Loading...

Follow 50 Campfires on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Bass bros Oliver Ngy and Cobi Pellerito are on the ultimate guys trip to Costa Rica. It’s jigging and relaxing on the ocean as they enjoy fresh pineapple on the boat. Cobi catches 7 new species in just one day, including his first yellowfin tuna. Tradition goes that he has to take a bite out of the heart….will he do it? Next on the hit list: Roosterfish and Giant Trevali. The boys are having so much fun, they extend their trip and explore the mainland on ATVs and some waterfall diving. #bealiveCostaRica #BACREp3

Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 1

Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 2

The post Episode 3 of Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Freshwater Fishing appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Bass bros Oliver Ngy and Cobi Pellerito are on the ultimate guys trip to Costa Rica. After exploring the freshwater fishing experience they travel to the coast to chase saltwater species. Cobi’s first trip out of the United States has many more firsts including first time eating octopus and it’s in a….burrito. The guys help cook up their catch in a snapper ceviche, split pacific spiny lobster tails and all local veggies.
#BACREp2 #bealiveCostaRica

Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 1

Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 3

The post Episode 2 of Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Freshwater Fishing appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Bass bros Oliver Ngy and Cobi Pellerito are on the ultimate guys trip to Costa Rica for some freshwater fishing. On Episode 1 of Angler Expedition Costa Rica Freshwater Fishing, they both cross new species off their list with the help of some expert local anglers. Cobi’s first trip out of the United States is filled with “Pura Vida” as they fish their way through the rainforest and explore the cuisine and culture of the country.
#BACREp1 #bealiveCostaRica

Watch more episodes:
Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 2

Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Saltwater Fishing | Episode 3

The post Episode 1 of Angler Expedition: Costa Rica Freshwater Fishing appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Our biggest gear giveaway of the year is BACK!

Calling all campers! We have a great lineup this year and we’ll be giving the entire prize package to ONE camper every week for ten weeks! Boom! From knives to chairs to outdoor ovens, we will truly Amp Your Camp for 2019.

This week we’re featuring the GCI Podrocker! Imagine bringing the most comfortable rocking chair ever to the campsite. It makes kicking back by the fire a sublime experience. The sling-style seat cradles you like no other, and the patented spring-action rocking make for the most relaxing evening of all time.
The rest of the gear!
The Camp Chef Professional Outdoor Oven means that there is literally nothing you can’t cook at the campsite! A 400-degree oven and two 9,000 BTU burners on the top will turn your campsite into a full-blown kitchen.
The Worksharp Field Sharpener is our go-to sharpener to keep your camp knives razor sharp. The built-in 20-degree angle guide takes your knife through five levels of sharpening – including a leather strop. It’s compact, and it gets the job done FAST.
The Kershaw Faultline has a three-inch 8Cr13MoV blade and is easy to open one-handed. The grippy rubber handle is comfortable, and it’s a great EDC choice because it only weighs 3.4 oz.
The UST Brilla 450 LED Headlamp kicks out 450 lumens on high, and will run for 40 hours on low. It also has both white and red lights, so you can switch to red late night at the picnic table without blinding everyone.

We’re giving away two knives this year! The Kershaw Reverb is a sleek folder that’s perfect for the trail, thanks to the handy carabiner clip. Attach it to your belt loop or backpack so it’s always ready to rock. It has a 2.5 inch blade and only weighs 1.6 oz. Sweet!

Smart hikers ALWAYS have a backup for starting fires. The Kershaw Fire Starter has a magnesium alloy shaft that is good for 3,000 strikes, and the plastic handle makes it comfortable to use. Don’t be caught in an emergency without one!

The post The Amp Your Camp Giveaway presented by GCI Outdoors appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
50 Campfires by 50 Campfires - 1M ago

You can absolutely rent a camping tent, and in the last few years, we’ve seen more companies offering rental gear for camping. There are a lot of reasons you might want to rent a tent:

  1. You’re a first-time camper and aren’t ready to drop the cash on a new one.
  2. You don’t camp that often and aren’t interested in storing one in your apartment.
  3. Your tent is old and you’d like to try out a specific type of tent before you buy it.
  4. You’re camping with more people than usual this weekend and need a large tent.
  5. You need to rent a few camping tents for first-time campers that you’re introducing to the outdoors (keep up the good work).
What to look for when renting camping gear

First off, your best bet is always going to be renting a tent locally because you won’t have to pay for shipping costs. There are some great websites that ship camping gear (listed below), but camping gear is bulky and expensive to ship. You might find a great two-person camping package for $99 only to find out that it’s another $65 to have it shipped both ways. Still, for some people, this is the only option to rent a camping tent because they don’t have a camping store anywhere near their house.

You also need to take a good look at the rental policy. What is the window for returning it? Do you have to get it in the mail the following Monday or do you have a few days to ship it back? Make sure you don’t get any unnecessary fees after your outdoor adventure is over.

Local options

REI

If you’re lucky enough to have an REI nearby this is a great option. Members can rent a four-person tent for $30/day with no deposit. If you need to rent sleeping bags and pads they’ll have those as well.

Nextdoor.com

Nextdoor is an online community that you can only join if you live in a specific neighborhood, which makes it safer and more trustworthy. If you’re a member (it’s free) it’s definitely worth posting to see if anyone will let you borrow a tent or rent one from them for a small fee.

Craigslist

Do a quick search on Craiglist to see if anyone in your area is renting their tent. People rent and sell just about everything on there and you might find exactly what you’re looking for at the right price.

Online options

Outdoorsgeek.com

Camping, backpacking, glamping, and canvas wall tents. $25-$75 per day.

Lower Gear Outdoors

Two person car camping tents for $29-$55 per day.

Coozie Outdoors

Marmot camping tents for $37-$105 per day.

Should you just buy a cheap tent?

This option needs to be discussed because, in the end, it’s what so many people decide to do. You can get a four-person tent at Walmart for $35. Is it going to last forever? No. But we always say that anything that gets people into the outdoors is a good thing. Either you’ll get hooked on camping or you won’t. If you do, you can invest in a better tent down the road. If you’re careful with your cheap tent you can probably get a few years out of it, and that’s better than not camping at all!

The post Can You Rent A Camping Tent? appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Being lost in the woods is a terrifying feeling.

There is no shortage of survival advice about what you should do in this scenario. You should stay put, build a shelter, conserve your energy, and stay calm. These are all things that you should learn how to do because they’re important. This tip is concerns the people who are looking for you, and is an easy way for them to find out exactly where you are.

These days most of us camp with our phones. They’re more computers that you can talk on than phones, which is why we like to bring them. They can take high quality photographs and video, store animal and and plant identification apps, and so much more. There’s one other thing that most of them do that could save your life: geolocation from a laptop (or another phone).

Here’s the tip: make sure that someone you trust has your login information to access the “Find My Phone” feature. Both Apple and Android phones have this feature. It’s ok if you’re lost where there is no cellular signal. Even in remote areas, you phone will often be in and out of service, so they may be able to locate you. This obviously assumes that your phone isn’t dead, but once again, most of us carry an external battery to keep our phones charged so we can keep snapping pictures. If you get lost in the woods you need all the help you can get, and this is another precaution you should take.

Bonus Tip: Make sure you download the entire area you’ll be in with Google Maps before you leave the house. It’s free, and you’ll be able to locate yourself with zero cell reception. Drop a marker at the trailhead before you head out and you’ll virtually eliminate the chance of spending a night lost in the woods.

The post This One Tip Could Save Your Life If You’re Lost In The Woods appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Duct tape isn’t the only way to fix camping gear.

Don’t get me wrong, I love duct tape. It works well for many things, but these days there are so many great products that work better for specific scenarios. The following list contains items that have been in my camp box for the last few years, and I swear by them. It’s to the point where I almost want something to go wrong so I can get clever and figure out how to fix camping gear on the trail (almost).

SG-20 Adhesive Repair Sealant
I came across SG-20 at a trade show about five years ago, and I’m not sure why it hasn’t become more popular. The guy had two one foot wooden curtain rods glued together end to end, and the wood would have broken before the bond did. Why do I like SG-20 for the campsite? Because it sets FAST. Like, so fast you better have your act together or you’ll miss your chance. You have about a 30 second window and it’s rock hard in five minutes. It’s incredible stuff if you need to fix camping gear. I WANT IT
Gorilla Tape
I’ll risk blasphemy and say it: duct tape isn’t #1 anymore. In a cage match Gorilla Tape is going to come out on top every time. Anyone who has used it knows it’s a superior product. It’s as simple as that. It’s more expensive than duct tape, but your camping gear is expensive too. Give it the fix it deserves. I WANT IT
Gear Ties
I use Gear Ties on everything from phone cables to tarp construction. But it’s just a piece of wire right? Wrong. It’s a piece of wire with a grippy rubber coating. Big difference. This is what makes them so effective, and the larger they get, the stronger they are. I fashion coat hooks out of the big ones at the campsite. They’re a must have. I WANT IT
Electricians Tape
“But I already have Gorilla Tape!” Here’s why you need Gorilla Tape AND electricians tape: electricians tape is stretchy. It gives you both adhesion and pressure, which provides a better solution in certain cases. The other benefit is that it doesn’t leave a bunch of residue behind when you remove it. And in case you’re wondering, yes there is a difference between 3M electricians tape and a generic brand. Ask any electrician. I WANT IT
Good Ol’ Sewing Kit

If you want to be prepared for anything you have to have a sewing kit. You don’t need a bulky kit with 30 colors of thread, so this minimalist one from Gear Aid does the trick. It comes with a few buttons and safety pins too, which will come in handy. If you’re not familiar with finishing knots you can learn a few here.

I WANT IT

The post 5 Must Have Items To Fix Camping Gear appeared first on 50 Campfires.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
25 Best Campgrounds Within Two Hours of San Francisco

Though there’s much to experience in America’s favorite city by the bay, it’s equally wonderful to get out of the urban area and explore the natural wonders Northern California has to offer. From the Central Coast to the vineyards of Napa, and the gold miners of Sacramento County, adventure awaits. What are you waiting for?

Get Directions
For Driving Walking Bicycling   show options hide options
Avoid Tolls
Avoid Highways
From
To
Fetching directions......
Central Coast

Big Basin Redwoods State Park: Boulder Creek, CA

As California’s oldest state park, Big Basin Redwoods State Park was established in 1902 in the heart of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Guests from all over the world flock to view the vast forest of ancient redwood trees just south of San Francisco. Other vegetation includes conifer and oak trees mixed with chaparral and riparian habitats. The diversity of the land is marked by elevations in the park, which vary from sea level to over 2,000 feet. More than 80 trails feature hiking for every kind of outdoors person. Photo opportunities run rampant with the sites of the ancient trees, waterfalls, lush valleys, and a variety of wildlife. Rest peacefully under a blanket of stars in one of the 142 campsites throughout the park, including sites for tents, horses, and primitive spots dotted along with five backcountry locations.

Big Basin Redwoods State Park

21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek, CA 95006

Campsites: $35

Learn more about Big Basin Redwoods State Park here.

Manresa Uplands Campground: Watsonville, CA

A little less than two hours away from San Francisco, the county of Santa Cruz features excellent beaches. Good citizens of the area saved the park some years back after concerns were raised about protecting beach land for the use of the public. This seasonal campground gives visitors easy access to fishing, surfing, boogie boarding, and all the other delights a stay by the seaside has to offer. Make sure to grab an official state fishing license to ensure your catch is legal, and be nice to the natural landscape surrounding the park.

Manresa Uplands State Campground

205 Manresa Uplands Rd, Watsonville, CA 95076

Campsites: $35

Learn more about Manresa Uplands Campground here.

Fremont Peak State Park: San Juan Bautista, CA

Visitors to Freemont Peak State Park experience sweepings views of Monterey Bay. There are incredible views in the hiking trails of the grasslands of the higher peaks of the Gavilan Range. Other views include the San Benito Valley, Salinas Valley, and the Santa Lucia Mountains east of Big Sur. Much wildlife lives in the pine and oak woodlands. There are plenty of spots for proper camping and picnicking throughout the park. The park also features an astronomical observatory with a 30-inch telescope, a popular destination for public programs on selected evenings.

Fremont Peak State Park

10700 San Juan Canyon Rd, San Juan Bautista, CA 95045

Learn more about Fremont Peak State Park here.

Bay Area

China Camp State Park: San Rafael, CA

Located right over the Golden Gate Bridge, China Camp State Park is the perfect overnight trek for busy San Franciscans looking to quickly get away. Waterfront views dot the scenery of the roadways in the park. Salt marshes, meadows, and oak habitats make for a diverse ecosystem on the land.  A variety of wildlife including deer, squirrels, coyote, fox, bats, and various birds can be viewed by interested hikers throughout the year. In addition to the wonders of wildlife, guests to the park can also learn some history. China Camp Village features a museum describing an early Chinese settlement that in its day housed 500 settlers, three general stores, a marine supply store, and a barber shop. Guests may camp overnight at Back Ranch Meadows Campground. Tents and RVs are welcome.

China Camp State Park

100 China Camp Village Rd, San Rafael, CA 94901

Campsites: $35

Learn more about China Camp State Park here.

Angel Island State Park: San Francisco Bay

Though situated just a ferry-ride away from San Francisco, Angel Island State Park might as well be a world away from the busy pace of the city. The U.S. Immigration Station processed many immigrants, the majority from China, from 1910 to 1940. During the Second World War, German and Japanese POWs were detained at the Station before being sent to facilities farther inland. Your vehicle must be left at home, and make sure to plan your trip well in advance. It can take up to a year to reserve your spot, but visitors will be able to reserve campsites and lodging six months in advance from the current date.

Angel Island State Park

Angel Island Tiburon, CA 94920

Campsites: $7-20

Learn more about Angel Island State Park here.

Point Reyes State Park: Inverness, CA

Offering more than 1,500 species of animals and plants to discover, Point Reyes State Park is a veritable playground for the budding or advanced naturalist in your life. Elephant seals made a triumphant return to the Point Reyes Headlands in the 1970s after having been absent from the area for generations. The best time to view the sea mammals is usually December through March for the birthing and mating season. Multiple campgrounds are available throughout the park. The Coast Campground is nestled within a small coastal grassy valley with easy access to the beach and tide pools. Glen Campground is located within a quiet forest along the Bear Valley Glen Trails. For camping on the water, Tomales Bay offers boat-in camping on the west side beaches of the state park.

Point Reyes State Park

1 Point Reyes-Petaluma Rd, Inverness, CA 94937

Campsites: $20-50

Learn more about Point Reyes State Park here.

Bothe-Napa Valley State Park: Calistoga, CA
Located right in the middle of the famous Napa region, this state park, which features hiking, swimming, and some cool yurt-style glamping available, is a perfect place to kick back for a leisurely weekend. During the day, visitors may take a calming hike while looking for interesting plantlife among the Ritchey Canyon on the Redwood Trail. A dip in the park’s pool cost a few bucks, but worth a quick dip after your walk. Afterward, try picnicking under the imposing Douglas Firs with some wine and cheese from the region.

Bothe-Napa Valley State Park

3801 St Helena Hwy, Calistoga, CA 94515

Campsites: $35

Learn more about Bothe-Nape Valley State Park here.

Castle Rock State Park: Los Gatos, CA

With sweeping views, chiseled sandstone, and green forests, there is much beauty to admire at Castle Rock State Park. Located at just over an hour away from the city, this state park draws visitors eager to hike the park’s 34 miles of rugged trails and climb the park’s caverns and rock, including its famous namesake. Budding and experienced botanists enjoy exploring the California black oaks and high-elevation coast redwoods. Camping is available year-round on a first-come, first-serve basis, so it’s best to make your reservation as early as possible. The campsites are for enthusiastic outdoors people, as campers are required to hike 2.5 miles from the parking area while carrying all of their equipment into the camp.

Castle Rock State Park

15000 Skyline Blvd, Los Gatos, CA 95033

Campsites: $15

Learn more about Castle Rock State Park here.

Kirby Cove Campground: Sausalito, CA

While this campsite is very close to San Francisco, visitors may still feel transported away with a quick stay at this campground offering one of the most unique views of the Golden Gate Bridge in the city. Kirby Cove is situated at the foot of the craggy Marin Headlands just west of the Golden Gate Bridge. A steep, mile-long trail to the cove begins at the parking area above Battery Spencer on Conzelman Road. The path descends through a stately grove of Monterrey pine and cypress and Blue Gum Eucalyptus. Fishing, hiking, mountain biking, and a host of other activities are available throughout the park.

Kirby Cove State Park

948 Fort Barry, Sausalito, CA 94965

Campsites: $25

Learn more about Kirby Cove State Park here.

Mount Tamalpais State Park: Mill Valley, CA

Mount Tamalpais was mentioned in Jack Kerouac’s The Dharma Buns, but this majestic state park offers more than just beatniks and hipsters. Visitors often enjoy gorgeous hikes, picnics, and some choice views of wildlife. At the top of the mountain, a visitor center provides information, snacks, and souvenirs.  The large Mountain Theater below regularly hosts outdoor plays and astronomy programs. Visitors may camp in several locations or stay in rustic view cabins at Steep Ravine or on private property at the West Point Inn. On weekends and holidays, it’s advised to arrive early to beat heavy traffic. Take the West Marin Stagecoach for a quick ride to this and other Golden Gate National Recreation Areas.

Mount Tamalpais State Park

3801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley, CA 94941

Campsites: $25

Learn more about Mount Tamalpais State Park here.

Rob Hill Campground: San Francisco, CA

Rob Hill Campground serves as San Francisco’s only official campground. At Rob Hill, new and experienced campers alike can view the lights of Sutro Tower, smell the fresh, ocean breeze, and hear the owls in their Cypress roosts. Campers have been enjoying the land while sleeping under the stars for generations. The first was the Ohlone, a tribe of Native Americans who were the first inhabitants of this area. After the US Army left Presidio in 2010, the area received a major renovation with the addition of upgraded group campsites, better restrooms, accessible paved pathways, and a building for educational programs.

Rob Hill Campground

1475 Central Magazine Rd., San Francisco, CA 94129

Campsites: $75

Gerstle Cove Campground: Jenner, CA

Visitors at Gerstle Cove Campground enjoy a variety of ecosystems, including grasslands, forested hills, and pristine prairies, to explore. The dramatic coastline provides a beautiful and dramatic view to visitors. There are over 20 miles of trails for hikers to trek. In addition, outdoor enthusiasts enjoy horseback riding, fishing, and scuba diving during visits. The campground offers 20 spots for an overnight stay. You can bring your canine friends, but they must be kept on a leash the whole time, and in your tent or vehicle during the night.

Gerstle Cove Campground

25050 Highway 1, Jenner, CA 95450

Campsites: $5-35

Learn more about Gerstle Cove Campground here.

Santa Cruz North / Costanoa KOA: Pescadero, CA

This eco-adventure resort offers guests the opportunity to experience and explore the natural beauty and protected coastline of California. A myriad of activities is available for whatever you’re into, including hiking, mountain biking, music, art exhibits, kayaking, and even spa treatments. The campground strives to keep a strict commitment to caring for the environment and has developed programs and initiatives to keep the area clean and protected. Make sure to check out Pigeon Point Lighthouse, which is just three miles north. This historically interesting lighthouse has watched over the sheer cliffs and rocky shores of the area since 1872.

Santa Cruz North/Costnoa KOA

2001 Rossi Rd, Pescadero, CA 94060

Campsites: Price Varies

Learn more about Santa Cruz North/Costanoa KOA here.

Butano State Park: Pescadero, CA

Founded in 1957, Butano State Park was established in order to protect precious redwood trees from the logging industry. Today, visitors enjoy hiking along 40 miles of trails scattered along the 4,000 acres of canyons and uplands of the property. Curious hikers may view woodpeckers, newts, and an exciting array of ecosystems throughout the park. Guided nature walks and weekend campfire programs are offered during the summer. Visitors may wish to leave extra drinking water at home, as drinking water is available at the park in both the main campground and the day-use areas.

Butano State Park

1500 Cloverdale Rd, Pescadero, CA 94060

Campsites: $35

Learn more about Butano State Park here.

Memorial County Park: Loma Mar, CA

On the 673 acres of Memorial County Park visitors have the opportunity to feel at peace with nature beneath old-growth redwoods that have grown for centuries. The park provides regular campfire and naturalist programs during the summer months. Guests are encouraged to learn about conservation, survival skills, and being good stewards of the land through these programs. Budding naturalists may view common plants around the park such as huckleberry, poison oak, ferns, redwood sorrel, and horsetail. Woodpeckers and stellar jays are good draws to birdwatchers. Two camping sites are available on the grounds. Both are open..
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview