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Andrea Son Dental surgeon at the Paulista University; Specialist in Dental Prosthesis by FFO – FundectoMestranda at UNG in the area of ​​digital flow and guided surgery; Beginning of the work with digital flows and CAD / CAM in 2014 – DIO Corporation in Brazil with headquarters in South Korea, in addition to working with companies such as Roland, 3Shape, among others. Development on several fronts related to the digital flow in software development projects, consultancies for the acquisition and implementation of new technologies, improvements and investigation of new materials in 3D printing, training, courses, researches. She was a speaker at our Brazil event.

Jenny: When was the first encounter you had with 3D printing? What was that experience like? What were you thinking at that moment?

Andrea: My first encounter was working with guided surgery for dental implants (2014), it was a very nice experience because it improved professional/patient experience and quality of care! Also working with scanners and software’s associated with 3D printers gave me complete digital control and predictability of many surgeries and treatments.

Jenny: What inspired you to start your journey in 3D printing?

Andrea: I always believed in technology. 3D printing with different types of printers opened doors to real experiments and prototypes instead doing this only in software and/or using heavy and expensive machines like milling machines. Since I was little, I always saw my dad reading and working with different tech solutions and it always inspired me, so we knew one day it would be possible to print our food the way we saw on Jetsons cartoon episode.

Jenny: Who inspired you the most along this journey in 3D printing?

Andrea: My dad, who pushed me to always search better ways to improve our patient’s treatment and to explore all limits from technology to make our life more creative and interesting.

Jenny: What motivates you the most for your work?

Andrea: A chance to make a better world in terms of discoveries, knowledge to anyone/anywhere and solutions to all people and communities with affordable price and different possibilities.

Jenny: What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

Andrea: Price and access to high-quality information from industry to everyone. To dental health area we need to do more research and studies about 3D printers, 3D printing process, and different materials to offer more reliability to all doctors and technicians trying to work with or thinking about investing in these machines. Nowadays, compared to other equipment and materials used by dental professionals, we have very few information about 3D Printing. Gratefully, with the help of many people. I work with many universities and different companies to study more about all solutions and possibilities to try to develop the best way to work with digital workflow using 3D printers.

Jenny: What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

Andrea: I think the biggest challenge is still access and materials, especially in Brazil, we need to find ways to get an incentive from the government to put 3D printers inside every school and university, so more people know about the technology and try different things. Also, we need more studies about different materials to give reliable solutions to our patients and again, it will come from education.

Jenny: If you are granted three wishes by a higher being, what would they be?

Andrea:

  • Trying every single printer existed nowadays
  • Helping with the development of 3D Printing technology
  • Working closely with one or different companies/universities and still be alive when 3D printing will be part of everyone’s life.

Jenny: What advice would you give to a smart driven college student in the “real world”? What bad advices you heard should they ignore?

Andrea: Technology came to simplify our lives and help us to improve our living and time. And any people from any field can creatively develop great solutions seeing technologies like 3D printing as ally. Everyone should spend a little time to understand how technology could help us. – World’s changing. So, I would not spend my life focusing only in one thing. I dedicate all my life and who I am, and who I’m becoming to every person I meet, every place I visited and every moment I lived. From reading a nice book to researching 3D printing materials, from using a new software to discovering a new hobby. I think diversity helps creativity and understanding different situations better.

Jenny: If you could have a giant billboard to promote a message to millions and even billions of people in our community (i.e. healthcare 3D printing and bio-fabrication), what message would that be?

Andrea: How many times we desired to make real, all kinds of prototypes imagined just inside our thoughts. With 3D printing and bio-fabrication we can make it.

Jenny: What were/was the best investment you made in 3D printing/bio-printing?

Andrea: My trip to Formlabs and IDS 2019 (biggest international congress from dentistry area) – in my first trip (Formlabs) I almost cried during the event/trip, seeing too many different people working together to improve.

Jenny: What were/was the worst investment you made in 3D printing?

Andrea: All investments made with 3D printing were well spent.

Jenny: What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

Andrea: Choosing to work closely to 3D printing companies as an industry person to learn more and focus on the technology, instead of staying inside of a dental clinic with my parents and continuing to improving our team and structure there.

Jenny: What do you enjoy in your spare time? What are you passionate about outside of your work/3d printing?

Andrea: I usually drink coffee, read a lot, stay with my family and research more about different technologies – I’m passionate about discovering new hobbies and new people and their stories.

JennY: What is your favorite quote? Why?

Andrea: “Wear gratitude like a cloak and it will feed every corner of your life.” (Rumi) – When I decided to let everyone teach me and help me with all kind of opportunity and information. I grew up faster than I imagined. When we help someone and let them help us… great things happen. And when we feel grateful about it and share this feeling, it perpetuates and spread to other people.

Jenny: What does the word “3DHEALS” mean to you?  =)

Andrea: A chance to connect with more people working with 3D printing to.

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Idea to Implementation: The Healthcare 3D Printing Market

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3DHEALS Influencer Interview: Derek Morris, Organ Manufacturing Group At United Therapeutics

The post Interview: Andrea Son, 3D Printing in Dental Surgery appeared first on 3DHeals.

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Expert Corner: Five Reasons Cybersecurity Will Play Critical Role in 3D Printing in Healthcare – Part 2

By: Stephan Thomas

In my last post, I discussed how the transition that we’re observing to digital manufacturing (especially additive manufacturing) means medical device manufacturers are confronted with a new set of risks related to the management and control of the engineering and manufacturing data of their products. I identified five key risk areas that manufacturers must secure in order to safeguard their brand value. In this post, I’ll focus on three of them: IP risk, liability risk, and confidentiality risk.

Read More

The  “Expert Corner” blogs aim to provide 3DHEALS readers unfiltered first-person narratives from industry experts and entrepreneurs in healthcare 3D printing and bioprinting fields. Zero-degree of separation is what we want to achieve between the cutting-edge technology and 3DHEALS community.

Tell Your Story Influencer Interviews

Luiz Fernando Michaelis, Co-founder & CEO of Hefesto Med Tech, Brazil 

“My inspiration began in the first year of residency but the one case that made me jump from being a clinician and dive into developing was a lady with terminal breast cancer and no real treatment to alleviate her pain from a femur fracture ‘cause there were no anesthetic options or orthopedic implants capable of doing it.”

Doris Canen, 3D Printing Tax Law Expert, Brazil  

“Brazil´s complex tax system is definitely one of the biggest challenges in my line of work and finding creative solutions for new technology considering an “older” local and international system is also a challenge. To overcome them understanding the different and changing interpretations of the rules and the risks involved is necessary.”

3DHEALS Startup Weekly Shout-outs:

Different companies within the healthcare 3D printing and bioprinting ecosystem will receive shoutouts in our weekly newsletter and on social media weekly.

Join the Directory, non-U.S. Join the Directory, U.S.

Partner Event:

2019 GRO Your Career Conference, April 23rd, 2019

3DHEALS Events:

3DHEALS São Paulo, Brazil: Healthcare 3D Printing and Bioprinting, Next Generation
Date: Wednesday, April 17th, 2019  |  Event time:  2:00 PM – 9:00 PM, São Paulo, Brazil, Register

3DHEALS Boston: Happy Hour @ Miracle of Science
Date: Wednesday, April 18th, 2019  |  Event time:  6:30 PM – 8:00 PM, Boston, MA, USA, Register

3DHEALS Cleveland, Ohio: 3D Printing in Healthcare
Date: Thursday, April 25th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, Register
(Apply to speak)

3DHEALS Boston Annual Summer Event: 3D Printing in Healthcare – Reconnected
Date: Thursday, July 18th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM Boston, MA, USA Register
(Apply to speak)

Articles you may like:

Weekly Newsletter April 8th, 2019

Interview: Dr. Ivan Chicchon, 3D Printing in Dental Implantation

3D Printing Metal: Where we’ve been and where we’re going

The post Weekly Newsletter April 15th, 2019 appeared first on 3DHeals.

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In my last post, I discussed how the transition that we’re observing to digital manufacturing (especially additive manufacturing) means medical device manufacturers are confronted with a new set of risks related to the management and control of the engineering and manufacturing data of their products. I identified five key risk areas that manufacturers must secure in order to safeguard their brand value. In this post, I’ll focus on three of them: IP risk, liability risk, and confidentiality risk.

Loss of control over intellectual property

As the digitization of manufacturing explodes and additive manufacturing becomes more prevalent, most medical device companies will be forced to consider the implications of the loss of control over the digitization of their assets. Just as the music industry suffered major revenue loss when its IP became digital (and was therefore easy to share or distribute illegally), the digital information that describes the design and engineering medical parts data will be a target of counterfeit operations.

The economic damage of IP theft is estimated at over $300 billion per year. [Ref 1] This total includes software piracy, counterfeiting, trademark violations, and other forms of stolen IP. Medical device companies need to take IP protection especially seriously because they are so heavily dependent on innovation and the value-add embedded in their product makes the industry a good target for IP theft. Today’s medical devices embody millions of dollars of research, design, testing, development, manufacturing, and marketing — and can take years to get to market.

In an industry that is at the forefront of rapid innovation, medical device companies must implement stringent and rigorous measures to protect their competitive advantages. Every year brings new rivals, novel solutions, and greater potential for theft. Whether entering a new market, incorporating connected products into their existing solutions, or exploring new manufacturing processes, medical device manufacturers must implement impregnable techniques coupled with legal strategies and a top-down risk awareness culture that protect their IP while enabling the transition to distributed manufacturing.

Liability risk may increase if a product’s design is not secure

Beyond the business and brand reputation risks of a counterfeit product are considerations of the ramifications of the effects of a counterfeit product. From a legal perspective, manufacturers must protect consumers from harm caused by their product and are liable for injury or property damage caused by any defect. In defense to such claims, the manufacturer could plead that it was not the producer of the counterfeit product, or that the product included a component that, unbeknownst to the manufacturer, was in some way defective. Either way, this is likely a lengthy and expensive legal headache.

Due to the personal-injury implications of a defective medical device, there is a heavy burden on every medical device manufacturer to ensure the integrity of all parts along its supply and manufacturing chains. In practice, this means it is essential to be 100% confident that the digital information that describes a product’s design and manufacture cannot be stolen, modified or corrupted. Absent a secure method to protect this information, a manufacturer is exposing itself to enormous potential liability risk and legal costs. The integrity of the medical device digital supply chain is, more than ever, a key priority for the industry.

Loss of control over confidential/personal data

One essential characteristic of the medical industry is its responsibility for PII (Personal Identification Information) and PHI (Personal Health Information), which require HIPAA compliance. Due to the life-critical nature of the services it provides, the healthcare industry is continually under attack by cyber terrorists. Ransomware is the top threat to healthcare organizations. In 2016, this industry suffered at least one breach every day, affecting more than 27 million patient records.

One contributing problem is that most healthcare facilities and organizations are vulnerable to these attacks because they have failed to implement the latest measures to prevent intrusion of hackers and malware. Meanwhile, media reports tend to focus on the personal healthcare records that were held for ransom (or, in some cases, stolen).

However, a recent Washington Post article highlights the fact that medical devices themselves are frequently not secure.

Cybersecurity researchers have also raised alarms about vulnerabilities in implantable medical devices that hackers could exploit to injure or even kill patients. Former vice president Dick Cheney famously had his internal pacemaker taken offline because of hacking fears. [Ref 2]

This highlights the need to ensure that access to, and the data produced, by a medical device cannot be compromised due to a counterfeit product. For example, an individualized medical device may contain personally identifiable information and a data breach may trigger security and privacy laws. Again, this points to the need to ensure that every medical device that is manufactured and released for sale is authentic and includes all the safeguards designed into it by the original engineering team.

Another example would be the prosthesis industry: additive manufacturing is a perfect technology to generate on-demand customized prosthesis. Some of the data contained in the technical data package necessary to manufacture the part may fall under HIPAA scope and as such must meet the most stringent security and privacy requirements.

In my next (and final post), I’ll focus on two cybersecurity risks associated specifically with manufacturing of medical devices: production risk and traceability risk.

References:

  1. http://www.ipcommission.org/report/ip_commission_report_052213.pdf
  2. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/paloma/the-cybersecurity-202/2019/01/29/the-cybersecurity-202-medical-devices-are-woefully-insecure-these-hospitals-and-manufacturers-want-to-fix-that/5c4f4a661b326b29c3778cef/

About the Author:

Stephan is currently the Co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Identify3d, a software company that develops software solutions for Digital Manufacturing, in charge of Strategy and Business Development. Identify3d enables the Digital Thread through design protection, manufacturing repeatability, and traceability. Stephan has more than 25 years of experience in Operations, Supply Chain, M&A and Restructuring with companies such as EY, Alvarez & Marsal and REL Consultancy. He holds an M.B.A. from Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business and a Master in management from Dauphine University (France). Stephan also lectures at the Berkeley-Columbia Executive M.B.A. on performance improvement topics. He is a board member of 3D4pro, an Additive Manufacturing Saas company.

You may also like:

  1. Five Reasons Cybersecurity Will Play a Critical Role in 3D Printing in Healthcare – Part I, by Stephan Thomas
  2. 3D Printing Poses Unique Security Risks for Medical Devices by Farah Tabibkhoei
  3. Cybersecurity for 3D Printed Medical Devices, Less Crazy and More Useful Than Bitcoins by Jenny Chen
  4. Decentralized Healthcare — Part II: Breaking It All Down by Jenny Chen

The post Five Reasons Cybersecurity Will Play Critical Role in 3D Printing in Healthcare – Part 2 appeared first on 3DHeals.

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Luiz Fernando Michaelis Co-founder and CEO of Hefesto Med Tech – Orthopedics 4.0; Co-developer of PetLock Orthosis; Participant of Stanford Biodesign @ Einstein; Fellow in Orthopedic Oncology; Medical Residency in Orthopedics and Traumatology; Graduation in Medicine – UFABC. Luiz will be a speaker at our upcoming 3DHEALS Brazil event.

Jenny: When was the first encounter you had with 3D printing? What was that experience like? What were you thinking at that moment?

Luiz: My first time with 3D printing was in October 2017 and it was an eye opening experience, since I thought it was something completely different and simpler. I thought at that time there were a lot to study to reach my goals.

Jenny: What inspired you to start your journey in 3D printing ?

Luiz: As an orthopedic surgeon my inspiration is aways the evolution of patient care and medical practice, specially in an area that lacks real new solutions for old, known problems.

Jenny: Who inspired you the most along this journey in 3D printing ?

Luiz: My inspiration began in the first year of residency but the one case that made me jump from being a clinician and dive into developing was a lady with terminal breast cancer and no real treatment to alleviate her pain from a femur fracture ‘cause there were no anesthetic options or orthopedic implants capable of doing it.

Jenny: What motivates you the most for your work?

Luiz: The possibility of changing the way we treat orthopedic patients, with more information and a more controllable and objective treatment for the orthopedic surgeon.

Jenny: What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

Luiz: As a lot of cases working with 3D printing, our biggest obstacle is time. Patients don’t always have the time to wait a lot for things to be printed. The solution is making the time to delivery a constant and work around it or develop a faster printer.

Jenny: What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing/bio-printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

Luiz: The biggest challenge for both Bio-printing and 3D Printing is to get more availability and usage in point-of-care medicine with reproducibility and quality. The solution is to keep advancing on research and thinking outside the box to evolve the technology and increase its uses.

Jenny: If you are granted three wishes by a higher being, what would they be?

Luiz: Have more time, more peace and the capacity to store more information.

Jenny: What advice would you give to a smart driven college student in the “real world”? What bad advices you heard should they ignore?

Luiz: I’d say that you got to be smart enough to understand the context and reality you live in and try to move in the right direction and that we usually don’t reach the dream without the work.

As for bad advice, there is no bad advice and none should be ignored. They ought to be heard and thought of.

Jenny: If you could have a giant billboard to promote a message to millions and even billions of people in our community (i.e. healthcare 3D printing and bio-fabrication), what message would that be?

Luiz: Less hype, more real solutions!

Jenny: What were/was the best investment you made in 3D printing/bio-printing/bio-fabrication?

Luiz:: The best investment is always taking time in testing and education. All the rest follows.

Jenny: What were/was the worst investment you made in 3D printing?

Luiz: Buying a printer that doesn’t match my need. A waste of money and time.

Jenny: What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

Luiz: Not having a regular doctor’s career to study and build technology.

Jenny: What do you enjoy in your spare time? What are you passionate about outside of your work/3d printing?

Luiz: I practice jiu-jitsu and go to the gym. I’m passionate about sports and knowledge.

Jenny: What is your favorite quote? Why?

Luiz: If you want something done, do it yourself. Because the only way you know something will be done and accordingly with what you want and actually doing it.

Jenny: What does the word “3DHEALS” mean to you? =)

Luiz: A possibility of making a difference and being a part of a bigger community

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The post Interview: Luiz Fernando Michaelis, Co-founder & CEO of Hefesto Med Tech appeared first on 3DHeals.

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Doris Canen LLM in International Tax Law from King’s College London (Chevening Scholarship). Graduate in Tax Law from FGV. Member of the Research Group on Taxation and New Technologies of FGV. Lawyer. Senior Tax Lawyer specialized in Direct and International Tax as well as New Technologies, working mainly with the taxation of cross border transactions, due diligence, contract revision and corporate restructuring involving Brazil. Previous experience in multinational companies, Big4 and law firms in London, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Doris will be a speaker for our upcoming Brazil event on April 17th, 2019.

Jenny: When was the first encounter you had with 3D printing? What was that experience like? What were you thinking at that moment?

Doris: I learned about 3D printing while reading OECD Papers on Digital Economy and how 3D Printing is one of the new technologies used worldwide. Also, FGV-SP organized an event in 2017 on the tax challenges of 3D Printing.

Jenny: What inspired you to start your journey in 3D printing?

Doris: After the above-mentioned event at FGV and observing the various challenges in my field of study (tax), I decided to pursue the study of 3D printing from a tax and business point of view.

Jenny: Who inspired you the most along this journey in 3D printing ?

Doris: Tathiane Piscitelli, PhD in Tax Law and FGV Professor and coordinator of the Taxation and New Technologies study group.

Jenny: What motivates you the most for your work?

Doris: The possibility to find creative solutions so that health and technology can advance in Brazil, considering the country´s complex tax system.

Jenny: What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

Doris: Brazil´s complex tax system is definitely one of the biggest challenges in my line of work and finding creative solutions for new technology considering an “older” local and international system is also a challenge. To overcome them understanding the different and changing interpretations of the rules and the risks involved is necessary.

Jenny: What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing/bio-printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

Doris: From a business structuring point of view, compliance with different legislation worldwide to allow the proper use of the technology.

Jenny: If you are granted three wishes by a higher being, what would they be?

Doris: It may sound cliché, but probably 1) health for everyone as it is impossible to live without it, 2) fulfillment – that people have the opportunity to do what they enjoy and make use of their talents and 3) dignified living conditions as many people don´t have proper homes.

Jenny: What advice would you give to a smart driven college student in the “real world”?What bad advices you heard should they ignore?

Doris:

Good advice: Effort pays off in the end and nothing comes without sacrifices so focus on expanding your knowledge through courses, practical experience and books and find a field of work you enjoy to specialize in and be known for.

Bad advice: The ends justify the means. I believe how you make it is just as important as actually making it so the ends do not justify the means.

Jenny: If you could have a giant billboard to promote a message to millions and even billions of people in our community (i.e. healthcare 3D printing and bio-fabrication), what message would that be?

Doris: Congratulations on healthcare being one of the lead sectors in 3D use (as per OECD information) and using it to improve health worldwide.

Jenny: What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

Doris: I believe switching jobs and areas of expertise presents a risk but pays off in the end.

Jenny: What do you enjoy in your spare time? What are you passionate about outside of your work/3d printing?

Doris: Working out, going to the beach and reading.

Jenny: What is your favorite quote? Why?

Doris: “Don´t let the noise of others´ opinions drown out your own inner voice” (Steve Jobs). I believe it is very important to choose your mentors and listen to them but many other people will try to discourage you and if you try to please everyone  you may not achieve all you are capable of achieving.

Jenny: What does the word “3DHEALS” mean to you?

Doris: Healing through 3D technology.

The post Interview: Doris Canen, 3D Printing Tax Law Expert appeared first on 3DHeals.

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3DHeals by Jenny Chen, M.d. - 3M ago
Metal 3D Printing in Dentistry – Restoration

Dr. Zsolt Pásztor

Based on the trends of the last few years, it can be stated that the digital revolution in dentistry has begun and seems to be irreversible. The question is no longer whether it should be introduced, but when, at what rate and to what extent. 

3D printing and more specifically metal 3D printing has a key role in this process. 

According to forecasts, the world of dentistry will be profoundly transformed by digital dentistry technologies. Experts agree that in the coming years, changes will be driven and impacted the most by 3D printing (additive manufacturing).

3D printing has made a spectacular entry and given a new impetus to the spreading of digital dentistry. Two areas can be mentioned, where the technology is already widely applied and its impact has been significant: 1) the manufacture of invisible orthodontic aligners and 2) metal restorations. This article gives an overview of the latter, based primarily upon the experience gained in Central-Eastern Europe.

READ MORE Interview: Renata Vano, 3D Printing in Prosthodontics, Brazil
What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

“There wasn’t biocompatible materials to work with FFF 3D printers. I created my own and found a partner to help with regulation process.”

READ MORE Interview: Rafael Vidal Peres, Founder of Aditiv and RealDent

What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

“Maybe I’m doing it now! I’m preparing myself for teaching about digital, after years working with high end quality dentures! The main problem is the result of Digital denture is not so good as a Handmade denture. But I think it’s because it’s just getting started. I believe that the materials and processes of the printers’ factories will evolve.  I’m introducing this technology to my students and to Brazilian Dental technicians… let’s see how it will be!”

READ MORE 3DHEALS Community Manager Spotlight: Kuwait

Dr. Ahmad Alali, currently works in the plastic surgery department, Babtain center of plastic and reconstructive surgery, Kuwait. He completed MSc in plastic and reconstructive surgery in University College London on 3D printing application in plastic surgery. Dr. Alali published several papers on this subject and attended conferences to promote 3D printing in healthcare. Furthermore, Dr. Alali is a board member in the international society of digital medicine and editorial board member in Journal of Digital Medicine. Read his interview with 3DHEALS. 

3DHEALS Startup Weekly Shout-outs: 

Different companies within the healthcare 3D printing and bioprinting ecosystem will receive shoutouts in our weekly newsletter and on social media weekly.

Join the Directory, non-U.S. Join the Directory, U.S. 3DHEALS Events: 3DHEALS São Paulo, Brazil: Healthcare 3D Printing and Bioprinting, Next Generation
Date: Wednesday, April 17th, 2019  |  Event time:  2:00 PM – 9:00 PM, São Paulo, Brazil, Register

3DHEALS Boston: Happy Hour @ Miracle of Science
Date: Wednesday, April 18th, 2019  |  Event time:  6:30 PM – 8:00 PM, Boston, MA, USA, Register

3DHEALS Cleveland, Ohio: 3D Printing in Healthcare
Date: Thursday, April 25th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, Register
(Apply to speak)

3DHEALS Boston Annual Summer Event: 3D Printing in Healthcare – Reconnected
Date: Thursday, July 18th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM Boston, MA, USA Register
(Apply to speak)
3DHEALS Brazil, São Paulo: Healthcare 3D Printing and Bioprinting, Next Generation – Pitch3D Competition Application Open NOW!

Rewards:

  1. Opportunity to present your startup to Brazilian and international investors from the 3DHeals platform
  2. Mentoring with Jenny Chen, CEO of 3DHeals (3hs)
  3. Technical mentoring in manufacturing with Fabio Sant’ana, in Technology (6 months) partnerFarcco
  4. 3D Systems Brazil offered a prize for the competition. They are giving vouchers for the imprima3d.com.br and their printing service. First place will win 1000.00 BRL to print products and second place will win 500.00 BRL. Winners will be invited to visit their facilities too.
SEE MORE 3DHEALS EVENTS Partner Events:

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Renata Vano Technique in Prosthodontics – Senac- 1993; Specialist Tec. in Total Prosthesis – Senac – 2003; Profª – Graduação; Technique in Dental Prosthesis / Senac -2003-2010; Profª – Specialization Tec. in Prosthesis Total / Senac 2006-2010; Profª in the courses: Apdesp -SP / Senac – SP / Dental São Paulo -MT / Dental Globo – GO / HGEF – CE / Unimar -SP /; Dental IT-SP / Company owner – Mega Smile – courses and trainings – 2004; Technical responsible for the acrylic sector laboratory ERO dental prosthesis – 2001-2018; World Champion in Total Prosthesis – Utah – USA 2017; Member DTG – since 2017. Minister of National and International Courses and Lectures (Ivoclar Speaker – US). She is also one of the speakers on the upcoming event in São Paulo, Brazil on April 17, 2019. For more information of the event you can check this link.

Jenny: When was the first encounter you had with 3D printing? What was that experience like? What were you thinking at that moment?

Renata: The first time that I saw a Denture was in Feb 2018 at Chicago LabDay. That was during a conversation totally informal, but I had many doubts about quality and process for make dentures. In Aug I decided to visit a big dental Lab in Huntsville, AL for understand the process and see result of this new technique for dentures production.

Jenny: What inspired you to start your journey in 3D printing?

Renata: The main reason is to develop a safe way for dentures production and a new way to Dental Technicians work, the first machine that I used was a Carbon and resins from DENTCA and KULZER.

Jenny: Who inspired you the most along this journey in 3D printing ?

Renata: The Oral Arts dental lab in Alabama- Matt Winstead and Valerie McMillan, DDS.

Jenny: What motivates you the most for your work?

Renata: I’m teacher in Brazil for 17 years and I have seen how difficult it is to produce Dentures, and most part of time the Dental Technicians take a long time for, or the final results are not so good in quality or function. I would like to develop a technique for dentures production: safe, security, high end results in quality, aesthetics, resistance to give back for patients a very good smile. I do believe in technology!

Jenny: What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

Renata: Well, here in Brazil all the steps for digital dentures production are super expensive yet. I have been making travels to the US to learn more about the Digital Dentures, but I can’t find all the machines, materials, and technology like in the US. It makes all the process of research too slow, or not happening the way that I like.

Jenny: What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

Renata: The biggest challenge in my opinion is the aesthetics and resistance of materials, the resins are not so pretty and we can’t get the result that we do with process of analog dentures. I’m sure that it’ll getting better … Maybe if the 3d be multi- color… We could print in colors…

Jenny: If you are granted three wishes by a higher being, what would they be?  

Renata: As a professional, I would like to have a Denture Center Brazil: Dental Lab (to attend dentists and patients in Full Mouth Reconstruction cases) + Dental lab school (for training Dental technicians into digital world in a responsible and correct manner. The students will learn about whole analog and functional process by rehabilitating patients and incorporating the technology in favor of their clinical cases.) As I person: health and Knowledge.

Jenny: What advice would you give to a smart driven college student in the “real world”? What bad advices you heard should they ignore?  

Renata: Work with your heart and soul. Never work about money!

Jenny: If you could have a giant billboard to promote a message to millions and even billions of people in our community (i.e. healthcare 3D printing and bio-fabrication), what message would that be?

Renata: Use your heart and soul to print new smiles!

Jenny: What were/was the best investment you made in 3D printing/bio-printing/bio-fabrication?

Renata: As I wrote before, here in Brazil the technology takes more time to arrive in Brazil, the equipment is very expensive and the resins are not allowed for use in the patient’s mouth. As soon as happens I’ll invest!

Jenny: What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

Renata: Maybe I’m doing it now! I’m preparing myself for teaching about digital, after years working with high end quality dentures! The main problem is the result of Digital denture is not so good as a Handmade denture. But I think it’s because it’s just getting started. I believe that the materials and processes of the printers’ factories will evolve.  I’m introducing this technology to my students and to Brazilian Dental technicians… let’s see how it will be!

Jenny: What do you enjoy in your spare time? What are you passionate about outside of your work/3d printing?

Renata: I like to be in touch with nature and spending my time with my family and friends!

Jenny: What is your favorite quote? Why?   

Renata: “The pain and pleasure of being.”

Jenny: What does the word “3DHEALS” mean to you?  =)

Renata: A new beginning! New opportunity and new knowledge!

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Rafael Vidal Peres PhD and master in biomaterials by the Military Engineering Institute (IME); Specialist in Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Orofacial Pain and specialist in Orthodontics. Experience in the area of ​​orofacial rehabilitation with emphasis on biomaterials, 3D printing and applied three-dimensional modeling. Founder of Aditiv that provides services in the area of ​​3D printing and three-dimensional biomedical modeling; Founder of RealDent specializes in 3D printing of realistic replicas of teeth for training; Researches in the area of ​​materials for 3D printing in partnership with companies such as PROTMAT, BRASKEM and 3DLAB. He is also one of the speakers on the upcoming event in São Paulo, Brazil on April 17, 2019. For more information of the event you can check this link.

Jenny: When was the first encounter you had with 3D printing?

Rafael:

2012.

Jenny: What was that experience like?

Rafael:

“This is the future”.

Jenny: What were you thinking at that moment?

Rafael: Treat my patients with my computer using CAD CAM.

Jenny: What inspired you to start your journey in 3D printing?

Rafael: Do things better and faster with amazing tools.

Jenny: Who inspired you the most along this journey in 3D printing ?

Rafael: Professional 3D artists and high level programmers.

Jenny: What motivates you the most for your work?

Rafael: Automate my work flow more and more and I belive that patients deserve to know that there are amazing tools that can improve their treatment.

Jenny: What is/are the biggest obstacle(s) in your line of work? If you have conquered them, what were your solutions?

Rafael: There wasn’t biocompatible materials to work with FFF 3D printers. I created my own and found a partner to help with regulation process.

Jenny: What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

Rafael: Customer development and regulatory agencies.

Jenny: If you are granted three wishes by a higher being, what would they be?  

Rafael: Education for people and something good to my family and friends.

Jenny: What advice would you give to a smart driven college student in the “real world”? What bad advices you heard should they ignore?

Rafael: Think about something that people will need in 10 years and try to help them today. If you make small progress, but continually, just ignore people that tell you that it will not work.

Jenny: If you could have a giant billboard to promote a message to millions and even billions of people in our community (i.e. healthcare 3D printing and bio-fabrication), what message would that be?

Rafael: Go digital and you will never come back.

Jenny: What were/was the best investment you made in 3D printing/bio-printing?

Rafael: Design my own printer.

Jenny: What were/was the worst investment you made in 3D printing/bio-printing/bio-Fabrication?

Rafael: Low cost DLP 3D printer.

Jenny: What was/is the biggest risk you took in your career?

Rafael: Make bioreabsorbable filament with big two screw extruder with 1kg of a very expensive pellets  (PhD thesis).

Jenny: What do you enjoy in your spare time? What are you passionate about outside of your work/3d printing?

Rafael: Surf.

Jenny: What is your favorite quote? Why?

Rafael: Done is better than perfect.

Jenny: What does the word “3DHEALS” mean to you?

Rafael: Help people with 3D tools.

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Based on the trends of the last few years, it can be stated that the digital revolution in dentistry has begun and seems to be irreversible. The question is no longer whether it should be introduced, but when, at what rate and to what extent. 

3D printing, and more specifically metal 3D printing, has a key role in this process.

According to forecasts, the world of dentistry will be profoundly transformed by digital dentistry technologies. Experts agree that in the coming years, changes will be driven and impacted the most by 3D printing (additive manufacturing).

3D printing has made a spectacular entry and given a new impetus to the spreading of digital dentistry. Two areas can be mentioned, where the technology is already widely applied and its impact has been significant: 1) the manufacture of invisible orthodontic aligners and 2) metal restorations. This article gives an overview of the latter, based primarily upon the experience gained in Central-Eastern Europe.

Nowadays, typically CoCr restorations are produced by 3D printing in dentistry. At the same time, titanium restorations gain also ground, the share of which is expected to grow by a significant rate in the coming years. 3D printed titanium restorations – owing to the advantageous features of titanium and 3D printing – offer a competitive alternative to restorations made of CoCr and zirconia, as well as restorations made by casting and milling technologies.

Casting is the longest used and most widely spread technology in dentistry. Both CoCr and titanium products can be fabricated by casting. As casting of titanium requires a higher level of technical competence and is also more expensive, with the exception of special works, the prosthetic restorations are typically made of CoCr.

The advantage of casting is its low investment cost, and in line with this the low price of the final product. However, some of the restorations produced by casting (about 10 to 20%), due to the features of the technology, contains inhomogeneity and inclusions. As these products are faulty, they must (should) be fabricated again.

The alternative to casting has been CNC milling for about two decades. CNC milling opened up the way to using new materials in addition to CoCr and titanium, too. A material frequently used for such prosthodontic restorations is zirconia. Zirconia restorations, for the time being, can only be produced with this technology. Moreover milling of zirconia requires a milling machine of lower capacity than that of CoCr or titanium.

One of the great advantages of the milling technology is that it produces a homogenous structure, reducing the ratio of the structurally faulty products practically to zero. An additional important advantage of the technology is that it results in a smooth surface, which is an indispensable requirement at the parts of the restorations fitting to the implants or implant interfaces (referring to as fitting parts later). A drawback of CNC milling is the high price of the product, which is resulted from the high investment costs and the high quantity of raw material (disk) to be used that finally turns into waste to a great extent.

As a result, CNC milling is used primarily for the production of zirconia, and to a smaller extent of CoCr and titanium restorations.

Titanium frameworks produced by the combination of 3D printing and milling (Source: Premet, www.premet.hu)

Metal 3D printing offers a new, viable option over casting and CNC milling. 3D printing is suitable for the production of both CoCr and titanium restorations. This latter, due to the explosive nature of titanium-oxide, requires a printer with a working chamber expressly engineered for this purpose, as well as greater technological competence and discipline. (It might be a reason of the current less extensive use of titanium vis-à-vis CoCr).

The product obtained by 3D printing, similarly to milling, has a homogeneous structure, therefore, the proportion of the faulty products is practically zero, too.

The surface of the product is rougher than that of the product made by milling, at the same time – with the exception of the fitting parts – this roughness is acceptable, since in case of veneering with ceramics it can be compensated, and in case of veneering with composites it is even advantageous.

Thanks to the recently developed processes combining 3D printing and milling (e.g. sint&mill), the fitting parts can also be produced in the required quality. Owing to this process, the smoothness of the fitting parts is equivalent to that obtained by CNC milling (as it is made by CNC milling), at the same time, the overall cost of production will be lower than in case of milling.

While the initial investment cost in case of 3D printing is also high, the significantly smaller amount of raw material (powder) required and the higher productivity result in lower specific fabrication costs and, consequently, a favourable product price when compared to milling.

In case of CoCr, the price of the 3D printed products is already competitive with that of the cast items, whereas their quality is higher. Due to the competitive price, 3D printing increasingly replaces casting and CNC milling in some Central-Eastern European countries. What is more, there are several dental labs in the region which produce restorations exclusively by 3D printing.

Subperiostalis implant made of titanium produced by 3D
printing (Source: Premet, www.premet.hu)




3D printing opened up new prospects for the fabrication and application of titanium restorations. The use of technology leads to higher quality compared to casting, a lower price compared to milling and greater conformity of the digital model and product compared to both. The advantage of 3D printing over milling is manifest particularly in the case of the various implants (e.g. circular, symmetric traditional or one-off platforms resting on the cortical bone surface) and traumatic platforms, as printing allows the production of such forms, which are practically impossible to make by milling.

Mandibula made of titanium produced by 3D printing on the basis of a CBCT scan (Source: Premet, www.premet.hu)

Using titanium improves the sense of comfort, as well as extends the lifecycle of the restoration, with the patient being the ultimate winner. The weight of the restorations made of titanium is lower than those made of zirconia and particularly of CoCr (one half of this latter), and their tensile strength and elasticity features are much closer to those of the natural bone. An additional argument in favour of using titanium is its good osseointegration property, which is an important criterion in case of implants, whereas its biocompatibility is preferred in case of sensitivity to traditional metal restorations.

The increasing reputation of 3D printing generated by the positive experience gained so far, as well as the declining prices of 3D printers and raw materials are suggesting the more and more widespread application of 3D printed metal restorations. This is particularly true for titanium restorations, which can also be applied in cases when the use of CoCr is not recommended or not possible.

Those practitioners, who have not yet done so, should try the application of 3D printed metal restorations. To do so, it is not necessary to invest in an own 3D metal printer since there are several service providers and centre on the market which can print these restorations, and naturally we are also pleased to help in respect to both CoCr and titanium restorations.

I express my thanks to my colleague, Mr. Lajos Bozsányi, for this contribution to this article.

About the Author:

Zsolt is strongly engaged in the application of 3D printing in the healthcare sector. He is the Managing Director of Premet (www.premet.hu), a company focusing on the production of 3D printed products, including those made of CoCr, titanium and PEEK, for the dental and medical sectors. He is the leader of a3D Printing Training Centre that delivers a training on digital dentistry. Zsolt is founder and Vice-President of the Hungarian Additive Technology Association. He is the lead expert of a project aiming at facilitating transnational cooperation of Hungarian entities on the application of 3D printing in the health sector. He is very much interested in importing best practices to Hungary and in a broader sense to the Central and Eastern European region and export them from the Region. Zsolt is also the current 3DHEALS Budapest community manager.

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3D Printing Has Come of Age But How Safe Are the Devices Going Into Our Mouth?

Dr. Frank Alifui-Segbaya

I commenced experimental research into the safety of 3D-printed devices at the time 3D Printing (3DP) was largely considered to be at a “proof of concept stage” in dentistry. I vividly remember how the technology was relatively unknown in my discipline when I arrived on the splendorous Gold Coast, 7 years ago to take up a lecturing position at Griffith University. It is against these backdrops that I would describe the recent hype and the desperate attempt by companies to diversify and innovate competitively as another milestone or perhaps a watershed in the dental specialism concerned with the design and manufacture of devices such as orthodontic splints (Fig.1), surgical guides, and dentures. While it is seemingly laudable that polymers and metals, which form the bulk of dental devices, can now be processed by 3DP, limited scientific evidence exists on their biological safety. It is, therefore, my intention to highlight some pertinent findings from my doctoral study that examined medically-approved photopolymers using the innovative zebrafish embryo model and analytical spectrometry.

READ MORE 3DHEALS Influencer Interview: Stephen Anderson, Renishaw

What do you think is (are) the biggest challenge(s) in 3D Printing/bio-printing? What do you think the potential solution(s) is (are)?

“The biggest challenge(s) in metal 3D Printing for serial end-use production implants are the elimination of machine variability, improving machine productivity and reducing cost per part while maintaining highest provable quality standards in the metallurgy of the part. This will be achieved with continuously improving manufacturing processes and by making deterministic machines so that users can measure machine and process performance. For PSIs the challenges are different: Accuracy of the scanners to capture patient data from which the PSI is modeled. The accuracy of the segmentation software that today still requires humans (source of variation) to make judgments about bone boundaries. Better design osteo-integrable surfaces while considering downstream implant removals. The desirability of on-demand printing and whether every hospital needs a printer etc.”

READ MORE 3DHEALS Community Manager Spotlight: Kuwait

Dr. Ahmad Alali, currently works in the plastic surgery department, Babtain center of plastic and reconstructive surgery, Kuwait. He completed MSc in plastic and reconstructive surgery in University College London on 3D printing application in plastic surgery. Dr. Alali published several papers on this subject and attended conferences to promote 3D printing in healthcare. Furthermore, Dr. Alali is a board member in the international society of digital medicine and editorial board member in Journal of Digital Medicine. Read his interview with 3DHEALS.

3DHEALS Startup Weekly Shout-outs: 

Different companies within the healthcare 3D printing and bioprinting ecosystem will receive shoutouts in our weekly newsletter and on social media weekly.

Join the Directory, non-U.S. Join the Directory, U.S. 3DHEALS Events: 3DHEALS Munich: Happy Hour @ Kumovis
Date: Wednesday, April 4th, 2019  |  Event time:  7:00 PM – 9:30 PM, Munich, Germany, Register 3DHEALS São Paulo, Brazil: Healthcare 3D Printing and Bioprinting, Next Generation
Date: Wednesday, April 17th, 2019  |  Event time:  2:00 PM – 9:00 PM, São Paulo, Brazil, Register 3DHEALS Boston: Happy Hour @ Miracle of Science
Date: Wednesday, April 18th, 2019  |  Event time:  6:30 PM – 8:00 PM, Boston, MA, USA, Register 3DHEALS Cleveland, Ohio: 3D Printing in Healthcare
Date: Thursday, April 25th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, Register
(Apply to speak) 3DHEALS Boston Annual Summer Event: 3D Printing in Healthcare – Reconnected
Date: Thursday, July 18th, 2019 | Event time: 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM Boston, MA, USA Register
(Apply to speak)
3DHEALS Brazil, São Paulo: Healthcare 3D Printing and Bioprinting, Next Generation – Pitch3D Competition Application Open NOW!

Rewards:

  1. Opportunity to present your startup to Brazilian and international investors from the 3DHeals platform
  2. Mentoring with Jenny Chen, CEO of 3DHeals (3hs)
  3. Technical mentoring in manufacturing with Fabio Sant’ana, in Technology (6 months) partnerFarcco
  4. 3D Systems Brazil offered a prize for the competition. They are giving vouchers for the imprima3d.com.br and their printing service. First place will win 1000.00 BRL to print products and second place will win 500.00 BRL. Winners will be invited to visit their facilities too.

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