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You’ve no doubt been hearing all about new tattoo aftercare cream F1030.

Inkluded introduced you to the brand earlier this year and its developer Scott gave us the low-down on why this invention is particularly special for the industry today.

The F1030 team having been travelling up and down the UK to our biggest and best tattoo conventions to share their new product with tattoo artists and enthusiasts all over the country.

F1030 at The Great British Tattoo Show - YouTube

Inkluded’s guest blogger Howard went on over to The Great British Tattoo Show to try the stuff for himself and report back:

“F1030 is really easy to apply, vegan-friendly and made from proven, dermatologically-tested ingredients. Another big advantage for me is the built in SPF 25 protection. Four days in, F1030 is keeping my skin protected and the itching down to a minimum (compared to previous tattoos). I feel that I’m further along the healing process at this point than I was with my last tattoo.”

“The The Great British Tattoo Show, at the F1030 stand, there was an NHS-qualified nurse who was able to answer specific questions I had. She was also doing seminars at the conventions so if you can attend one, it’s worth listening to!”

Photo: The Great British Tattoo Show

The Great British Tattoo Show

Feedback from tattooists for F1030

Team F1030

F1030’s upcoming convention dates are:

  • Cardiff Tattoo and Toy Convention (15 – 16 July)
  • Tattoo Jam (11 – 13 August)
  • International London Tattoo Convention (22 – 24 September)
  • Midlands Tattoo Industry Show (29 September – 1 October)
  • Manchester International Tattoo Show (29 – 30 October)
  • Florence Tattoo Convention (3 – 5 November)
  • International Brussels Tattoo Convention (10 – 12 November)
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Tattoo by Paul Talbot

Bromsgrove-based ‘graphic tattooist’ Paul Talbot is known for, not just his striking artwork, but the thoughtful approach he takes to it. It’s an understatement to say that he views tattooing in a different way to everyone else.

In this in-depth interview, I get to know the man behind these beautiful collages, and hear about his experiences to date that have influenced his now original art perspective.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

You have a background in the digital design world, is that right? Has this influenced your work and artistic process today?

I actually became a graphic designer through an unusual set of meetings and happy accidents.

When I was 17, I decided that art college wasn’t for me. I’d always loved punk-rock fanzines and poster art, and the album covers of my favourite bands, but once at art college, I realised that this wasn’t considered ‘proper’ art and they had no place for someone who wanted to make ‘art’ with a photocopier, rub-down letters and a bottle of correction fluid!

I’d also recently joined a band, almost by accident (I was actually their sound engineer). When after a particularly disastrous gig the singer (Kerry) decided that the band needed another guitarist, I was the obvious choice. He gave me a tape of the set-list and three days to learn the songs before performing with the band for the first time.

Pop Will Eat Itself - X, Y & Zee (Video) - YouTube

The band was from Stourbridge and we toured quite a lot with other bands from that local scene. At the time a few of the bands from the area had got record deals and (in the same way that Seattle became the home of grunge a few years later) Stourbridge was – for a very short time – the home of the ‘grebo’ scene in the UK.

Pop Will Eat Itself was part of that scene and I became friends with them whilst touring. I was blown away when I saw the artwork for the This is This album and loved the ‘fake corporate’ style of it – the deliberate over-use of labelling, copyright notices and seemingly unnecessary technical information included as part of the artwork. I presumed that the credit in the artwork was yet another part of the design but when I found out that it was for something called a ‘graphic designer’, and that he was the guy that I had just been talking to, I was speechless!

This is This, 1989

Weirdly, many of the things that have happened in my life since then hinge on that very short exchange.

Firstly, I realised that art and design were two entirely different things and that the reason I’d struggled so badly at art college was because I was a graphic designer. I just didn’t know it!

Fortunately being in a band involves a lot of downtime. As Charlie Watts famously said, being in The Stones was “5 years of working and 20 years of hanging about.” So I spent my all my ‘hanging about’ time learning as much about design as I could.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

Secondly, I eventually landed a job at one of the countries top indie publishers at a time when they were expanding. It was a pretty low down position but it meant that I worked my way through the company learning every aspect of publishing both on paper and digitally. Everything from a pizza shop advert to a complete re-design of the company’s flagship publications.

I left the company after about ten years, after having won international design awards and being promoted beyond the position of Head of Graphic Design – to a department called ‘Paul’ with the job description of ‘the Paul stuff’. Just like playing in the band, it was a fantastic and exciting time right up until the end. Then it was utter shit.

Over the years, working as designer, I’d fallen in love with digital collage, grunge typography and the post-modern art movement in general, but I had absolutely no outlet for it. The problem with most companies (big and small) is that (for the most part) their design is very ‘dry’ and safe.

Sadly, very few companies have the vision or the balls to really go beyond this, even though the proof of the benefit of great design is everywhere in the world – representing the biggest, best and most loved brands out there.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

I decided to set up my own company and try to focus on doing designs that looked more like the things I’d always loved, combined with all the new stuff I’d been looking at and learning about over the last ten(ish) years.

This was a great plan, but a disaster and I – very quickly – found myself back doing dry corporate materials for clients who – largely – didn’t give a shit about the design.

But, it was very well paid and offered me lots of downtime during which I could pursue my other passions. It was during this brief ‘life of leisure’ that I hooked up with an old friend for a beer and it’s that chance meeting that would – eventually – lead to my becoming the ‘graphic tattooist’ I am now, in very much the same way I became a graphic designer.

I regularly speak to traditional tattoo artists who might not ‘agree’ with experimental and forward-thinking styles of tattoo art. What do you think of those forms of tattoo art that still stick to a set of rules? 

I think what is considered traditional is really just a matter of longevity. It’s human nature that some artists will always look to history for inspiration and some will look to the future to see what is possible. I think it’s two different mindsets.

The disadvantage of only looking backwards is that the art-form never progresses beyond the point it was deemed traditional, and its styles, tools and techniques are locked in time forever. The advantage is that (done well, of course) it’s consistently great and proven.

Clients can be confident of it ‘just working’ which is why first-timers quite often go with the classics, but as we move further and further forward, its iconography has less and less resonance in the modern day.

Mr Paul Talbot tattoos at his studio in Bromsgrove

It’s also ironic that the artists responsible for creating and defining the styles that we would now consider to be traditional tattoos weren’t traditionalist at all but far from it! They were mavericks and pioneers. If a technique didn’t exist, they created it, If the tools weren’t good enough, they improved them using the latest technologies. If the supplies didn’t cut it, they made their own.

They are responsible for almost everything we take for granted in modern tattooing: mag needles, brightly-coloured ink in more than five colours, the coil tattoo machine, wearing gloves, Sumi or grey-wash techniques, the marriage of American and Japanese motifs, black and grey tattooing… the list goes on and on.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

I think that I have a lot in common with those early-days pioneers. I think my mind-set is probably quite close to theirs. If a tool or technique I need doesn’t exist, I’ll do my best to either make it or find something and repurpose it to do the job I need it to do.

Only time will tell if I’ll have anything like the impact they did but I’ve vastly improved a couple of things in tattooing already…

I own Evolution Cords a clipboard company and the first one to offer a guarantee. I’m the guy responsible for the creation of Black Powder and Brother entering the tattoo market with a thermal printer, because they saw me using one of their fax-printers to make stencils – something they didn’t even know it could do!

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

My design background also gives me a unique approach when it comes to working out how to actually tattoo my work and how to make it last over the years. You have to learn the rules first so that you can decide which ones are worth breaking.

Design is process-based and largely about problem-solving so I learnt every style of tattooing, the techniques involved and accepted wisdoms. Once I felt I had a good handle on it, I worked out the best ways to develop my style by using and, in some cases, inventing, techniques.

I have always done this with a foundation based on the knowledge passed on by the artists who came before me. Because of the ‘rooted’ nature of my knowledge I can confidently move the art forward without worrying if it will last. I’ve looked at all the limitations and taken them into consideration.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

What does a ‘rule-breaking’ tattoo give the wearer that a more traditional tattoo does not?

Probably the biggest advantage for the wearer is that the work is always fresh, unique and constantly evolving, just like the people who wear it!

When consulting with clients you work with themes rather than objects, and think about tattoos in a much more abstract sense. Can you explain this approach?

This is one of the negatives that tattoo TV has given us. Way back when (about 2002) a TV producer was looking to fill ten to fifteen minutes of airtime with something other than an inaudible artist talking over an incredibly loud tattoo machine, yet another shot of the back of an artist’s head or a pointless slow-mo of ink in rinse cup. He came up with the ‘brilliant’ idea of interviewing the client about what they were getting and why.

Fast-forward 15 years and now everyone thinks that all tattoos must have to have a deep-rooted meaning that is personal only to them. They have been sold a TV lie and have fallen for it. The truth is that all tattoos were deeply personal before any of this re-programming happened.

It just wasn’t about having a story you tell beforehand. It didn’t matter if you’d seen the face of Jesus in a grilled cheese sandwich – the tattoo and the time spent in the chair was the story, the reason you decided to get a tattoo was just the catalyst for that shared moment.

Tattoo by Paul Talbot

So, as you can imagine, a lot of clients these days confuse ‘the why’ with ‘the what’ and end up asking for very literal, well-worn, clichéd ideas. It’s not surprising when you realise that creative lateral thing is something that has to be trained and developed just like any skill.

So, in order to avoid just doing the same old images in the same old ways, I prefer my clients to just point me in a direction and let me connect the dots in a different way for them. This gives them a proper amount of input into the theme whilst allowing me enough freedom to create something special and unique. I make most of my artwork during the session when the client is around so it’s pretty relaxed and direct.

It’s one of the many benefits of coming from a 2 deadlines a day, 7 days a week, background – I can make artwork very quickly once I have the initial idea, so each client can watch their piece come together. It’s quite exciting actually!

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Earlier this month you were introduced to a new tattoo product, F1030, and were promised more information soon in the form of an interview with one of the brains behind the whole thing.

Meet Scott… 

What has been your involvement with F1030?

I joined Flen Health and have been involved in the wound healing industry for 14 years. Philippe Sollie, the CEO of the business, has built a portfolio of products used throughout the world in wound care and dermatology – his first resulted from a family member who got a burn at a BBQ. We discussed the tattoo market and how Bepanthen was widely used with no defined application for use in this market.

How F1030 can help your tattoo

Why does the tattoo industry need F1030 at this particular time?

The aftercare market is very saturated. There are lots of cosmetic products out there with various ingredients and claims. As a tattooed person myself, I was confused as to which was the right product to protect my investment.

I then started talking to various tattoo artists who also expressed that their customers did not always follow the right advice and they had to touch-up work where the aftercare procedure had not been followed. Artists also talked to me (as a healthcare company representative) how it would be great to have a product that had the regulatory aspects, that had been supported by education.

The tattoo industry is still growing – we have worked with medicals, tattooists and laser removal clinicians to develop this. Flen Health wants to support artists and consumers with a defined message to heal your tattoo and give the best long-term result for your tattoo.

Scott with tattooist Paul Talbot

The importance of tattoo aftercare

Let’s talk about other creams. Why is F1030 any different?

I don’t want to be critical of other products. I’d rather state clearly why we developed F1030…

As well as having numerous tattoos over the years, I’ve been involved with healthcare professionals and acute and chronic wound care for 14 years. I have developed an understanding of how and why wounds heal and, more importantly, why they don’t.

The principles of good tattoo aftercare http://www.honeytraveler.com/buy-zovirax/ apply in that the newly tattooed skin must be protected, moisturised and soothed. That is the legacy that has led to the development of F1030.

How does your skin react to a new tattoo?

Tell us about the experience of using the F1030 on your own tattoos, in the testing period.

We have put together a case series in the form of evaluations from customers around the country who used the product pre-launch. I myself am tattooed heavily and had 4 tattoos to trial the product.

Depending on the tattoo size and area, on average it would take 10-14 days to fully heal. F1030, I found created a protective barrier – it was so easy to apply compared to other products I had used. It was non-sticky or greasy but had the right amount of emollient to keep the skin moist.

We have also added a standard sun protection of SPF 25 which I feel is great to have built into that product, better than adding protection products over the top.

F1030 is clinically evaluated

What sort of things can people expect to learn if they come to meet you guys at conventions?

That tattoos are wounds and healthcare professionals advocate standard wound healing principles that should be adopted by anyone having a new tattoo. This is why our booklets at the conventions and online are there to explain the importance of a good tattoo aftercare with protection, moisturising and soothing of newly tattooed skin. We have live seminars too and Q&As you can get involved with.

How tattoos heal just like wounds

Anything else about the product you want to share?

F1030 is a medical device. The manufacture, clinical development and marketing of F1030 is controlled and safety, effectiveness and quality are guaranteed. We would like consumers to go away from having their tattoo and be safe in the knowledge that their work will be protected and remain vibrant by using a medically-approved product that takes their tattoo through the healing process.

Meet the F1030 team this weekend at The Great British Tattoo Show

For any questions, email Scott directly at scott.graves@flenhealth.com

The man himself!

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Tattoo healing is so important

Last month I met a man called Scott Graves. Scott works for a medical company called Flen Health and has spent the last few years of his career trying to answer two questions – is a tattoo a wound, and how can we make sure that wound heals healthily?

When Scott first reached out to Inkluded to tell me about his new tattoo aftercare cream, F1030, he sent me something I’ve never been given before by any tattoo company wanting me to share their product. I’m referring pages of medical research and evaluation. Graphs, diagrams, reports and presentations written by medical professionals and university professors who have spent the last year or so with their heads buried in the tattoo world.

Medical professionals have been part of the development of F1030

These individuals, along with Scott, the team at Flen Health and a team of experienced tattoo artists, have been exploring why a tattoo is a wound and exactly how the skin is damaged through this process. Finally, and perhaps the most important question here, they’ve been trying to find out what we need to do in the aftercare procedure and why.

I can’t even begin to condense these hundreds of pages of information into one short blog post, which is why you’re going to be hearing more from the F1030 team, via Inkluded, in the coming year.

F1030 is on sale now

So, who are the company behind F1030?

Flen Health are a global creator and distributor of healing products, Flen Health specialise in skin healing. They work with medical professionals to provide hospitals and surgeries with the best creams and gels to heal wounds. They’ve been committed to international wound clinical research for the last 15 years. Their famous ‘Flamigel’ is used to treat wounds, burns and grazes in hospitals all over the world.

So, what exactly is F1030?

F1030 is a protective and moisturising cream for newly tattooed skin. It provides a fatty barrier which reduces http://www.honeytraveler.com/buy-ventolin/ water loss from the epidermis and provides moisture to dry skin. In an exuding tattoo, the lipo-alginate layer of F1030 is activated and consequently will absorb excessive fluid to restore and maintain the water balance in the tattoo.

It’s all about getting the right moisture balance

Why is moisture balance so important?

Analysing the moisture balance of their products is a priority for Flen Health. With tattoos (and any wound), an environment that’s too moist increases the risk of infection. On the other hand, too dry and you’re looking at scabs, cracked skin and possible patchy (and delayed) tattoo healing.

They’ve been developing the formula of F1030 to ensure that the final product provides the optimal moisture balance.

What other medical properties does the cream have?

If I was to talk to you about lipid barriers, optimal viscosity and haemostasis… it may sound Greek to you. I’m no medical professional. That’s why, you’re going to be hearing more from the brains themselves as we speak direct from Scott in the coming weeks.

Find out about F1030 at a convention near you

Explore more yourself in person!

Scott’s been working with nurses and medical professionals for the last year and now they’re coming to a tattoo convention near you in 2017 to run workshops and presentations to tell you in layman’s terms why this product is a positive move for the tattoo industry.

They launched F1030 last weekend at the Brighton Tattoo Convention. Be sure to also catch them at:

  • The Great British Tattoo Show (27 – 28 May)
  • Leeds International Tattoo Expo (8 – 9 July)
  • Cardiff Tattoo and Toy Convention (15 – 16 July)
  • Tattoo Jam (11 – 13 August)
  • International London Tattoo Convention (22 – 24 September)
  • Midlands Tattoo Industry Show (29 September – 1 October)
  • Manchester International Tattoo Show (29 – 30 October)
  • Florence Tattoo Convention (3 – 5 November)
  • International Brussels Tattoo Convention (10 – 12 November)

Find out more and purchase on the F1030 website.

F1030 can be bought via their website

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Photo: YouTube – Zakk F

Charlotte Williams wanted to share her thoughts on the relationship between music and tattoos.

Rock music, especially heavy metal, would never have been the same without one of its most iconic figureheads; a man so legendary that he’s identifiable by only one-word name – Lemmy. But apart from his musical skills, the vocalist/bassist also liked body ink. Despite only having three, Lemmy loved his tattoos so much that when they faded over the years, he had them spruced up by celebrity tattoo artist Kat Von D. The session was then featured in an episode of the popular tattoo show LA Ink.

Lemmy’s legacy

Considering Lemmy’s influence in both the music and tattoo industry, many fans paid homage to the iconic musician after he passed away through their own body ink creations. Among the first to remember Lemmy was the Foo Fighters frontman, Dave Grohl. Long time close friends Brent Hinds (Mastodon vocalist) and Norman Reedus (The Walking Dead) also etched the memory of Lemmy permanently on their skin by getting their own tattoos as tributes to the rock icon.

But aside from high profile personalities, fans were also quick to share their love and respect for Lemmy. Tattoodo featured as many as 20 tattoos, all in honour of one of the world’s greatest musical legends. They range from Lemmy’s image to Motörhead album art to other objects associated with the band.

A Motörhead fan and his tattoo artist even got recognition after the tattoo on the former’s lower leg showing Lemmy’s face won the Best Coloured Portrait in last year’s DC Tattoo Expo. Blabbermouth mentioned that Farkas shared the award with Evan Olin, the Rhode Island-based tattoo artist who did the handiwork, and stated that the ink art took more than 9 hours to finish.

Remembering Lemmy

Admittedly inspired by The Beatles, Lemmy’s passion for music got him acquainted with other 60’s musical stars like Jimi Hendrix. But for someone as musically talented as Lemmy, just following the footsteps of another artist was never enough. He would later on forge his own path which eventually led to the formation of Motörhead.

Fast forward four decades later, and Motörhead’s albums are still adored by fans. Now, the band is considered among hard rock’s greatest acts and a major contributor to the foundations of heavy metal.

Motörhead’s influence became so popular that the band has been celebrated outside the world of music as well through games which feature either the members of the band or their music or even both. The Motörhead slot title included in the thematic slots lineup on the Slingo gaming platform incorporates the band’s tracks as its background music. Even the band members themselves got involved in the gaming industry by collaborating with developers for the role-playing game Through the Ages, which Loudwire specified as part of the band’s celebration for their 40th anniversary.

But most of all, Motörhead will always be remembered because of Lemmy as he was the mastermind behind the band’s music, and until his passing, he was the only original member. His music will live on, and now his image, too – through the tattoos of loyal fans worldwide.

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