Loading...

Follow The 104 Homestead on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

If making herbal remedies is new to you, this is a great starter salve. This vapor rub goes together quickly and easily, so you can be using it just a couple hours after starting. Even faster if you put the finished product in the refrigerator to harden it up faster. 

Is your nose stuffy? Feeling a little phlemgy? Do your sinuses feel ready to explode? Congestion is no fun and it can be triggered not only by the common cold, but also as a side effect allergies and irritants in the air. Even things like pregnancy, menopause, and stress can cause congestion. This recipe helps fight the congestion so you can pioneer on. We all know a homestead waits for no one. Not even a sick person.

Homemade Natural DIY Vapor Rub Recipe

This is the recipe I’ve been using for the last 5 years (ever since we ditched the Vicks — which contains petroleum, a non-eco-friendly product). Petroleum contains xenoestrogens which may increase estrogen problems in the body. No one needs that in their life. Plus, petroleum does not add value to your skin. It merely acts as a barrier, which you don’t need if your skin isn’t broken. Coconut oil and cocoa butter add nutrients and moisture to the skin.

Ingredients

It’s worth it to purchase high quality oils when you’re using them for a medicinal purpose. Fear not, though. High quality doesn’t necessarily mean high cost. I really like Plant Therapy. They guarantee to have no synthetics and parabens as well as GMOs, SLS, and other artificial substances and are very reasonably priced. Doterra is another wonderful choice. I used it this last time because I happened to have it on hand. Doterra is pricier, but it’s good stuff.

Instructions

Using a double boiler, melt the coconut oil and cocoa butter. If you don’t have a double boiler, you can use a glass container held off the bottom of a sauce pan with a canning ring. Don’t forget to add water to the sauce pan. I’ve done that and I assure you that you’ll scorch your pan and still have solid cocoa butter.

Once melted, add the beeswax and stir gently until the wax is melted as well. I like to use wooden chopsticks or craft sticks (like wide popsicle sticks) to stir. Remove from heat and allow the mixture to sit for about 5 minutes. It will start to harden, but still be mostly liquid.

Add the essential oils. It’s best not to add essential oils to really hot salve base because heat may change the therapeutic benefits of the oils. Combine with a spoon or wooden chopstick. Pour your homemade vapor rub into a glass jar. As the mixture continues to cool the liquid will solidify, making it a creamy, spreadable rub.

Makes approximately 4 oz. Lasts about a month.

Homemade Vapor Rub with Eucalyptus & Other EOs
Yields 4
Coconut oil and cocoa butter add nutrients and moisture to the skin. This vapor rub goes together quickly and easily, so you can be using it just a couple hours after starting.
Write a review
Print
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
787 calories
3 g
0 g
89 g
1 g
21 g
93 g
1 g
0 g
1 g
64 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
93g
Yields
4
Amount Per Serving
Calories 787
Calories from Fat 780
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 89g
137%
Saturated Fat 21g
103%
Trans Fat 1g
Polyunsaturated Fat 12g
Monounsaturated Fat 52g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 3g
1%
Dietary Fiber 2g
6%
Sugars 0g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
1%
Vitamin C
2%
Calcium
2%
Iron
5%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/3 c. Coconut Oil
  2. 2 tbsp. Cocoa Butter
  3. 1 1/2 tbsp. Beeswax Block Shavings/Pellets/Pastilles
  4. 20 drops Eucalyptus Essential Oil
  5. 5 drops each Lavender, Peppermint, Rosemary, and Tea Tree Oil
Instructions
  1. Using a double boiler, melt the coconut oil and cocoa butter.
  2. Once melted, add the beeswax and stir gently until the wax is melted as well.
  3. Remove from heat and allow the mixture to sit for about 5 minutes.
  4. Add the essential oils. Combine with a spoon or wooden chopstick.
  5. Pour your homemade vapor rub into a glass jar.
Notes
  1. As the mixture continues to cool the liquid will solidify, making it a creamy, spreadable rub.
beta
calories
787
fat
89g
protein
1g
carbs
3g
more
The 104 Homestead https://104homestead.com/
Required Disclaimers

If you are making this for children, please be aware that rosemary and peppermint essential oils are not recommended for kids under the age of 10. Eucalyptus may cause slower respiration on young children. Having said that, I’ve used a diluted version of this vapor rub recipe on my kids after the age of two. I cut the eucalyptus, rosemary, and peppermint down by about half.

For more cough and cold help, check out Homemade Fire Cider for Cold & Flu Season, Hyssop: Why You Need to Make Some Space for This Herb (scroll down to see my hyssop congestion tea recipe) and Homemade Cough Syrup with Lime, Thyme & Ginger.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Was the elderberry syrup not potent enough to keep the colds at bay? Need a little something between doses of fire cider? Homemade cough syrup with the medicinal properties of lime, thyme, and ginger is probably just what you need. And don’t forget about the honey. Honey for coughs is probably the original home remedy.

This cough syrup is effective the day its made. That’s something that can’t be said of many other home remedies for coughs. Make it right now and in an hour you can be cough-free.

How do you make homemade cough syrup? Ingredients

1 Lime, sliced thin
3/4 c. Raw Buckwheat Honey
1/2 loosely packed Fresh Thyme Sprigs
1″ Fresh ginger, sliced 
2 c. Water

Instructions

Place the lime slices in a glass container or bowl and pour the honey over them. Set them aside so the honey can draw the lime juice out. Feel free to poke and prod the limes a bit to get more juice out.

In a small saucepan, bring the thyme and ginger slices and water to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook uncovered until the liquid is reduced to about half. You should have about one cup of liquid now. Remove from the heat and let cool. Add your limes and honey to the cooled herb broth. Strain the liquid into a jar and stir to combine. 

Store your cough syrup in the refrigerator. It will keep for 3-4 weeks. Shake before administering. Take a tablespoonful throughout the day as needed, especially before bedtime. Small children should be given a teaspoon. Older children (10+) can be given an adult dose. Although I don’t heed this advice, I am required to say that this homemade cough syrup should not be given to children under the age of 1 because of botulism risk. 

Medicinal Benefits of the Ingredients Ginger

Loaded with nutrients and bioactive compounds, ginger has a very long history of use in fighting the flu and common cold. It has powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

Buckwheat Honey

Buckwheat honey has higher concentrations of macronutrients, trace elements and anti-oxidant compounds than other honeys. Just plain buckwheat honey was more effective than over-the-counter cough medicine in a clinical trial.

Lime

Limes are packed with vitamin C, a natural antioxidant that is important for boosting the immune system and protecting against colds.

Thyme

 Thyme is antibacterial, antifungal and spasmolytic. It helps to subdue a fitful cough. It’s also a wonderful expectorant, helping the body to eliminate accumulated mucus.

Ginger, Lime & Thyme Cough Syrup
Serves 28
This cough syrup is effective the day its made. Make it right now and in an hour you can be cough-free.
Write a review
Print
16 calories
4 g
0 g
0 g
1 g
0 g
24 g
1 g
0 g
0 g
0 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
24g
Servings
28
Amount Per Serving
Calories 16
Calories from Fat 1
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
0%
Saturated Fat 0g
0%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 1mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 4g
1%
Dietary Fiber 1g
2%
Sugars 0g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
1%
Calcium
0%
Iron
1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 Lime (sliced thin)
  2. 3/4 c. Raw Buckwheat Honey
  3. 1/2 Fresh Thyme Sprigs (loosely packed)
  4. 1″ Fresh Ginger (sliced)
  5. 2 c. Water
Instructions
  1. Place the lime slices in a glass container or bowl and pour the honey over them. Set them aside so the honey can draw the lime juice out.
  2. In a small saucepan, bring the thyme and ginger slices and water to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook uncovered until the liquid is reduced to about half. You should have about one cup of liquid now. Remove from the heat and let cool.
  3. Add your limes and honey to the cooled herb broth. Strain the liquid into a jar and stir to combine.
Notes
  1. Store your cough syrup in the refrigerator (3-4 weeks).
  2. Adults & children 10+ = 1 tbsp. as needed
  3. Children 1-10 = 1 tsp. as needed
  4. Not recommended for children under the age of 1.
beta
calories
16
fat
0g
protein
1g
carbs
4g
more
The 104 Homestead https://104homestead.com/
Adults may choose to add a splash of whiskey.

The alcohol dilates blood vessels a little bit, and that makes it easier for your mucus membranes to deal with the infection,” Dr. William Schaffner (Chair of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center)

How do you make homemade cough drops?

These horehound cough drops are one of my favorites. Horehound can be a bit bitter, but with the addition of honey, they’re pretty good. If you’ve made hard candy before, you can handle this recipe.

These peppermint cough drops use the power of essential oils. Please make sure to only use therapeutic grade oil that is safe to ingest (not all essential oils are created equal). These are a semi-hard drop.

If you’re a fan of real cherry, you’ll love these black cherry cough drops. My favorite thing about them is that they last a really long time and taste good to boot. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Maintaining a garden can be relaxing and fun, or it can be a colossal pain in the bum. It honestly comes down to the tools you have on hand. Having high quality garden supplies (and keeping them in good working order) will make the season a lot easier and more enjoyable. Having said that, there are a lot of garden supplies you really don’t need. Sure, they’re nice to have on hand, but really they’re just one-hit-wonders that take up space in your garden shed. Save your money and your space unless you have an abundance of one or both.

Must-Have Garden Supplies Shovel

There are a few things to consider when choosing a shovel or spade. The size of the head, the length of the handle, and the types of jobs you’ll be doing. If you are smaller or weaker, you don’t want a large #2 blade because a full shovel will be very heavy. You may prefer a #1 or a #0. If you’re a tall person, the last thing you’ll want is a short, stumpy shovel. You want the handle length to match your frame. Speaking of handles, I know fiberglass is all the rage, but a well maintained wood handle will probably serve you better. They are less prone to breakage and they can be easily be replaced in the event that you do manage to break it.

Finally, consider the tasks you’ll be doing. If you have a small garden, you won’t want a huge shovel blade.

Stirrup Hoe

Stirrup hoes are perfect for removing weeds from the garden. They certainly can save your back from bending over again and again, plucking out the weeds individually. With both sides being sharp, you can push or pull to cut larger weeds at the surface and pull up tiny fragile weed seedlings. 

Rake

I suggest two rakes for your garden shed. The first is specifically for the garden. Instead of spending an arm and a leg for a fancy garden rake, get a children’s rake with metal tines. This will allow you to rake out between garden rows. The other rake I suggest is a big lawn rake. The bigger the better. I like my 30″ one and I prefer plastic tines. They tend to be gentler on the lawn.

Wheelbarrow

Whether you’re moving shrubs around the yard, hauling manure and compost, or disposing of garden debris, you need a good wheelbarrow. Steel wheelbarrows are sturdier, but more expensive. Plastic can be fragile, but they’re cheaper and often deeper. Two wheels or one? Two wheels offer more stability (especially when filling the wheelbarrow). One wheel offers more maneuvering ability.

I have two wheelbarrows because I found it too hard to pick one that could handle all the things I threw at it. First, a metal 2 cubic foot wheelbarrow with a single air-filled wheel and the traditional two wooden handles for moving large, heavy items. Second, a plastic 4 cubic foot wheelbarrow with two hard plastic wheels and a metal bar handle for moving garden materials around.

Garden Hose

Do not skimp here. I have gone through many cheap hoses and I promise you, it’s not worth it. Invest in a good hose. Avoid those gimmick hoses like the expandable hoses and coil hoses (seriously, do you know how easy it is to get caught up with all those coils???). Choose a rubber or rubber blend with brass fittings. I also suggest 3/4″ over 1/2″ because the repair parts are more common and therefore less expensive.

Garden Gloves

Everyone has been going on an on about those Badger Gloves. I haven’t tried them myself, but they look funky to me. Maybe they are the best thing to ever happen to gardening. I’ll let you decide. Personally, I prefer a nice set of stretchy gloves that are somewhat waterproof on the palms. The lighter-weight the better. 

Pail

My pail actually isn’t a pail, I think it’s suppose to be a bucket for putting drinks in during a party. I got it for about $5 in the RiteAid clearance section. I managed to track it down on Amazon for you (here), but I’d check out your local RiteAid if you have one because it might be cheaper. The size holds a lot of weeds, but it’s not unmanageable. Plus, mine is lime green which makes it easy to spot when I’ve abandoned it somewhere in the garden and I can’t remember where.

Trowel

Some trowels come with a grippy handle and I really prefer these ones. I’m a bare handed gardener most of the time (you know, connecting with the earth and all) and the smooth handled ones can cause blisters. You’ll also want a curved handle. I don’t know why those flat ones are on the market. They’re basically useless. You go to scoop up a mound of soil and it slides right off. It doesn’t need to be a big curve, but enough to cup the dirt. Folding options and ones with teeth on the sides are a waste of money in my opinion. Keep it simple and cheaper. This one is perfect and it’s only $5.

Garden Journal

If you are like me and you love being super-organized in the garden (or maybe you need help with your garden organizational skills), The Gardening Notebook is perfect for you. It’s one of those resources you purchase once and it just gets better year after year. I keep mine in a cheap 2″ binder in my garden shed so I can easily find it when needed — unlike my seed stash that I’ve misplaced several times this year.

The Gardening Notebook will help you keep all the important information in one place so that you will have more time to spend in the garden.

Nice-to-Have Garden Supplies Rototiller

I’m generally a no-dig girl because I choose to use a Back to Eden technique, but sometimes a rototiller still comes in handy. It’s almost a must-have item to grow root vegetables here in Maine. If you’re working in an established garden you can often go with a cheaper and more lightweight front tine tiller. If you have really hard soil or you’re establishing a new garden, you may need a heavier rear tine tiller.

Drip Irrigation System

I’m not going to lie, I invested in a drip irrigation system and I have a love/hate relationship with it. I like that it cuts down water consumption in the garden as well as the ease of use (just turn on the spigot, wait a bit, turn it off). What I don’t love is that has to be set up every spring, which requires advanced plant planning, and it needs to be pulled up every fall so water doesn’t freeze in the lines during the winter. Sometimes you have a second crop going into the ground in the summer and working around the hose can be a pain. 

Wheel Hoe

I was gifted a wheel hoe and it sat in the shed for a few years before I finally took the time to Google it and figure out what it’s used for. It’s actually handy for a lot of jobs, such as creating furrows and hills for crops, loosening compacted soil, and stripping weeds around delicate plants. Sort of a Swiss Army Tool for gardens. It turns out they can be very pricey for a manual tool. Thankfully they are a common tool in New England so you might find one hiding in the back of a barn, long forgotten.

Compost Turner

As we discussed in Composting Guide for Beginners, there are several types of composters available if you want to upgrade from a standard pile. Capacity is a big part of in the decision regarding which one to choose. 

Greenhouse

Choosing a greenhouse can be difficult. There are a lot of things to consider so the greenhouse suits your needs. It’s too much to fit in here, but you can find out everything you need to know right here

Caring for Your Garden Supplies

When you’re going to be frequently using a tool, a simple spritz under the hose when you’re done with it will suffice for maintenance. If it will be a while before you use the tool again, it’s wise to hose and try the tool before putting it away or clean it off with a stiff wire brush. Mineral spirits can remove gunk that may have accumulated on your garden supplies. 

Always hang your tools up when they aren’t in use. Yes, if you came by my homestead you would see rakes and shovels propped up all over the place. Do as I say, not as I do. Moisture from the ground can shorten the lifespan of your supplies and it increases the risk of rust.

A whetstone can be used to sharpen pruning sheers, the edges of shovels, and the sides of trowels. I like to sharpen my tools in the spring when I get into gardening gear but ground is still frozen and again in the fall just before the big harvest happens. 

With proper care, your garden supplies should last your lifetime. If you find old supplies at a yard sale or someone offers you some of their old tools, a little TLC can easily restore them. Garden supplies are a great investment for your homestead.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Chocolate Pudding Pie with Chocolate Crust was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work.

How much do I love chocolate? Let me count the ways. In fact, as much as I love my various berry pies, chocolate pudding pie might be my favorite. It’s pudding in a pie crust and topped with whipped cream. What’s not to love? I’ll take you from start to finish making this pie from scratch, but you can go the pre-made route on any aspect of this recipe. Don’t have time to make a crust? Feel free to purchase one. Same goes with the whipped cream. Nothing tastes quite as good as homemade, but if this is new to you it might be best to start slowly.

Chocolate Pie Crust

This crust works great not only for chocolate pudding pie, but also for cheesecake and most fruit pies.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/4 cup Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  • 2 tablespoons Sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 tablespoons Oil
  • 1/4 cup Cold Unsalted Butter (sliced into pats)
  • 3 to 5 tablespoons cold water
Instructions

Place the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine. Stir in the oil, until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the butter pats, tossing to coat. Stir in the water (the colder the better), a tablespoon at a time, just until the dough gathers itself into a ball.

Chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour.

On a lightly floured surface, pat or roll the dough into a rectangle about 1/2-inch thick. Fold it into thirds, like a letter. Roll out again to a thickness of 1/2-inch. Turn the dough sideways and repeat two more times. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours minimum.

Dust the work surface with flour, and roll the dough out to an inch or two larger than your pie plate. Roll the dough around the rolling pin and transfer to the dish. Trim off any excess, then roll and crimp the edge.

Bake in a preheated 375°F oven for 20 minutes.

Chocolate Pudding Pie Filling Ingredients
  • 1 Pie Crust (see above)
  • 6 cups Whole Milk
  • 1-1/2 cups Sugar
  • 6 tablespoons Cornstarch
  • 6 tablespoons Cocoa
Instructions

In a large saucepan, whisk together sugar, cornstarch and cocoa. Whisk in milk and stir continuously over medium heat until mixture thickens and is bubbling.

Let mixture cool for 3-5 minutes and then pour into prepared pie crust. Allow to cool at room temperature for one hour and then transfer to refrigerator to cool completely.

Homemade Whipped Cream

Whipped cream is one of those things that you buy because you think it must be so hard to make. In reality it’s super easy. Three ingredients and just a few minutes and you will have real whipped cream, which is 100 times better than the fake stuff.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup Heavy Cream
  • 1 tablespoon Confectioners Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
Instructions

In a large bowl, whip cream until stiff peaks are just about to form. Beat in vanilla and sugar until peaks form. Make sure not to over-beat or your whipped cream will then become lumpy and butter-like. Once it’s reached the perfect consistency you can dollop or spread it all over your chocolate pudding pie!

Grab the Recipe Card

Print out this handy recipe card to you can easily follow the flow.

Chocolate Pudding Pie
Serves 6
It’s chocolate pudding in a chocolate pie crust and topped with real whipped cream. What’s not to love?
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
4 hr
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
4 hr
697 calories
97 g
99 g
32 g
13 g
19 g
397 g
322 g
68 g
0 g
10 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
397g
Servings
6
Amount Per Serving
Calories 697
Calories from Fat 280
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 32g
49%
Saturated Fat 19g
97%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 9g
Cholesterol 99mg
33%
Sodium 322mg
13%
Total Carbohydrates 97g
32%
Dietary Fiber 4g
14%
Sugars 68g
Protein 13g
Vitamin A
24%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
32%
Iron
9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Crust Ingredients
  1. 1 c. All-Purpose Flour
  2. 1/4 c. Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  3. 2 tbsp. Sugar
  4. 1/2 tsp. Salt
  5. 2 tbsp.
  6. 1/4 c. cold Unsalted Butter (sliced into pats)
  7. 3-5 tbsp. cold Water
Pie Filling Ingredients
  1. 6 c. Whole Milk
  2. 1-1/2 c. Sugar
  3. 6 tbsp. Cornstarch
  4. 6 tbsp. Cocoa
Whipped Cream Ingredients
  1. 1 c. Heavy Cream
  2. 1 tbsp. Confectioners Sugar
  3. 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
Start with the crust
  1. Place the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine. Stir in the oil, until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the butter pats, tossing to coat. Stir in the water (the colder the better), a tablespoon at a time, just until the dough gathers itself into a ball.
  2. Chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour.
  3. On a lightly floured surface, pat or roll the dough into a rectangle about 1/2-inch thick. Fold it into thirds, like a letter. Roll out again to a thickness of 1/2-inch. Turn the dough sideways and repeat two more times.
  4. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours minimum.
  5. Dust the work surface with flour, and roll the dough out to an inch or two larger than your pie plate.
  6. Roll the dough around the rolling pin and transfer to the dish. Trim off any excess, then roll and crimp the edge.
  7. Bake in a preheated 375°F oven for 20 minutes. Side aside to cool completely.
Prepare the filling
  1. In a large saucepan, whisk together sugar, cornstarch and cocoa. Whisk in milk and stir continuously over medium heat until mixture thickens and is bubbling.
  2. Let mixture cool for 3-5 minutes and then pour into prepared pie crust.
  3. Allow to cool at room temperature for one hour and then transfer to refrigerator to cool completely.
Make whipped cream while the pie cools
  1. In a large bowl, whip cream until stiff peaks are just about to form.
  2. Beat in vanilla and sugar until peaks form. Make sure not to over-beat or your whipped cream will then become lumpy and butter-like.
  3. Once it’s reached the perfect consistency you can dollop or spread it all over your chocolate pudding pie!
Notes
  1. Top your completed pie with chocolate shavings or a dusting of cocoa for a super fancy finished product.
beta
calories
697
fat
32g
protein
13g
carbs
97g
more
The 104 Homestead https://104homestead.com/
And if you love chocolate as much as I do, you might want to check out my recipes for Decadent Triple Chocolate Brownie Recipe and Double Chocolate Chip Cookies. I’ve also got a big list of quick and easy desserts that are ready in an hour or less. If you need something to wash it down with, try my homemade cocoa

Chocolate Pudding Pie with Chocolate Crust was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work. If you are reading this post outside of The 104 Homestead, it's stolen and I would appreciate a heads up. You can email me at jessica@104homestead.com
---
The 104 Homestead - Homestead where you live.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

5-Minute Homemade Fudge (with lots of variation suggestions) was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work.

Homemade fudge is a holiday staple. A good fudge melts in your mouth. The best fudge melts in your mouth and can be whipped up in five minutes or less. This is that recipe. If you’re ready to impress your friends with a unique homemade fudge, look no further. Below you will find many suggestions for things you can add to your Plain Jane Fudge. 

Ingredients
  • 6 cups Semisweet Chocolate Chips
  • 1/4 cup Butter
  • 2 cans Sweetened Condensed Milk
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
Instructions

Place chocolate chips, sweetened condensed milk, vanilla, and butter or margarine in large microwaveable bowl. Zap in microwave on medium in 30 second intervals, stirring each time you check, until chips are melted. Once melted, gently mix in stir-ins, if desired. Pour into well-greased 9×13″ glass baking dish. Refrigerate until set.

Homemade Chocolate Fudge
This homemade fudge melts in your mouth and can be whipped up in five minutes or less.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
1 min
Cook Time
4 min
Total Time
5 min
Prep Time
1 min
Cook Time
4 min
Total Time
5 min
7806 calories
1077 g
392 g
417 g
106 g
252 g
1863 g
1126 g
982 g
2 g
146 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
1863g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 7806
Calories from Fat 3582
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 417g
642%
Saturated Fat 252g
1258%
Trans Fat 2g
Polyunsaturated Fat 14g
Monounsaturated Fat 132g
Cholesterol 392mg
131%
Sodium 1126mg
47%
Total Carbohydrates 1077g
359%
Dietary Fiber 59g
238%
Sugars 982g
Protein 106g
Vitamin A
71%
Vitamin C
34%
Calcium
259%
Iron
184%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 6 c. Semisweet Chocolate Chips
  2. 1/4 c. Butter
  3. 2 cans Sweetened Condensed Milk
  4. 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
Instructions
  1. Place chocolate chips, sweetened condensed milk, vanilla, and butter or margarine in large microwaveable bowl.
  2. Zap in microwave on medium in 30 second intervals, stirring each time you check, until chips are melted.
  3. Once melted, gently mix in stir-ins, if desired (see notes below).
  4. Pour into well-greased 9×13″ glass baking dish.
  5. Refrigerate until set.
Optional Stir-Ins
  1. Crushed Peppermint Candies/Candy Canes
  2. Crushed Pretzels
  3. Walnuts
  4. Crispy Bacon
  5. Chopped Dates
  6. Mini Marshmallows
  7. Maple Syrup
  8. Freeze-Dried Fruits
  9. Cayenne Pepper
beta
calories
7806
fat
417g
protein
106g
carbs
1077g
more
The 104 Homestead https://104homestead.com/
Optional Stir-Ins for Plain Homemade Fudge

The quantities below are merely suggested. Don’t feel like you are committed to choosing just one. Mix and match. Play with ratios. Have fun with it! The very worst that could happen is a batch that maybe isn’t suitable for a holiday party. Snack away on it (because you should never waste perfectly good chocolate) and try again. In ten minutes you can have a party-ready batch.

  • 1 cup Crushed Peppermint Candies or Candy Canes
  • 2/3 cup Crushed Pretzels
  • 2 cups Walnuts
  • 8 pieces Crispy Bacon
  • 1 cup Chopped Dates
  • 1/2 cup Mini Marshmallows
  • 3 tablespoons Maple Syrup
  • 2 cups Freeze-Dried Fruits
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

My husband loves a combination of bacon and cayenne. I always eyeball it, but I’d guess I add about 6 strips of bacon and 1 heaping 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne.

If you’re wondering about peanut butter, I prefer to keep the layers separate and not mix peanut butter in my homemade fudge. Instead, I make my own Peanut Butter Cups. They take longer, but are worth the wait.

And speaking of time, if you are on a time crunch to get desserts on the table, you might also appreciate this list of 22 Quick & Easy Dessert Ideas that can be made in an hour or less.

5-Minute Homemade Fudge (with lots of variation suggestions) was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work. If you are reading this post outside of The 104 Homestead, it's stolen and I would appreciate a heads up. You can email me at jessica@104homestead.com
---
The 104 Homestead - Homestead where you live.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Raising Goats on the Homestead – Assessing Expenses was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work.

Let’s be honest, while owning a small herd of goats can be lucrative, many people aren’t raising goats to earn massive profit. In fact, most people who own and raise goats tend to choose them based on their personality or a natural affinity for the animal.

However, whether you own goats because caring for them is something you enjoy doing, or if you are hoping to take on a profitable venture on your land, taking stock of cost versus ultimate benefits and earnings is essential. When you conduct a proper cost analysis, you can ensure you are not spending too much on your goats, while also making the most of your time and money raising your herd.

Once you have a baseline of what you are spending, and you can compare it against what you earn or your benefits from your goats, then you are able to make smart decisions when making purchases and other goat-related expenses. In short, you can make sure every decision ultimately benefits you and your homestead.

Setting Up a Space for Your Goats

During the set up process, it’s important to plan what type of goat(s) you’d like. While there is no standard to deciding on breeds, you should keep your needs in mind. For example, when working with a small homestead, pygmy goats or nigerians may be intuitive choice whereas boer goats are great to raise on a farm for meat.

When you are considering raising a herd of goats on your land, whether you are thinking about just one or two goats in the backyard, or a small herd of forty or sixty goats out on the field, the first step in the process is to ensure you have the required space for the number of desired goats. You also must have the correct accommodations, and the startup capital to initially fund your venture before the profit begins to roll in.

Outdoor Space Requirements

A general rule of thumb to follow for required land or pasture is usually between ten and fifteen square feet for each adult goat. Of course, this number can vary depending on the size of the goat (the rule above is for average goat sizes), the type of land you own, whether you will be offering woods, pasture, or range land, as well as how much indoor space you will have for them.

Indoor Space Requirements

The importance of offering some indoor housing is that it will benefit your goats by increasing production as well as keeping the goats healthy and free of all diseases. Doing this will directly impact your production in the long term. As such housing can vary widely from a barn set up with amenities to simply an indoor room where they can sleep, the pricing for it will also vary, and can be greatly adjusted to suit your specific financial needs.

Of course, buying initial land, housing, goats, feed, and more during the setup process will require some startup capital. In order to have that capital in the bank, you must first bring your overall spending down so you can make a concerted effort to save money to invest in your goats.

Operating Expenses Associated with Goats

At this point, you should know how many goats you want to purchase, where you will feed and house them, and be prepared to actually buy the goats. From the start, it’s important to account for all maintenance expenses, as keeping track of these costs from the beginning will help you to reduce costs and earn more money in the long run.

These expenses can vary widely depending on things such as goat(s) becoming pregnant, your local resources and produce costs, and other personal maintenance costs. Below is a sample of what you might expect when maintaining operating costs for your goat.

  • Indoor Bedding: This should be changed about once a month, and costs about $10.
  • Food: Goats can eat 2 to 4 pounds of hay per day. It is ideal to purchase your hay in 40 pound bales, so you can limit your trips to the store. A bale of hay can cost anywhere from $3 to over $15 (depending on where you live, season, etc.).
  • Food Supplements: Improve your production and ensure healthy goats with goat pellets ($20). Pellets should last several months.
  • Veterinary Visits: Depending on the health of your goats, you should anticipate between $50 and $250 annual costs for a veterinarian for each goat.
  • Small Maintenance: These costs can vary, from hoof trimmers to deworming, so keep track of all of these costs in your personal ledger.
Costs of Labor

In addition to costs that come right out of your wallet, a goat is going to require some of your personal time as well. When recording your labor, you can record it in simple hours, or as a cost per hour based on what that time is worth to you. Conservative prices should start at around $5 per hour.

The following includes some average labor hours per week of a goat farm that is raising ten goats.

  • Milking the goats: 7 hours
  • Set up and clean up before and after work: 2.3 hours
  • Manure handling and changing the bedding for the goats: 1 hour
  • Feeding hay and grain to the goats: 1 hour
  • Miscellaneous tasks: 6 hours

Balancing the Expenses

If you have goats, or you are interested in raising goats, the reality is that it’s possible to generate income that can make the entire process affordable. In order to keep profits up, the revenue generated by the goats should be able to pay for many of the costs that go into goat farming.

First, you can benefit from the actual goats and their products. If you are breeding, you can sell baby goats as pets or for other farms. You can also earn money through showings, which can add value to your animals and their offspring by getting certification of quality traits in your herd.

While it is unlikely you will be able to sell milk commercially with a few goats, you definitely won’t be buying your own milk, which is a benefit that adds to the usefulness of raising goats. In addition to milk, you can produce instead of purchasing products like cheese and yogurt, which you can also choose to sell in local farmers markets and produce farms.

The Benefits of Raising Goats

Raising goats is a very rewarding experience, but it doesn’t have to break the bank. In fact, it can reward more than just your love for animals, but also put income into the bank, as long as you take the time to record and manage your expenses.

Raising Goats on the Homestead – Assessing Expenses was written by Jessica Lane and she reserves all rights to this work. If you are reading this post outside of The 104 Homestead, it's stolen and I would appreciate a heads up. You can email me at jessica@104homestead.com
---
The 104 Homestead - Homestead where you live.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview