case. Any economic status or social standing can leave a person falling into the path of illicit drug use. Nearly 1.5 million people in America will use cocaine at least once monthly. Although research has been conducted on cocaine usage, there is still a common question that arises- why do people use cocaine? The answer to this will be different from each individual who goes through a cocaine addiction. Your financial status can affect your risks of cocaine abuse, however, your personality will also play a vital role.

Financial Status and Cocaine Use

Since cocaine is illegal, expensive, and cause overdoses and addiction, why do people use cocaine?

For those who aren’t used to taking drugs, it is often questioned why people do them in the first place. The initial drug use will highly vary between individuals, but the reasoning for continued drug use may be similar for a good amount of people. Personality traits and illicit substance use go hand in hand much of the time. Financial status also links to illicit drug use with either poor or wealthy status. With a drug like cocaine, the abuse by a wealthy person may link more to a disorganized or undisciplined personality. This may not be the only reason a wealthy person uses cocaine, but those living in poverty don’t always match up to those personality traits. A study entitled Personality traits and illicit substances: The moderating role of poverty, conducted by Angelina Sutina, Michele Evans and Alan Zonderman, gave a peek into drug use and financial status. People with a personality which lacked discipline and those who performed actions before thinking were more prone to drug use. This conclusion of character traits in wealthier people who used drugs was unrelated to drug use among people living in poverty. This means that those using drugs in poverty had other reasonings for their usage.

With the complexity of drug use, a single factor for the reasoning of use is simply not fathomable. For those living in poverty, personality traits may be different than those holding more wealth. People living with any financial status can experience stress, troubles, and life-altering events. Many people may assume that the rich will conduct in cocaine use for recreational purposes, as the poor will be using to cope with life struggles. This is sometimes the case, and sometimes not the case at all. With wealthy people, the purchasing of cocaine may be more attainable as they can afford the drug for regular use. They may use the drug because they believe it is the best for coping with stress. People who use cocaine may have also begun to use the drug for recreational purposes, and then developed an addiction. This same explanation can go for a person living in poverty. Although it may be more difficult to afford a drug like cocaine, once anyone begins drugs, there is a risk for abuse. People will find a way to obtain the drugs when going through addiction, regardless of financial status.

Cocaine Addiction

The use of drugs on television, music videos, and movies creates a strong vision of acceptable behavior in the eyes of teens, adults and even children. Cocaine addiction is real and affects those of many ages and circumstances. To diagnose cocaine dependence in an individual, you must first know the symptoms of a present addiction. According to the American Psychiatric Association, you don’t need more than three of the following symptoms to be diagnosed with the dependence.

  • Tolerance to euphoric effects of cocaine, needing more of the drug.
  • When cocaine is not being used, withdrawal symptoms like confusion, hallucinations, agitation, or depression can occur.
  • Cocaine is used excessively.
  • Cannot reduce the use of cocaine successfully.
  • Time is mainly spent on cocaine by obtaining and using it.
  • Isolation. Not being around friends or family.
  • Doing illegal things such as stealing, shoplifting, or burglary for money to use on cocaine.
  • Life absences from work, school, assignments, etc.
  • Despite knowing the consequences, still using the drug.

The effects of cocaine are detrimental on parts of the body that involve mood, appetite, and thinking. Although recreational use is intended for giving pleasurable feelings of euphoria, disturbing sensations can follow the use of cocaine. Feelings of violence, suicide, confusion, paranoia, nervousness, and other uncomfortable feelings are often reported with people who use cocaine.

For those who do not have the personality traits of hostile, disorganized, undisciplined, and antagonistic, drug use may not be a likely event in your life. Unfortunately for many people, the choice has been made to initially start drug use from any reasoning. At any age, people who use cocaine are at risk for a cocaine addiction. Drugs may even alter a person’s brain to change certain aspects of their personality. This is what makes an addiction so dangerous and disabling to a person’s life. Relationships, health, jobs, and family can all be ruined by a cocaine addiction. Functioning through daily life is an ultimate struggle for people who use cocaine. Rehabilitation programs can lead the way out of addiction, and on the path of a productive life again. Rehab programs administer proven methods of repairing emotional and spiritual damage from drug use. They can also help to build self-esteem, improve physical health, and learn coping skills. During rehabilitation, the root causes of your addiction can also be looked into and addressed. Life is an endless opportunity, and gaining ahold of what you think you lost during addiction is attainable. Addiction specialists are here to help for a safe and efficient recovery to get you back into a drug free lifestyle.

The post Can Your Financial Status Put You at Risk for Cocaine Abuse appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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Explaining addiction to a non-addict is not something simple. It’s hard for non-addicts to understand what addiction is and what it does to the addict. Dependence weakens the body, mind, and lifestyle of those who suffer from the disease, and unless you’ve experienced it personally, it can be hard to understand. First of all, a lot of non-addicts get thrown off by the definition of a “disease.” You don’t just outgrow an addiction as you potentially would a disorder. The fact is that addiction is indeed classified as a disease of the brain and body. The compulsive use of substances despite the health risks and other consequences is a daily struggle for abusers.

More than one factor contributes to labeling addiction as a disease. The American Medical Association, the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and other notable medical organizations classify addiction as a disease. Those who have been impacted by addiction include not only the abuser but friends and family of the user. Non-addicts can sometimes find it difficult to understand what is going on with an addict during the abuse, and after sobriety. There is an importance of understanding the differences between addicts vs. non-addicts in a society where addiction is unfortunately all around. In many instances, addicts feel that there is no way of explaining addiction to a non-addict, that there is no way a non-addict can comprehend what they are describing.

Explaining Addiction to a Non-Addict 

Diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and addiction similarly follow a pattern of remission and relapse. These can be managed and treated, but not necessarily cured. Changes in the brain make addiction more difficult to cope with as a physical dependency is formed. The ability to make rational decisions is destroyed by the loss of behavior control. Willpower just isn’t strong enough for a person to stop using a substance for good on their own. When explaining addiction to a non-addict, it’s essential to understand that addicts’ brains are different, as changes in neurons and circuits do compromise health and decision-making.

Although addiction is a misunderstood disease, it is a highly known issue. So why would people begin substances if there’s a risk to addiction? You may also find yourself wondering how to understand a drug addict, especially if you’re close to one. When it comes to understanding a drug addict, it must be known that addiction can happen to anyone. Although there is a risk for addiction when an addictive substance is first used, not everyone thinks of it. Sort of like when a decadent dessert sits in your reach, and even though you don’t want the consequences of eating it, you must try it. Of course, refraining from sweets is less difficult than restraining drug use. When substances are introduced, the environment may play a strong role.

A person’s regular environment revolves around friends, family, lifestyle activities, and economic status. With these factors, an environment could also include peer pressure, potential abuse, stress, and exposure to drugs. When explaining addiction to a non-addict, the non-addict may have a hard time understanding the initial cause of the substance abuse. For every addiction, different factors take a part of why it was initially started. Other than the environment, a person’s genetic makeup can also present a mental disorder. This is especially difficult to understand because unless you’re pre-diagnosed, the addiction is not necessarily foreseen. There are also stages in an individual’s life that also affect a person’s risk for addiction. Teens are in a dangerous and vulnerable time of their lives where drug use is deemed trendy. It sounds horrible, and it is. The brain of teenagers is also still in development, especially the areas responsible for decision-making. This creates vulnerability because the lack of judgments and self-control may lead to impulsive drug use.

For those who suffer from addiction, the power of choice ends after the initial substance use. Explaining addiction to a non-addict may be difficult when non-addicts can sometimes judge a person by their initial actions. Since environmental factors take place with any age group, it is common that all sorts of people are presented with an opportunity to try substances. It’s not always easy to say no to drugs or alcohol. Dopamine levels are affected by drugs and alcohol. Dopamine plays a vital role in motivation, emotion, and pleasure feelings. A tolerance will build on the addictive substance when it is used over time. Seldomly a person thinks ahead and predicts how their body and brain will respond to initial drug use. No one chooses to be an addict, and many people are also not aware of the risks of common prescription drugs.

The truth with addiction is that it cannot be overcome by the individual alone. However much the person suffering wants to quit, other associated issues make it nearly impossible on their own. Other problems may include withdrawal symptoms and co-occurring mental health disorders. Mental health disorders are prevalent to co-exist with addiction. It’s important when learning how to understand an addict, that more than one issue will exist with addiction sufferers.

Mental health illnesses can make a person susceptible to addiction, but can also occur after the addiction begins. Severe mental illnesses can make a person one-half times more likely to go through substance abuse. Mood disorders, panic/anxiety disorders, and personality disorders all have a considerable amount of susceptibility to addiction. Diseases of this criteria include bipolar disorder, general anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. People suffering from anxiety and mood disorders are two times more likely to develop an addiction. Some people find it difficult to learn how to explain an addiction because they may hide information on their mental health status.  

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, those with schizophrenia are actually four times more likely to develop an addiction issue, and bipolar disorders are more than five times. Working in reverse, people who have suffered from addiction are likely to have a mental illness. Among alcoholics, mental illnesses play a key role. Anxiety and PTSD are classified as the most diagnosed illnesses among alcoholics. Connecting both addiction and mental illnesses is called dual diagnosis. The treatments for dual diagnosis often address the problems associated with both problem areas. Treatment centers that treat coinciding issues tend to have the best results in life management and sobriety. Mental illnesses and addiction both can be classified as diseases. Addiction cannot be cured, but adequately managed with the appropriate treatment. Mental illnesses are not all diseases, although some have the same criteria when it comes to management and coping vs. curing.

Addiction has been an advancing issue in the United States in the past and currently still. Measures of awareness are making an impact, although millions of people are still presently affected. With a low rate of treatment seeking individuals among these numbers, the suffering continues. Sobriety is attainable with the right guided treatment programs. When it comes to explaining addiction to a non-addict, people do not always want to admit their troubles. By addressing the addiction as early as possible, a considerable benefit is achieved for receiving earlier treatment, and quicker sobriety.

The help you need is just around the corner with the best-fit treatment program for specific and individual needs. Contact A Forever Recovery and speak with professional counselors to guide you through the steps of recovery.

The post Addicts vs Non-Addicts: Explaining Addiction to a Non-Addict appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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Drug addiction today is viewed as a disease and can be treated through modern,scientifically researched methods. This disease is characterized by long-lasting changes that occur in the brain.

Modern society is generally on the same page about addiction, but it hasn’t always been that way.

Society in the past has viewed drug addiction as a moral choice that has created a flaw of the individual.

Treatments for people with addiction included imprisonment, church-guided prayer, and sending individuals to asylums. These “treatments” were not surprisingly an ineffective way to recovery. 

The history of drug abuse has been a problem from the beginning foundation of the county. Before the 19th century, the drugs that were commonly used and abused were related to plants that helped reduce the feelings of pain. In modern times, we have harmful synthetic drugs, but even the primitive forms of drugs abused in the past were dangerous. Even when natural substances are being abused, the body can experience addiction. Drug abuse history also spreads out to early uses of opium and alcohol. The United States began to take action and offer treatment solutions and regulations for the public.   

Early Abuse and Treatments

Opium and alcohol were both used to dull the pain during certain surgical and medical procedures. Before the Civil War, the effects of drugs and alcohol and their addictive qualities were not entirely understood. This was an issue since many soldiers of the Civil War were given drugs for pain and became addicted after surgery. In the 1800s, morphine, codeine, and cocaine were developed and unregulated. The wide availability of these newer developed drugs made it easy for many people to try, and become addicted.

The US began to develop laws and regulations when it became clear that drugs are a serious problem among the public. To help the drug problem, regulations like the ones made in 1906 were passed to make it more difficult to obtain certain drugs. The 1906 Federal Food and Drugs Act was meant for regulating drugs, foods, medicines and their traffic.

Although drugs were no longer easily accessible for the public to obtain, addiction was still prominent throughout the United States. Trafficking drugs still gave the access people needed to try and abuse substances, resulting in an addictive state. Since substance abuse was still being recognized as a significant issue for public health and safety, the US had to take further actions. These actions resulted in The Federal Bureau of Narcotics prosecuting medical doctors that gave prescriptions that violated laws. Treatment options were expanding, but still limited as the knowledge of addiction was still lacking.

Substance abuse research began funding when the NIMH was established. The NIMH, or the National Institute of Mental Health, began after World War II. Efforts made to diminish drug abuse for generations to come started with research by this group. Research on addiction, prevention, and public awareness was initiated and progressed during this time.

Drugs kicking out other drugs? In early drug abuse history around the 1950s and 1960s, doctors believed that using drugs like LSD could treat alcoholism and other addictions. As the use of some medications does seem to counter certain symptoms drug abusers experience today, the use of hallucinogenic drugs seems not at all helpful. As the hallucinogenic drugs became illegal themselves, the use of this method for treatment became abandoned.

In this same area particularly, consumers had begun to use drugs for less medical and more recreational purposes. During the 60s and 70s, the drugs being abused varied from marijuana, cocaine, crack, heroin, LSD, and hallucinogenic mushrooms. The “hippie” culture was known for abusing more of the hallucinogenic substances, while other drugs still were a major problem amongst other areas of the public. The addictive nature of opiates made the fight against drugs more challenging, and the treatment that followed. As the popularity of certain substances began to rise, so did the approaches to prevention.

Understanding drug addiction has come a long way from the research concluded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, health professionals, and scientists.

In drug addiction, understanding the individual’s mental health is key to understanding the right treatments. This is the area of misunderstanding in the past history of drug abuse. Individuals were not accessed separately with diverse symptoms. Rather, the individuals suffering from drug addiction were treated as a whole, mental and moral health issue to be experimented on with “treatments”.

In present times, addiction is treated in a variety of ways, with thousands of available treatment facilities in the U.S. Modern treatments can stretch from behavioral therapy, counseling, medication, and holistic approaches. As many people who suffer from drug or alcohol addiction may also have a coinciding mental health disorder, treatment facilities often address both.

Detoxification is one way that many drug treatment facilities similarly begin their treatments. When people suddenly stop the use of certain drugs, withdrawal symptoms can occur. With detoxification programs in a treatment facility, the management and coping of withdrawal symptoms is learned. In previous understanding through the history of drug addiction, suffering through withdrawal was deemed necessary for rehab. The doctors of that time may have seen suffering necessary for mainly a means of punishment for having the addiction in the first place. Although ridding the abused drugs from an individual’s system is necessary, an individual does not need to suffer. Many non-medicated ways of coping through withdrawal symptoms are provided at alternative treatment facilities.

Therapy

Therapy is an excellent way of preventing an individual from relapse after beginning a treatment program. Support groups are one of the ways therapy is integrated into a treatment program’s routine and schedule.  The therapy given in support groups may include cognitive and behavioral. New ways of thinking can be developed such as talking openly about experiences, identifying and managing problem behavior, recognizing cravings and time management. Learning these skills can help an individual to establish the motivation to change and stay off drugs.

Inpatient and Outpatient Programs

With the choice of modern rehabilitation programs being readily available throughout the United States, individuals seeking treatment have many options. Inpatient rehab is a form of rehabilitation where an individual resides in a treatment facility. This can proceed for less than a month or more than a month. Focus areas include nutritional health, exercise, therapy, and skill learning. Inpatient programs are said to be the most beneficial of programs since the individual is fully engaged in the program by living on the premises.

Outpatient rehabilitation is quite similar to inpatient rehab, although the treatment is focused on the individual’s regular schedule. By participating in outpatient rehabilitation, a person can receive treatment while going about their day-to-day schedule. Usually, this program is less expensive than inpatient programs. Therapy is also a part of outpatient rehab, as the home environment of the patient typically makes a comfortable atmosphere. Change is not always an easy task for someone suffering from addiction, which is why family support is often needed for continuing therapy.

Treatment for people with addiction has most definitely changed in drastic ways throughout the history of drug addiction. Treatment programs today give a variety of individualized assistance for the best outcome and recovery for all sorts of addiction and mental health issues.

The post Past and Present Addiction Treatment: What the Future Holds appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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Today, the growing menace of drug abuse among the employees has raised apprehension in various socioeconomic strata. Thankfully, the awareness that the abuse of drugs may affect workplace is rapidly rising in acceptance. In the recent past, there has been a widespread concern on whether employers can address the issue of drug abuse at the workplace. The answer to this vexed question is YES! The workplace provides an excellent opportunity to curb drug use and influence of other psychotropic substances. The employers can play a very integral role in helping to make treatment as successful as possible by promoting initiatives that focus on improving health. These programs should offer benefits that support various services like; interventions, confidential screening, counseling, self-management programs, peer support groups, medications and follow-up treatment and recovery. The best way to achieve is by conducting pre-employment and routine fitness-for-duty alcohol and drug testing to check addiction and ensure health for optimum productivity. In this article, we take a look at possible impacts of drug abuse in the workplace, costs of problematic substance use to an organization and how the employers can efficiently deal with such issues. Many organizations understand that almost all aspects of the workplace require alertness, quick and precise reflexes. For this reason, the employers are increasingly trying to curb the problematic Effects of Drug Abuse and Addiction including;

  • Stress-related or psychological effects induced by substance use by a co-worker, friend, or family member that affects other employees’ productivity.
  • Illegal activities at work including selling illicit drugs to other employees
  • Interfering with concentration, attention, efficiency, and accuracy while at work.
  • Reduced productivity, illness, and absenteeism
  • Addiction-related crime, injuries or accidents
  • After-effects of drug use (withdrawal, hangover) affecting job performance, and
  • Any other impact on an employee’s emotional state, motor coordination, perception alertness, and judgment that also impacts making safety-sensitive decisions or working safely.
Costs of Problematic Substance Use to an Organization

According to National Safety Council, employees who abuse drugs are two to five times more likely to get fired or quit within the first year of employment, file workers’ compensation claims, be violent or injured at work, be late for work, or take unexcused absences. In any of these cases, employers often take the responsibility which can at times translate to more than $3,200 a year for every employee who abuses drugs. In fact, researchers believe that drug abuse costs U.S. business owners more than $140 billion every year. Therefore, preventing excessive alcohol use and drug abuse increases individual’s chances of better health, longer and productive life. It also results in a massive increase in company productivity.

What Can Employers Do to Prevent Drug Abuse at The Workplace?

According to the TN Department of Labor & Workforce Development, roughly more than 30% of all employees are aware of illegal sale in their workplace. For this reason, it is critically imperative for employers to engage in the prevention of drug use by implementing effective workplace substance policies and programs. These long traditions of initiatives should emphasize on the benefits to the victims, their families, employers, and the economy of preventing addiction to drugs. Furthermore, the treatment programs should help to maintain an individual’s recovery from substance abuse and relapses. For more progressive enterprises, they are supposed to have a deepened understanding of costs, nature and sheer scope of the ‘epidemic’. As a result, they should place a much greater emphasis on the development of broad consensual partnerships at workplace focused on the identification and rehabilitation of severe drug use problems. However, it is so unfortunate that many small businesses, unlike large organizations, don’t have assessment or substance testing programs in place. Here are some ways through which employers can drug abuse at places of work.

Employee Assistance Programs

Without a doubt, one of the most effective ways to deal with drug and alcohol problems in the workplace is the establishment of an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The EAPs are supposed to be confidential and provide whatever help that makes it possible for an employee to remain on or return to the workplace. Usually, the programs may be operated in-house by agency personnel and are staffed by professional counselors. These programs provide help to workers facing a range of personal difficulties like mental and emotional problems, alcohol and drug abuse issues, care concerns, and financial issues, marital and family issues.

Drug Use or Impairment Policies

Additionally, organizations can have drug use or impairment policies. They ought to be very detailed and informative. Typically, a drug abuse policy should be far-reaching with provision for disciplinary action, ways of assisting drug users, employee’s rights to confidentiality and everything in between. Further, supervisors and managers should be enlightened on how to identify and deal with drug use issues and how employees can be offered educational programs. An effective program may include videos about drug use in the workplace, written materials about substance use and abuse, and maybe a drug awareness day. Though it’s not the employers’ responsibility to diagnose a possible drug use or dependency, they should spot an impaired employee, and take the appropriate measure as stated by the organization’s policy.

Drug Screening/ Drug Testing Programs (DSPs) and Educational Programs

Another potent strategy of preventing the ‘epidemic’ is integrating drug-free workplace campaigns and using workforce drug testing. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, approximately 68.9% of all drug users in the U.S. are believed to be employed and in active employment. This shocking revelation is a clear indication that educational and drug testing programs are paramount. Ideally, drug testing can be done before hiring and during employment period. This helps organizations to identify drug abusing employees, minimize the risk of hiring new employees who could be drug users, save considerable amount given towards employee compensation or health care, and curb the substance abuse among the employees. Further, it ensures prevailing of drug-free workplace environment that promotes positive attributes like work culture, safety, employee productivity, professionalism, and etcetera.

Typically, an employee drug testing can be efficiently performed using hair follicle testing, urine testing, and saliva testing. Although commonly abused drugs can be identified during routine urine drug testing, hair follicle testing is non-invasive and often performed in laboratories. The urine testing is done using test strips and provides reliable and accurate results. The latter, saliva testing, is also non-evasive and offers instant results. This will ensure that only the efficient and productive employees are retained. Unfortunately, the limited number of facilities to meet the clinical demand for drug testing is still one of the major hindrances in combating alcohol and drug abuse in the country. Thankfully, reputable drug testing centers are in place to ensure finding a perfect addiction treatment is always a call away.

Road to Recovery

Though the problem of substance abusers affects virtually everyone in an organization, they can be successfully treated, emerge with an immense recovery and get back to work to offer a full load of productivity with good health. Business, large and small alike should put in place programs, policies, or procedures that curb the economic impacts induced by abuse of alcohol and other drugs. Therefore, employers should not give up the fight in ensuring that the organization has a zero tolerance towards drug abuse by employees. In a nutshell, the workplace can be a perfect place to deal with substance abuse issues.

The post Can Employers Prevent Drug Abuse at Work Place? appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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Today, the growing menace of drug abuse in the workplace has raised apprehension in various socioeconomic strata. Thankfully, the awareness that the abuse of drugs may affect employees is rapidly rising in acceptance. Recently, there has been a widespread concern on whether employers can address the issue of drug abuse in the workplace. The answer to this vexed question is YES!  The workplace provides an excellent opportunity to curb drug use and influence of other psychotropic substances.

Ways to Prevent Drug Abuse in the Workplace

Employers can play a very integral role in helping to make treatment as successful as possible by promoting initiatives that focus on improving health. These programs should offer benefits that support various services like interventions, confidential screening, counseling, self-management programs, peer support groups, medications, and follow-up treatment and recovery. The best way to achieve this is by conducting pre-employment and routine fitness-for-duty alcohol and drug testing to check addiction and ensure health for optimum productivity.

In this article, we take a look at possible impacts of drug abuse in the workplace, costs of problematic substance use to an organization, and how the employers can efficiently deal with such issues. Many organizations understand that almost all aspects of the workplace require alertness, quick and precise reflexes. For this reason, the employers are increasingly trying to curb the problematic effects of drug abuse and addiction including:

  • Stress-related or psychological effects induced by substance use by a co-worker, friend, or family member that affects other employees’ productivity
  • Illegal activities at work including selling illicit drugs to other employees
  • Interfering with concentration, attention, efficiency, and accuracy while at work
  • Reduced productivity, illness, and absenteeism
  • Addiction-related crime, injuries, or accidents
  • After-effects of drug use (withdrawal, hangover) affecting job performance
  • Any other impact on an employee’s emotional state, motor coordination, perception alertness, and judgment that impacts making safety-sensitive decisions or working safely
Costs of Problematic Substance Use to an Organization

According to National Safety Council, employees who abuse drugs are two to five times more likely to get fired or quit within the first year of employment, file workers’ compensation claims, be violent or injured at work, be late for work, or take unexcused absences. In any of these cases, employers often take the responsibility which can at times translate to more than $3,200 a year for every employee who abuses drugs. In fact, researchers believe that drug abuse costs U.S. business owners more than $140 billion every year. Therefore, preventing excessive alcohol use and drug abuse increases individual’s chances of better health, longer and productive life. It also results in a massive increase in company productivity.

What Can Employers Do to Prevent Drug Abuse in The Workplace?

According to the TN Department of Labor & Workforce Development, roughly more than 30% of all employees are aware of illegal sale in their workplace. For this reason, it is critically imperative for employers to engage in the prevention of drug use by implementing effective workplace substance policies and programs. These long traditions of initiatives should emphasize on the benefits to the victims, their families, employers, and the economy of preventing addiction to drugs.

Furthermore, the treatment programs should help to maintain an individual’s recovery from substance abuse and relapses. For more progressive enterprises, they are supposed to have a deepened understanding of costs, nature, and sheer scope of the ‘epidemic.’ As a result, they should place a much greater emphasis on the development of broad consensual partnerships at workplace focused on the identification and rehabilitation of severe drug use problems. However, it is so unfortunate that many small businesses, unlike large organizations, don’t have assessment or substance testing programs in place. Here are some ways through which employers can deter drug abuse in the workplace.

Employee Assistance Programs

Without a doubt, one of the most effective ways to deal with drug abuse in the workplace is the establishment of an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The EAP’s are supposed to be confidential and provide whatever help that makes it possible for an employee to remain on or return to the workplace. Usually, the programs may be operated in-house by agency personnel and are staffed by professional counselors. These programs provide help to workers facing a range of personal difficulties like mental and emotional problems, alcohol and drug abuse issues, care concerns, and financial issues, marital and family issues.

Drug Use or Impairment Policies

Additionally, organizations can have drug use or impairment policies. They ought to be very detailed and informative. Typically, a drug abuse policy should be far-reaching with provision for disciplinary action, ways of assisting drug users, employee’s rights to confidentiality and everything in between. Further, supervisors and managers should be enlightened on how to identify and deal with drug use issues and how employees can be offered educational programs. An effective program may include videos about drug use in the workplace, written materials about substance use and abuse, and maybe a drug awareness day. Though it’s not the employers’ responsibility to diagnose a possible drug use or dependency, they should spot an impaired employee, and take the appropriate measure as stated by the organization’s policy.

Drug Screening/ Drug Testing Programs (DSPs) and Educational Programs

Another strong strategy of preventing the ‘epidemic’ is integrating drug-free workplace campaigns and using workforce drug testing. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, approximately 68.9% of all drug users in the U.S. are believed to be employed and in active employment. This shocking revelation is a clear indication that educational and drug testing programs are paramount. Ideally, drug testing can be done before hiring and during the employment period. By doing this, it helps organizations to identify drug abusing employees, minimize the risk of hiring new employees who could be drug users, save considerable amount given towards employee compensation or health care, and curb the substance abuse among the employees. Further, it ensures prevailing of drug-free workplace environment that promotes positive attributes like work culture, safety, employee productivity, professionalism, and etcetera.

Typically, an employee drug testing can be efficiently performed using hair follicle testing, urine testing, and saliva testing. Although commonly abused drugs can be identified during routine urine drug testing, hair follicle testing is non-invasive and often performed in laboratories. The urine testing is done using test strips and provides reliable and accurate results. The latter, saliva testing, is also non-evasive and offers instant results. This test will ensure that only the efficient and productive employees are retained. Unfortunately, the limited number of facilities to meet the clinical demand for drug testing is still one of the major hindrances in combating alcohol and drug abuse in the country. Thankfully, reputable drug testing centers are in place to ensure finding a perfect addiction treatment is always a call away.

Road to Recovery

Though the problem of substance abusers affects virtually everyone in an organization, they can be successfully treated, emerge with an immense recovery and get back to work to offer a full load of productivity with good health. Businesses, large and small alike should put in place programs, policies, or procedures that curb the economic impacts induced by abuse of alcohol and other drugs. Therefore, employers should not give up the fight in ensuring that the organization has a zero tolerance towards drug abuse by employees. In a nutshell, the workplace can be a perfect place to deal with substance abuse issues.

The post Can Employers Prevent Drug Abuse in the Workplace? appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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The widespread uptrend in drug abuse and addiction in recent years in the United States has reached highest-ever levels.

It has gotten to the point that President Donald Trump has declared the opioid crisis a “National Health Emergency.” And many states in the union have declared their own states of emergency in an attempt to turn the rising tide of addiction in their states.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have called the opioid crisis the worst addiction epidemic in US history, and link the shocking rise in addiction with the concurrent rise over the last couple of decades in the number of opioid painkiller narcotics prescribed to patients across America.

These powerfully addictive opiates were massively over-prescribed by doctors who were either ignorant of there potential for causing addiction, or who were rendered ethically unscrupulous by the massive amounts of money to be made in the prescription drug market.

The result of this trend of over-prescription in the medical field was countless people across the US made into unknowing addicts by taking the medicine that their doctors had recommended

Opiates are not the only culprits either, with addiction to most any street drug you can think of also on the rise. As people who are addicted to prescription medications can no longer acquire them or can’t afford the prices for them on the illegal market, many turn to more common and less expensive street drugs like heroin and cocaine.

The effects and impacts of drug abuse and addiction are far-reaching and affect far more people than just those who are addicted. The effects of drug addiction are also not just physical, there are many emotional effects of drug abuse and addiction for anyone who becomes addicted and for those who love and are close to them.

Addiction comes in many forms and there are so many different substances and drugs that a person can become addicted to that it is unlikely that we will ever know all the ways that addiction can affect a person, but there are some characteristics of addiction that are common to most if not all cases.

These can be broken down into the following:

Dependence

Dependence on a drug or substance is when the body of the user becomes acclimated to the presence of the drug in its system and can no longer function without it. There are also very often strong mental and emotional effects of drug dependence. These effects can take many forms but one of the common aspects of mental drug dependence for the user is:

  • Feeling like they need the drug not just because they like its effects, but because without it they don’t feel like they could live their life, perform day to day tasks like work or school, or even make it through the day without it.

Withdrawal

When someone who is dependent on a drug decides to stop taking it or can no longer get it for whatever reason, they will go through what is called withdrawal.

There are many symptoms of withdrawal and they tend to all be different for each different drug, but there are some common mental and emotional effects for many of them.

These effects can include:

  • Depression.
  • Anxiety.
  • Strong feelings of loss.
  • Intense cravings to use the drug which can be both physical and emotional.
  • Intense mood swings and irrational behavior. This can involve sudden anger, aggression, grief, sadness, guilt, etc…

Tolerance

This is when after a period of drug or substance use, the body either becomes depleted of its natural resources of vitamins and minerals or it starts to develop defenses against the drug and the drug starts to have less of an effect.

The user then needs to take the drug in larger and/or more frequent doses of the drug to continue feeling the positive effects that they expect.

There are not typically many emotional effects of drug tolerance other than perhaps irritation or frustration.

Abuse

Drug abuse is a very large subject but is usually defined as using drugs recreationally or non-medically, in larger than recommended doses, or in any way likely to cause dangerous situations or health risks to the user.

Abuse of drugs and other substances can cause all kinds of emotional effects for the user and those around them.

Some of these effects can include:

  • Feelings of euphoria or well-being caused by the drug, not the user’s actual circumstances or condition.
  • Other unreasonable emotional reactions including grief, happiness, anger, mild to extreme aggression, rage, feeling emotionally numb or hollow, and many other variations.
  • Lowered inhibitions. This can be mild like feeling more social or less reserved, or may be extreme like not caring who you have sex with or not caring that you are walking in a bad part of town, naked and covered in blood.
  • Loss of memory. People who abuse drug and substances are often at risk of losing memory of events that take place while they are under the influence of the drugs. These people may also do or say things that are vastly out of character as they may not be consciously themselves while on drugs.

Overdose

When a user takes too large a dose of drugs or ingests too large a quantity of a substance like alcohol for their body to safely absorb and process (detoxify) they are said to have overdosed. Overdose symptoms are different for different drugs but more or less all of them involve a high risk of unconsciousness and death.

For the user, there may not be much conscious emotional effect other than maybe fear or regret, but for the people around them and for those who love them, an overdose is a terrifying event that can cause all kinds of negative emotions.

The threat of losing the person they love and realizing that they have such a serious drug problem if they did not already know about it can seriously devastate someone connected to an individual that has an overdose.

Addiction

Addiction is another broad term that covers a vast subject, and everyone experiences addiction differently and to different drugs, but addiction can be generally defined as a strong and often overwhelming compulsion to use a drug or substance despite its negative effects on the user and/or those around them.

The emotional effects caused by addiction are frequently vast and terrible for both the user and anyone connected to them.

It would not be possible to list all of the emotional effects of addiction here or perhaps anywhere, but here are a few that are common:

  • Many addicts feel like the drug or substance is their friend. Maybe their best or only friend.
  • Addicts often feel that they do not have a problem, and so they can often become estranged from the people who care about them and want to help them get better.
  • Loved ones of a drug addict often feel numerous emotions as a result of addiction. Feelings such as anger, grief, betrayal, loss, emotional disconnection from the addict, and many others.
  • People who care about an addict often feel a strong desire to help the person they care so much about, but don’t know how or feel like they can’t get through to them or get them to realize that they even have a problem. This can be extremely upsetting.

It is clear that the emotional toll of addiction is great and effects far more people than just those who become addicted.

Addicts are not the only people who need and deserve help, and there are many rehabs and groups out there that offer help and support to those who are connected to someone struggling with an addiction.

The post Beyond the Physical: The Emotional Repercussions of Addiction appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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As the years pass us by, drug and alcohol addiction becomes more of a problem for our nation’s women than it ever has been before.  Now, we live in a country that struggles intensively with substance abuse to the degree of it being a regular occurrence in some demographics, and an accepted standard in many others.  The increase in nationwide substance abuse has occurred across the boards as far as demographics go, but no demographic has been harmed as badly as women have.

There is no doubt that drug abuse statistics are rising, as the trend has been stable for more than a decade.  And yet, when we look even further we can see that it is the specific demographics that have shown such significant increases in substance abuse statistics that the extensive need for remediation is present.  When it comes to women and substance abuse, there are now fifteen-million women who abuse drugs and alcohol, where-as twenty years ago there were far less than that.  With fifteen-million addicted though, that is almost thirteen percent of all women of the age of eighteen or older, and the numbers on that are just getting worse with each passing year.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine in association with the National Institutes of Health performed a fascinating study on the relationship of substance abuse to gender.  They studied each decade, taking the study several decades back, to examine how addiction has affected men and women.  Here is their summary of where this problem is heading:

  • “Gender differences in rates of substance abuse have been consistently observed in the general population and treatment-seeking samples, with men exhibiting significantly higher rates of substance use, abuse, and dependence.  However, recent epidemiological surveys suggest that this gap between men and women has narrowed in recent decades.  For example, surveys in the early 1980s estimated the male/female ratio of alcohol-use disorders as 5:1, in contrast to more recent surveys that report a ratio of approximately 3:1.”

This shows the trend for exactly what it is, a leveling of the playing field so to speak, and a clear distinction of increasing substance abuse among women, while substance abuse among men stays relatively the same.  Recreational drug users are now almost just as likely to be female as they are to be male, and particularly with prescription drug abuse, this is actually more likely to be a woman’s problem than a man’s problem in present day America.

Recreational Use of Drugs

For most, drug use first starts with the recreational use of drugs.  Most drug users start as recreational drug users and then transition out from that and into a more regular substance abuse pattern.  For women, the recreational use of drugs usually transitions very quickly into regular substance abuse if the recreational use is not first addressed rapidly.  Women generally speaking use substances differently than men do, using smaller amounts and for a shorter period of time, yet also generally speaking becoming addicted more quickly than men do.

Women typically respond to substances very differently too.  They respond to cravings differently, and they are more likely to relapse after treatment.  Furthermore, while women are less likely to abuse drugs than men are, even in this day and age, those women who do choose to abuse drugs have a higher likelihood of dying from the habit than men do.  This is entirely biological, with drugs typically affecting a woman’s body more severely than a man’s.  

When it comes to women and recreational drug use in America, prescription pills are by far the culprit in this recent increase in female drug addiction.  Studies from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration show us that almost five-million women (or four percent) of the women over the age of eighteen, abuse prescription pill drugs.  Furthermore, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates to us that every three minutes in our country, a woman goes to the emergency department for prescription drug abuse.  

One article in “U.S. News” dives deep into the aspects of recreational substance abuse in women, how damaging it can be, and how quickly it can go from bad to worse to full blown addiction.  The article also goes over how women in the 21st century are far more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol recreationally than women in the 1900s were.  According to the article which also quotes an Oxford University study:

  • “Research at Oxford found women are approximately 75 percent more likely than men to report a recent episode of depression and 60 percent more likely to report an anxiety disorder. The same study concluded that cumulatively, women are up to 40 percent more likely than men to develop a mental health condition.  Such findings are relevant because anxiety, depression and/or other mental illnesses often co-occur with substance abuse (as a form of self-medicating symptoms of an underlying disorder) – so much so that treating “co-occurring disorders” is now an established norm in substance abuse treatment. In theory, women’s greater vulnerability to mental illness also makes them more vulnerable to substance abuse.”

This of course is only the tip of the iceberg.  It’s not just a mental illness factor, though the advent of the sort of ridiculous, “Popularity of mental illness as a reason for all of our problems in the 21st century” is certainly a big factor in why more and more women are now abusing drugs and alcohol these days.  But there are other factors at play here.

Why Do People Use Recreational Drugs?

There are more factors for women substance abuse.  Substances are simply more available for women now for one thing.  Also, women are seeing substances as being a “solution” now more so than a taboo item.  Furthermore, addictive substances are more likely to be legal now more so than ever before.  Women are less likely to commit illegal acts than men are, hence their hesitancy to abuse illegal street drugs.  However, prescription drugs, the top drug of choice for women of all ages and ethnic backgrounds, are also perfectly legal.  With all of these factors added together, it is no surprise that this is happening.

Luckily, there are solutions that solve the problem of, “Why do people use recreational drugs,” at its very source.  There are tools that people can work at to create and maintain sobriety, the primary one of course being rehabilitation through an inpatient facility.  Women of course respond very well to inpatient addiction treatment, as do men.  Women are also more likely to be willing to go to rehab than men are, with the small exception of addicted women who have young children.  That demographic is actually the toughest to convince!

Women who struggle with even the most simple of recreational substance abuse habits need to be helped through a treatment center.  Inpatient drug and alcohol addiction treatment centers possess the tools and the settings necessary to help even the most heavily addicted of women.  With these tools, any woman can break free and get back to a sober lifestyle.  

No woman should have to face addiction alone and with no clear idea where she can turn for help.  That is cruelty incarnate.  Thankfully, there is always a place that any woman who suffers with addiction can go to to get the tools needed to vanquish addiction for life.  A Forever Recovery can help with this.  A Forever Recovery has rehabilitated thousands of women over the course of a decade of helping people beat addiction.  For more information and to get started, reach out to A Forever Recovery today at 877-467-8363.  Don’t wait until it is too late and addiction completely consumes you or someone you care about.  Call today to get started on the path to recovery.

The post Women and Recreational Drug Use in America appeared first on A Forever Recovery.

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