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The 2019 edition of IFA Berlin is wrapping up, after showcasing the newest consumer electronics with a focus on artificial intelligence. (Trade) Show Me What You Got! Although co-innovation carries forward as a given theme from last year, one of the main topics at this year’s IFA Berlin is artificial intelligence. The trade show brings together a who’s who of consumer electronics, as well as new players in the industry, all there to show off what they’ve been working on. Artificial intelligence is now a major part of our digital world, whether we like it or not. At Testbirds, we welcome our new robot overlords. In fact, we want to help them get better so they can help us in our daily lives, which in turn should lead to fantastic new creations. Easy Living, Easy Shopping Who knows what we might accomplish when we don’t have to choose our own washing machine program, our fridges warn us if our beer is freezing, and our stoves yell at us for leaving the burner on. Optimally, we’ll make good use of our extra time and resources but then again, we might just spend more time shopping online. And the places we shop won’t only be the ones that have the products we want, they’ll be the ones that give us the best user experience with the least amount of annoyance and errors. They’ll be the ones who decided to start testing early in development, who continuously test their webshops after launch and make use of the results for further improvement. When our favourite webshops inevitably become the favourite of others as well, they’ll be the ones who make sure they can handle the increased amount of traffic. Then, we can finally enjoy all the new gadgets presented at IFA Berlin in time for the upcoming shopping season. Something Fold, Something New, Something Walkman, Something Hue Many new products were presented at IFA Berlin. Among them, we find an updated version of the Samsung Galaxy Fold and its counterpart the Huawei Mate X, Bluetooth capabilities added to Philips Hue lightbulbs, and a portable speaker from Sonos (by the way, if you’re at DMEXCO you can win a Sonos One at our booth so come say hi). Some of the more obscure products included a built-in clothes steamer for your closet, a Sony Walkman that doesn’t play cassettes, and a pillow with a wagging tail called Qoobo that reduces stress when you pet it. Less Stress Through More Tests So, if you’re stressing about the quality of your chatbot, or any other type of digital product, you could get a Qoobo to reduce your stress levels a bit. Or you could just get in touch with Testbirds and we’ll make sure you don’t have anything to be stressed about in the first place. This week we’re at DMEXCO in Cologne at Booth No. E-052a, Hall 07.1. Come meet us for a chat and a chance to win a Sonos One! Meet us at DMEXCO! Other articles related to: artificial intelligence, crowdtesting, IFA Berlin Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud crowd games app distribution engineering finance Apple Google artificial intelligence ecommerce connected cars BirdFlight best practices Flashback Friday end-users Card Sorting Crowdworking crowdsourcing End-to-End Testing history's biggest software fails AR cloud testing consumer electronics I/O Design end-user testing How-to event comparison test BugAbility dmexco Android Guest Article crowdtesting human ressources device cloud data privacy software development life cycle GRDN gaming computers global real device network functional testing functionality Bring your own cloud growth About the author Fredrik Forss International Marketing & PR Manager After growing up all over our beautiful planet and being more interested in commercials than the shows they were paired with, it made sense for Fredrik to join our team and be responsible for our international marketing efforts. Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Categories Search the blog Search for: Tags Tag cloud Crowdworking Guest Article software development life cycle Design history's biggest software fails Flashback Friday computers end-user testing How-to best practices artificial intelligence comparison test dmexco functionality Google connected cars device cloud gaming crowdtesting AR cloud testing ecommerce data privacy Card Sorting Apple global real device network Android games end-users crowd finance GRDN event engineering crowdsourcing I/O BugAbility Bring your own cloud End-to-End Testing human ressources functional testing BirdFlight consumer electronics growth app distribution Categories Categories Accessibility (2) App recommendation (7) Career@Testbirds (11) Case Studies (3) Code of Conduct (8) Crowdtesting (39) Device Cloud (25) Device Cloud Documentation (5) E-Commerce (9) Events (26) Founder's Views (12) Games & Gaming (2) Global Real Device Network (7) Guest Article (21) How To (22) Internet of Things (9) Meet our top tester (7) Mobile Commerce (9) Mobile Phone (8) My Role at Testbirds (27) News & Infos (80) Orga 4.0 (10) QA (45) Recruitment (6) Software & App Reviews (12) Software & IT (8) Software bugs & malfunctions (17) Terms from the world of IT explained (17) Test Automation (28) Testing Platform Nest (6) Testing Reality (52) Test Objects (0) Trends in Software Testing (22) Usability (28) Usability & User Experience (50) Virtual Reality (3) Webinars (13) Women in IT (4) Links Blog Home Rate this post Other content that might be interesting for you: Testbirds Training: Webinar on April 28th by Markus Hatzelmann | April 8, 2016 | Webinars | 0 Comments Come one, come all! Join our first Training Academy session on April 28th! If you are a dedicated reader of this blog (or one of our awesome... Read More Cognigy and Testbirds investigate Chatbots & Conversational AI in upcoming webinar by Sahil | May 3, 2019 | Webinars | 0 Comments In today’s world, where artificial intelligence is revolutionising how we approach and execute labour, the introduction of Chatbots and... ..read more
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On September 4th, 2019 we hosted our first Usability Speedtesting MeetUp in our Munich office. Five companies, five test objects, five testers, and pizza and beer – these were the ingredients of a lively and insightful event. Our goal was to bring companies and testers from our crowd together to create useful insights on the usability of the new products on display. 5 Companies, 5 Testers – Lots of Interesting Discussions We were happy to welcome around 50 people to our 1st Usability Speedtesting MeetUp in our Munich headquarters. Starting out the evening with pizza and beer wasn’t too bad… Five companies got the opportunity to have their digital products tested by five testers from our crowd. The variety was wide: from zooplus, who brought their beta version of a new app feature, to SPORT1 who tested their mobile website, and BMW Motorrad who brought a replica of a motorbike’s steering element with a TFT-display and VR glasses. Focus Online and E.ON also took the chance to get valuable feedback on their products. The five testers were selected according to various demographic criteria to ensure that they exactly matched the companies’ target groups. So, for example, we had a pet owner for zooplus and a motorbike rider for BMW Motorrad. Naturally, each tester also had a high affinity for the Internet, websites, and apps, which was an important criterion for everyone involved. How does Usability Speedtesting work? As we already pointed out, we invited five companies and five crowd testers which means we had five testing stations. Big surprise, right? 😉 The testers chose which station they wanted to start at and rotated every 12 minutes. The “serious” part of the evening – after pizza and beer – started with a short introduction from our Co-Founder and COO, Markus Steinhauser. After that, the first two testing rounds began. Before the first break we listened to a 15-minute talk by Jann Kirchhoff, Product Success Manager at BMW Motorrad. He gave us insights into the test we conducted (and are still conducting) with them. If you want to learn more about this and our partnership with BMW, read our blog article “Our step into the automotive world…” or have a look at our BMW case study. After Jann’s talk we had another two rounds of testing followed by another talk, this time by Lena Lupprian, UX Designer at E.ON Deutschland, on the topic “5 Surprising Insights from User Interviews”. The evening ended with a final round of testing and a lot of networking. Crowdtesting – Suitable for Every Development Stage It was great to see that we had different products from all stages of development at our Usability Speedtesting MeetUp. For us, this reflects one of the biggest advantages of crowdtesting – it’s suitable for any kind of digital product, any industry, and any stage of development. It doesn’t matter if you have a website or online shop, a mobile app or game, an IoT or smart device, a wearable, or a chatbot or virtual assistant – our testers give valuable and insightful feedback that helps you deliver the best version of your product. Happy testers, happy clients, happy Testbirds We got a lot of positive feedback during the event. Testers especially enjoyed the opportunity to exchange ideas and thoughts directly with the companies involved. One tester said: “It was an insightful and well-structured event. The limited time for the tests and the two presentations made the evening rich in variety and entertaining. Due to the many new situations of every test, my concentration and receptivity have been strengthened. It was great to get an immediate reaction to my feedback from company representatives and at the same time understand what they wanted to know. And of course, pizza and beer were the icing on the cake. 😊“ The attending companies emphasised that every new look at their product and all the feedback is very insightful and helpful for further development. Testing is a chance to get direct feedback from those who are really important – the users. Assumptions and thoughts on what users might like and expect are replaced by proven data and the opinion of real users. With this feedback in mind we can truly say we had a great event and are already looking forward to opening our doors for the 2nd Usability Speedtesting MeetUp. To give you an even better insight, have a look at our gallery. Other articles related to: crowd, crowdtesting, event, Crowdtesters, Usability, UX, ux design, meetup Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud end-user testing How-to computers crowdtesting ecommerce Google artificial intelligence event dmexco games best practices Card Sorting consumer electronics growth GRDN app distribution Crowdworking finance gaming end-users device cloud End-to-End Testing BirdFlight Android crowd comparison test AR history's biggest software fails global real device network Bring your own cloud software development life cycle Guest Article Flashback Friday Design Apple BugAbility engineering I/O data privacy cloud testing functional testing functionality human ressources crowdsourcing connected cars About the author Simone Groß Content Marketing Manager When Simone is not working on superb texts for Testbirds, she and her horse live it up on the tournament areas in Bavaria. Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Categories Categories Accessibility (2) App recommendation (7) Career@Testbirds (11) Case Studies (3) Code of Conduct (8) Crowdtesting (38) Device Cloud (25) Device Cloud Documentation (5) E-Commerce (9) Events (26) Founder's Views (12) Games & Gaming (2) Global Real Device Network (7) Guest Article (21) How To (22) Internet of Things (9) Meet our top tester (7) Mobile Commerce (9) Mobile Phone (8) My Role at Testbirds (27) News & Infos (79) Orga 4.0 (10) QA (45) Recruitment (6) Software & App Reviews (12) Software & IT (8) Software bugs & malfunctions (17) Terms from the world of IT explained (17) Test Automation (28) Testing Platform Nest (6) Testing Reality (51) Test Objects (0) Trends in Software Testing (22) Usability (28) Usability & User Experience (50) Virtual Reality (3) Webinars (13) Women in IT (4) Links Blog Home Rate this post Other content that might be interesting for you: Learn from our Bird Rob: Screencasts How-To by Josephine Whalen | May 8, 2015 | Guest Article, How To, Crowdtesting | 3 Comments Need help capturing the screen of your PC or mobile device when reporting a bug? Our tester, Rob, is here to save the day! Hi, I am Rob Sep. I’m 53... Read More TOP 10 CROWDTESTING TIPS by Miles Walbank | April 25, 2014 | How To, Crowdtesting | 0 Comments Crowdtesting. Exciting in principle, exciting in practice. But is it simple to master? We’re here to put the record straight that testing with us is... Read More “I Want to Improve Software” – Why Birds Test by Andrea Gudmundsdottir | February 7, 2014 | ..read more
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We have big news! This year you can meet a tester from our crowd at our dmexco booth on 11th and 12 of September in Cologne. Bring your digital product and get it tested. Moritz will test your website and share his thoughts with you while performing your test case. The idea behind it We believe in crowdtesting as an ideal tool to ensure that you are hitting your KPIs, getting a proper ROI and are able to optimise your conversion rate. We thought about many ways to prove that to you: videos, charts, case studies. But the best way is simply to show. So, we decided to bring a tester from our crowd to the booth and give you the chance to let your website be tested live. Experience how insightful crowdtesting can be – even with just one tester. And then imagine how much you could learn from testing with 10, 20 or 50 testers. Who will be there? We’ve invited our tester Moritz from Cologne. He joined our crowd in 2017 and has already worked on several tests. His preferred test types are Usability Tests and Bug Tests. Moritz is very experienced – he is a computer science student and is working as a professional tester. Like many young people, he spends almost 5 hours per day online on his computer or his smartphone. He uses several social media platforms, shops online and uses messaging services. He also uses smart home devices like Philips Hue, Alexa, Nest, Raspberry Pi and Google Home. For him testing and searching for bugs sometimes feels like a treasure hunt and he es very enthusiastic when he finds ways to improve a website. He is looking forward to dmexco, because there he is able to give direct feedback and actually talk to the people about their digital product, which he says is probably the most efficient information exchange. What can be tested? Moritz will test your website with use cases chosen by you. Possible questions/ use cases might be: • What would you do to find XYZ? • Please describe in your own words what XYZ is/ what you use XYZ for. • How would you rate the operability of the website? Moritz will then share his thoughts aloud with you and this way providing you with direct feedback. How can you get your website tested? Interested? – great! The easiest way to get your website tested is to just drop by at our booth (Booth No. E-052a, Hall 07.1) at dmexco in cologne. Moritz will bring his laptop so all you need is the URL of your website. Of course, you can also book a meeting with him, either via our contact form or by contacting one of our sales colleagues who will be at dmexco. For further information just click the button below, there are also some dmexco tickets left to win! Book a meeting Other articles related to: crowdtesting, dmexco, meet a tester Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud coding comparison test Crowdworking Benutzerfreundlichkeit Android alan turing Bring your own cloud Client consumer electronics corrupted blood crowdtesting artificial intelligence cloud testing code school CES cyber-physical systems BirdFlight Apple connected cars Arbeit BugAbility App Store Rating app store AR Business Development Card Sorting Crowdtesting Code of Conduct contest cookie app distribution crowd crowdsourced testing crowdsourcing amazon best practices computers Bug costumes Amsterdam christmas shopping codecademy bugs christmas presents Arbeitswelt Christmas About the author Simone Groß Content Marketing Manager When Simone is not working on superb texts for Testbirds, she and her horse live it up on the tournament areas in Bavaria. Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Categories Categories Accessibility (2) App recommendation (7) Career@Testbirds (9) Case Studies (3) Code of Conduct (8) Crowdtesting (37) Device Cloud (25) Device Cloud Documentation (5) E-Commerce (9) Events (26) Founder's Views (12) Games & Gaming (2) Global Real Device Network (7) Guest Article (21) How To (20) Internet of Things (9) Meet our top tester (7) Mobile Commerce (9) Mobile Phone (8) My Role at Testbirds (27) News & Infos (79) Orga 4.0 (10) QA (45) Recruitment (6) Software & App Reviews (12) Software & IT (8) Software bugs & malfunctions (17) Terms from the world of IT explained (17) Test Automation (28) Testing Platform Nest (6) Testing Reality (51) Test Objects (0) Trends in Software Testing (22) Usability (27) Usability & User Experience (49) Virtual Reality (3) Webinars (13) Women in IT (4) Links Blog Home Rate this post Other content that might be interesting for you: The history of the “bug”: How insects conquered the world of computers by Susanne | May 5, 2017 | QA, Software bugs & malfunctions, Terms from the world of IT explained | 0 Comments “Terms from the world of IT explained” is a series of blog posts that explains the origin of common IT terms. We often use them in our daily life,... Read More Testing 4.0 – The Next Generation of Quality by Franziska Rduch | February 26, 2016 | Testing Reality | 1 Comment As you might have noticed in our prior blog posts, we have been thinking a lot about digital innovation and Industry 4.0 lately. As our daily and... Read More Connected Cars ’16: Testing in the Automotive Industry by Sahil | July 4, 2016 | Internet of Things, News & Infos, Testing Reality, Events | 1 Comment When it comes to innovations in technology, there are few industries as progressive and defining as the automotive industry. Attributed to a number... Read More Test like the best: Meet Snowflake81 by Markus | October 10, 2014 | Guest Article, Crowdtesting | 0 Comments It’s time for another story from one of our testers. Meet Snowflake81, one of our female testers from Germany who has been among the Top 100 in... Read More Crowdworking – Die Zukunft der Arbeit?! by Veronika Wasza | September 23, 2015 | Code of Conduct, News & Infos | 0 Comments Wie verändert die Digitalisierung unsere Arbeitswelt? Ersetzen uns zukünftig Maschinen? Hat der klassische Arbeitsplatz, wie wir ihn bislang... Read More We want you! How to find good talent as a start-up by Philipp Benkler | October 12, 2017 | Founder's Views, Orga 4.0, Recruitment, Career@Testbirds | 0 Comments Finding the right people is one of the biggest challenges for start-ups. First, there was only us three founders, we were small and not (yet)... Read More Behind the Scenes: Testing of Conversational AI at Testbirds by Regina | May 21, 2019 | Webinars, Testing Reality, Usability & User Experience, Usability | 0 Comments These days at Testbirds, we’re talking a lot about chatbots, machine learning, and conversational agents. While these topics have always interested... Read More I’m Marc-David and this is my role at Testbirds by Nilani Shan | July 18, 2014 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that gives insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More Video: Achieving a Seamless User Experience Through Testing by Sahil | December 14, 2018 | Webinars, Testing Reality, Usability.. ..read more
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CNN and The New York Times – certainly two very big names in the news industry that know how to present themselves. To show you the capabilities of crowdtesting, we chose those two websites as UX testing subjects for our crowd. The reason? Because we truly believe that there is always room for improvement. Even when you are one of the biggest players in your market, you can always improve a should always strive to do better each and every day. At Testbirds, we believe that our crowd can help you do so. Let’s talk about how… We asked around 500 testers from all around the globe to have a deeper look into the respective websites: cnn.com and nytimes.com. The results they provided were interesting as well as surprising. Below, we’ve split our analysis and want to start with a very common UX topic: Mobile vs. Desktop use. Data & Statistics about Mobile Usage Mobile first! How long has this been said? Mobile design and users are important and there is still a lot of room for improvement UX-wise, especially when we have a look at websites around the globe. But first, let’s have a look at some statistics that show desktop vs. mobile usage (as of 2018). What percentage of web traffic is mobile? The Mobile vs Desktop Usage Study of PerficientDigital states that 58% of site visits in 2018 came from mobile devices. Additionally, mobile devices made up 42% of the total time spent online. Looking at those statistics from a UX perspective, it’s important to consider that people spend less time on a site when using a mobile device. The average mobile user spent 5.95 minutes per visit, whereas desktop users spent an average of 11.52 minutes. Another difference between mobile and desktop users is that mobile users visit fewer sites than users on a desktop device. And whereas the average mobile user views 5.15 pages per visit, the average desktop-user views 9.84. These are all important statistics to consider when designing your mobile website. Mobile Users vs. Desktop Users in the News and Media Industry Speaking of CNN and The New York Times, let’s have a look at the numbers for the news and media Industry, keeping them in mind for our later analysis of their sites. At 51%, the percentage of mobile web usage is even higher compared to other industries. Mobile users on these sites are quicker; they only spent on average 3.33 minutes on the site and viewed 3.05 sites. What about video views and search? TechJury collected 52 Mobile vs. Desktop Usage Statistics for 2019 that help us to understand how users watch videos and perform searches on mobile and desktop devices. Let’s start with the fact that more than half of all video views come from smartphone users. According to Google, 58% of all searches happen on mobile devices. Furthermore, nearly 4 out of 10 people searched on Google with only their smartphone. In summary, we can say that mobile is a big player when it comes to website visits, time spent on sites, video views, and search. This news shouldn’t come as a surprise, but something to consider before discussing the UX battle. UX Battle: What our Crowd says about CNN and NYT In this UX battle, our Crowd dug deeper into the mobile and desktop websites of CNN and The New York Times (cnn.com and nytimes.com, respectively), focusing especially on the front page, video section, and the search functionality. Below, we’ll discuss the results. Front Page & Layout The first thing you notice when entering a website is the overall layout. In general, whether you like the look of a site or not is more a feeling rather than something you can explain with detailed reasons. We were surprised to observe that the user experience on the mobile versions of CNN and The New York Times was more liked than the one on the desktop version. At the very beginning of the user journey, we want to concentrate on the entrance point for most users: the front page. We can all agree that the front page especially of a news website should be clear and well-organized. While the mobile and desktop versions of the CNN site was rated as “clear” or “rather clear” by around 66% of our participants, there was quite a big difference between the mobile and desktop versions of The New York Times site with regards to clarity. Users enjoyed the mobile version of NYT a lot more than the desktop view. Let’s have a closer look at the differences between the two sites: The desktop version of NYT is cluttered with different things: headlines, pictures, stories, bullet points, and so on all arranged in quite an unstructured way. It’s hard to digest all the information and to recognize which headline belongs to which story or image. However, on the mobile version, we get a completely different Images, headlines, and bullet points – in other words, the “normal” layout of an article preview. The design is only interrupted by a sprinkling of headline-only article teasers. All in all, we can say that the mobile version seems to be cleaner and more structured than the desktop version, users seemed to like it as well. Looking at CNN, we can see that the desktop version seems much more structured, all while showing less information. While The New York Times site tries to add a short introduction to the stories under the headlines, CNN mostly just gives headlines without further explanations. This leads to a similarity between the mobile and desktop versions of the site. However, it should be noted that test participants liked the preview offered by the NYT site. We can’t discuss a news website without mentioning how breaking news is displayed and prioritized. Let’s have a quick look at the prioritization of breaking news on each site. On CNN, the results from mobile and desktop users were quite similar, as demonstrated in the chart below. However, on the NYT site, there seems to be a large gap between what desktop and mobile users see. After topicality, the variety of content is an important aspect for news sites. One might assume that the desktop version is always rated better than the mobile view due simply to the fact that there is a lot more space for content on a desktop device. While this is especially true for CNN, the gap between mobile and desktop is surprisingly quite small for the NYT. So, who wins the first round of our UX Battle? The point for front page and layout goes to… The New York Times! The good mobile site performance in particular helped push them over the top. Video Section Video Section Video becomes more and more important when we talk about how users are consuming the news they receive. That’s why the next part of our UX Battle deals with the video content of CNN and The New York Times sites. We first wanted to know how users rated the video section in terms of visibility on the front page. Looking at the results, it becomes quite clear that NYT has a lot of room for when it comes to visibility. Although both websites have “video” as an own category in their menu, it seems that videos are a lot easier to find on CNN. We get an explanation for this looking at the menu on mobile devices. CNN’s videos are a lot easier to find because The New York Times hides the video section at the very end of the menu. Another reason why this might be is that the NYT does not include any videos in their article previews on the front page, while CNN does. It’s a shame that the video section of the NYT site is so hard to find, especially when we consider the findings from the next few questions that addressed the quality of the video sections. In terms of quantity, relevance, and player performance of video content, the NYT sites succeeds. This is especially due to the fact that the video player performs so well on both the desktop and mobile versions of the site. For CNN, things look different. While the desktop version seems to function seamlessly as well, the mobile version didn’t convince our testers. This makes the NYT site a winner again! Search Are you ready for the third and final round of our UX Battle – Mobile vs. Desktop? This section is all about searching and finding a specific article on the desktop and mobile versions. What’s the most important thing about search? That you find what you’re looking for! The good news is that almost 80% of our testers found the articles we asked them to look for on both pages. How easy was it for users to find them? Looking at the results, searching for articles on the NYT was quite easy on both the desktop and mobile sites. Searching on CNN was easier on a desktop than on their mobile device. Another important aspect of search is how many relevant articles are displayed in the search query. According to our testers, there’s a big difference here between the NYT and CNN. Whereas over 60% said that there were more articles relevant than irrelevant to their search on the NYT site, the percentage drops to 44% on the mobile version of CNN and only 38% if we have a look at the desktop version. For the third and final round of our UX Battle, the points again go to The New York Times. Overall After we had a deeper look into the front page and the video section and search functionalities of both sites, let’s compare the overall design on web browser, tablet and mobile. The results for the web browser are very close and therefore can’t identify big differences between CNN and the NYT. Looking at the performance of both sites on a tablet, one can notice some minor differences. We can observe the biggest contrasts when we have a look at the results from testers using a mobile device. While the results for both websites are still very good, the NYT is rated better than CNN. Our Conclusion and Possible Advice While both the CNN and The New York Times sites are rated highly, there is always room for improvement. Comparing the mobile and the desktop version of The New York Times we see that users rate the mobile version higher. In a comparison study, the NYT could try to understand the reasons for this rating and how they can structure their desktop version even better. CNN could do a competitor analysis to get deeper insights into what testers liked about the NYT site and then try to improve their own website based on this feedback. In their video section, the NYT should try and understand where users would expect this section to be located and how important it is rated. Especially on mobile devices, they should try to increase its visibility, as users rated the quality of the videos quite high once they found them. In terms of searching, CNN should try and understand why it was easier for users to find articles on the desktop site. A possible question that applies to both versions of the site: Is it better to show more but perhaps irrelevant articles in the search results, or would it be better to show fewer but more relevant articles? Not sure how both companies would go about doing so? Well, we have a few ideas! Why not try a Usability and UX Study, Remote Interviews, or Remote Usability Videos to truly understand what your users see and think and how they behave when visiting your website. Testbirds can help you with that! Our crowd consists of over 400,000 testers from all around the world and you can select your exact target group with the help of 65 demographic criteria. If you want to learn even more about the ways our crowd can help you test your website, let’s talk in person. We are going to be at the DMEXCO 2019 on 11th and 12th of September in Cologne. Click the button below to get in touch and book a meeting with us at our booth. Meet us at DMEXCO Other articles related to: crowd, News, website testing, crowd testing, media Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud app distribution Apple amazon code school christmas presents Benutzerfreundlichkeit consumer electronics codecademy cloud testing costumes cyber-physical systems Bring your own cloud Android computers Card Sorting connected cars crowdsourcing Bug crowdtesting Crowdworking crowdsourced testing BirdFlight cookie alan turing AR App Store Rating Arbeit Client contest comparison test christmas shopping artificial intelligence ..read more
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Cross-device testing is a crucial key success factor in our multi-device-landscaped world for improving the effectiveness of our online businesses. Maybe its beneficial impact is often a bit underrated, and that is why we already wrote about multi-device usage and the resulting importance of cross-device testing in one of our latest blog-posts about e-commerce. Today we want to highlight the topic with regards to its relevance for online marketing. Fragmented Device Landscape – an Obstacle for Online Marketing Campaigns If you break it down to the essence, online marketing campaigns mainly consist of the three components: image, text, and call-to-action. I know, most marketers will now feel this is a misrepresentation of their daily work. Of course, online marketing is way more than just creating appealing graphics with image, text, and CTA. Based on the big picture, marketers need to go through endless analyses and conversion rate optimization cycles, while always keeping in mind their 360° marketing strategy with a storytelling approach fitting across all devices in the best case. But if we are looking at the visible result of a campaign it is these three components that remain.The perfect arrangement and layout of these components is the set screw to optimize a campaign’s KPIs like click-through-rate, conversion-rate and bounce-rate. Often through executing one A/B-test after another (see our latest blog post about conversion rate optimization, if you are interested in learning how you can optimize more efficiently). Ok, so image, text, CTA and A/B-Testing sounds like a plan that is easy to tackle. But let me tell you something: this is easier said than done. As the term multi-device usage already implies, customers tend to consume ads on many different devices. The hundreds of different screen sizes, operations systems, and email providers make it anything but easy to secure that the marketing campaigns work as intended for every customer on his or her device and that conversation rate optimization tests really show valid results. Differences in Mobile and Desktop Marketing Campaigns need to differ depending on the used device. The different user behavior of using a smartphone compared to a desktop is only one reason. The most obvious factor is the screen size. It is not only done by simply shrinking a graphic to the smartphone sizes to optimize for mobile. Moreover, the whole layout needs to be adapted depending on the device the campaign is received. Here are some best practices on how to change the three components image, text and CTA when creating multi-device campaigns: TextThe right amount of text content for a desktop campaign is in nearly all cases too much for smartphone campaigns. You can’t expect the targeted person to scroll and consume longer than a couple of seconds. Ensure that the layout of your campaign is simple, understandable, and easy to grasp for the consumer. ImageIt is all about the right format. When running a cross-platform marketing strategy, a common issue is that images get chosen in formats that do not match the best practices for their destination. For mobile, images cropped to portrait-aspect ratio often perform better whereas landscape-aspect ratio is the go-to format for desktop campaigns. It is often overlooked to optimize for the specific target destination although it can have sizable effects on ROI. Call-To-ActionsFor desktop campaigns, we often use more CTA’s because we want to offer the consumer a variety of choices, be it a newsletter-subscription, a link to a specific landing page or of course the “Buy”-Button. For mobile CTAs should be applied with caution. Less is more is the credo here, and you should try to showcase only one actionable item at a time. Two or more CTAs side by side will overload the frame, and their effectiveness will be diluted. Device Cloud for Multi-Device Testing of Online Marketing Campaigns The stated best practices are a good first step. However, they only cover general differences between mobile and desktop marketing and still don’t help much when it comes to handling the sheer never-ending flow of different and new device sizes that are accompanied with the increase in cross-device usage. If you really want to have an overview on how your campaigns look on the different desktop, tablet and smartphone versions you need a testing platform to test all the combinations of operating systems, devices, browser versions and email providers without buying hundreds of different real devices. The Testbirds Device Cloud gives access to this device world in a digital manner. It is possible to test on 2.5 million virtual combinations of devices, operating systems, and browsers, as well as real devices all around the world in the Global Real Device Network. Let’s talk about Cross-Device Testing at Dmexco I have two good news for you: 1) If you want to learn more about how the Testbirds Device Cloud can help you improve your online marketing KPIs on all different devices, we can talk about this at the dmexco on 11th and 12th of September in Cologne. 2) If you don’t have a dmexco ticket, you can win one in our raffle by simply booking a meeting with us. And the best thing, now that we talked about the benefits of the Device Cloud, you even can win one out of 20 Device Cloud packages for 3 months. What are you waiting for, click the button and we will see each other at dmexco! Meet Us at Dmexco and Win Other articles related to: device cloud, dmexco, Online Marketing Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud App Store Rating connected cars Card Sorting contest computers Bring your own cloud Client cookie Crowdtesting Code of Conduct amazon crowd crowdsourcing app store crowdsourced testing Crowdworking Amsterdam BirdFlight Apple christmas presents Benutzerfreundlichkeit codecademy bugs coding corrupted blood alan turing cyber-physical systems christmas shopping Android comparison test Arbeit costumes Bug app distribution Christmas AR CES Business Development best practices Arbeitswelt cloud testing code school consumer electronics crowdtesting artificial intelligence BugAbility About the author Regina Heiß PR & Marketing Manager Birds flying high, you know how I feel… whenever Regina is not working in the marketing-team for Testbirds, you can find her singing with her Jazz-Trio . Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Categories Categories Accessibility (2) App recommendation (7) Career@Testbirds (9) Case Studies (3) Code of Conduct (8) Crowdtesting (35) Device Cloud (25) Device Cloud Documentation (5) E-Commerce (8) Events (25) Founder's Views (12) Games & Gaming (2) Global Real Device Network (7) Guest Article (21) How To (20) Internet of Things (9) Meet our top tester (6) Mobile Commerce (9) Mobile Phone (8) My Role at Testbirds (27) News & Infos (79) Orga 4.0 (10) QA (45) Recruitment (6) Software & App Reviews (12) Software & IT (8) Software bugs & malfunctions (17) Terms from the world of IT explained (17) Test Automation (28) Testing Platform Nest (6) Testing Reality (51) Test Objects (0) Trends in Software Testing (22) Usability (26) Usability & User Experience (48) Virtual Reality (3) Webinars (13) Women in IT (4) Links Blog Home Rate this post Other content that might be interesting for you: German Testing Day 2019 – We are there! by Simone Gross | May 16, 2019 | QA, Events, Usability & User Experience, Test Automation | 0 Comments Meet us at Kap Europa, Frankfurt at the German Testing Day 2019. Visit our booth and listen to Felix Kuperjans, Technical Lead Device Cloud,... Read More Quality Assurance at Testbirds – What’s new? by Franziska Rduch | March 3, 2016 | QA, Testing Reality, Test Automation | 7 Comments It has now been nearly two weeks since the launch of Testing 4.0 and our new website. The entire Testbirds team is extremely happy about how things... Read More The History of the @: From Medieval Monks to the Early Days of the Internet by Susanne | December 8, 2017 | Terms from the world of IT explained | 3 Comments In this edition of “terms from the world of IT explained “, I will not talk about a term in particular, but about the history of a sign we all use... Read More Video: Achieving a Seamless User Experience Through Testing by Sahil | December 14, 2018 | Webinars, Testing Reality, Usability & User Experience, Usability | 0 Comments Today’s market for digital products is highly competitive. This has given rise to the necessity for companies to provide a high level of user... Read More I am Frida and this is my role at Testbirds by Markus Hatzelmann | March 24, 2016 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that gives insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More MWC Raffle – Hall of Fame by Franziska Rduch | February 24, 2017 | Testing Reality | 0 Comments It might sound weird, but we cannot wait for Monday. On this day Mobile World Congress 2017 will start and we are very happy to be a part of it. As... Read More ..read more
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Password Protected To view this protected post, enter the password below: Password: Submit The post Protected: This is the End ..read more
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…the BMW Group! Today we are excited to announce a comprehensive contract. First, let me start at the very beginning. Our journey started with end-to-end testing of BMW Motorrad’s Connected App in 2018 and from there, the story began. How Crowdtesting Helped Improve the Driving Experience Today, connected car apps offer several helpful features to make the driving experience even better. Users can navigate or track their ride as well as access the vehicle data during or after their bike tour. App and motorbike are connected via Bluetooth and features are shown on the motorcycles’ displays. As a new app was being developed in 2018, Testbirds was supporting as a partner to test it internationally with different smartphones and motorbike combinations. Testers were asked to test the beta version in typical use cases with their motorbikes. As tests could only be conducted by riders who own a motorcycle with a special TFT-display, tester recruiting has been quite challenging. But we managed it with our Bring-Your-Own-Crowd™ principle. Now, How Did We Get to the Long-Term Partnership? Like everyone else, Testbirds had to go through a thorough request for proposal. During several rounds, we were able to demonstrate our technical capability. Besides that, our Code of Conduct also played a key role in getting chosen as a testing partner. The Code of Conduct are self-imposed guidelines for prominent crowdsourcing companies. It aims to create general guidelines about how to act in regard to crowd work and thereby create a basis for a trust and fair cooperation between service providers, clients, and crowd workers, supplementary to current legislation. What’s Tested and How? Testbirds will be a digital testing partner for the company’s apps and digital services with a focus on digital application testing. BMW gets access to our crowdtesting services as one part of a broader testing program. As crowdtesting relies on real users with real devices, it is ideal for further improvement of digital products and customers’ experience. That way, every journey from A to B can be made even more comfortable and personalized. Philipp Benkler, Co-Founder and CEO of Testbirds had a few words to say about the partnership: “We are proud to partner with BMW Group to help optimise the company’s digital products and services. Testbirds and BMW Group share the vision that crowdsourced testing of apps and digital services throughout all stages of software development are key to change – it’s our goal to help improve application quality, accelerate software releases, and deliver digital products and experiences that have a real impact for BMW Group and its customers.” Other articles related to: End-to-End Testing, Partners, Testbirds Exclusives, UX, automotive, BMW, BMW Motorrad, BMW Group Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud automation App Store Rating Benutzerfreundlichkeit cloud testing alan turing Business Development consumer electronics codecademy app Bring your own cloud Android webinars code school christmas shopping browser Amsterdam coding app distribution Arbeitswelt Card Sorting connected cars amazon BirdFlight AR app store contest Bug bugs Apple Client Arbeit Christmas BugAbility best practices CES apps automated testing computers BITKOM Birds comparison test Beta-App artificial intelligence christmas presents Crowdtesting Code of Conduct About the author Simone Groß Content Marketing Manager When Simone is not working on superb texts for Testbirds, she and her horse live it up on the tournament areas in Bavaria. Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Categories Categories Accessibility (2) App recommendation (7) Career@Testbirds (8) Case Studies (2) Code of Conduct (8) Crowdtesting (34) Device Cloud (14) Device Cloud Documentation (5) E-Commerce (6) Events (23) Founder's Views (12) Games & Gaming (2) Global Real Device Network (6) Guest Article (21) How To (20) Internet of Things (9) Meet our top tester (6) Mobile Commerce (8) Mobile Phone (8) My Role at Testbirds (27) News & Infos (78) Orga 4.0 (10) QA (44) Recruitment (6) Software & App Reviews (12) Software & IT (8) Software bugs & malfunctions (17) Terms from the world of IT explained (17) Test Automation (21) Testing Platform Nest (6) Testing Reality (51) Test Objects (0) Trends in Software Testing (21) Usability (25) Usability & UX (47) Virtual Reality (3) Webinars (12) Women in IT (4) Links Blog Home Rate this post Other content that might be interesting for you: Don’t miss out on the Benefits of Test Automation by Simone Gross | April 26, 2019 | How To, Test Automation, Device Cloud, Testing Platform Nest | 0 Comments Are you testing your software manually? That’s great! But if you really want to upgrade the efficiency of your test processes you should consider... Read More Meet our Testers: Michele from Italy by Josephine Whalen | January 29, 2016 | Guest Article, Crowdtesting, Meet our top tester | 2 Comments For our first tester interview of the year we decided to interview Michele, one of our top testers in Italy who recently participated in a test that... Read More Testbirds Training Academy: Automated Testing Webinar on the 3rd August by Bree | July 22, 2016 | Webinars, News & Infos, Testing Reality, Global Real Device Network | 0 Comments Testing software, whether it’s apps, websites or other software, can always be challenging. There are so many factors that come into play when... Read More Apple does it again: How the tech gigant is revolutionising our behaviour by Markus | June 17, 2016 | QA, Internet of Things, News & Infos, Trends in Software Testing, Usability & UX | 0 Comments On Tuesday, Apple was once again holding its annual developer conference WWDC and presented its latest innovations. Two weeks ago, we reported on... Read More I’m Susanne and this is my role at Testbirds by Jonna | August 18, 2017 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that give insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More A New Nest for the Testbirds by Nilani Shan | May 8, 2014 | News & Infos, Testing Platform Nest | 0 Comments Some of you might have seen it already - We have a new nest! The development and project management team have worked very hard and now a completely... Read More A (very) Brief History of Software Testing by Bree | November 11, 2016 | Terms from the world of IT explained, Software & IT | 1 Comment Testing has been around longer than you would think and by extension software testing isn’t a relatively new concept either. Before markets became... Read More I’m Homi and this is my role at Testbirds by Nilani Shan | August 21, 2014 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that gives insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More How Testbirds was born: What I’ve learned from evaluating business ideas by Philipp Benkler | December 6, 2017 | QA, Founder's Views,.. ..read more
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As you might have picked up already, in July we address E-Commerce testing a lot on our Testbirds blog. In the last weeks we already tackled down some different testing methods: we emphasized the importance of cross-device testing due to the ongoing mobile-shift, showed how an Exploratory Bug-Test is executed and explained how much optimisation potential lies in testing in general (if you missed it: with crowdtesting we once helped a client increase his conversion rate by 30%!). In this week’s e-com series blog post, we want to present you with a rather simple thing: An Overview. What are the most common testing methods for web shops. Whether if it’s when creating an online-shop from conception phase to prototyping and to post-release stage, or also when the web shop is already running or a relaunch is planned. Card Sorting during Conception phase Yes, an online-shop needs to have an appealing design with an outstanding portfolio of products and services. A solid structure that is intuitive and simple is equally important though, because websites that make it easy for users to navigate, are a necessity for success. To put it into marketing-terms: Customer-centricity is key, especially during conception phase. With a Testing Method called Card Sorting, the customers’ needs are included into the development process from the very beginning. The target group helps define an intuitive navigation and menu structure. With Card Sorting, a representative tester group of a client’s target customers sort and categorise virtual cards to define a clear and logical navigation structure. Usually there are two different options: the 50-100 testers either receive topics and must cluster them into new topics, e.g. they create their own menu structure; or they receive pre-defined topics and must group different items and words under those topics. With both options the outcome is a comprehensive feedback towards clarity and structure, which gets analysed by Testbirds project managers who also formulate concrete recommendations for improvement. Card Sorting in short: Card Sorting helps with the challenge of having a simple navigation despite a large amount of content 50-100 testers representing the client’s target group define a logical navigation structure Feedback towards clarity and structure Fast Execution: testing phase 1-3 days, results and analysis 3-5 days Prototype Evaluation via Remote Interviews A next step towards a well-functioning online-shop is prototyping. Whether if it’s a click-dummy that contains the first versions of designs and navigation structures or even just first pictures and PDF files of the final website, a Prototype Evaluation Test is outstandingly important, because uncertainty is a huge matter to contend with. Will the product be accepted by the target group? Are different features necessary and understandable? Operational blindness makes it nearly impossible for an unbiased view on the software, risking missing important details and developing an unsuccessful product. An effective way to gain some insights into the customers minds is asking the target group for constructive feedback before the development phase takes place. One common testing method to do so is by executing Remote Interviews. In Remote Interviews, the target group specific selection of testers share their screen and their thoughts in a video conference about a client’s digital product. Normally in 30-minute sessions with one tester at a time. The client is able to remotely watch, communicate and guide the tester during the whole testing process and is so able to control the procedure by direct interaction. The biggest advantages of this test method is the flexibility and direct feedback that make readjustments possible even during the testing phase. The interviews get recorded and can be re-evaluated at a later point. Remote Interviews in short: Prototype Evaluation through Remote Interviews shows what the target group thinks about the idea before the development phase starts Normally 5-10 testers share their thoughts about the prototype in direct remote conversations with the client Very flexible testing manuscript and fast feedback Duration of the testing phase is dependent on the number of testers, results and analysis can be delivered in 5-7 days QA and UX during Development and Post-release With every online-shop it is most crucial to make sure that functionality and user-friendliness are flawless and on par. Whether it is during the development phase or after release, or even if an online-shop is already running for many years, the most common testing methods are functionality tests and usability tests. We have clients, who need our help right after a relaunch of their online-shop, because the release was too error-prone due to a lack of testing beforehand. Another client had his web shop for several years, which looked fine at first glance, but still the crowd found 249 bugs on the site. Usability and UX Study If a website does not meet the expectations of its users, or if users are unable to easily fulfill the intended actions, alternatives offered by competitors are often just a click away. Seemingly small features like headlines or an image next to the “buy” button can have serious consequences. Therefore, aspects like text to image ratio can be hugely influential. Although developers and designers are experts when it comes to their company’s software and digital products, they will never have an unbiased view due to organisational blindness. In a Usability & UX Study feedback from the crowd regarding usability and user experience of a webshop gets collected by conducting up to 10 use cases with up to 5 qualitative and 8 quantitative questions. The tester group can be chosen from over 65 demographic criteria and of course is adapted to exactly represent a client’s target customer. Usability and UX Study in short: Usability and UX Studies help figuring out how the target group experiences a webshop The recommended number of testers is 15-20 Benefits are that user expectations and needs are recognized and user satisfaction can be improved Exemplary duration: Testing phase on the platform: 2-7 days, Results and analysis: 3-7 days Exploratory Bugtest It is no news how fatal it can be if the basic functions of a webshop don’t work, especially in the ever-growing complexity of the device-landscape. The main purpose of the shop is to sell products and if this purpose cannot be fulfilled, well there is no reason for it to exist. Online-shops hence need to be extensively checked for functional errors and bugs on all devices. In a blog post 2 weeks ago, we already explained how Exploratory Bugtests are executed in more detailed, for this blog post, we hence stick to a short summary: Exploratory Bugtest in short: Exploratory Bugtests are executed to ensure the functionality of the software on all the different devices in the market Normally 10-20 testers per device type are in one tester group The outcome is overall feedback on functionality and bug categorization & prioritization Exemplary duration: Testing phase on the platform: 1-3 days, Results and analysis: 1-2 days Testbirds Top Tipp If time is an issue, for example right before the release of a web shop, but both QA and UX still need to be tested, one of the most popular Testing Service at Testbirds combines the two methods QA and UX. The Bugability Test functions as a sort of all-in-one service to simultaneously test both the functionality and get usability feedback with the help of the crowd. Bugability Test In a Bugability Test, a group of testers, that matches the target customer of the client, conducts up to 10 use cases, where they are asked to complete up to 3 qualitative and 5 quantitative questions and give feedback regarding the usability of the web shop. The testers also report defects in comprehensive bug reports with details on the respective test device, title, severity, category, description, actual/ expected result and deliver screenshots and/or videos. This combination of functionality and usability testing gives a 360°-Feedback to eliminate critical malfunctions on the website right before launch. The test set-up is done by Testbirds project managers who consolidate the results in detailed test reports with recommended courses of action. Bugability Test in short:  Bugability Tests give feedback to the general question: Do I have a high-quality digital product? The recommended number of testers is 20-35 testers Biggest benefit is the combination of functionality and usability feedback Exemplary duration: Testing phase on the platform: 2-4 days, Results and analysis: 2-4 day Online-Shops need to be tested continuously Retail sites are highly dynamic with new offers, new products, sales, etc., which makes webshop testing a complex and ongoing necessity. It therefore is most efficient to include the testing methods stated above permanently into the many development sprints. With many clients, at Testbirds we therefore entered long-term partnership for continuous testing, an approach we’ve learned is extremely successful. Other articles related to: BugAbility, Card Sorting, Usability and UX Study, e commerce, Testing Methods Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud computers Bug Beta-App automation code school Arbeit webinars apps CES Christmas BITKOM BirdFlight Benutzerfreundlichkeit Crowdtesting Code of Conduct Arbeitswelt app distribution coding contest app bugs amazon Business Development Apple automated testing Card Sorting alan turing app store Android christmas presents App Store Rating BugAbility cloud testing Client Amsterdam christmas shopping AR Birds Bring your own cloud best practices comparison test codecademy browser artificial intelligence connected cars consumer electronics About the author Regina Heiß PR & Marketing Manager Birds flying high, you know how I feel… whenever Regina is not working in the marketing-team for Testbirds, you can find her singing with her Jazz-Trio . 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Did you know that global revenue in eCommerce still is growing with an annual growth rate of 9%? I didn’t. Honestly, I thought we have long since reached a point where online market coverage is somewhat completed and revenue only increases by basis points. But in 2017, e-retail sales accounted for 10,2% of all retail sales worldwide and this figure is expected to reach 17,5 % in 2021. It’s not too late to enter the eCom market, there is high potential to make some money even if you are at the very beginning of starting a business or just now switching from offline to online. About the fundamentality of testing your online-shop In the blog-post last week, we’ve learned that 43% of all order cancellations of online purchases are due to technical malfunctions in online-shops. In combination with the statistic stated above (eCommerce still to be a lucrative market) this shows that one essential factor to make effective use of the market growth is a well-functioning online-shop. I don’t want to ruin the punch-line here, but…Testbirds can help with that. If you are not convinced yet, here are 5 pretty valid benefits of testing and crowdtesting your webshop. How your webshop can benefit from Software Testing Software testing with the help of a tester crowd and the usage of automated testing services has a highly positive impact on improving the efficiency of your testing processes and boosting your online business in general. The following list of advantages is based on the experience of Testbirds and on the insights and learnings that derive from many testing projects we did over the years: 1) Testing improves your web shop in 100% of the cases In every test, the testers from our crowd find at least one bug, this means testing is expedient in every single case. With one of our biggest and most successful e-Commerce clients for example, we did 5 bug tests over a period of 6 months. In total 249 bugs got detected by the crowd, even when at first glance the online shop of this client looked fine. 2) Testing significantly increases your conversion rate The most severe bugs are the ones that occur during the check-out and payment process. Unfortunately, this step also tends to be more error-prone than others due to its complexity. Fair enough, but even the most flawless check-out process is useless, if customers don’t reach this step due to bugs beforehand, or a bad UX. Thorough testing of both functionality and usability of the whole customer journey is therefore most crucial. At Testbirds, for example, we executed an extensive usability crowdtest for a large insurance company. The relevant target group from our crowd created detailed feedback about the client’s website under realistic testing conditions. This led to a 30% improved conversion rate after the implementation of the Testbirds feedback. 3) Testing with the Crowd leads to an increase in the number of releases per year by 150% This means with outsourcing the testing and QA processes to a crowd, your dev-teams are able to focus more on their core responsibility, namely develop and optimize the online functionalities of your web shop. This shift in focal points not only can double the amount of releases per year, but according to Hobson&Company can scale them up by 150%. Most definitely due to the fact that testers are able to provide a very high level of testing experience and efficiency. 4) 10% higher retention rate through Crowdtesting Only one tiny bug on your web shop can be responsible for losing customers. I experienced a situation that shows this pretty well: I tried to order pizza online a few months ago and there was a major bug on both the mobile version and desktop version of the site. It was not possible to choose the size of the pizza, there was no button for me to click on. Every time I tried to continue with the ordering process, I got the same error message that I first need to choose the pizza-size otherwise I was not allowed to put something into the shopping cart. Of course, I never visited this site again. Hobson&Company found out that crowdtesting leads to an increase in retention rate in 10%, but to be honest, my gut feeling tells me it could be even more. 5) Testing cuts costs How you can save money when you get your web shop tested professionally? Firstly, the quality of your online-shop gets better which leads to less critical fixes needed. Secondly, with Crowdtesting you can get your website tested even before its launch, which helps remove errors and problems. You also save customer service money, since you reduced the number of unsatisfied customers beforehand. Thirdly, if you automate your testing processes, for example with the Device Cloud Test Automation, you both gain quality and decrease the long-term costs of the service. Testbirds as Testing partner We test web shops. Whether if it’s inspecting the site for functional errors and bugs or checking if the UX and shopping experience matches the expectations of the target costumer. Whether it is cross-browser testing, cross-device testing or the testing of a complete User Journey End-to-End, from order process to delivery and returns. With the help of 400,000 Testers of our Crowd and an unlimited number of different combinations of devices, browsers and operating systems in the Testbirds Device Cloud, there is basically no test scenario, we can’t execute. Don’t be deterred by this multitude of different types of software tests, next week we are going to explain the most common ways we use for webshop testing. Until then, Linda from our Account Management team is the perfect contact person, if you want to learn more about our flexible testing solutions. She specializes in eCom and the testing of web shops. Contact Linda Other articles related to: crowdtesting, e commerce, webshop testing, business growth Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud christmas presents AR Crowdtesting Code of Conduct Card Sorting contest alan turing consumer electronics bugs Christmas amazon comparison test code school Bring your own cloud coding apps Android connected cars BugAbility Amsterdam artificial intelligence cloud testing BirdFlight Bug automated testing Arbeit app distribution browser Arbeitswelt webinars app codecademy Birds Benutzerfreundlichkeit Beta-App Business Development automation Apple best practices Client computers app store CES BITKOM christmas shopping App Store Rating About the author Regina Heiß PR & Marketing Manager Birds flying high, you know how I feel… whenever Regina is not working in the marketing-team for Testbirds, you can find her singing with her Jazz-Trio . 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Testbirds, however, welcomed 2014 with a big bang. What is a Bird... Read More I’m Maximilian and this is my role at Testbirds by Franziska Stiegelmair | September 18, 2015 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that gives insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More History’s Biggest Software Fails: The Heartbleed Bug by Sahil | July 3, 2015 | News & Infos, Software bugs & malfunctions | 0 Comments Previously on History’s Biggest Software Fails, we took the time to explore the World of Warcraft: Corrupted Blood Incidence. While the... Read More I’m Laura Chung and This is My Role at Testbirds by Andrea Gudmundsdottir | February 28, 2014 | My Role at Testbirds | 0 Comments My Role at Testbirds is a series of blog posts that gives insights into the daily life at the office. Every so often, one of our employees will... Read More What is Crowdtesting and how do you use it? An overview by Markus | April 24, 2015 | QA, Trends in Software Testing, Usability & UX | 0 Comments Crowdtesting (crowdsourced testing) has its roots in.. ..read more
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43% of all order cancellations of online purchases are due to technical malfunctions. This statistic makes it abundantly clear how often not even the basic functions at webshops are working. It also makes me want to bluntly state the following: Through thorough webshop testing and respective UX optimisation, the number of online orders can be increased by a maximum of 43%. Yes, that’s a bit overstated, but honestly: do we all know if the functionality of our webshops is 100% flawless? We don’t! Often due to a lack of resources, devices or necessary expertise in testing. Also, retail sites are highly dynamic with new offers, new products, sales, etc., which makes webshop testing a complex and ongoing necessity. At Testbirds, this is one of our core propositions and testing with the help of the crowd is one successful approach. We use the help of a global online community, that tests software under real conditions for user-friendliness (Usability and UX) and functionality (Quality Assurance) issues. The Testbirds crowd consists of over 400,000 registered users with more than 650,000 different devices from 193 countries. In one of our former blog posts we wrote about the importance of cross-device testing of webshops. Of course, a flawless UX across all devices is crucial, especially due to the on-going shift in purchasing towards mobile, but what’s even more important is that the basic functionalities of a webshop actually need to work. In this post, we want to explain how exactly this can be tested. Test Set-Up – Exploratory Bug Test A common approach to test the functionality of a webshop is to execute an Exploratory Bug Test. The website gets tested with user stories and predefined tasks while still allowing testers to maintain the freedom to complete each step their own way. Every detail of the testing procedure is documented by the crow. This process of testing outside of laboratory environments helps discover the bugs that lead to the most common errors encountered after a product’s release. Webshop Test Design and Script What exactly the crowd tests, is planned by one of our Project Managers together with the respective client. Based on the structure of the online shop and predefined testing goals, they develop user stories and tasks and set the test up in our testing platform, the Nest. The Test script could look something like the following: Use Case1 | Overview Open the website XY take a general look. Explore the obvious functions and acquaint yourself with the website. Use Case 2 | Product Search and Filter Now you know a little bit about the website and you want to search for some specific product. Please try the search function and use the filter and sorting options on the result page. Use Case 3 | Detail Page In use case 2 you found a very nice product and you want to take a deeper look at it. Please check out the detail page of the product and look for design issues. After this have a look at other detail pages, switch sizes and colours and look for bugs or issues. Use Case 4 | Add to bag Imagine you really like the nice product from use case 2 and 3 and you think of buying it. Please add it to your bag. Use Case 5 | Buying a specific product Please find Product X in size 38 and color white and add it to the shopping bag (delete the product from foregoing use case), delivered to your address and pay them with credit card (your order will be blacklisted, and you do not actually receive something, nor will you have to pay). Use Case 6 | Registration Imagine that you really like the products of this website and you want to return to this page. Please try to register yourself (you can delete your account after the test) and check the registration confirmation email. Use Case 7 | Login Please try to log in with your new account from use case 7. Use Case 8 | Account Now go to your account and check the personal information. Try to change some information (e.g. telephone number) and add a shipping and billing address to your account. Use Case 9| Exploratory Bug In the end of this test please explore the website by yourself and hand in every bug you can find. Tester Group for a Webshop Test For a webshop test it is just as important to choose the right tester group in order to make the results as relevant as possible for the respective target group of the clients online-shop. For the right size and selection, our project managers choose the candidates with over 65 criteria from the crowd and examine, which testers suit best for a specific test case. Demographics such as age, gender, income but also information about testing devices, testing experience, specific shopping preferences etc. can be important criteria for building the tester group, that at the end matches the target group of the client. Webshop Test Results “Crowdtesting has proven to be efficient. We can start testing on a Monday and see the results on Tuesday. It’s a powerful addition to our development process.” ,said Lieven Swinnen, Manager e-Business Landal GreenParks Once everything is set up, a test can be executed relatively fast. The first results are often already there after 1-2 days. The raw data are accessible for the client as well and the testers make screenshots/videos, that document technical problems and mark down every bug they find during the Exploratory Bug Test of the webshop. The final results are then consolidated and summarised by the project manager in a final test report. Benefits of Crowdtesting According to Hobson&Company, Crowdtesting can lead to an increase in customer retention rate by 10% – evidence of how effective it can be to include crowdtesting into your testing processes as an ongoing solution. “We have a continuous process of change, adjustment and improvement. Testbirds offer their testing solutions with the same flexibility and agility, which made us decide to embed their testing services continuously into our development cycle.” Corny van de Wal, Team Manager Shop Development & Production What other beneficial impact Crowdtesting can have on both the efficiency within your testing processes and for your business, we will share with you in another blog post next week. Other articles related to: crowdtesting, QA, Exploratory Bug Testing, e commerce Share it if you like it: ← Previous Post Tag Cloud bugs automated testing CES BirdFlight connected cars AR automation Card Sorting Arbeit cloud testing Christmas Apple Bug app distribution amazon code school app Birds Beta-App computers Amsterdam alan turing Benutzerfreundlichkeit webinars comparison test App Store Rating christmas presents codecademy Crowdtesting Code of Conduct Bring your own cloud BITKOM christmas shopping artificial intelligence best practices contest BugAbility apps coding Android Client Arbeitswelt browser Business Development consumer electronics app store About the author Regina Heiß PR & Marketing Manager Birds flying high, you know how I feel… whenever Regina is not working in the marketing-team for Testbirds, you can find her singing with her Jazz-Trio . 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