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Cities say short-term holiday lettings market is contributing to soaring long-term rents

Ten European cities have demanded more help from the EU in their battle against Airbnb and other holiday rental websites, which they argue are locking locals out of housing and changing the face of neighbourhoods.

In a joint letter, Amsterdam, Barcelona, ​​Berlin, Bordeaux, Brussels, Krakow, Munich, Paris, Valencia and Vienna said the “explosive growth” of global short-stay lettings platforms must be on the agenda of the next set of European commissioners.

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Hotels and museums do their best to hide the horrors of the past from those who visit, but it needn’t be this way

Over the past few weeks, I have realised that I am the worst kind of British tourist. My crime is way worse than binge drinking in Benidorm, or mortifying locals in Rhodes with sex acts performed in front of their Orthodox chapels. I’m the party pooper who, while on holiday in destinations popular with Britons, has the audacity to ask: what actually happened here?

For example, I had the good fortune to find myself in Jamaica last month after a filming stint in Kingston, when I realised that my hotel was actually named after a former slave plantation on whose grounds it still stands. That history is completely invisible to the predominantly British tourists who stay there, unless they go out of their way to visit Rose Hall, a museum on the other side of the vast estate where the owners’ “Great House” still stands.

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As New York gets ready to celebrate WorldPride on 26 June and 50 years since the Stonewall uprising, locals pick cultural spaces, tours and nightlife that embody the city’s queer spirit

The Metropolitan Museum is marking Stonewall 50 with a gay-related theme for its annual gala and the exhibit Camp: Notes on Fashion (free with museum ticket; adult $25, under-12 free, until 8 September). LGBT critics such as RuPaul have suggested the show fails to capture the concept of “camp” and I generally agree. Nonetheless, it’s a great opportunity to see the fun, extravagant side of the Costume Institute’s amazing collection. Also, the show includes a great display of art and objects from LGBT history, including Pennington’s portrait – the only full portrait – of Oscar Wilde, and Paul Cadmus’s often-discussed but rarely seen The Fleet’s In!, with its scandal-rousing scene of mixed gay and straight cruising in 1930s New York.

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Lakes can be quiet beauty spots, a hive of fun activities or great places for hiking, swimming and sailing. Please share your favourites

Lakes can form great focal points for a trip whether you’re in to wildlife watching, watersports or camping on the waterfont.

Tell us about wonderful lakes to visit in this country and Europe. You might have found a a serene beauty spot, a great cottage or cabin, a lakeside restaurant, walked a spectacular route around a lake, swum across it or sailed.

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Hawaii, Mexico and Palau are encouraging tourists to use reef-friendly lotions – but protecting ourselves from the sun shouldn’t fall by the wayside

Last year, the Pacific nation of Palau announced that, from 2020, it will ban sunscreens containing certain chemicals linked with coral degradation. Tourists will have offending suncreams confiscated and anyone importing them will face a $1,000 (£800) fine. In addition, Hawaii’s ban on sunscreens that contain oxybenzone or octinoxate – the two most controversial chemical compounds – comes into force in 2021, and tourists swimming at certain beauty spots in Mexico are already forbidden from wearing non-biodegradable sunscreens.

If it all sounds pretty serious, that’s because it is. Sunscreen is supposed to be an entirely good thing. Having been a holiday essential since we learned about the damaging effects of UVB – and, later, UVA – rays last century, it is the stuff of nostalgia, adventure and longed-for escapes to warmer climes. News that the coconut-scented creams we have been slathering on for protection could be toxic to the environment is as welcome as a seven-day rainy forecast. So where do we stand with it as we head into summer?

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Milan’s reputation for just stuffy high-end dining is changing. Our selection focuses on fabulous flavours without the fancy prices

Not long ago, Milan was considered to be Italy’s least exciting food city: home to a breathtaking cathedral and well-heeled fashionistas but with little to offer in the way of creative or authentic food. However, the opening of restaurants such as Trattoria Trippa (in 2015, and now the darling of Milanese diners and one of the most sought-after reservations in the country) and in hosting the World Food Expo in the same year, perceptions of Milan started to shift. Our pick of cheap eats, bars and desserts highlights a food scene away from the ritzy restaurants and tourist traps many associate with the city.

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Beyond the blarney of the Kerry tourist trail, the Reeks District is pitching itself as the country’s adventure playground, with five outdoor activities on offer

Halfway through cycling the Ring of the Reeks in Kerry, I realise I am going to make it. Not just the circuit’s full 90km but also the tourist board’s Big Five Challenge, which was launched this month.

I started my mission three days earlier with a seven-hour trek to the top of Ireland’s highest peak, 1,039-metre Carrauntoohil in MacGillycuddy’s Reeks, the range of mountains I’m now encircling by bike. The following day’s action included surfing on Inch Beach, kayaking for 6km across Caragh Lake, and night-time paddleboarding on Cloon Lough in Kerry’s Dark Sky Reserve. Today’s ride includes 1,350 metres of climbing over three of Ireland’s highest mountain passes.

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Millennials become the biggest market for luxury liners as they share holiday moments using onboard wifi

When Emma Le Teace, 25, tried to get her boyfriend to go on a cruise with her, he didn’t want to go. She booked it regardless – and he loved it. “I think he’s been on five now.”

She has been on 21 cruises, and is planning three more this year. “I love visiting new places and, with a cruise, you know your view is going to be completely different each morning when you wake up. A kind of excitement builds up as you get closer to a new destination.”

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The Guardian | Travel by Juan Alberto Romero Rodríguez, Inte.. - 4d ago

Almost entirely surrounded by water, this Andalucian port city boasts 3,000 years of history, reflected in ancient buildings, traditional fish dishes and salt-of-the-earth people

Cadiz’s most famous beach, Playa de La Caleta, is right in the old town. Get there an hour before sundown and watch the sun dip gently into the Atlantic, as the small fishing boats are painted gold by its final rays. This beach imitated Havana’s craggy harbour in the James Bond film Die Another Day – when Halle Berry famously emerged, goddess-like, from the sea. The cove is marked by a distinctive Moorish-style white balneario (spa) and flanked by two ancient fortresses (Castillo de Santa Catalina and Castillo de San Sebastián).

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Raise a glass to the Californian city with more than 200 craft breweries and tasting rooms

It is early morning and I’m swimming in a coffin-shaped pool surrounded by gnarly ancient cacti, overlooked by a 12-storey floral mural. It was an invigorating way to wake up listening to the muted stirring of downtown LA – and I needed it after only two hours’ sleep. The night before, the Mad Men vibe at the stylish lobby bar of the Hotel Figueroa had led me to order a couple of late-night Old Fashioneds to help me on my way. Clearly, I should have had a few more. As my Californian sister-in-law told me: “LA for cocktails, San Diego for beer.”

Related: Beyond Comic-Con: San Diego's beaches and Pacific views are its real stars

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